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Charles II: November 1675

Pages 377-426

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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November 1675

Nov. 1.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. To-day arrived a ship of this town which left Rotterdam last Thursday. The Saturday night before there began a very great storm, wind N.W. He tells us of many ships lost on that coast, and of several of their inland vessels overset, and that about Amsterdam the sea made a breach, whereby much land was laid under water with great loss of people and cattle. To-day there is a general muster for this town, two foot companies appearing in very good equipage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 188.]
Nov. 1.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Several vessels are come into this harbour to load corn, some for the Canaries and some for Holland, taking the advantage of an Act that when corn is at such a rate the King is to pay the exporter 5s. a quarter, which will be very considerable in some places, but I wish they may not be sorry hereafter for want of it themselves. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Nov. 1.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The French man-of-war I gave you an account of in my last went out of this harbour last Saturday morning, the wind fresh at N.E., and came in again the same forenoon and remains there. In the harbour are now about 20 or 30 light ships bound for Bordeaux and other parts of France, a small vessel of this harbour laden with corn for the Canaries, and one of Weymouth laden with pilchards and poor John for Leghorn. Wind N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 190.]
Nov. 1. Caveat at Lord Chief Justice North's desire that no grant pass of the office of Clerk of the Treasury now in possession of Lord Berkeley without notice to his Lordship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 17.]
Nov. Request that the above caveat be entered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 191.]
Nov. 1.
Whitehall.
The Duke of York having a just demand of several deficiencies due to him by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and desiring a reference to the Lord Privy Seal and the Lord Lieutenant to report their opinions what number of acres do of right belong to him, reference ordered as desired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 60.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 195.]
Nov. 2. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 366. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 192, 193.]
Nov. 2.
Queen's College.
Thomas Crosthwaite to Williamson. Begging his favour on behalf of his kinsman, Francis Cape of Bassenthwaite Hall, Cumberland, there, a searcher's or waiter's place belonging to the custom house of Carlisle being now vacant by Mr. Williamson's death. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Nov. 2.
Billing Magna.
Dr. Lively Moody to Williamson. Mr. Say must sit down still with his misfortunes. The living, it seems, was not directly in the King's but in the Lord Keeper's gift, and I hear since Mr. Hatcher had engaged or at least solicited you in behalf of one Sculthorpe. However I did my part, and 'tis not the first kindness I have offered at for my friend, though sometimes for my own disadvantage. For the future I may learn to be more cautious, though at present I know nothing but to make bricks and that without straw, and so I may do still for the best Churchman of them all. Some lay friends God has raised me at all times, and, when the priests and Levites pass by, some unconcerned, others offended that I have outdone them, they look on me with some compassion. I had rather indeed have Phaethon's epitaph applied to some others than myself. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Nov. 2.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Variable winds and weather, frost, snow, and now rain. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Nov. 2.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. I gave you an account of the Merlin yacht taking up her anchors she was forced from. On Saturday they got them, and stood northward with four or five light ships, but the wind being contrary brought them back into this road again last Sunday night, where they are now at anchor. Some wheat is shipped here and gone for Holland, and much more will be exported if the Act continue unrepealed, which grants for every quarter exported 5s. paid out of the Customs. Corn is already a considerable price for the encouragement of husbandry, but, if this Act be continued, it will advance much more, and take much from the revenue, and be very hard for the poor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 197.]
Nov. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Dutch mail, which should have been at the Brill on Saturday at noon came not till Sunday last towards evening, notwithstanding which the packet-boat arrived here about noon yesterday, with a northerly and N.E. wind. The delay they lay on the inundation, which happened there by the last storm. It is reported that much of North Holland was under water, the steeples of their churches and some tops of houses only in many places to be seen. It so suddenly surprised them that it has been the destruction of many men, women and children. I shall not be forward to give their computation of how many hundred thousands of acres were drowned, but I have heard it is frequently discoursed among the Dutch that this loss far exceeds the damage done them by the French war.
The master gave an account of the loss of ships near the Brill. They had very much lightning in that storm on Monday, and some say off Flushing they saw a steeple on fire by it and heard much thunder. It was observed the sea ebbed but very little, for in that storm the lowest of water was as high as their ordinary spring tides. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Nov. 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. With note to Mr. Ball that in the week's paper of news sent him the votes of both Houses for Thursday, Friday and Saturday were omitted, but he saw them in other copies. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Nov. 2.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 200.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 200 i.]
[Nov. 3.] List of the sheriffs for the English counties for the three years ending on the morrow of All Souls, 1675, with a list of the persons chosen by the Lords of the Council on the morrow of All Souls', 1674, from among whom the sheriff of each county was to be pricked for the ensuing year, showing who was pricked for each county, with additional names suggested by Williamson. On the back is a list of the Welsh sheriffs for 1675 and notes by Williamson of the qualifications or disqualifications of some of the persons in the lists. [Ibid. No. 201.]
A fair copy of the above notes by Williamson. [Ibid. No. 202.]
[Nov. ?] Notes giving reasons why Sir Compton Reade and John Pyott should be excused from serving as sheriff for Buckinghamshire and Staffordshire respectively. [Ibid. Nos. 203, 204.]
Nov. 3. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 366, except the proceedings in Committee about shipbuilding, which appear from the report on p. 369. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 205, 206.] Annexed to one,
Paper on behalf of many knights, gentlemen and others, prisoners for debt, desiring that to the bill read that day for amending an Act made in 1671 for the discharge of such prisoners for debt or damages as should make oath that they had not estates of the value of 10l. a clause might be added for the discharge of such prisoners also as will part with all their estates both real and personal for the satisfaction of their creditors, and submit themselves or any witness to be examined on oath for the true discovery of their estates. [Printed. Ibid. No. 206 i.]
Nov. 3. Thomas Rotherham to Williamson. Requesting him to write to the bailiffs and burgesses of Yarmouth for making Thomas Watson free of that corporation. [Ibid. No. 207.]
[Nov.] Thomas Rotherham to [Williamson]. Informing him that, if he signifies his desire to the head bailiffs on Mr. Watson's behalf according to the first letter from his correspondent, the writer perceives the business will be done. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Nov. 3.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The late northerly winds have prevented any ships of late importing here, only the Joan of this place two days since from St. Valery. The master only informs that the French king was sick, but not much trouble expressed for it amongst the people. Their armies, they say, are going into their winter quarters. About 10 days since the Thomas and Mary of this place bound for Morlaix was met by two Ostenders off the Start, who fired a gun on him and afterwards boarded him, taking away several things and making the master pay a pistole for the shot, though she had a sea-brief. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Nov. 3.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. This morning I was informed the Norwich was arrived at Beaumaris in expectation of the Lord Lieutenant's return from London in order to his transportation for Dublin. The Monmouth yacht sailed from Holyhead for Dublin last Saturday with Lord Dillon. I formerly received a newsletter from your office once a week, but, since his Majesty went from London to Windsor, I have been neglected. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Nov. 3. I. G. to [Williamson]. Bitterly inveighing against the lawyers whom he compares to their disadvantage with the monks in Henry VIII.'s time, complaining of the monstrous fees they charge, their refusal to take up a case without receiving them in advance, their arrogance in assuming the title of "learned in the law," &c. Among other things he mentions that the memory of Charles V. is still held sacred in Flanders, because he instituted a register of land transfers, and suggests that Charles II. by establishing such an institution might deserve the title of Charles le Bon. [Latin. 3½ pages. Ibid. No. 211.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing and admitting William Hill, of Hillsborough, Down, to be a Privy Councillor in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office Vol. 9, p. 403.]
Nov. 4. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 11. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 212.]
Nov. 4. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 367. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Nov. 4. Lord Poulett to Williamson. Requesting him to propose in place of Col. Strangewayes and Mr. Audley Grey, lately deceased, the colonel's two sons, John and Thomas, as deputy lieutenants for Dorset. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Nov. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat arriving since my last we are destitute of news. Wind S.W. and weather dull, darksome and rainy. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Nov. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Our surmises of damage done to Holland by the last spring tides are cleared up by the information given us of the favourableness of them from two packet-boats lately arrived, one last night, the other this morning. They have had the wind not only contrary but high against them, which the masters say was the reason they durst not venture in all this time. They have had as we the wind westerly, where it continues. All their news (and that unfixed too) is, that the Dutch fear the French this winter, and that there was a muttering there, as if they were in some motion, so that the Dutch officers and soldiers in the Brill expect to be drawn back to the frontiers. [Ibid. No. 216.]
Nov. 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Nov. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 218.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 218i.]
Nov. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 2nd put to sea above 20 English and Straits merchantmen for Bordeaux, &c., wind N.W., but the wind coming about once more westerly it is believed they will put back again. The 3rd the Prosperous of London from Barbados put to sea. They speak of the vigentsy (sic) and care of the Governor and people there in finding out the negroes concerned in the late rebellion, and securing themselves for the future. This morning put to sea the Dolphin of Havre from St. Domingo, homeward-bound, wind W. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Nov. 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President and the remanent Senators of the College of Justice. The Principal Commissioners of Prizes in England having 4 Nov. last represented in a long narrative the injury they conceived to be done to his Majesty's interest by a late sentence in the Scotch Court of Admiralty in favour of Capt. Rankin, a privateer, and his partners, whereby the Tortoise of Nantes was condemned as their prize, his Majesty ordered me to transmit the whole case to you. This having come to my hand towards the close of the last winter session, and the said Commissioners having 22 Oct. last sent me a letter to the same purpose, whereof a copy is enclosed, I now send you the whole case with his Majesty's order thereon, whereby you will perceive that his Advocate is charged with the prosecution thereof. I beseech you to send your answer as soon as you conveniently can. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 359.] Perhaps enclosed,
The state of the case touching the Tortoise of Nantes, taken last June by a Dutch caper on her way to the French plantations in the West Indies and retaken in August, now at Leith.
Prince Rupert commanded the Nightingale and the Galliard, a French man-of-war, to ply northward, to discover the Dutch East India fleet. About the Dogger Bank they spied a Dutch prirateer with three prizes, one English and two French. The Nightingale after several hours sharp fight forced the privateer to fly, and then took two of the prizes, one English and one French. Meanwhile the French frigate chased the third prize, the Tortoise, and made her strike sail, but a Scotch privateer, coming accidentally, ran her first on board. The French captain appealing to the Nightingale as his superior, Capt. Pierce, her commander, turned out all the privateer's men, and put a crew of his own and some of the Galliard's company on board her, but, the ships being divided by stress of weather, the Nightingale and the said three prizes came into Leith, where Capt. Pierce delivered them into the custody of the sub-commissioners there. The Scotch privateer, commanded by Capt. Ranken, came at the same time into Leith, and presently in the Court of Admiralty claimed the said ship and goods, for having first boarded her. Sir Alexander Bruce of Broomhall, said to be a part-owner of the said privateer, and Capt. James Crawford came to the said sub-commissioners to allege the privateer's right, and the said Sir Alexander, who is deputy to the ViceAdmiral, the Earl of Kincardine, and who, in the Earl's absence, with the Judge of the Court, manages the Admiralty affairs there, commanded the Admiralty waiters to put seals and locks on the hatches, as the waiters of the sub-commissioners in behalf of his Majesty had done the day before. But the subcommissioners gave no other answer than that they conceived the right was in his Majesty, and that they must lay all before the Lords Commissioners of Prizes at Whitehall (which they did by several letters and depositions) and attend their resolutions thereon. The said letters and depositions were sent to the Court of Admiralty here in order to proceed in his Majesty's behalf, but, before any determination could be therein, 'tis represented by further letters of the 6th instant from the subcommissioners that the Scotch privateer had procured warrant from the Admiralty to break the seals and locks and unlade the goods, which order was put in execution notwithstanding a public protest by one of the sub-commissioners. The Judge of the Admiralty here, having notice of these proceedings, by his letter of the 15th instant set forth to the Lords Commissioners his opinion of the violent manner thereof and how the Scotch privateer had no kind of colour to share in the prize, his Majesty's frigate having solely ranquished the Dutch ship of force, which was its guard.
After the goods were by violence taken ashore, they were put into cellars, and the sub-commissioners not only took an inventory thereof, but put locks on the cellars. However by his letters of the 18th one of them represents that the judge gave warrant for the sale of the best of the said goods, as the wines, brandy, and tobacco, which he also protested against, yet they were bought by one Hamilton, an officer of the same court, who, finding locks on the cellars, went to Sir Henry Bruce, 26 Sept., 1673, and procured his order to be possessed of the goods, and, in case of refusal, that the doors should be violently broke open, which was put in execution, and the doors were violently opened and the goods taken away, and the said sub-commissioner entered another protest against the same, but all in rain. At the sale the conditions were read to the bidders, where the said Sir Alexander, being the public agent, directed the merchants assembled to take notice that, if the prize proved his Majesty's, the buyer was to be liable to pay the Custom and Excise, but, if the privateer's, then only to pay tenths and fifteenths, on which uncertainty, the difference in payment being very great, none of the merchants would hazard to buy the goods, so that this was the probable reason why they fell into the hands of the said Hamilton who was supposed to be employed by the said Sir Alexander. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 220.]
The Lords Commissioners of Prizes to the Duke of Landerdale. We presented his Majesty in Council, 4 Nov, last, with a full state of all proceedings touching the Tortoise, and prayed that the said case might be appealed to the Lords of Session in Scotland, and he declared he would give your Grace directions to that effect, and you received all the papers accordingly. However we hear not yet of any progress in the said appeal, which we are the more solicitous in, because there are considerable debts on the prize account, to part of which we design the product of the said ship and her lading, presuming very much from what we know that the Lords of Session will find it most inst to reverse the hard sentence given in prejudice of his Majesty. So we recommend the matter to your favour that the same may have dispatch at the session of the Lords now approaching. The Council Chamber, Whitehall, 22 Oct., 1675. [Copy.] With memorandum endorsed that Secretary Williamson is desired to more his Majesty to renew his commands to Lord Landerdale to write to the Lords of Session to expedite the appeal of the Tortoise according to the case fully stated in Council in an order of 4 Nov., 1674. [Ibid. No. 221.]
Nov. 4.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection to the Earl of Carnwath and to Elizabeth Fraser, Lady Dowager elder of Towie, for three years respectively. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 360.]
Nov. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the creation of the office of Clerk of the Entries in the port of Dublin and for a grant of the said office to William Pledwell during good behaviour. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office Vol. 9, p. 380.]
Nov. 5.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news more than fair weather, wind N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 222.]
Nov. 5. Warrant to William Smith, messenger, to apprehend St. Germain, a Jesuit, and bring him before Secretary Williamson. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 88.]
Nov. 6. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 368. On the back of one copy are notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords on the 4th. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 223, 224.]
Nov. 6.
Pembroke's Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. Some occasions last summer called me into the North, where I had the opportunity of visiting Mistress Curson, who is mighty sensible of the great tenderness you have expressed, and has resolved to order all affairs according to your directions. The 23rd of last month I accompanied her and Mistress Ardrey on their journey from Milbeck towards Musgrave as far as Penrith, where I left them in very good health. I am apt to assure myself that you will remember him who sends this as a testimonial of the duty he owes you. [Ibid. No. 225.]
Nov. 6.
Queen's College, Oxford.
John Mill to Williamson. I cannot have so little regard to the peculiar concern you own for Mr. Wyndham's studies, as not to express an industry in promoting them suitable to the justice of your expectation. The favour of your confidence in this is too great to be rudely frustrated by an ordinary diligence in his institution, and I hope I shall be easily thought incapable of so indiscreet an ingratitude as to neglect the happy occasion now allowed me of evidencing my ambition to merit your countenance and approbation. I crave the greater freedom in professing my resolutions of a very singular zeal in this, because I find his deficiency in his rudiments such as I should be sorry to have an estimate of my pains taken from his progress, which for some time can be but little discernable. We shall be obliged to converse a considerable part of the day with classic authors, in order to a more perfect understanding of the Latin tongue, before we can proceed to more rational studies. If his diligence equals his capacity, this nonage of his will be shorter. In the interim nothing shall be wanting on my part, whereby I may in any measure contribute to the improvement of his intellectuals. [Ibid. No. 226.]
Nov. 6. Dr. Isaac Vossius to Williamson. Begging that by his favour he may be given permission freely to transfer his library furniture from the vessel that brought it to a smaller one, in which it may be conveyed to Windsor. [Latin. Ibid. No. 227.]
Nov. 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last, the wind having been ever since contrary at W. and N.W., where it is at present. [Ibid. No. 228.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bailiffs and Burgesses of Yarmouth. At the request of a fellow servant, an officer in the King's House, recommending to them a friend of his, Thomas Watson, to be a freeman of their town. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 61.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Approbation of John and Thomas Strangewayes to be deputy lieutenants of Dorset. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 17.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Benjamin Wood to hold with the vicarage of Roydon, Essex, which he now possesses, the vicarage of Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 13.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Warden and other the Electors of New College and of Winchester College. Recommending John Thistlethwhaite, one of the Senior Scholars of Winchester, for New College at the next election. [Ibid. p. 14.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Grant to Sir John Rolle, K.B., of two fairs at Buckland Brewer, Devonshire, one at the feast of All Souls, and the other on Whit-Tuesday yearly for ever. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 89.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the Earl of West meath and others in behalf of themselves and the 54 persons commonly called Nominees and the heirs of such of them as are dead, and of Robert Arthur, son and heir of John Arthur, provided for by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, have by their petition informed us, that, notwithstanding they were by the said Acts to be restored to their ancient estates, yet they have hitherto received no benefit by that grace intended for them, save only that of late we have preferred them to the tenancy of the lands held from us by custodium in Ireland, the greatest part whereof being (as they allege) mountainous and barren, for which cause they were retrenched by the Adventurers and refused to be accepted by the reprizable persons, and that they are notwithstanding charged with so great a rent to us, that they cannot receive any considerable relief out of those lands, as was intended, in consideration whereof and of their long and chargeable attendance whereby many of them are reduced to great extremity, they have humbly besought, that, for the final settlement of the Adventurers, Soldiers, and other reprizable persons now in possession of the 2,000 acres to which we intended to restore the petitioners, we would order you to appoint commissioners to reprize the respective Adventurers, Soldiers and others now in possession of the 2,000 acres restorable to the petitioners as aforesaid out of the lands now in custodium there, and all other lands which shall appear to be in our dispose to the use of the said Acts, and restore the petitioners to the said 2,000 acres respectively, as was provided and intended to be restored to them by letters patent under the Great Seal of Ireland, and that, for their present relief, we would order the increase of rent exceeding the yearly quit-rent of the said custodium lands to be remitted, and that in the meantime all grants of concealed lands may cease, which requests were referred to the Committee for Irish Affairs, who by their report of 23 July last have certified: that they had taken into consideration (the Lord Lieutenant being present) the above proposals, both for granting to the Nominees the custodium lands of the common stock intended for the uses of the said Acts and remitting the increase of rent for their present relief, and also for restoring them to the possession of their principal houses and 2,000 acres thereto adjoining according to the said Acts, if they or their ancestors were possessed of so much on 22 Oct., 1641, by reprizing the Adventurers, Soldiers and others now in possession thereof out of the common stock of custodium lands and out of the several lands in Ireland yet undisposed of, viz., lands restored to Irish natives as proviso-men and innocents above what was their own on 22 Oct., 1641, and lands enjoyed in Connaught by transplanted persons, though they were restored to their ancient estates, and lands in possession of transplanted persons, who had formerly no estates of freehold, and lands enjoyed by others of greater value than their ancient estates, whereupon the said Committee have certified their opinion, that for the present relief of the said Nominees we may grant them the custodium lands aforesaid and remit the increase of rents over and above the quitrents thereon and likewise bestow on them the said undisposed of lands towards reprizing the several persons now in possession of the estates to which they were to be restored by the said Acts, if now the same may be legally done, but, if it cannot, then they were of opinion that we may grant to the said Nominees the said several undisposed of lands, to be proportionably divided amongst them in satisfaction of their 2,000 acres and principal house to which they were to be restored by the said Acts, but before any such distribution they advised there should be an inquiry and true estimate made of the value of those very lands each Nominee should have been restored to by the Acts aforesaid, and of the value of the lands he at present enjoys, the same to be rated according to the valuation prepared by the Lord Lieutenant and Council for a direction to the Commissioners of Claims, to the end that, if any Nominee be found to be satisfied in value above what he should have been restored to by the Acts, it may be left to our bounty whether he shall keep the same, but, if what any Nominee has in value above the 2,000 acres fall short of the ancient paternal estate whereof he or his ancestors were possessed on 22 Oct., 1641, the Committee were of opinion that we may continue it to them, and, if the principal messuage or any of the 2,000 acres appointed to the Nominees have been assigned to any Adventurer, Soldier or other who has taken out letters patent for the same, and such Nominee desire to try his title with the said Adventurer, Soldier or other, the Committee were of opinion that he may be free to do so, but, that our bounty be respited till the trial be over, and lastly they advised that such of the Nominees as have not received any benefit or satisfaction at all either out of their 2,000 acres or otherwise, be in the first place satisfied the value of their principal houses and 2,000 acres or so much as they were to be restored to by the Acts out of such lands as are at present in our dispose to the use of the Acts. We are well satisfied with the said report, and it is accordingly our will and pleasure that you pursue and execute the same in such manner as the thing will bear, and as will be most effectual for the purposes aimed at by the same, we being desirous that the said Nominees should receive the benefit of our gracious intentions towards them as far as the matters mentioned in the report will reach, and the way of proceeding therein offered be practicable, but, if after examination on the place you find any clause thereof inconvenient, you are to forbear proceeding on such doubtful clause, till you have received our further directions thereon, putting nevertheless in execution all the other parts thereof. And our further will and pleasure is that Gerald Fitzgerald and Mary, his wife, she being the heir of George Fitzgerald, mentioned amongst the petitioners, and Robert Arthur, named also as one of the said petitioners, be admitted in the condition of Nominees and that they receive the benefits intended to the Nominees in the premises as if they were themselves Nominees, the agents for the Nominees having consented thereto. [Nearly 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 381.]
Nov. 7.
Oxford.
William Wright to Williamson. Thanking him most warmly for freeing him from that office, that he was in danger to serve. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 229.]
Nov. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats came in last night, but brings no news. The wind continues westerly and blows fresh. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Nov. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 231.]
Nov. 7. Warrant to William Smith, messenger, to search for and apprehend St. Germain, an alleged Jesuit, and bring him before Williamson or the Privy Council. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 88.]
Nov. 8. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 13. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 232.]
Nov. 8. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 369. [Ibid. No. 233.]
[Nov. ?] James Ward of Langley near Windsor to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for his engine for pumping water which on trial before his Majesty in St. James' Park was found to pump by the strength of one man two ton of water in a minute. At the foot,
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. On the back,
Report of Sir W. Jones, Attorney-General, in favour of granting the petitioner's request. 19 Nov. [Ibid. No. 234.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 65.]
[Nov. ?] Thomas Rayner of St. Giles in the Fields, corn chandler, and Christopher his son and Martha, wife of the said Christopher daughter of Alexander Broome, deceased, to the King. Petition for a pardon for a marriage between the said Christopher and Martha solemnized without the privity of Mrs. Randall, Martha's mother, who on pretence that Martha, whom she formerly affirmed to be 17, was under 16 at the time of the marriage, now threatens to prosecute the petitioners and their friends who were at the marriage. At the foot,
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. On the back,
Report by Sir Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, that the young woman's friends had treated with Thomas Rayner for a marriage with his son, and they seemed to agree, but, before the marriage agreement could be perjected, the young people married, and that he conceives it is a very fit case for a pardon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 235.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 61.]
Nov. 8. Walter Goold to Williamson. Lady Inchiquin, being very ill and unable to wait on you in person, has commanded me to request you to stop the sending of a letter written by the Commissioners of Tangier, till Lord Inchiquin's secretary, Col. George Phillips, who is daily expected in the Mary Rose, arrives, who comes on purpose to give an account of all transactions in that garrison. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 236.]
Nov. 8.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Saturday came to anchor in this bay 20 light colliers with the Merlin yacht. Several of them were down as low as Tynemouth Bar, but the north wind blowing a hard gale forced them back here. Several left their anchors behind them. The yacht got an anchor here, and last night they loosed, and are gone northward, the wind being E. [Ibid. No. 237.]
Nov. 8.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. On receiving yours of the 6th with the enclosed I went to our bailiffs, and entering into discourse about Mr. Watson found they were as ready to comply with your desires as when I first moved it to them. Hereon I delivered them your letter, and they desired me to inform you they would suddenly call an assembly, where they would effectually serve you.
Our Nonconformists continue their meetings publicly at their usual place and in as great numbers as ever, a shame they should be suffered to contemn the laws whilst the makers of them are sitting. It is this sufferance that emboldens them to this height of impudence, who, when the laws are put in execution, are as tame as lambs, and not found, what they pretend, either as to number or courage. My blood boils within to see this dishonour put upon the nation by an inconsiderable people, who are easily restrained, if the magistrates and those in office were punished for the neglect of their duty. [Ibid. No. 238.]
Nov. 8.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Saturday night a Dantzig ship being in Portland Road, a French man-of-war, which had been here some time, went out of our harbour, and next morning there being no sight of either ship some of our town conjecture that the Frenchman boarded her at night and carried her away, but I can learn no good ground for their conjecture.
Just now the Speedwell ketch of Salem from New England came into our harbour bound for London, having 5 weeks' passage. The master gives account that King Philip's Indians have destroyed several of our English there, having at one time about 10 weeks since killed three or four and twenty of Capt. Beere's company with their captain, and five weeks since 64 under Capt. Lathrop with their captain as they were going with provisions to a garrison the name whereof the master forgot, not above four escaping. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 239.]
Nov. 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 240.]
Nov. 8.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind being last week N.W., last Wednesday those bound for France went out of this harbour, and on Thursday the French man-of-war and French Banker, that I gave account of in my last, went hence. Some small vessels are in the harbour at present. A small Isle of Wight ship took fire last Saturday evening, and had been clearly burnt, had it not been quenched by boats from the shore, but she was saved and only her forecastle burnt. Wind now S. [Ibid. No. 241.]
Nov. 8.
Chippenham.
Inquisition of ad quod damnum reporting that a grant to Giles Eyre of two yearly fairs at Downton, Wiltshire, will not prejudice any neighbouring fairs. With writ for the inquisition prefixed, dated 18 June. [Latin. Ibid. No. 212.]
[Nov. 8 ?] Reasons offered to Parliament why an Act should be passed for making the river Derwent navigable from Derby to the Trent, as being beneficial to the trade of the town, to the carriage of goods in the county, they being of great weight as lead, iron, coals and stone, and to the preservation of the highways. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 368, 369.) [Printed. Ibid. No. 243.]
[Nov. 8 ?] Objections against the proposed Act laboured by a few gentlemen that get lead and maltsters in Derby, showing public and private inconveniences to result therefrom to Loughborough, Leicester, Nottingham, the south-east part of Derbyshire, and several private gentlemen. [Printed. Ibid. No. 244.]
[Nov. ?] "A letter from a Person of Quality to his Friend in the Country" giving an account of the proceedings during the previous session on the Test Bill (see Lords' Journals, of 8 Nov., Vol. XIII., p. 13). Printed in State Tracts, A.D. 1689, p. 41, and elsewhere. [Two copies. Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F.]
[Nov. 8 ?] Answer by M. de Luzancy to a paper presented to the King by Father St. Germain, a Jesuit, to justify his violence to him. I came to England a little more than four months ago in order to embrace the Protestant religion, which I did with great joy, and to show the sincerity of my conversion printed a sermon giving the reasons of it. The whole Popish faction thereupon being unable to answer these reasons, thought it necessary to behave in their usual manner, that is to abuse people, ascribe to them intentions they have not, publish that one is come to get married in England, and a thousand things of that nature.
Father St. Germain egged them on, and, when he met French Protestants, he could not restrain his zeal, and told them a hundred things against me. I desired to see that man who never having known me, was blackening me so assiduously. An opportunity occurred at Windsor at the French Ambassador's house. The conversation turning on a point of controversy, I disputed some time with him. He promised to turn Protestant if I proved a fact to him that we were arguing about. He was convinced of it, but, far from keeping his word, he exhorted me to turn. Going out together we conversed for about an hour, when he displayed to me the great good things he was doing here for the Church of Rome, and pressed me to return to it. It was he who sent back all who had quitted it; that the sight alone of the Church of England confirmed him to remain as he was, that here he had lost all the virtues he had acquired in France, but that his love for the Church of Rome was increased.
I have not spoken to him since and all I have known of him is that he ran about everywhere to tear me in pieces. I have met him several times and have been always civil to him, never speaking ill of him, though I knew many little stories about him.
I continued to preach either at Windsor or London, and everywhere he sent people to observe me. But, seeing I appeared firm and that I had wherewith to show him the weakness and falseness of his religion, when he spoke to me, he believed it necessary to take a shorter and surer way. The fourth of October he came to my chamber with another man at nightfall, as I was preparing to go out. I do not know if he saw by my expression that his visit surprised me, but he said smilingly, "You are perhaps astonished to see me here at this hour." I replied that persons of his merit never took people by surprise, and that he did me too much honour. He then came in with his companion, and, I having told them to be seated, they began to speak of ordinary topics, till the Father asked me if they could speak freely in my room. I answered "Yes," and, thinking that he wished to argue without being overheard, I added that no one lodged above or below me, that there were few neighbours, and that I had chosen the place as fit for study, and that he could safely speak. He got up immediately, telling me that I was a wretch, who had horribly scandalised the Church, and that, had I a thousand lives, I could not expiate such a great fault. He called me a renegade, an apostate, a Huguenot, for whom there was no salvation, if I did not go to pass the rest of my days in a monastery. He said this in a furious passion. As I began to answer him, the other man interrupted me, saying in bad French, that there was no need to argue, that they stabbed and removed people when they did not do what was wished, and that, if I said a word, or even rose from my chair, there were three men ready to do it, and that I must resolve to die or to leave England. I promised them everything they desired, and I believed I had got rid of them, when the Father told me, that to make sure of my promise, they wished me to copy and sign a writing they presented to me. As I was rising from my seat, the two approached, the one who was not a Frenchman saying, if you utter a single word, if you do not do as we wish, you have not a moment to live, and the Father ran to my door to call the three men on the staircase. I was seized with terror, and wrote the paper, from which I omitted many things, as far as the fright I was in allowed me. While I was writing, the one not a Frenchman always watched me, and the Father went from time to time to the door. At last, when the paper was in their hands, they rose, threatening that, if I said a single word of what had passed there were 4,000 Catholics in London, they knew where I went and whom I saw, and that I should disappear in a quarter of an hour, when I least expected it.
I did not cry out after them, for, besides not knowing how I ought to call the English to my assistance, I was in such a fright that I could not move for an hour afterwards. I went to bed in the greatest imaginable trouble, and next day concluded that I must recover my paper at any price. At first I conceived I ought to make a complaint, but several reasons (which follow) deterred me.
I therefore believed I ought to use address rather than force and pretend to agree to what he wished of me, in order to get back my paper under the pretext of wishing to add or omit something.
The Jesuit came to see me in the evening and told me he had come from the Spanish Envoy's, from whom he had asked means of sending me into Flanders by Ostend (he took care not to put that particular in the paper he presented to his Majesty) but the Minister had refused him (I do not know if he spoke the truth) and that I should cross to France in a yacht his Majesty had lent to a Catholic lord, in which a Jesuit, who was going to the Indies, was also to cross.
I appeared to fall in with his plans, and he told me seriously that there were many people to whom force must be used, that there were natures slow to do right, who had to be pushed, that if he had not used force to me, I should not be indebted to him for my eternal salvation. He appeared to me this first time cool enough.
Next day he came back, and, as I seemed to agree with him, he grew warmer than on the day before. I took the opportunity of telling that fear had prevented me from seeing what I was writing, and asked him to show me what I had written that I might add or omit what was proper. I hoped thereby to get it out of his hands. He said it was reasonable, and he would bring it next day.
Next morning he sent me his servant with a letter, saying that the Catholic lord had refused him a place on the yacht, and that I must therefore cross to Rochelle in a merchantman, which is to sail at daybreak. (He took care to say nothing of this to his Majesty in his paper.)
He came to see me in the evening and finding his letter on my table burnt it so quickly that I hardly perceived it. He wished to remove the suspicion this might have given me, by appearing to speak to me with confidence. It was during this conversation, that, asking him how he had ventured to come and find me as he had done, he told me, that, if he had been discovered, he knew the King's intention thereupon, that his Majesty is a Catholic in his heart, that they were working to establish liberty of conscience, and that, if that were once done, England, before two years were out, would recognize the Pope, that indeed the Parliament made a noise, but that it is a wave that must be let go by, that there are Jesuits here, who do not appear, but who carry on important business, that he had for 24 months persecuted a monk who had turned Protestant, and that at last he had made him make a public abjuration in the Portuguese ambassador's chapel.
However I consulted one of my friends, a very good Protestant, whom I have produced to his Majesty. At first he advised me to make the thing public, but, when I told him the Jesuit had promised to let me see my writing, he advised me to go on dissembling. Therefore, seeing he came no more to me, I went to his lodging accompanied by the same Protestant witness I have also produced to his Majesty. He told me that at the same hour next day he would return my paper. I returned and seeing he was giving me bad excuses, I appeared a little vexed, on which he said, Why do you trouble yourself ? Think only of leaving. We have put everything in order. I have a mistress who spares nothing for such matters. You are only asked to leave, on which you will be given up to 3 or 400 pistoles.
Next day I returned again but without result. He said he had spoken to those who had my paper, but they had been unwilling to give it him. However he asked me to go to London to speak to a merchant to know when the ship for Rochelle was to sail. I was unwilling to do so, and he thereupon used horrible oaths, swearing that he would return that paper, and that we would settle it together, provided I did so. I did so the day after to prevent giving him suspicion, and I warned one of my Protestant friends, whom I have produced to his Majesty, in order that he should know where I was, in case I did not return at such and such an hour. Besides, I knew before I went, that ship would not sail for more than eight days afterwards. Finally, after getting me to do this, he told me plainly that I should not see him. I immediately betook myself to a French minister, who advised me to be silent for some days more, and to preach publicly in order that my sentiments might be known. I did so, and I applied to a lord who is well known for his probity and for his love of religion, who laid my complaint before the King. The King was kind enough to receive it, and ordered Mr. Williamson to inform me of it. Everyone knows his Majesty's judgment on my complaints and on that Jesuit's defences.
(Reply at length to the various counter-charges brought against him by St. Germain. See Commons' Journals. Vol. IX., p. 369.) [16 pages. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 246.] Annexed,
Extract from the register of baptisms of the church of St. Sauveur, Paris, of the baptism of Hipolithe, son of Francois Chastelet, aged 27 months, 11 May, 1651. [French. Ibid. No. 246I.]
Certificate of Hippolite Chastelet having received the tonsure. 17 Dec., 1661. [Latin. Ibid. No. 246 ii.]
Certificate by Hardain, Archbishop of Paris, of Hippolite Chastelet having received the four minor orders. 24 April, 1666. [Latin. Ibid. No. 246III.]
Testimonial by Gabriel, Bishop of Autun, in favour of Hippolite de Chastelet, who is leaving the house of the secular Fathers of the congregation of the Christian Doctrine at Aralon. 12 Dec., 1673. [French. Ibid. No. 246 iv.]
Licence for a year by the Vicar-General of the Archbishop of Paris to Hippolite du Chastelet, sub-deacon, to preach. 17 March, 1674. [Latin. Ibid. No. 246 v.]
Testimonial by Gabriel, Bishop of Autun, in favour of Hippolite du Chastelet, who had been for 10 months previously in his diocese. 8 Nov., 1674. Aralon. (All these copies of testimonials relate to de Luzancy, the name Chastelet had taken.) [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 246 vi.]
[Nov. ?] Statement by Jaque Roupphano de Villeneuve, that about a month ago about 7 in the evening he saw on the Earl of Oxford's staircase two men, a smaller one and a larger one, who were conversing. He heard one say "He has preached," the other said "No matter, we have what he has written in our poelet." They said further "He made a stout resistance." Thereupon three others came and said "Let us go," on which they separated, and one party went towards Pall Mall, or rather towards St. James', and the other towards St. Alban's Street. Three of them had swords and were dressed in black, unless the deponent was mistaken on account of the darkness of the evening. [French. Ibid. No. 247.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Bastinck, Mr. Langley, Mr. Welsh, and the Searcher at Gravesend. Circular. Warrants having been issued for the apprehension of St. Germain, a Jesuit priest, who lately made an attempt on the person of the Sieur de Luzancey, a convert to the Protestant Religion, with endeavours to draw him back to the Church of Rome, and to that end to have obliged him to transport himself beyond the sea, and he not being to be found, directing him to make diligent search among such as endeavour to pass the sea from that port for the said St. Germain (a description of whom is enclosed), and, if found, to carry him before the Mayor of that town to be committed by him to safe custody, or otherwise to be sent up hither under a safe guard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 61.] Annexed,
The said description. [Ibid. p. 62.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Keeper of the petition of Cary, Viscount Molyneux, William his son and heir apparent, Bridget, his wife, and Richard Lucy of Charleton. Warwickshire, praying that the Justices of the Common Pleas might be authorized to appoint the said William and Bridget one or more guardians, and to allow them by such guardian to suffer a common recovery. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 62.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir John Lethieullier praying an order for payment of 1,500l. lent his Majesty on the funds of the fee-farm rent. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Roger L'Estrange, Surveyor of the Press, or to one of the messengers, to make strict search for all copies of a book entitled, A Letter from a Person of Quality to his friend in the Country, and also for the author, printer, or publisher thereof, and when found to bring them before Williamson or a Justice of the Peace, and also to seize all such copies thereof as shall be discovered. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 89.]
Nov. 9. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 14. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 248.]
Nov. 9. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 370. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 249.]
Another copy of the proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. No. 250.]
Saturday, Nov. 9. (sic.) Sir Thomas Lynch to Williamson. Just now coming home I found letters from Jamaica and Barbados with the enclosed account, which I send, because particular, though so very lamentable. The Foresight escaped miraculously by the experience and dexterity of a Jamaica pilot.
The gentleman Lord Vaughan sent was four days at Havana, the frigate not suffered to come in, and he told for answer that satisfaction must be demanded at Madrid. [Ibid. No. 251.]
Nov. 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The westerly winds continue to hinder our packet-boats. It blew yesterday a very fret of wind, but to-day it is much slackened and got more westerly. [Ibid. No. 252.]
Nov. 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Concerning the non-arrival of the packet-boats as in the last. The late sudden change of the weather, our bodies not having been by degrees habituated to it, has opened a Pandora's box of colds among us, of which I have had my share very severely. [Ibid. No. 253.]
Nov. 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The last violent winds have but (sic) several ships to sea not yet heard of, since which no news presents, or that which is not acceptable, that is, the confirmation of the loss of at least 200 at Tangier.
Postscript. 4 p.m.—Two of our Deal pilots, who came even now from Flanders, say that in the last storm last Thursday they saw several ships strike and founder, one whereof they report to be the Abraham belonging to Dover. [Ibid. No. 254.]
Nov. 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 255.]
Nov. 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. This evening here are 4 or 5 French ships homeward-bound from the Bank. [Ibid. No. 256.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 256I.]
[Nov. ?] Monsieur Morel to the Duke of York. Being in company with another French gentleman, an Englishman there speaking of religion said, "If we could discover that our King favours the Roman Church, or is in his soul of that religion, we should know how to find means to cut off his head, as his father's was, if he does not take care." God only knows the heart of that wretch, and his reason for uttering these sacrilegious and terrible words. We are both ready to confirm on oath the words of this scoundrel, whose abode I can discover without making any noise, after which I shall produce the other witness, if his Majesty and your Highness find it proper. We do not know if he has the same intentions as the cruel usurper, and if he is capable, which God forbid, of putting himself at the head of the rebellious. I warned Lord Finch, who recommended me to be diligent since I had so much love for your Royal persons, which I cannot do without leaving my work, by which I live, for your Highness will remember, if he pleases, that the last St. Charles' day I had the honour of presenting my works to his Majesty with numerous "eloges" on his glory which he received with so much praise and kindness as led me to hope for his royal liberality. However, when I took the liberty of asking it of him most respectfully a few days afterwards, he replied he was a poor man like myself, which not a little surprised me in a monarch who is one of the most generous in the world, for never has any King or Prince received my works without giving me some present, and he is the only one from whom I have received nothing. Judge if after that I am obliged to pursue and look for his enemies at my own expense. I should be quite satisfied if your Royal Highness would decide the amount of that royal bounty. It is true I would have held him discharged for what he should have given me at the time he did me the honour of receiving my works, but now I do not know if I shall give him a discharge for 100 or 50 guineas, and, when I shall present two petitions, one to the Upper and one to the Lower Chamber, it will cost him 200, and perhaps more, but, to avoid all this, let yourself be the arbitrator, I promising to accept what he shall give you, that, when I shall be asked for marks of the liberality of his Britannic Majesty, I shall have something to show.
Your Royal Highness will know that the Duke of Monmouth ordered me 5 guineas in recompense for my "eloges" of him, the Lords, 2 or 3, and the Duchess your wife, one lately by the hands of the Countess Lucretia, an Italian, but I believe this is not the whole of her Highness' bounty who passes for a very generous Princess. My abode is at the sign of the Crown in New Cane Street near Long Acre in the parish of St. Giles. Endorsed by Williamson, as received from the Duke 8 or 9 Nov., 1675. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 257.]
Nov. 9. Warrant to John Bradley to search the house of Catharine Knight in St. Giles' for a seditious and scandalous pamphlet, entitled, A Letter from a Person of Quality to his friend in the Country, and to seal up as many of the said pamphlets as he shall find, and bring them before Williamson with the said C. Knight. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 89.]
Nov. 10. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 15, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 371. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 258.]
Separate notes of the proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. Nos. 259, 260.]
Nov. 10. Examination of Catharine Knight, of the parish of St. Giles', widow, taken before Secretary Williamson. The woman who was in her chamber, when the messenger came, and slipped away, lives about Smithfield, but she refuses to tell her name. She had some of the same books, viz., a quartern, from her before, and the money received for them was on the table when the messenger came. The said woman was to have this quartern also now seized with her. She received 32s. for the quartern she sold before. She had 150 copies in all of the said book, and this unknown woman had the greatest part of them. She disposed of no copies but to this woman. This woman was with her last night and bought a quartern for which she paid 32s. this morning. Being asked again if she disposed of any copies to any but the said woman, she answered she sold 25 or 50 to a certain fat woman who keeps a bookselling shop at the foot of the stone stairs going up to the Court of Requests, and that she and the other woman were the only persons to whom she disposed of any. The fat woman had them at 18d. a piece, and paid her 36s. in the whole. She carried the copies to the fat woman yesterday sennight, and delivered them to the maid, the mistress being in the shop, in the afternoon. The maid fetched 36s. and then had the books. She went to the shop and showed one of the books to the mistress and asked if she would buy any, telling her they were 18d. a piece. The mistress answered she would send her maid to pay for them, on which the maid went with the examinate through the Hall in New Palace Yard, where she paid her 36s. for a quartern she had. She came by the knowledge of this fat woman by the unknown woman, who told her she believed she would have some of them. Asked where she had any of the said copies, she said they were left for her altogether on Saturday sennight at the house where she was taken, in the shop wrapped up in a cloth. Nobody was in the shop but a little boy, the party that brought them laying them down and saying they were for the examinate. The cloth they were lapped up in was a piece of striped stuff. They were in sheets, and were stitched up by herself alone. No person has ever been since to inquire after them or ask money for them. She knows not from whom or whence they came or who left them. Returning home about 10 that morning the little boy told her something was left for her. She was nowhere but at one Bayley's, where she formerly lodged. She never dealt in the dispersing of any books whatever before, and does not know any printer or bookseller. She never acquainted her landlord or any one else in the house with anything of this matter. The unknown woman, besides what she had last night and was to have had this morning, had about 12 before at 16d. a piece. Her landlord is Robert Champ, who keeps a potter's shop at the Coach and Horses in St. Giles'. Saturday sennight the unknown woman had some of those books from her the first time. She has known her for several years, but refuses to say on what occasion she first knew her. Meeting her the said Saturday, the examinate told her she had some books to sell, asking if she would have any, and there, going into an alehouse she does not remember, the examinate went home and fetched a parcel of the books, selling them for 16d. a piece. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 261.]
Nov. 10. Note by William Killigrew that Thomas Martin is a gentleman of the Privy Chamber, that he has no house in Berkshire nor 50l. lands in the county, yet is every year for malice named to be sheriff, and that his Majesty for three years past has been troubled by Martin's friends to exchange him for some other more fit. [Ibid. No. 262.]
Nov. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last post I acquainted you that the foul weather last week had wrecked some ships off the coast of Flanders. The Abraham of Dover, a small pink, came aground to the eastward of Calais at a small parish called Hewest. Our pilots from Flanders say that on the Flemish coast and at sea near those parts about 36 vessels sank, stranded and ran aground.
Capt. Cable bound for Tangier has promised great care in delivering the Earl of Inchiquin's and Mr. Bland's packets which came to me about three weeks ago. All this part of Kent are troubled with great colds and coughs, the like never known before. Moderate weather, wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 263.]
Nov. 10.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night I received yours by the gentleman you mentioned, to whom I performed all things requisite for his passage in the packet-boat, and he had the best accommodation she could afford him. They sailed about 2 this morning, wind S.W., a fresh gale, but supposed to be a very safe and speedy passage. Our masters of the packet-boats that arrived yesterday from Nieuport and Calais report great damage on those coasts by reason of these last storms, and that on the Flemish coasts six merchantmen are cast away, mostly English and Irish, and very few of the men saved. Also a Deal vessel was cast away near Calais, but all the men saved. her lading belonging to a merchant of this town.
We have hitherto escaped these late high tides by the favour of the winds, but our harbour is in very great danger of having the fresh water stopped up, nothing having been done for want of money all this last summer.
I received yours by the flying post, and have made diligent search after St. Germain, the Jesuit, who, I am sure, according to the description, has not passed this way. I shall use all possible endeavours for his apprehension. [Ibid. No. 264.]
Nov. 10.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. A vessel from Malaga reports that the Marigold, a small vessel outward-bound from hence, was chased by a Sallee man-of-war and forced ashore on the coast of Spain, which they carried off. The men got ashore and saved themselves. [Ibid. No. 265.]
Nov. 10.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. By a ship lately arrived from Dublin we have advice of the quiet posture of that kingdom, and trade there is likely enough to flourish. The prohibition of their cattle being imported here puts them upon inquiries after a supply of that defect in the way of commerce with other counties. [Ibid. No. 266.]
Nov. 10. Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to apprehend Robert Champ, living at the sign of the Coach and Horses, and keeping a potter's shop in St. Giles', with his wife and a little boy usually in the shop, and bring them before Williamson. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 90.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
Pardon to George Newton, yeoman, for forgery, barratry and perjury, and all felonies, offences, &c., committed by him since 29 May, 1660. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Judith Moore of a pension of 150l. a year charged on the Irish revenue to be paid to her, her executors, administrators or assigns, until the sum of 2,000l. be paid to her or them at one entire payment, the same being in lieu of a former grant of the King's right in the mills of Kilmainham, which was resumed on the Lord Lieutenant's information that the said mills were situate within the King's deer park near Dublin and were proper to be kept therewith. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 90.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 196.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
Whereas Percy Church, deceased, by his will gave 100l. to the English Benedictines at Paris, 50l. to the English nuns at Pontoise. 60l. to the English nuns at Paris in the suburb St. Antoine, 40l. to the English nuns at Rohan, 50l. to the nuns at Gravelines, and 40l. to the Secular College at Douai, which sums are forfeited to the Crown by the laws of the realm; warrant for a grant of all the said sums to William Brent and Matthew Johnson. the executors of the said will, or to their nominees. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 92.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
Proclamation offering a reward of 200l. for the apprehension of M. St. Germain, who on a late sermon preached by M. Luzancy, alias Chastelain explaining the reasons of his conversion from the Romish to the Protestant religion, attacked him in his lodging, and compelled him to sign a retractation of what he had published; also strictly forbidding any violence or affront to the said M. Luzancy. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 339.]
Draft thereof, dated the 8th, differing considerably from the printed proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 245.]
[Nov. 10 ?] List of proclamations issued for the apprehension of particular persons since 20 July, 1564, the last being the above for St. Germain's apprehension. [Ibid. No. 267.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Charles, Earl of Middlesex, and Thomas Felton, Groom of the Bedchamber, of a yearly pension of 800l. sterling for their lives and the life of the survivor, to commence immediately after the expiration of the therein recited grant of the like pension to Sir John Hanmer. (See ante, pp. 351, 356.) [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 384.]
[Before Nov. 11.] Invitation to meet the Stewards on 11 Nov. at St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, at 11, and after sermon to accompany them thence to Merchant Tailors' Hall in Threadneedle Street to dinner, giving the bearer half-a-crown, and to bring this ticket with him. [Printed. Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 268, 269.]
Nov. 11. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 18. [Ibid. No. 270.]
Nov. 11. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 372. [Ibid. No. 271.]
Nov. 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats, which had landed passengers and mails at Lowestoft, came in yesterday. They brought no news. The wind continues northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 272.]
Nov. 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 273.]
Nov. 11.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Since my last two Dutch capers arrived at Falmouth which brought in a Rochelle vessel that came laden with fish from Canada. About the same time came in three French vessels laden with fish from the Bank for Havre. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 274.]
Nov. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 9th came in here three French vessels from the Bank belonging to Havre. The 10th came in here two Dutch men-of-war, the Samaritan and the Brandewicke, both belonging to the States, with a French prize from Canada, laden with fish and some furs. They took her about 14 days past 40 leagues westward of Ushant. It is said she belonged to Rochelle, and that they made an indifferent year of fishing at Canada. A small vessel from Bordeaux bound for Cork says they have made a good vintage there this year, and that several vessels will be ready to come away the next fair wind. [Ibid. No. 275.]
Nov. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 276.]
[Nov. 11.] Case of the Company of Glass-sellers in London and all others selling glass or earthenware in any town in England or Wales in relation to the Bill for suppressing Hawkers, Pedlers, &c. Stating that notwithstanding previous prohibitions many persons wander about selling glass and earthenware who are very injurious to the glass and earthenware sellers, who from the nature of their goods are obliged to keep large houses and pay heavy rents, and that such persons are a sturdy incorrigible people, who generally cheat people with bad wares, and often corrupt men's servants to steal their masters' provisions to truck with them, and praying that a proviso be added to the above bill to prohibit all hawkers of glass or earthenware from going about in any city or borough in England or Wales to sell any glass or earthenware under the penalties inflicted by the Act on other pedlars and petty chapmen. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 373.) [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 277.]
[Nov. 11.] Newsletter to [Sir Francis Radcliffe] containing notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 372. [Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 7.]
Nov. 12. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 19. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 278.]
Nov. 12. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 374. [Ibid. No. 279.]
Another copy of the proceedings in both Houses on 11 and 12 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 280.]
Nov. 12.
London.
Sir Robert Vyner to Williamson. I had lately the examination of Mrs. White about selling that ill pamphlet, and found her, in my opinion, a poor innocent, weak creature, that to get a penny knew not what she did. She promised to stay the party that brought them, but it's like they have taken the alarm and do not appear. I request you would show her what mercy you can, supposing that you want not enough that are more considerable to make examples of. [Ibid. No. 281.]
Nov. 12.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Shipping news. The wind continues S.W., with very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 282.]
Nov. 12.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. A small ship, said to be of London from Ostend for Bilbao, the master of Dover and most of the men English, having rode four or five days in Torbay wind-bound, was last night boarded by a small French man-of-war and carried away as prize. A gentlewoman, said to be the late Governor of Ostend's widow, with all her jewels and wealth was on board, bound for Spain. The French man-of-war went out of this harbour yesterday evening; it is supposed he had intelligence of her. The captain reports that the Dutch ship and goods taken off the strand in Torbay some time since by the French is condemned for prize in France. [Ibid. No. 283.]
Nov. 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 284.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 284i.]
[Nov.] Request that the next internal dignity in the church of Exeter be for Bernard Galard. M.A. With note that this was brought by Lord Arundel of Trerice, with a declaration that his Majesty had promised to do it. [Ibid. No. 285.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Careat that no pardon pass to Mr. Nicholas and Mr. Cook for building in Spitalfields contrary to licence, without notice to Mr. Stint at his chamber between Elm Court and Fig-tree Court, in the Middle Temple. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 17.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Exeter. Recommending Bernard Galard for the next vacant internal dignity and canonry in that church. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 15.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of St. Asaph. Recommending for the first donative or sinecure in his disposal Richard Lewis, who has done good and faithful service as chaplain in the Navy, and in the last war against the Dutch lost both his speech and hearing, and is thereby rendered incapable of performing his duty in that function. [Ibid.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for inserting John Sumpter, convicted of a robbery at the summer assizes for Berks, and since respited, in the next general pardon for the Oxford Circuit without any condition of transportation. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 92.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Grant, on the surrender of Dr. Robert Wiseman, to Thomas Exton, LL.D., of the office of Advocate-General; fee 20l. per annum. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 93.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, in consideration of the many faithful services to the late and present Kings of Richard Grace of Courtstown, co. Kilkenny, for a grant of a yearly pension of 300l. to him for his life and after his decease to Robert Grace, his son, for his life, as a free gift without account, to commence from Michaelmas last, the same to be put on the establishment of Ireland and inserted in the civil lists thereof under the head of pensions and annuities. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 385.]
Nov. 13. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 21, and the Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Appendix, Part II., p. 43. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 1.]
Nov. 13. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 374. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Another copy of the above proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. No. 3.]
[Nov. ?] Edward Bray and Edward Bray, his son and heir apparent, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioners' ancestors were the undoubted patrons of the rectory of Sheere, Surrey, but that, one Smyth having been presented to it by King James, the petitioner Edward Bray, the elder, in strictness of law cannot in consequence of this usurpation present, should a vacancy occur, till he has recovered the right by petition of right, a very tedious and chargeable process, and therefore praying a grant to the petitioner Edward Bray, the younger, and his heirs of the King's right of presentation gained by the said usurpation. At the foot,
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. At the side, His report in favour of granting the petitioners' request. 21 Nov. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 61.]
Nov. 13. Nathaniel Williamson to Williamson. Requesting his good word to the Lord Treasurer in the business he spoke to his Honour about, which is a sub-searcher in the Custom House, the name of the deceased party being Dee. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 5.]
Nov. 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. Wind S.W., weather dull and heavy. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Nov. 13.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 10th and 11th arrived here the John, Jane, Society and Prosperous of this place from Morlaix. Soon after their arrival there about two months since the Duc de Chaulnes came there with several troops of the King's Guards, a regiment of Swiss and others to the number of 5 or 6,000. He continued there near 20 days, in which execution was done on three of the principal mutineers, two broken and strangled, the other hanged. They have several of them in hold, some of whom are for the galleys, others for soldiers, &c. Some few they make exemplary in the noted towns of the province. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 7.]
Nov. 13. Bill for things for mourning bought of John Bull, amounting to 8l. 13s. 3d. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
Commission to Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, and Christopher, Duke of Albemarle, to be Lord Lieutenants of Essex, with a clause vacating the former commission to the Earl of Oxford to be Lord Lieutenant of that county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 17.]
Nov. 13. Memorandum that the Bishop of Oxford signified his Majesty's pleasure that the first vacant prebend at Westminster was promised by him to Monsr. Bréval. [Cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 17.]
Nov. 13. Richard Aldworth to William Bridgeman. Returning him the Lord Lieutenant's thoughts on his perusal of Sir William Talbot's letter. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 197.]
Nov. 14.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning ran ashore on the Goodwin Sands a small ship. Many of our Deal boats are gone to her assistance, and hope to get her off next flood, she being now a-dry. We cannot give account of what she is till our boats return. The wind just now is come to N.N.W., so the fleet of merchantmen outward-bound, being about 50 or 60 sail, are gone to the westward. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 9.]
Nov. 14.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon Lord Berkeley arrived here, and about 9 this morning went on board the yacht appointed to transport him to Calais, and sailed with a very fair breeze at N., and as fine weather as could possibly be. He was very well, his journey having not in the least discomposed him.
Our coast abounds with privateers. The Ostenders lie at our haven's mouth a week together, and their boats are every day ashore for intelligence, so that our vessels freighted with horses for Calais have been forced to unship them; nay, they threaten to carry the King's mail up to Ostend, in case the Calais packet-boats carry horses over. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Nov. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Nov. 14. Warrant from Williamson to William Smith, messenger, after reciting that it appears by the examination of Edward Panton there is reason to suspect Col. Naper of being privy to the concealment of St. Germain, the Jesuit, to search for the said colonel and to bring him before Williamson. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 93.]
Nov. 15. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 23, and Commons Journals, Vol. IX., p. 376. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 12.]
Separate copies of the above notes. [Ibid. Nos. 13, 14.]
Nov. 15. James Hickes to Williamson. On a second view of Mr. Benson's Saturday night, I find I was to give you a return, which was done and directed to him by my sudden view and mistake. I most humbly beg your pardon. The petition I have returned to Mr. Benson with an account of our condition here. Yet, if you move the Colonel for a letter-carrier's place, which is 8s. a week, I question not he may comply with your desire, though he has at present three persons expecting the like employments as they fall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 15.]
Nov. 15.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Giving an account of the three French ships from the Bank, and the two Dutch men-of-war and their prize as in Holden's letter of the 11th, calendared ante, p. 399. The men-of-war went out of this, wind N.W., last Saturday, leaving their prize here. The three French Bankers are still here with some other small vessels, wind now E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Nov. 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last Saturday morning the two Dutch men-of-war put to sea, leaving their prize here till they return. The three French Bankers here are afraid to put to sea though the wind be fair, for they believe the Dutchman will lie cruising for them, seeing they know them to be here. Much corn is buying up in those parts for the Canaries and Holland, so that the price is raised since harvest 3s. on 20 gallons, and is like to be dearer, for the encouragement the merchant has of 5s. per quarter paid them at the Custom House very much encourages them to buy, so that the Act, which is good for the farmers, is not beneficial to the town and tradesmen. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Nov. 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Nov. 15.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The late fogs and bad weather drove into this road the Providence of Fowey laden with French wines from Bordeaux bound for Bristol, which gives an account of a very plentiful vintage there, and that the wines this year prove generally good. [Ibid. No. 19.]
[Nov. 15.] List of sheriffs chosen for the year for the several counties of England, with notes by Williamson relating to those for the counties of Flint and Montgomery, differing in one or two cases from the names given in the printed list of sheriffs. [Ibid. No. 20.]
[Nov. 15.] Names of three persons [as nominees for the office of sheriff] of Flintshire; Owen Barton to be excused. The same as in the endorsement of the preceding paper. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
Commission to Christopher, Duke of Albemarle, to be Lord Lieutenant of Devon (except the royal citadel, town and borough of Plymouth, with the parishes, liberties and precincts thereof), with a clause vacating the former commission to the Earl of Bath to be Lord Lieutenant of that county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 17.]
Nov. 15. The Duke of Monmouth to Dr. Isaac Barrow. Expressing his satisfaction at his being chosen Vice-Chancellor by the University. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 37.]
Nov. 16. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 24, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 377, except that in the House of Lords, the Duke of Buckingham acquainting the House with his intentions of bringing in a bill for the ease of Protestant Dissenters, leave was given him for it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 22.]
Separate copies of the proceedings in each House. [Ibid. Nos. 23, 24.]
Nov. 16.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news except the continuance of fair weather, wind W. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Nov. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One packet-boat arrived on Sunday, which carried away the Saturday's mail yesterday, there being not one here till that came in. Another came in since, but neither brings any news. Wind and weather very uncertain. Two men are secured here on suspicion of renegadoes, and possibly one may be the person sought for, but I have not been abroad these several days, and leave it to the fuller account of the examinants, who will not be wanting in their endeavours to serve you. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Nov. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. A fishing smack yesterday spied in the Downs the hinder part of a ship, and some barrels of tar, which our seamen hearing went off with several small boats and are now come ashore with about 30 barrels of tar and some boards, yet many are swimming in the Downs. 'Tis supposed by our seamen that in the storm last Sunday night she struck on the east part of the Goodwin and suddenly staved and broke to pieces. Undoubtedly all the men are drowned. We hear of another vessel lost which belonged to Dover, only the master and two men saved. Several pieces of wreck appear at sea daily. We have now heard of above 40 between England, Holland and Flanders lost at sea, stranded or run aground. Pleasant weather, wind at or near N.E. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Nov. 16.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. In my last I gave an account of the vessel on the Goodwin. Our Deal boats have got her off and brought her into the Downs without any damage to her. She came from Ostend and was bound to Dover to be made free. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Nov. 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Nov. 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
Grant of a prebend of Westminster, vacant by the death of Dr. Boreman, to Francis Durand de Bréval, D.D., one of the King's chaplains. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 16.]
Nov. 17. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 25, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 378. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 31.]
Separate copies of the above proceedings. [Ibid. Nos. 32, 33.]
Nov. 17.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning arrived the John's Adventure from New England. The master tells me that the rebellion of the Indians has laid a stop to all trade, and that they are very numerous, notwithstanding they take and kill many of them, and those that they take they send away for Barbados and Nevis and Jamaica and Spain and sell them. A little before the ship came away the Indians had laid an ambuscade and cut off and killed a captain and lieutenant and 60 of the company of New England men. They very seldom appear in a body, but lie lurking in by-places behind bushes and trees, so that they cannot do that execution upon them they would, if they appeared in bodies.
Some great ships have been cast away to the northward, for this morning a great many barrels of tar have been taken that were swimming in the sea through the Downs, and it is thought the men are all drowned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 34.]
Nov. 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The tar that I told you about last post came out of an English vessel that grounded towards the north part of the Goodwin. Two of her men were found in her, both having hold of some part of her for fear of being beaten off with the great waves. In her bottom is iron which our men are now fetching. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Nov. 17.
4 p.m.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night arrived here a person of quality who this morning went for London. He came incognito, so to-day's letter spoke not of his arrival. Now I understand him to be Lord Douglas from France. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Nov. [17]/27. Coloured diagrams of two appearances of parhelia and haloes seen that day from 10 a.m. till noon and from noon till 2 p.m. [at Bordeaux]. [French. Ibid. No. 37.]
[Nov. 17 ?] Bill for prevention of frauds and perjuries and Bill for explaining and supplying defaults in an Act for preventing frequent abuses in printing seditious, treasonable and unlicensed books and pamphlets and for regulating printing and printing presses. (See Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 20, Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 378.) [39 pages. Ibid. No. 38.]
Nov. 17. Memorandum that Dr. Allestree, Provost of Eton, signified the King's pleasure that the first vacant prebend in Westminster should be granted to Mr. Moreton at the Earl of Oxford's request. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 17.]
Nov. 18. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII,, p. 27, except that the hearing of Sir N. Stoughton's appeal is appointed for that day 3 weeks instead of the 30th as given in the Journals. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, Nos. 39, 40.]
Nov. 18. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 379. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 41, 42.]
Nov. 18.
Brompton
Information of Jeremiah Bromley, Collector of the Customs, Scarborough. 9 Oct. last in the house of William Lawson of Scarborough he heard John Wyvill of Osgodby say that the King was a whoremaster and minded his whores and neglected the concerns of the kingdom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 43.]
Nov. 18.
Scarborough.
Certificate by the bailiffs and magistrates of Scarborough at the desire of John Wyvell of Osgodby that Roger, his father, was a very loyal and faithful subject to his late Majesty and was in the Commission of the Peace for the North Riding, and was in arms under his Majesty's command in the late civil wars, and that his eldest son, William, was cupbearer to his present Majesty then Prince of Wales, and bore arms himself under his Majesty's command, and that the said John himself was in actual service for his late Majesty in the late unhappy wars, and that the whole family were very great sufferers for his late Majesty, and that the said John is the only one remaining of them, and that he has always carried himself before them (and has the same report of his neighbours) as a very loyal subject. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Nov. 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news. Wind N. and the weather dull and heavy. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Nov. 18.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. In my last I gave you an account of the tar taken up in the Downs. It is since found the ship came from the eastward, and was laden with pitch, tar, iron, and flax. She was lost on the Goodwin and was an Englishman. All the men are lost. Last night came into the Downs the Richmond yacht, which brought Lord Douglas and his company. They are all landed and gone for London and the yacht is gone for the river. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Nov. 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Nov. 18.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Thomas Fanshaw during pleasure of the office of Keeper of Game within 10 miles of London and Westminster. [Precedents 1, f. 118.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that Charles Leaue had stated by his petition that his father and his whole family had faithfully served the late King, his uncle having been slain and his father much maimed in his service, and their whole estate sold to raise forces and answer debts contracted in the royal cause, and that the said Leaue himself disbursed his wife's portion in Sir John Booth's attempt, whereby he is reduced to great want, and prayed a gift of an arrear of a fee farm rent in Lincolnshire, and that the Lord Treasurer had reported on the reference of the petition that the gratuity desired is an arrear due to the Crown for a rent reserved on a grant of Sutton Marsh, Lincolnshire, by the late King from several persons, viz., 150l. 10s. 3d. from Lady Dacres, 78l. 9s. 8¾d. from Francis Wrenham, and 168l. 3s. 7d. from Philip Leman, amounting in all to 398l. 3s. (sic); for a grant of the said three sums to the said Charles Leaue as a free gift without account. [2½ pages. Precedents 1, f. 121.]
Nov. 19. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 29, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 380, except that in the former is omitted that in the order made the previous day in Sir N. Stoughton's case the day was altered to Monday sennight. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 49.]
Separate copies of the proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. Nos. 50, 51.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
John Field to William Bridgeman. At Secretary Coventry's desire requesting that a caveat be entered in his office that no reversion pass of the Keepership of the King's Libraries without notice to him. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Nov. 19.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news except the change from fair weather to rain and this morning to frost and some snow. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Nov. 19.
Yarmouth.
Edmund Thaxter and Thomas Bradford, bailiffs of Yarmouth, to Williamson. Yesterday we caused yours to be read at our public assembly, where, nem. con. Mr. Thomas Watson's freedom was granted him gratis as you desired. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Nov. 19.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Informing him of Mr. Watson's having been granted his freedom.—I have of late been very ill supplied with your letters of intelligence and Gazettes. If there be any fear of a breach, favour me with a line to give me notice of it, for I have now ready to go out of this port 500l. on my own adventure, which, if there be any fears of a breach, I would insure. Here is a rumour of a Dartmouth man being taken by a Sallee man-ofwar and carried into Argier, where the ship and goods are made prize and the men slaves, and that the Consul of Argier has given notice that they are like to break with us. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Nov. 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Only this day a ship of Rochester built 18 months ago, bound in ballast for Rochelle, struck on the Eddystone. The master and all the men are come safe ashore in their boat, but it is supposed the ship is sunk. [Ibid. No. 56.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 56 i.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a dispensation to James Rossington to accept and hold the rectory of Lezant, Cornwall, with that of Up Ottery, Devon, which he now holds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 78.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
The King to ————. As he has ordered 5 out of the 7 Fellows of Eton College to be chosen from the Fellows of King's College, Cambridge, recommending Richard Martin, M.A., Fellow of King's College, as a person deserving of a fellowship, to which his good performances at Eton School, wherein he has officiated several years, entitle him to be chosen to the next fellowship vacant after those to which Mr. Godolphin and Mr. Upman are already recommended. [Ibid.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Chilton to be ensign to the Duke of York's company of foot under Captain George Bridges at Portsmouth. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 140.]
Nov. 19. Caveat that no grant pass of Keeper of the King's Library in reversion without notice to Secretary Coventry. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 18.]
Nov. 19. Caveat that no pardon pass to — Earle, of Kingston-on-Thames, convicted of several robberies and felonies, till notice be given to Sir Winston Churchill. [Ibid.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent for 14 years to James Ward for his invention of an engine for pumping water, and of several other water works for draining grounds and raising water to a great height. [Precedents 1, f. 122.]
Friday.
Nov. 19.
Francis Sarsfield to Williamson. The Duke of Monmouth is ready to concur with Secretary Williamson in order to signify his Majesty's pleasure to Lord Essex in favour of Sarsfield, servant to his Grace. His Grace has promised also to get the King to speak to him at Council, if it can be conveniently done, which Secretary Williamson is desired to contrive. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 198.]
[Nov. ?] Dorothy, relict of Thomas Chiffinch, late Keeper of the Closet, deceased, to the King. Petition, stating that her late husband by warrant under the signet and sign-manual of 10 Nov., 1665, received of Lord Ashley, then treasurer of the proceeds of the sale of prizes, 3,252l. to be employed according to his Majesty's directions for his service, and, it not appearing for what service the said money was employed, it was set insuper on the petitioner's husband, whereon process has been lately issued out of the Court of Exchequer against his executors or administrator, and the petitioner is like to be troubled to give an account thereof, and further stating that she is informed that several other sums are certified by the late Sir Robert Long to be paid to her said husband on account, whereas they were paid him to supply the Privy Purse, which, she is informed, renders no account but to the King, and 1,892l. was delivered to her said husband to be paid to Monsr. Feurier, a French merchant, by his Majesty's command, and 1,000l. more was delivered him for defraying the charges of the works at Hampton Court, of all which after so long time she is not able to render any particular account, but she believes his Majesty was acquainted with the expenditure thereof, and therefore praying a Privy Seal to discharge her from the said moneys, and from rendering any further account for the same, and for superseding the process already issued and for stopping any further process to be issued out against her for the said moneys. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 57.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
His Majesty retaining a gracious sense of the petitioner's late husband's great faithfulness in his long attendance on him, and recalling that the above mentioned sums were laid out according to his particular directions, is pleased that the petitioner be discharged from the said sums and from rendering any further account of the same, and that the petition be transmitted to the Lord Treasurer to give order that a Privy Seal be passed, discharging her accordingly. Prefixed is a copy of the above petition, in which after "at Hampton Court" is added "besides 1,000l. on a Privy Seal of 4 Nov., 1661, and 200l. by Privy Seal of 30 March, 1663." [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 63.]
Nov. The Duke of Albemarle to the King. Petition, stating that in the grant dated 23 Aug., 1664, of the site of Clarendon House, the site was described by mistake as lying in the parish of St. James' in the Fields instead of St. Martin's in the Fields, and that the petitioner has since purchased Clarendon House, and because of the above mistake in the description praying a grant and confirmation of the premises. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 58.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the above petition that he may give order for passing a grant as desired and for rectifying the mistake in the said former grant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 65.]
Nov. 20. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 32. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 59.]
Nov. 20. Copy of the protest of the Lords against the vote for no address for dissolving the Parliament. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 33.) [Ibid. No. 60.]
Nov. 20. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 381. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 61, 62.]
Nov. 20. Notes taken in shorthand of the Earl of Shaftesbury's speech on the debate of appointing a day for hearing Dr. Shirley's cause. (Printed in Christie, Life of Lord Shaftesbury, Appendix, p. lxxxiv.) [Ibid. No. 63.]
Nov. 20. Dr. Lancelot Addison to Williamson. I found Dr. Tully at Grittleton in a very weak condition, yet seeming so desirous of life that I durst not propound anything that might suggest the likely nearness of his end. He said he would request that his month might be assigned to me, as hopeless to wait any more himself, but, if his letter should be of any significancy, I conceive he will scarce be able to write and therefore I solely depend on you in that affair. As to Ripon, though I dare scarce mention it, I have ventured humbly to request you to move the King therein while Dr. Tully is alive, and before any may perhaps have made suit for it. The doctor told me it might be worth 100l. per annum and better to one that would reside there for some part of the year. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Nov. 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived on Thursday night which brought several passengers, but neither deserting soldiers or news that I could hear of. I beg pardon for that lame account I gave last Tuesday, not knowing whom your express to Capt. Langley concerned till last night. My own illness, as well as his absence, I hope will procure some mitigation of my offence. On Sunday night two young men were hindered from passing over for Holland by a letter from Mr. Cole, a merchant in Bartholomew Lane, London, which I imagined might have been the aim of your express, but as yet we hear nothing of Monsr. St. Germain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 65.]
Nov. 20.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Thursday the Earl of Donegal, Lord Taaffe, Mr. Justin Macartie and Capt. Chichester arrived here and went yesterday towards Holyhead in order to their transportation for Dublin. Lord Clare is also at Neston, waiting for a wind for Ireland. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of George Penne of Dorsetshire praying a licence to hold a fair from 8 to 14 May inclusive in Tollar Wilme Downs in the said county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 66.]
Nov. 20. Grant to Sir Thomas Samuel, of — in Northamptonshire, of a baronetcy. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 93.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant in the usual form to the Earl of Pembroke to preserve the game in Wiltshire. Minute. [Ibid. p. 97.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to George Harris of the offices of Secretary of Jamaica, &c. (calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1675–1676, p. 302). [Precedents 1, f. 120.]
Nov. 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Since about 4 yesterday morning it has blown a storm at E.N.E. There are not above 6 ships in the Downs, which have suffered no damage, but at the mouth of the Sandwich river, about five miles northward of this, a small vessel for Bordeaux ran aground yesterday and is not yet got off. Some say, if she comes not off next tide, she will be lost. The winds and seas are somewhat abated.
Postscript, 3 p.m.—It blows very hard at N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 67.]
Nov. 21.
Deal
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day passed by the back of the Goodwin Sands about 100 great ships, but what they are we know not. In the morning a ketch of Margate going into Sandwich haven ran ashore, and lay dry for one tide, but is now got off. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Nov. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. Several ships with wines from Bordeaux for London and other ports are stopped at Spithead and Stokes Bay. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Nov. 22. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 34. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Nov. 22.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Ten light ships are now at anchor in this bay, one of which is a flyboat of this town which has been wanting these two months, and was concluded to be lost, not having been heard of since. With much ado she arrived in Holland, though very leaky, and they were forced to cast overboard a great many of her coals. The master brought over three English women, which were saved out of a vessel of London bound for Newcastle. The vessel was stranded at sea, only these three women were put into a boat with an old man and a boy, and were four days at sea before they got the land near Harling. One of the women had a young child, which died when they came within sight of land, and they left two children on board, one being alive, but they were forced to leave it. The rest of the company got into a caper which took them on board. The old man and the boy they left in Holland, being so starved that they were not in a condition to come away, for the boy's toes were so perished that they saw them cut off before they went away. These passengers were at London to be touched for the evil by his Majesty, and were returning home. Here is and has been very violent weather, the wind being now N.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 71.]
Nov. 22.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have a universal cold in town and country, but I suppose that is no strange thing at this season, the wind being all northerly. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Nov. 22.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Thursday last, the wind being N., about 30 sail went out of this port, most bound for France. Several sail are since come in from France, some laden with wines, two or three with nuts. A merchant I met this morning informs me he saw 7,000 soldiers march into Bordeaux before he came from thence on the 14th, and 4,000 more were expected. They marched in with their swords drawn, the point to the ground. They intend to demolish a great part of the town lying nearest the castle, and have seized on all the arms of the town. Saturday came in one from Lisbon laden with sugars and Brazil tobacco for Havre, and one from Portaport belonging to Plymouth laden with sugars and fruit. The French vessels from Newfoundland with fish and the French prize brought in by a Dutch man-of-war continue here still. Wind E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Nov. 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 19th came in here several which left Bordeaux the 13th. They report that 5 days before they came out about 1,200 men came in, horse and foot, all armed, and their swords drawn, unknown to the inhabitants before they were within 8 miles of the city, for, if they had had timely notice, they would have withstood them. They have pulled down the city wall, and say they will pull down every 20th house. They quarter 15 or 16 in a merchant's house, and he must maintain them and give them moneys besides. They put a great obstruction to trade, merchants not knowing what to do, three or four hundred ships lying there, some part laden, others having no goods on board, and the merchants know not whether it be best to put any on board. What will further come of it is not known, but it is much feared it will be worse, more forces coming in daily. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Nov. 22. "An Act for the better and more easy rebuilding the Town of Northampton" (printed in Statutes of the Realm, Vol. V., p. 798) and two private Acts passed that day. [Printed. Ibid. No. 75.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Licence to Peter Blake, High Sheriff of Hampshire, to live out of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 17.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Commission to John, Earl of Bath, to be Lord Lieutenant of the town and borough of Plymouth, with the parishes, liberties and precincts thereof. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 18.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Henry Killigrew of letters of administration of the estate of Hugh Willoughby alias Revell, of the City of London, a bastard, deceased intestate, which escheated to the Crown, and was granted 4 Oct. last to the said Killigrew. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 94.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 76.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Grant in reversion after Hugh May to Thomas May of the office of clerk of the recognizances to be taken before the Chief Justices of the King's Bench and Common Pleas, and of clerk for making and enrolling the same. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 95.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to James Ward, of Langley, of an engine for pumping water, which by the strength of one man shall pump two tons of water a minute. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for swearing Robert Sayers to be a corporal of the Yeomen of the Guard in reversion, to be admitted on the first vacancy among the present four corporals. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 23.
Queen's College.
Dr. Timothy Halton to Williamson. I have inquired concerning Pearson, who was recommended by the trustees of Dovenby School to be one of your exhibitioners. There is a place vacant, if you please to bestow it on him. Dr. Tully continues in the country and is not able to travel to Oxford. I think there is small hope of his recovery. You bid me mind you of my brother William, and you would procure some benefice for him. A living some 14 miles from Oxford called Swerford is at present vacant. It is in the Bishop of Chichester's gift, and is worth 120l. per annum. If you think fit to concern yourself about it, it will be a very great kindness to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 77.]
Nov. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats made a short passage from the Brill hither last Sunday night, but brought no news. The wind was at N.E. To-day it is N.W. with a hard frost. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Nov. 23.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day several outward-bound merchant ships and the Navy yacht for France with the wind N.E. passed through the Downs. I have not had any newsletter from your office above these three weeks. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Nov. 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. Some Bordeaux ships bound for London that put in here with the easterly winds went to sea last Sunday, and since, meeting with contrary winds, came back to Spithead. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Nov. 23.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. Last Friday happened another odd passage of the French in Salcombe Road. An Ostend caper, having taken a French vessel laden with salt, and sending her home for Ostend, the wind being contrary, brought her into Salcombe Road, where a small French man-of-war was riding, which makes no more ado but claps the prize on board and carries her away. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Nov. 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The master of a ship arrived to-day from Rotterdam reports there was a Dutch man-of-war at the Texel, who on that coast met three English merchantmen, and made them strike to him, they being bound for Rotterdam. When they came in, the masters complained. On this the captain was secured and sent prisoner to the Hague. It was reported at Rotterdam he would be executed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 82.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 82 i.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
Licences to Robert Knightly, High Sheriff of Surrey, and to Sir Edmund Jennings, High Sheriff of Yorkshire, to live out of their respective counties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, pp. 17, 18.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Welsh, Mr. Bastinck and Mr. Langley. His Majesty having received information that two young ladies, daughters of Sir [John] Warner of Suffolk, who some years since changed his religion and made himself a Jesuit, are like to be transported beyond the seas, in order to their being put into nunneries, in the interim, till he may have taken the order necessary according to law for preventing their transportation, I am commanded to signify his pleasure that you have a strict eye what persons shall endeavour to embark in that port for any part beyond the seas, and make stay of such as you shall have cause to suspect on this occasion, and, having carried them before the Mayor of that town or some other Justice, secure them, till they be able to give a good account of themselves, and certify the same to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 62.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 83.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Winchester. Recommending Thomas Cobb for the place of auditor of that church, vacant by the death of Edward Traffell, and dispensing with a clause in their statutes which provided that the places of Chapter Clerk and Auditor are to be in one person. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 16.]
Nov. 23.
London.
Newsletter to [Sir Francis Radcliffe]. The last post we hinted some votes of the House of Commons in opposition to Dr. Shirley's petition for an appeal to the House of Lords. They declared the same to be illegal. The Lords that very day passed a vote that the proceedings of the House of Commons were scandalous, unjust and tending to the destruction of the Government, and on further debate, their Lordships finding no probable way of reconciliation, it was proposed by some to make an address to the King to have this Parliament dissolved, at which many Lords were startled, both spiritual and temporal. Lord Mohun began the business, Lord Shaftesbury seconded it. The debate held 5 hours, and about 9 at night the question was put whether the House should make an address to the King to dissolve this Parliament. The House was equally divided, 48 in the affirmative and 48 in the negative, but the Earl of Ailesbury coming in late and being demanded his opinion, being ignorant of the debate and having a proxy, declared for himself and proxy Not Content, that is to say, not to have this Parliament dissolved. Next day, being Sunday, in the evening the King and Council met, and, it being apprehended that, seeing the vote was so near equal, there was a great sense in the Lords to a dissolution and likewise in the Commons, though that question was never put there, and taking in other interests upon the Romish and English account conducing to that end or what the private reasons were we cannot tell, but the consequence of the debate was that the King should prorogue this Parliament to 15 Feb., 1676[–7]. The King made no speech, but the Lord Keeper declared the King's pleasure to prerogue this Parliament to that time. Three bills were presented for the Royal assent (particulars of which appear by Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 34), but the bill read and committed in the House of Commons to appropriate the Customs for the future to the use of the Navy and several other public Acts almost ready to come up to the Lords could not pass, because they were not finished, so the tax of 300,000l. is not enacted to be laid upon the nation.
Great notice was taken by the House of Commons, when they went up to the House of Lords and heard the prorogation, that Lord Lauderdale, concerning whom they formerly made an address to the King that he might not be so near his person, had the honour to carry the sword that day before the King. The members, both Lords and Commons, hasten out of town. [Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 8.]
Nov. 23.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the Willing Mind, Nightingale, and Consent, all of By-the-ford (Bideford), from Sanse bastens (St. Sebastian), which carried fish from Newfoundland there. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 199.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Folliott, Viscount Powerscourt, and the references thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and the Lord Treasurer and their reports thereon, all calendared ante, p. 334, for causing letters patent to be passed to the said Viscount and his heirs or his nominees of so many lands and hereditaments in Ireland as were forfeited to or vested in the Crown by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, as shall be tendered by him or them from time to time, not exceeding 5,000 acres plantation measure, at such yearly rents as Adventurers or Soldiers are by the said Acts to pay in the several provinces, and for admitting the said Viscount to place deficiencies of any interests satisfiable by the said Acts on any lands and hereditaments forfeited to or vested in the Crown by the said Acts, and also for causing inquisitions to be taken for finding the title of the Crown to any lands and hereditaments to be passed to the said Viscount by virtue of these letters and for ascertaining the quantity thereof. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 400.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 200.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, that the principal Secretaries of State cause directions to be given to the officers at the several ports to take especial care that, without his Majesty's special licence, they permit not Catherine and Susanna, the daughters of Sir John Warner, to pass beyond the seas, who, having been bred up in a monastery beyond the seas, are now come to England, there being intentions of carrying them back to get them to profess themselves nuns, and that, if they attempt the same, the officers do forthwith cause them to be secured, and give immediate notice thereof to a principal Secretary of State. With memorandum that Mr. Secretary had written before by the King's particular direction. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 84.]
Nov. 24.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to William Bridgeman. Requesting the loan of the charter of the Hamburg Company, if Mr. Secretary can spare it. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Nov. 24.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. A good while ago I gave you an intimation of a difference among some of the justices of this county about removing the Quarter Sessions from Kendal. Divers justices here and I are desirous that the Quarter Sessions be kept both at Appleby and Kendal, as they have been, according to the confession of the gentlemen who are for the alteration, for near 70 years, but we believe for much longer. It will be easy to demonstrate that an alteration will be much to his Majesty's prejudice, and not a little to the trouble, charge and dissatisfaction of the county, especially of the barony of Kendal, most of whom are the King's tenants. I hope it will be no offence for us to desire to serve our sovereign and our country in the same good old way our predecessors have done formerly. For obviating any partial information that may be made to you I have given Sir George Fletcher copies of all the letters that have passed amongst us, which will truly acquaint you with the reasons of this difference. He will communicate them to you, as also will Sir John Otway, who has acted with us. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Nov. 24.
Deal
Richard Watts to Williamson. We do not understand of any shipwreck this last storm. We have had now three or four days of good weather. The wind is now come to the west, which will bring in the ships expected these 14 days. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Nov. 24.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yours for Lord O'Brien is come to my hands, which will be carefully delivered him on his arrival. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant a dispensation to Robert Fish, M.A., to accept and hold the rectory of Cotes Magna, with that of Bytham Parva, which he now holds, both co. Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 79.]
Nov. 24. Reference to the Lord Keeper of the petition of Lodowick Bray, desiring a commission of review in a cause between him and Henry Skipwith. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 66.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. Renewing the recommendation by his letter of 2 June last of John Ceely, M.A., a prebendary of that church, for the canonry residentiary next vacant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 17.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
Grant to Edward Bray, junior, in fee-simple of the advowson of the rectory of Sheere, Surrey. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 24.
Whitehall.
Proclamation. In accordance with the Act of 15 Car. II. c. 7, entituled an Act for the Encouragement of Trade, prohibiting the importation of any commodities of the growth, production or manufacture of Europe into any of his Majesty's plantations in Asia, Africa or America (Tangier only excepted), but what shall be shipped and carried directly thither from England, Wales or Berwick, with the exceptions therein mentioned, as notwithstanding the said Act great quantities of such commodities not shipped as aforesaid have been and are imported into several of the said plantations, and likewise putting in execution the Navigation Act (12 Car. II. c. 18), the Act for regulating the Plantation Trade (22 and 23 Car. II. c. 26), and the Act for better securing the Plantation Trade (25 Car. II. c. 7), and all other laws relating to the trade of the plantations. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 340.]
Draft thereof, noted as read in Council 24 Nov., and approved. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 89.]
Nov. 25. Sir Thomas Lynch to Williamson. I have been kept in bed and the house these 12 days by a fit of gout, so could not wait on you in the affair the Duke spoke to you of, but hope to be able to go in a day or two. But I durst not so long defer my petition on behalf of the bearer, my friend and kinsman Mr. Payne, a sober ingenious divine, as Dr. Stillingfleet and my Lord of Canterbury will testify. He would beg to have the living of Southweald by Burntwood, vacant by Parson Alford's death, which is in the Bishop of London's gift, but at present in his Majesty's by the vacancy of that see. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Nov. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The winds have been westerly since my last, which this morning sent us such a tide as frightened the whole town and did us some considerable damage. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Nov. 25.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. Assuring him that in obedience to his letter of the 23rd he would take all possible care to stop any such persons as he mentions, should they offer to take passage from that port.—Col. Whitley lately told me that your orders ought to come to him, and so to me, or at least that I should advise him of all your orders that came to me, but I told him, if it were anything concerning the profits of his boats I would, else I prayed his pardon. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Nov. 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This forenoon came in four Dutch East India ships outward-bound. They had been beating up the Channel, but, the wind being very contrary, anchored about 10 this forenoon. About 100 Dutch vessels went into the Cowes, but these chose rather to come into the Downs. They were forced out last Friday by that East India Company for fear of being frozen up. One of these East India ships is said to be 1,200 tons, and she is Vice-Admiral. The Admiral is near 1,000, the other two not above 6 or 700. Another flyboat is since come in bound for East India, and about 20 sail are at the back of the Goodwin plying westward. This forenoon a Council of War was held on board the Dutch Admiral, and 'tis reported they sent an advice vessel to Holland desiring them to send the men that were bound with them, and left behind by reason of their coming out. A topsail gale due west. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 93.]
Nov. 25.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Concerning the East India ships mentioned in the last. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Nov. 25.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. I shall use all endeavours to stay the two young ladies mentioned in yours of the 23rd, if they attempt to pass this way. We expect this evening our packetboats from Nieuport and Calais, the wind, which has been some time contrary and blown very hard at N.W., being now abated. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Nov. 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. The Bordeaux ships are since sailed to London and other northern ports. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Nov. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday put to sea several vessels from France and elsewhere homeward-bound, as also the three French Bankers, with a fresh wind at N.W. It is said that at Bordeaux the King's forces have pulled down a whole street that hindered the citadel from commanding the city. The inhabitants, in spite of the soldiers, keep their arms. They say that by reason of a frost they had much of their grapes are decayed, and the wine not so strong or good as formerly. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Nov. 25.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. A vessel bound for Ireland to load pilchards was by contrary winds put into Tenby, but without damage, and sailed thence last week. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Nov. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bayliffs of Yarmouth. Requesting them to return his thanks to the Corporation for granting Mr. Watson his freedom. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 63.]
Nov. 25. Privy Seal for payment to Sir Leoline Jenkins, Ambassador Extraordinary for the treaty to be held at Nimeguen, of 1,500l. for his equipage, of 100l. per week for his entertainment and allowance, and of such sums for intelligence, &c., as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 96.]
[Nov. ?] Christopher Barker to the King. Petition, stating former letters of his Majesty dated 24 March, 166[8–]9, granted with the consent of the Lord Chamberlain, Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, recommending him for the Esquire Bedell's place next vacant, the petitioner being every way qualified, and no statute of the University opposing his election, but that he has been hitherto deprived by a party in the University of the favour intended him, and therefore praying letters mandatory or that his Majesty will signify his pleasure some other way that his former letters be immediately obeyed, one of the said Bedells being now ready to die, and the party there endeavouring to precipitate an election in order to deprive the petitioner of his Majesty's favour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 99.]
Nov. 25.
Whitehall.
Consent by the Duke of Monmouth that his Majesty's letter to the University of Cambridge on behalf of Mr. Barker be renewed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 37.]
Nov. 26.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Fair frosty weather, wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 100.]
Nov. 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived several vessels from Bordeaux. They report that the 15th and 16th instant came into that town 7,000 foot and 5,000 horse, who are there on free quarter, and that labouring men as porters, &c., have two or three to quarter on them, who are maintained with provisions by the master of the house. The soldiers frequently break out the head of a cask and drink out the wine. All their stables being taken up, they force the merchants to make their storehouses stables. They have so employed the boats to fetch over the men and horses that masters cannot get their wine on board. 900 sail were then there to load wine, the major part are since gone, some loaded, some half loaded, and some light. This deserved punishment is to requite them for their large assistance to the Brutish rebels. Not a topsail gale at W. and by S. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Nov. 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Here is a report that a ship lately arrived at Dartmouth declares that a ship of that place was lately taken by the Turks and carried into Argier, where the ship and goods were made prize and the men sold for slaves. [Ibid. No. 102.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 102 i.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir Matthew Andrews, High Sheriff of Wiltshire, to live out of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 17.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. On the petition of Col. William Helyar, in consideration of his services to the late King and himself, recommending them to renew his lease of a farm called Berry, in the parish of Branscombe, Devonshire, which he has much improved at his own charges, for three lives on such reasonable fine and terms as they can agree with him. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 47, p. 18.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a grant to William Legg, late Groom of the Bedchamber, of several lands and hereditaments in cos. Louth, Roscommon and Galway subject to yearly quit-rents of 92l. 14s., and that the said William Legg, since deceased, and George his son, have been eminently loyal and serviceable to the Crown, and that the said George Legg has besought that the said quit-rent might be released, a liberty having been reserved in the treaty for farming the Irish revenue of releasing 1,000l. a year quit-rents without allowing to the farmers any defalcations or abatements for the same, and a reference to the Lord Lieutenant and his report in favour of the petitioner, with which report the Lord Treasurer of England fully agrees; for a release and discharge to the said George Legg of all the said quitrents except 4l. 10s. a year, which is to be reserved out of the lands so granted to the said George (sic) Legg, the same to be payable out of the said lands by such proportions as the said George Legg shall desire, otherwise to be payable out of the whole lands, with a proviso that the said quit-rent and the arrears thereof be paid till Christmas next. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 387.]
Nov. 27. John Platt to the King. Petition, showing that the petitioner has a just cause of appeal from a decree made in the Court of Chancery, 5 June last, in a cause there against him and others at the suit of St. John's College, Cambridge, whereby the petitioner's estate in certain messuages and hereditaments in the parish of St. Sepulchre, Middlesex, and elsewhere is decreed to be held and enjoyed by the college against the petitioner as to any title he has under William Platt, who devised the premises to the college, or the said William Platt's heir at law, and that the petitioner and all claiming under him shall on any trial at law or otherwise admit the said William Platt's will to be good and a good devise to the college of all his estate and interest in the premises, notwithstanding that the said devise is void, and that the petitioner has a good estate in law and equity under the said William Platt; and that the said plaintiffs in Chancery brought also an ejectment in the Court of Common Pleas for recovery of the said estate, on which a trial at bar was held this term, and thereupon the plaintiffs were nonsuited, for the petitioner was advised not to admit the said devise to be a good one according to the said decree, the same being wholly void at law, whereupon since the said trial the said college has obtained an order in the Court of Chancery that a writ of assistance should issue to the Sheriff of Middlesex to put them in possession of the said premises, and for an injunction to stay the petitioner's proceedings at law for recovery of his costs on the said nonsuit, and that an attachment should issue against the petitioner for contempt of the said decree, unless the petitioner show cause to the contrary next Thursday, which, so long as the decree stands in force and unappealed from, the petitioner cannot possibly defend; and that by reason of the differences betwixt the two Houses of Parliament touching the right of judicature in appeals from Courts of Equity the petitioner was advised to respite his appeal, but, the Parliament being prorogued, he humbly appeals to his Majesty as the fountain of justice for the reversing of the said decree and that commissions may issue for hearing and determining the petitioner's appeal, and that in the interim all proceedings in the Court of Chancery be stayed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 103.]
Nov. 27.
Beaudesert.
Sir Brian Broughton to Williamson. I present my thanks to you for keeping off his Majesty's mandamus, though his letter did it for one. The manner of the election at All Souls' for the other was thus. The first day it stood for one place. The fellows were so divided that my son had but 12 votes, the whole number of fellows being 27. The Warden's wife's kinsman had 3 votes of the fellows, which was more than any one of the other had. The next day my son had 15, so the other could have but 12 besides the Warden and his wife, but notwithstanding the other had the fellowship given him by the Warden.
Col. Danvers has been preaching to his party in this country at all their meetings and went throughout the kingdom, as I am informed, on foot. 'Tis strange a person of his quality and estate shall come 100 miles on that account. All the factious parties are very stirring at present, more than of late. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Nov. 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind of late has been mostly westerly, now it is W.S.W. It has been very high, so that it has not only forced several ships into this port for shelter, and among them yesterday the Merlin yacht, but has also hindered our packetboats arriving here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 105.]
Nov. 27.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Thursday night arrived here a small vessel of our town that left Bordeaux last Wednesday sennight. The master says that three days before his coming thence a great many soldiers came into Bordeaux, of which near 10,000 were horse and dragoons, and were quartered on the inhabitants at their cost to their regret, and besides that all the arms of the inhabitants were taken from them, one parish after another, but the names of the owners were put on each arms. No person had been then seized or imprisoned. Several vessels have in this fortnight arrived here from that and other places in France and elsewhere, but brought no news worth writing. I suppose from Lyme, that being a great deal nearer to it, you will have an account of what Bridport does as to their election of a new burgess in the room of Col. Bishop. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Nov. 27.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 25th arrived here the Francis of this place in 14 days from Bordeaux laden with wines and prunes. At their coming away the place was in great distraction at the near approach of 15,000 soldiers sent by the King to take their winter quarters in and about the town. The government of the town had some thoughts of withstanding them, but 2,000 of them entered the place the 9th. This is looked upon to be the effect of the King's displeasure, and further, it's feared, will follow for their late withstanding the King's edicts and impositions on them. Above 500 sail of English are there for loading which this will much impede. Their wines are very green this year, by reason of much rains they have had in the vintage. That coast is very full of Ostenders and Biscayers, so that a French vessel cannot pass. They only make bold with the English as they did by this Francis to take a little of their provisions &c. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Nov. 27.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Danby, Lord Treasurer. I give my reasons for signing the present account, lest the case be misapplied as a precedent. The King did not give Sir William Lockhart any particular sum for his equipage, but left him to provide it at his discretion, and then deliver in his account. This is the only case I know of an equipage being left to the Ambassador's judgment. Sir William's death so early makes many things allowable which would not have been so, had he lived out most of the campaign, especially the edibles, which are not properly parts of equipage but ought to be discharged from his weekly allowance of 100l. for housekeeping, but he was obliged to provide for a 6 or 7 months' campaign, and died at the very beginning; this caused his weekly allowance to cease, and the damage would have fallen on his widow, who had nothing to defray it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 205.] Prefixed,
Account of the equipage made for his Excellency Sir William Lockhart, Bart., his Majesty's ambassador in France, which marched from Paris for the campaign, 15 May, 1675, with other extraordinary expenses as followeth; being for equipage, coaches, horses, liveries, provisions for the table, wardrobe, postage, plate for the field, expenses from his death, 8 June, N.S., till his lady's leaving Paris 8 Sept., being 12 weeks, expenses for her journey homeward, expenses in passing warrants, gifts on audiences, New Year's gifts, &c., amounting in all to 5,566l. 17s. 1d. Signed Robina Lockhart, John Lewin. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 203.]
Nov. 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of the University of Cambridge. Reinforcing his former letters of 24 March, 1668–9, which recommended Christopher Barker for the place of an Esquire Bedell, on the next vacancy, in consideration of the his loyalty, sufferings and low condition, and the loyalty of his father. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 189.]
Nov. 27.
Whitehall.
Memorandum on behalf of the Provost of Eton that nothing pass concerning a second prebend's place at Windsor, the same being promised to Mr. Roswell, schoolmaster of Eton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 17.]
Nov. 28.
London.
Sir L. Jenkins to Williamson. Reminding him, according to the leave he gave him last night, of passports in his favour, as his baggage will without them run a great risk at sea, if he cannot have it ready to go along with him, or if it be separated from him by storm. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 108.]
Nov. 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Nov. 28.
Downs.
Capt. James Jenifer to Samuel Pepys. I sent on board the Dutch admiral to demand the four Englishmen, and went on board myself this evening but was refused with unbecoming language. The time of tide and evening is so late that we cannot get up our anchors, but in the morning (God willing) we will try if a few shot will prevail. My instructions are very absolute to bear me out. The men are young, having lately escaped from slavery, and, if once in the Indies, never likely to come home again, some thousands of the King's subjects being no better than slaves there. At the foot.
Request of William Curtis and three others to Capt. Jenifer to rescue them from the service of the Hollanders, who hold Englishmen no more than dogs, and to bring them into the King's service, where they will serve four months without pay. [Copies. Ibid. No. 110.]
Nov. 29. Capt. James Jenifer to Samuel Pepys. This morning we got up our anchors and again demanded the four men. On refusal we fired four shots, the first at random the others in place, when the Dutch Vice-admiral came on board and began to capitulate what power I had to demand them. I showed him the 36th article of my instructions and gave him half-an-hour to consider, and within the time the men were sent, though they much wished to wait till the Dutch Ambassador in London had consulted his Majesty. I durst not consent lest they should have an opportunity to give us the slip. They are still very confident through him to recover the men. I shall keep them till further orders. They are four as brave young and able men as ever I saw. It is a pity these Dutch should thus inveigle our youth when we have so much occasion for them, having the general trade of the world. Annexed,
Article 36 in the instructions to the commanders of ships, that they are to send on board foreign vessels, and reclaim any of the King's subjects to serving thereon contrary to the Proclamation forbidding any subjects to serve any foreign power or state, and to compel their wages to be paid up. [Copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 110.]
Nov. 29.
London.
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Williamson. Not long since I delivered to the King a memorial concerning a Swedish ship, the Calmar. Her cargo being referred to Sir L. Jenkins, I desired the ship might come into the same consideration and be referred to Sir Leoline. But, as there was no letter for you accompanying the memorial, I am desired by the interessants or their factors to do it as yet, which I hope you will accept and favour me with a speedy and gracious answer from his Majesty, that a report may be made before Sir Leoline's departure. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Nov. 29.
Rotherby.
Sir William Hartopp to Williamson. The favour of your company with so many civilities to me were so received, that I could not have run from you, had not the Pie Corner gentlemen driven me out of town, but their conjunction with I know not whom, and themselves know not for what sent me packing to my poor home. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Nov. 29.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came in a small vessel from Bordeaux. The master says that off the Lizard he met five French men-of-war of 70 and 80 guns apiece, plying there to look out for the Dutch East Indiamen, and on this news the Dutch East Indiamen here are at a stand what to do, but the wind being not fair they have further time to consider. I wrote to Mr. Yard that I have had no newsletters from the office this three or four weeks, of which I beg your favour. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Nov. 29.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. This morning arrived the Calais packet-boat, but we expect several mails from Nieuport, the wind for many days having blown hard and contrary, so that the mail which arrived from London on Saturday night was sent away this morning for Nieuport in a hired vessel, but, the wind being now abated and the weather fine, they may be expected here tonight or to-morrow morning. The passengers from Calais bring no news save that 'tis hoped the treaty to be this winter at Nimeguen may produce a good peace. Vessels daily arrive from Bordeaux that tell us of the miserable state of those people, lying under their King's displeasure, and that the gates and walls of their city are pulling down. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Nov. 29.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Saturday came in a small Dutch man-of-war to carry off the prize I wrote of to Plymouth, where the man-of-war of 30 guns waits for them. Yesterday she went hence with the prize. The Royal Defence of London is still here waiting for lading for the Straits, and here is likewise the Luce of this port, ready to go for Virginia, and four or five more small vessels. The wind is at present W. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Nov. 29.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 27th came in here the John of London in 8 days from Bordeaux. They say that place is in a very sad condition by reason of the King's forces there, about 14,000 horse and foot. They Quarter 15 or 16 horses and men on a merchant, who is to find them meat and drink, and 20lb. hay and 10lb. straw a day for their horses, and to pay them 5s. a week in money. They have taken all the city arms into their custody, and have set guards all over the city and at every gate, so that no goods can go out without licence from the new governor. They strike out the head of almost every third hogshead of wine, and whatever damage they do to the inhabitants is little taken notice of. They are willing to pay the gabelle with all arrears, but that will not serve. Several ships that lay there for freight are come away, and gone for Rochelle, Nantes and other places, there being no hopes to have any there, the merchants being in such a distraction. They spare no merchants though they be aliens. They have removed the Parliament, and threaten to pull down some of the city. They can find no relief as yet, but it is repoted the King will be there in person within 14 days. They talk of three suns seen there lately in the firmament, but no certainty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 116.]
Nov. 29.
Swansea
John Man to Williamson. No shipping has arrived here these 14 days save the Rebecca ketch of London from Dennigale (Dingle) Haven in Ireland with herrings and butter for Havre. The master reports all things in those parts in a quiet and good condition. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Nov. 29. Warrant to John Blundell and John Bradley, messengers, to take into custoday — Greene, clerk to Mr. Petit of the Inner Temple, and to bring him before Secretary Conventry. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 146.]
Nov. 29. Privy Seal for payment to Thomas Chudleigh, Secretary to the Extraordinary Embassy for the treaty to be held at Nimeguen, of 300l. for his equipage and transportation and of 40s. a day for his diet and entertainment, and of such sums for intelligence &c. as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 96.]
[Nov. 30.] List of the Royal Society and of the present Council, of whom 11 are to be continued and 10 new ones to be chosen out of the Fellows, 30 Nov. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 118.]
Nov. 30.
London
Adam de Cardonnel to Williamson. Giving his little son's address at Leyden, and begging his Honour to vouchsafe him some directions, that by following them while in those parts he may be the better able to serve his Honour. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Nov. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The contrary winds have so kept back our packet-boats that not one of them is here, nor was there last Saturday to take over the mail that came. The wind continues westerly, where it was last Thursday morning, when we had so great a tide as almost amazed us, it being a foot higher than that we had 23 Oct. last, by which we suffered so much loss and they in Holland were so near an inundation. We have some apprehensions that they probably may have received more damage by this last, they also being the lee shore. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Nov. 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 121.]
Nov. 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 122.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 122 I.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Presentation of William Norris, M.A., to the Vicarage of Southweald, Essex. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, p. 80.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Rory McKenzie, advocate, for striking and beating or offering to strike or beat John Steward, advocate, within the new session house of Edinburgh in the part appointed for the advocates before the ordinary Lord of the Bills at the by-bar, when the Lord was sitting on the bench in the Outer House on 20 Nov., 1675. [Docquet. S.P.Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 360.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation to George Graham, minister at Orwell, nominating him to be minister at Lochmaben, which is vacant through the transportation of Archibald Inglis, last minister thereat, to the paroch kirk of Eskirk. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 361.]
Nov. Lord Townshend to Williamson. Requesting him to move his Majesty that John Pell of Dassingham, the second person on the list for sheriff for Norfolk might be excused, and suggesting James Ward of Hendringham, if one is wanted in his room, and also that Samuel Kerridge, one of the three for Suffolk, might be excused. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 123.]
Nov. Anthony Thorold to Williamson. On the return from Turkey of John Hart, an ingenious young man of the next parish, I present you this relation. He going in 1667 to London became a servant to Captain Wise, commander of the Tunis Merchant, and in 68 in a fleet bound for the Straits convoyed by the Falcon and Speedwell was met by six Algerines, and after a sharp fight and their ship set on fire, he was taken by the Turks. The fleet returning to Algier, John was carried by the captain that took him to the King's house. The King a few days after sent him as a present to Mustapha Homor, General of the camp of the Arabs, who a little time after arrived at the camp in the Soro, who received him, but would not admit him to kiss his hand as he offered, but in 10 months after made him keeper of his treasure, sometimes having much money in pieces of 8 and aspers, their own coin, 232 of which make a piece of 8. After three years, for John was 3 years and 9 months amongst the Moors and Turks without seeing a Christian, several battles were fought with various success. At last his master was killed, and John became a servant to Mahomet Martilla, who took the command. He afterwards being strangled by the order of the King at Algiers, who sent for him there, John lived some time in the King's house falling to him by the death of his late master. This King was very averse to a peace with England, and the soldiery rose against him, and, as he was going from his own house to the House of Justice, slew him. Then John fell to the Byleete, and was afterwards bought by a soldier who used him ill, but afterwards carried him to Candia and so to Smyrna, Lord Finch being there, Rickwood consul. Mr. Turner, an English merchant, seeing him at the consul's with the assistance of other English there ransomed him from his hard master at 100l. sterling. He lived two years with Mr. Turner, who going to France into Italy sent John home in the African frigate. The places John has seen amongst the Moors are Tittory, Constantine, Biscery (Biskra), where the dates come from, Mosobis (? Mezezeb), a people most abhorred by the Turks; amongst the Turks the island Soye (? Scio), Tunidis (?Tenedos), Constantinople, &c. John speaks good Moorish, Turkish, Italian and some Spanish, and shoots well flying or running, and he may be acceptable at your service, or any gentleman may have occasion for such a person. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 124.]
Nov. Edward Smith to Williamson. Hoping he will not forget his promise a year ago to entertain him as a servant now that he has taken a house, he having been a true and faithful servant to Lord Arlington. [Ibid. No. 125.]
[Nov.?] Notes by Williamson, endorsed, "Lord Cavendish and Mr. Howard made friends."
Mr. Howard.—Owns he writ it, says he has a witness that heard the words said, and that, not being in a condition to send to him and have satisfaction, he did write that letter to put Lord Cavendish on calling him to account.
Lord Cavendish.—Has a great respect for the (?) Colonel, that is dead, and for the Earl of Carlisle and the family, and does not remember he said any such words.
How he came to put up the paper.—Did not mean it a reflection on the family, as he hopes none of his family will take what was said by Mr. Howard a reflection on his family.
Lord Ossory.—III done of him that reported this to Lord Cavendish.
Lord Carlisle.—Lord Cavendish calling out (?) any man that is not of his mind in the character he gives of Mr. Howard. A suitable reparation must be given or else, he fears, it will hardly sleep.
Lord Keeper.—It goes far to a satisfaction that Lord Cavendish says he does not remember to have said anything &c., that he owns a respect for the Lord and the family. There must be a disposition on both sides to be reconciled. To lay this at the King's feet. Mr. H. to ask Lord Cavendish's pardon for his letter, if Lord Cavendish denies the words, and Lord Cavendish to ask his pardon for the paper he posted &c. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 358–369 passim.) [Ibid. No. 126.]
[Nov. ?] "Two Seasonable Discourses concerning this present Parliament, Oxford, 1675," being "The Debate or Arguments for dissolving this present Parliament and the calling frequent and new Parliaments, as they were delivered in the House of Lords 20 Nov., 1675," and "A Letter from a Parliament man to his Friend, concerning the proceedings of the House of Commons this last session &c." by T.E. (Both these are printed in State Tracts, London, 1689 and 1693, pp. 65, 69.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F.]
[Nov.?]
Whitehall
Warrant, after reciting a petition of the Walloon Congregation in and about Canterbury, stating that they and their ancestors there having been numerous are now near 2,500, whereof a considerable number, manufacturing silk, jersey and worsted, have used divers orders and ordinances established by mutual consent with the approbation of the Justices of Kent and Canterbury, and now lately by the Justices of Assize, so that they have by the said trade not only sustained their own poor, but employed many thousands of the English, but that of late many refractory persons of their own congregation and nation have for their private profit refused to conform to the said orders and ordinances to the utter ruin of the said manufactures; for the incorporation of them by the name of the Master, Wardens and Fellowship of Weavers in and within one mile of Canterbury with the powers &c. usual in such grants, reserving liberty for any English weavers within the limits of the corporation to become members thereof. [2 pages. Precedents 1, f. 119.]
Nov. Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.:—
Vol. 375./No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
127 Nov. 1 3 1 0 N.E.
128 " 2 3 3 0 N.W.
129 " 3 3 6 0 W.
130 " 5 3 7 0 N.W.
131 " 6 3 10 0
132 " 7 3 11 0 N.W.
133 " 8 3 12 0 S.W.
134 " 9 3 18 3 S.W.
135 " 11 3 17 2 S.W.
136 " 12 3 19 2 S.W.
137 " 13 3 18 1 S.W.
138 " 14 3 0 0 N.N.W.
139 " 15 2 1 0 N.E.
140 " 16 2 2 2 W.
141 " 17 2 0 0 N.
142 " 18 2 2 0 S.W.
143 " 20 2 2 0 N.E.
144 " 21 2 2 0 N.E.
145 " 22 2 2 0 N.W
146 " 23 2 1 0 N.E.
147 " 24 2 2 0 S.W.
148 " 25 2 9 0 W.
149 " 26 2 4 1 W.
150 " 27 2 10 3 W.
151 " 28 2 9 1 N.W
152 " 29 3 8 0 N.W.
153 " 30 2 10 0 N.W.