BHO

Charles II: December 1675

Pages 427-485

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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December 1675

Dec.1.
Whitehall.
Rules and directions as to the precedency of the several regiments and their officers. These correspond to those of 28 May, 1673, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673, p. 304, except that after "the cornets as eldest captains of horse" is added, "and the guidons as youngest captains of horse. When the troops march with their colours, the officers of the same degree command according to the seniority of the troops respectively, but, when they are commanded out in parties, the officers of the same degree are to command according to the dates of their commissions." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 154.]
Dec. 1.
Queen's College.
Thomas Crosthwait to Williamson. This should be a letter of thanks for your last favour to me in relation to the custom house of Carlisle in which I understand I was prevented. I beg your pardon, if instead of thanking you I turn it into a petition for another favour, which is if you would assist a friend of mine, Richard Pearson, in procuring or directing him how to procure the Great Seal for a lapsed living named Duns Tew in the diocese of Oxon. The patron, Sir John Reed, stands now excommunicated, and the living having had no vicar these two years is now sequestered by the Bishop of Oxford. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Dec. 1.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. By a messenger last night from Holyhead I heard that the Earl of Donegall, Lord Taaffe, Mr. Macarthy and Captain Chichester were still there, waiting for an easterly wind to transport them for Dublin. Lord O'Brien is not yet arrived here, so your packet to him is still in my hands. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Dec. 1. Caveat on behalf of Sir Copleston Bampfield that nothing pass concerning the grant of the estate of Richard Sweatland, the same being forfeited to the King for killing a boy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 18.]
Draft thereof by Williamson, adding that no grant pass till an execution of 60l. he has against Stier be remitted, and with other memoranda by Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 157.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Gilbert Talbot, praying a lease of the manor of Pickering and Scalby, Yorkshire, of the present value of 239l. per annum, for 41 years, to commence after such estate as the Queen by her powers shall grant in the premises. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 66.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Col. Robert Werden, desiring the reversion of a certain farm called Moregrange, in the parish of Beeford, Yorkshire, and the rectory of the church of Elly (?Ella), with the tithes of the parish and the advowson of the same. [Ibid. p. 67.]
Dec. 2.
Bridlington
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The light colliers formerly at anchor in this road loosed on Monday night and are gone northwards, and, we expect, are got down. We have little or no news by sea. Most of our ships are laid up, except some that are gone over with corn. The conventicles continue their frequent meetings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 158.]
Dec. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The last packet-boat from Holland arrived here 21 Nov., and, though the wind has been contrary, being mostly westerly, as it continues, yet it has been calm and the weather fair, so that with some kind of a fear we look out more earnestly for them. Please countenance a dispatch from Sir R. Southwell about clearing an obstruction in the sale of the buss here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 159.]
Dec. 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Dec. 2.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. There has been a report as if St. Germain, the priest, and his consort had taken ship at Falmouth, and gone for France. Two strange persons came into an inn at Flushing, a small village over against Falmouth. They were bravely mounted, their horses esteemed worth 60l. at least, and their pockets full of gold. They kept themselves privately, and at last disposed of their horses for 15l., and put to sea this day sennight. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Fell. His Majesty, having this morning declared his pleasure for making my Lord of Oxon Bishop of London, at the same time declared that absolutely he would have you to succeed in the see of Oxford and to hold your deanery in commendam for several considerations. He has understood how little agreeable this promotion will be to your own mind and liking, but is pleased to declare, that for several reasons relating to the good of the Church, and particularly of that see and place, so it shall be, and has accordingly commanded me this evening to signify this to you as his pleasure and resolution. I wish you all joy in your sacred function, and the poor Church many more helps of your great piety and worth, in a time when, God knows, she is brought so much to need them.
Postscript.—Dr. Smith has the canonry, Mr. Trumball the parsonage of Witney, and St. Cross is kept in commendam two or three years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 64.]
Dec. 2. Congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of London, with letter missive recommending Dr. Henry Compton, Bishop of Oxford. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 18.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Ralph Trumball, M.A., to the rectory and vicarage of Witney, Oxfordshire, void by the translation of the Bishop of Oxford to London. Minute. [Ibid. p. 19.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Having taken into consideration in Council the petition of six of the daughters of Col. John Lane, deceased, concerning the payment of the 6,000l. granted to them, and finding the same cannot be satisfied in the manner provided by the contract with Lord Ranelagh, yet continuing our intentions of owning the said colonel's services in the persons of these his daughters by rendering the grant of the said 6,000l. effectual to them, we hereby in very especial manner recommend to you to take particular care for satisfying the said 6,000l. to them either out of the advance money payable by the new farmers of the revenue of Ireland or out of such other branch of the revenue there as shall be most convenient for our service. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 391.]
Dec. 3.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Yesterday sailed from the Tees two vessels of this place laden with lead and butter for Rotterdam. The wind S.W. with the continuance of very fair pleasant weather. The post at this time of year fails us in these parts, so I beg excuse for your not hearing oftener. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 162.]
Dec. 3.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. No ships have arrived here since my last. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell, Recorder of London, to insert Elizabeth Chamberlaine, prisoner in Newgate, sentenced to transportation at the Old Bailey for stealing 20s. and a Bible from Thomas Ferriers, into the next pardon but to omit her in the clause for transportation, this being her first crime. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 146.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir Richard Earle, High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, to live out of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book, 42, p. 17.]
Dec. 3. Memorandum that his Majesty at the instance of his Royal Highness promised to Mr. Barnes, one of his chaplains, the living of Much Mugden (Munden) Herts., on the death of the present incumbent, Dr. Lightfoot. [Cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 18.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the place of Clerk of the Hanaper Office to Henry Seymour, son of Sir Joseph Seymour, brother of Henry Seymour, Groom of the Bedchamber, for his life in reversion after the said Henry Seymour, the present holder, and Edward Seymour, his nephew, to whom it had been granted in reversion. [Precedents 1, f. 121 a.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a clause in the Act of Explanation, which, because in some counties and baronies the quit-rents by the rules of that Act chargeable on the lands therein might exceed or at least amount to the full value of the lands therewith charged or very near thereto to the great discouragement of all plantation and improvement thereon, empowered the Lord Lieutenant and Council for three years after the passing of the Act to make such abatements of quit-rents as they should think fit, and that any order of Council touching such abatements and enrolled in the Court of Exchequer should be as valid as if the same had been enacted by the Act, and that, that time having elapsed without such necessary relief being given, by a commission of 5 Dec., 1669, the Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation were given further power to make some abatement of quit-rents due out of the forfeited lands then undisposed of by them, whereof no certificates had then been passed by them, but, that, because the said commission was passed but a short time before the power of the said Commissioners determined, and after they had passed certificates of most of the lands wherein such abatement was fit, and that they were so strictly limited by their commission and instructions that they could not give such relief to many as was necessary, very few quit-rents were abated in pursuance of the said commission, and that many lands in several counties and baronies that have been passed by certificate of the said Commissioners or by letters patent, or have been restored to the former proprietors, being charged with the quit-rents payable thereout by the said Acts, are so coarse and barren that the quit-rents amount to or nearly to the yearly value thereof, by reason whereof the quit-rents have been so far suffered to run in arrear, that the profits of the said lands will not be sufficient to answer the arrears and the growing quit-rents, so that by the quit-rents being so high and the arrears so great, many of the said lands lie waste and all plantation thereon is hindered and the revenue thereby impaired, whereas, if the quitrents were reduced and part of the arrears discharged, they might well yield some moderate rent and also contribute to other public charges, and that there are some other forfeited lands remaining in the King's disposal that are so coarse and barren that they are not of sufficient yearly value to answer the quit-rents payable thereout by the said Acts: To the end that the revenue from the said new quit-rents may be settled and ascertained so that it can be relied on for the future, the King being assured that the Lord Lieutenant will take care that the revenue may be maintained as much as may possibly consist with the necessary relief of his subjects. authorizing and requiring him to cause a commission to be issued to himself and four others of the Privy Council chosen by him, with full power to examine the values of all lands which they shall judge not to be of sufficient value to satisfy the quit-rents payable by the said Acts and the arrears and other public charges due for the same, or whereof the quit-rents according to the said Acts nearly amount to the yearly value thereof, and, upon due knowledge of the value thereof and examination of such other circumstances as may be necessary to guide them, by orders under their hands to cause such abatements to be made of the said quitrents and the arrears thereof as they shall think fit, with power to the said Commissioners to examine upon oath, such commission to continue for 12 months from the date thereof and no longer, and the abatements made in pursuance thereof to be certified to the King in Council with all convenient speed after the expiration of the commission, all orders under the hands and seals of the Commissioners touching the abatement of any quit-rents or arrears to be sufficient warrant for releases and discharges to be passed of such part of the said quit-rents and arrears as shall thereby be remitted or abated. And, in case any of the lands, the quit-rents on which or the arrears thereof shall be thought fit to be abated, remain undisposed of or not held by any letters patent, then the said orders of the said Commissioners shall in all letters patent hereafter to be passed thereof be a sufficient warrant for passing letters patent to the persons entitled thereto under such quit-rents as shall be mentioned in such order of abatement, notwithstanding that in any certificate of the Commissioners for executing the said Acts or in any royal letters any other or greater rents shall be ordered to be reserved out of such lands than the quit-rents so abated, or notwithstanding the rents of such lands are joined or included in one or more charge or charges with other lands more valuable. And further, that Lord Ranelagh and his partners and the Farmers of the Revenue should have such reasonable defalcations as shall be proportionable to the loss they shall suffer by any such abatement made by virtue of the said commission, with a proviso that the powers of the Commissioners shall not extend to the abatement of any quit-rents due out of any lands that shall appear to them to be of the yearly value per Irish acre of 12d. in Leinster, of 9d. in Munster, of 8d. in Ulster or 6d. in Connaught nor to the abatement or discharge of more than 4,000l. per annum in the whole of the yearly quit-rents. [5 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office Vol. 9, p. 395.]
Dec. 4. Monsieur de Villeneuve to Williamson. Requesting him to accept this little bottle of bright ink, it being an established fact that in all this city, great as it is, there is no good ink to be had. [Partly in French and partly in Spanish. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 164.]
Dec. 4.
Rotherby.
Sir William Hartopp to Williamson. Having been long a traveller in my younger days, please accept my second thanks, my first not being received, and, I assure you, no bill of exchange ever came so welcome to me as your civilities. If sometimes one minute's leisure may permit me three lines, and some mention in them of the King's safety, I can be then a little merry. We hear of very untoward libels, I hope not true. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Robert Bostock, B.D., to the rectory of Paglesham, Essex, which is in the King's gift by reason of the vacancy of the diocese of London. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 80.]
Dec. 4.
Jersey.
George Ralegh to Williamson. I suppose you have heard that the French king has caused the walls of Bordeaux to be demolished, and fined the inhabitants three millions of livres. We have no other news here, except that Sir T. Morgan has made an incredible progress in the pier he has undertaken to raise at St. Aubin's fort. It is 300 feet long, and in the foundation 41 feet broad. For 76 feet of its length it is 11 and 12 feet high and 35 feet broad on the top. The rest is of a very good height, so that all the seamen that come in acknowledge they receive very great benefit by it already, and doubtless it will be an excellent pier. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 31.]
Dec. 5. Lord Latimer to Williamson. According to your commands I sent my man to wait on you, but, he not finding you within, I trouble you with this to desire you to enter Mr. Carpenter for the first prebend at Westminster, Windsor or Worcester, and to let the bearer have a copy of it under your hand, which, I am informed, you did for the Duke of Ormonde's chaplain, and, if you will favour me in the same kind, you will infinitely oblige me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 166.]
Dec. 5. Jo. Stonhouse to Williamson. Reminding him of the affair he last begged his assistance in, relating to Mr. Medlicott, who is chosen Recorder for Abingdon in place of Mr. Holt. He is a person in all respects qualified for that employment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 167.]
Dec. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Dec. 5.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Two days since arrived here the Elizabeth of this place from St. Malo and Guernsey in three days. The Parliament for Brittany assembled at Dinant has given the King 3,000,000 lirres, the tax of 5 sols on tobacco and 2 on tin. Notwithstanding, 13,000 are to be quartered this winter in the province, 10,000 horse, 3,000 foot, no places considerable excepted, but Morlaix and St. Malo. Their Marseilles fleet narrowly escaped de Ruyter in the Straits very lately. Colds so generally there amongst them, even to a mode, but many make their exit by it. This ship came out with several other English merchantmen for these western ports, mostly laden with linen and corn. Drapery sells there, but not at the former rates. Guernsey well. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Dec. 5. Memorandum that Lord Latimer signified to Williamson that the King has promised the first vacant prebend at Westminster, Windsor or Worcester to Mr. Carpenter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 18.]
Dec. 5. The Duke of Monmouth to Dr. Isaac Barrow. Having given my consent that his Majesty's letter be sent to the University for making Christopher Barker an Esquire Bedell on the first vacancy, I give you an account of it, lest I should appear unmindful of your privileges and the promises I made on that behalf. Understanding that he (besides his Majesty having formerly granted him letters to the same effect) was pressingly recommended by both my predecessors, I was very desirous to accomplish their intentions towards one who has the merits of his own and his father's sufferings, especially being one that by your statutes is capable of that employment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 37.]
Dec. 6. Affidavit by James Allardice, living at the sign of the Globe over against Ivy Bridge in the Strand. At the Palsgrave's Head at Templebar between 2 and 3 p.m. Mr. Stysted said his Majesty had sold Tangier and Madam Currwell was to have the money, and that his Majesty was about selling all the foreign plantations to the French King, and that there was a paper put up on his Majesty's picture on horseback at the end of Lombard Street that his Majesty was in a worse condition than his father, having disobliged all his friends, and that he was going to France to live with Madam Currwell, Duchess of Portsmouth, and that she has transported 17,000l. within this last 19 days out of England. The gentlemen present, of whom the informer was one, told him he deserved to be hanged for speaking such seditious and treasonable words. He answered, if all he said was true, his blood would be upon our heads. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 170.]
Dec. 6.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning a small man-of-war is come into the Downs, which says he belongs to the Duke of Brandenburg. The wind being S.W. has brought in 30 or 40 sail. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 171.]
Dec. 6.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Two come lately from Bordeaux tell us of the sad devastations the French soldiery has committed on the town, and their outrages among the people. They tell us of the revolting of Bayonne to the Spaniard, and of the French King's sending 30,000 soldiers to reduce them to obedience, but they resolve to persist in rebellion. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Dec. 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. There came in here yesterday the Turkey Merchant of London from St. Malo, richly laden, bound for Cadiz, and the Ann of Dublin, both in four days from thence, bound home. They have about 30 Irish officers on board, that came out of the French King's service, and are returning home on our King's proclamation. They also report that the French King has established the last severe gabelle on paper and other commodities throughout the kingdom. Three or four small vessels from Croisic are also come in, which confirm the news from Brittany. A small vessel from Bordeaux confirms that three suns apparently appeared there with rainbows dividing them. The Master says he saw it and several hundreds besides. The Adventure of Penryn from St. Malo on the 4th met off the Start our Bordeaux fleet of about 60 sail, wind N.W., so it is supposed they are all safe arrived before this comes to hand. It is said the Irish officers from France are going to raise new companies in Ireland for the King of France's service next spring. So much corn is buying up in those parts to carry beyond sea, that the poor people begin to murmur, and the price begins to rise very much. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Dec. 6.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. These parts are in a pretty healthful condition, though of late colds have been very epidemical, but not very mortal. There is no news here, trading being so extraordinarily dead, no vessels have come here of late from any foreign parts. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Judge of the Admiralty Court. Transmitting by his Majesty's command the enclosed papers relating to a Swedish ship, called the Salamander, arrested at Queenborough by one Hartson of Amsterdam, for his consideration and opinion. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 65.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of George Penne, similar to the former reference calendared ante, p. 410, except that the date for which the grant of holding a fair is requested is from 18 to 25 May. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 67.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Grant to Henry Smith, D.D., of a canonry of Christ Church, Oxford, void by the translation of the Bishop of Oxford to London. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 19.]
Dec. 6 and 8. Warrants to Thomas Smith and John Potts, messengers, respectively, to search for, and bring before Williamson Edward Stisted, for spreading false and seditious news. Minutes. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 97.]
Dec. 7. The deposition of Thomas Fidge before Secretary Williamson. Concerning the words spoken by Stisted agreeing closely with Blount's examination calendared post, p. 440, except as follows:— The French lady had sent lately out of England many thousand pounds, and would go ere long, for she had bought a great estate. She went to her Majesty and said she was married to his Majesty by a bishop, and was his wife as well as her Majesty. A Scotchman hastily spoke to Stisted about selling Tangier, and he called him Scotch dog, and said he was one of the nine that sold the King. Stisted said 'twas treason to say Dunkirk was to be sold, but 'twas presently after. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 175.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord High Treasurer. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure, who has seen the docquets and certificates annexed to C. Frowde's petition and is satisfied therewith, that his Lordship sign the docquets requisite for passing the grant to the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Dec. 7.
London.
Sir Thomas Player to Williamson. As he understands that the bailiffs and wardens of the Weavers Company are petitioners to his Majesty and the Council touching a difference amongst some of their members about the use of those looms which caused a great disturbance of late, entreating him to afford them his favour and kindness therein.
Postscript.—I know one of the masters of the said Company to have been a very great sufferer for his late Majesty both in his estate and person. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Dec. 7. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. Though the affair whereof you lately wrote be of such moment as will require much time before a determinate answer can be given, and possibly the longer a deliberation is, there will appear still greater uncertainty, I must at least acknowledge your letter and express my due sense both of his Majesty's great and undeserved favour and also your obliging kindness. I shall forbear to trouble you with the history of my concerns, and the manifold incapacities I lie under to fill that station in the Church which a too indulgent charity has thought me equal for. But, the Bishop of Oxford intending to be here in a day or two, I shall give him such a particular account of the whole matter as will, I hope, be satisfactory. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Dec. 7. Lionel Walden to Williamson. My being in the Isle of Ely prevented my returning you thanks for your kind letter, but, being there in order to your commands, I hope you will excuse me. I have made the strictest enquiry I can concerning those persons, both in the Isle and in our own country, that we have a jealousy of, but cannot hear they have been from home. When anything comes to my knowledge worth your information I shall give you an account. The greatest dissatisfaction that is amongst the gentry with us is that we were not kinder to his Majesty, for everybody was inclinable to give freely, and I hear that some persons have chastised my peevish neighbour. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Dec. 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This forenoon arrived here in six weeks from New England a Mr. Martin. He says the Indians increase very much, and have powder and military necessaries which they get from the French, for it seems that divers of the French are married and live with the Indians. One company of above 100 men fell before them, all dying except five, who fell amongst the dead and so preserved their lives. Mr. Martin says there is very great fear of the loss of those colonies, the enemy much increasing, and the thing is the more dangerous, because several of the petty kings up in that country, which ever had wars, are now united and join all together. Last night about 25 vessels arrived from Bordeaux; about 8 are bound for the Netherlands. Many of them speak of the just reward those rebels receive. A topsail gale at W. and by N. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 180.]
Dec. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Dec. 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Success frigate sailed to the eastward this afternoon. I am told the Mary Rose will sail to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 182.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 182i.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl Marshal. I am extremely sensible of the great compliment you have made me by Mr. Hayes. It were not reasonable I should be a second time burthensome to your interests at Thetford, having had it so little in my power to deserve from your Lordship or the town.
I acknowledge with much sense the favour you have done Ball in my consideration. I hope he will set himself to deserve in some measure the good you are pleased to design him. I am not a little out of countenance to be thus always on the begging hand, but it is the lot of my condition to receive, as it is of your Lordship's quality and station to be able to oblige and give. I beg your pardon that I did not wait on you to wish you a happy journey, and to recommend to you, as they might come in your way, my poor interests and relations in Cumberland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 65.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Roger Bradshaigh, desiring a certain arrear of 2,200l. due from one Collins, a receiver. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 68.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to the Bishop of London to hold with the said bishopric the Mastership of St. Cross. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 19.]
Dec. 7. Warrant to John Potts, messenger, to apprehend and bring before Williamson, William Bone, tailor, living in Bridges Street, Covent Garden, for concealing certain dangerous and treasonable words. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 97.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that in the contract of 4 Aug., 1671, with Lord Ranelagh and his partners they covenanted within 4 years from 25 Dec., 1671, to discharge the arrears on the establishment unpaid 25 Dec., 1670, not exceeding in the whole 144,148l. 11s. 4d., by even and equal portions, the first payment to be made on or before 24 Dec., 1672, that by the letter of 26 Nov., 1672 (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1672–3, p. 211), such arrears were to be paid by 12 equal payments to be made every three months, that by the said contract the King covenanted that, in case any of the funds thereby assigned to them should be any ways lessened, discounted or extinguished by any act of his during their term, he would allow them not only an equivalent abatement and defalcation, but also a proportionable respite out of the sums by them undertaken, and that Lord Ranelagh and his partners have informed him that they have not been able to satisfy the said arrears at such times and in such portions as by the said letter were appointed by reason of the many great remittals, abatements, allowances, respites and defalcations granted since the commencement of their undertaking, whereby the funds assigned to them for satisfying the said arrears have been very much lessened or extinguished, and have besought in pursuance of the said covenant to be allowed some further time for discharging what is yet unpaid of the said arrears, as also of the moiety of the 10 months' arrears becoming due during the government of the first Lords Justices, and undertaken by them to be paid before 25 Dec., 1675, granting and allowing to the said Lord Ranelagh and his partners a further 12 months from 25 Dec., 1675, for clearing and discharging whatever is behind and unpaid at the signing of this warrant of the said arrears so by them undertaken, which they are to pay and satisfy within that time, not only without any composition, defalcation or other deduction whatever according to their covenants, but also in the payment of the said arrears such an equality is to be observed as that the persons concerned (if any), who have already received less or nothing of their arrears than others, may in the first place be satisfied so much as to bring them to a parity with those who have already received part of their arrears, and all other payments afterwards to be made by equal proportions, and particularly they are to take care that what part of the said arrears is due to the quarters may be punctually paid, in such manner and with such notice that all unnecessary trouble and attendance may be prevented, and declaring and ordering that no advantage shall be taken against the said Lord Ranelagh and partners on any pretence of breach of covenant by reason of their not having paid the said arrears at the times settled by their contract or the letter of 26 Nov., 1672, so as the same be now paid by them within that further time of 12 months allowed by these presents, and further ordering letters patent to be passed for the better and more effectual securing the favour hereby intended them. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 392.]
Draft thereof, dated Nov., with memorandum that it was communicated to the Lord Lieutenant and agreed to by him. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 201.]
Separate draft of the clause about equality of payment of the arrears. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. After reciting the petition of William Benning, Provost of Edinburgh, and others, owners of the Agnes of Burrowstowneness, which represented that the petitioners, having obtained a pass from the Lord High Admiral of Scotland, set the said ship to sea with two other Scotch ships, and that about 1 Sept. last, they were met on the high sea by two Swedish men-of-war and a caper, and that, notwithstanding the pass, the said Agnes and the other two ships were seized by the said Swedes with their lading and carried into Gottenburg, where they are still detained:—That Secretary Williamson forthwith represent the matter to the Swedish Resident here, and also prepare a letter for the King's signature to the King of Sweden, that the said ship and her lading may be forthwith restored to the petitioners, and that they may receive satisfaction for her unjust capture and detention. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 183.]
Dec. 8. The examination of Edward Stisted taken before Secretary Williamson. Confesses that being in a certain company the 6th instant he said there was a report about the town that Tangier either was sold or to be sold, and that to the French. Asked, if he had said that the Duchess of Portsmouth was to have the money, he denies saying any such thing, and says further that he had the report of the sale of Tangier from a Dr. Bourne, and that having, 6 Dec. at night, asked Sir Edmund Wyndham whether he knew anything of it, Sir Edmund answered he had heard such a report.
Asked further, whether he had reported that the King had shut up the Exchequer, and that the new Bankers had thoughts of putting themselves into the King's Bench, he confesses he said that Lombard Street was full of people come thither to withdraw their money from the goldsmiths on a report spread abroad that they were about lending more money to the King, and that two of the said goldsmiths were broken or had shut up their shops.
Asked concerning a libel, he says that on a scandalous libel either put upon the horse, cast in the gallery or fixed on a door, the King had doubled his guards. He likewise confesses having said that it was reported that the French lady had sent a great sum out of England in order to build a house. He denies that he ever said that the French lady went to the Queen and told her that she was married to the King by a bishop, and was the King's wife as well as her Majesty, but confesses that Mrs. Bourne, wife of the said Dr. Bourne, had said to him on the 5th instant or thereabouts that she had heard that Madame Queroualle had said to the Queen or some of her servants, that she was as much the King's wife as the Queen, only that she was not married by a bishop. Asked, whether he had said the King was in a worse condition than his father having disobliged all his friends, and that he was going to France to live with Madame Queroualle, he denies having said any such words, or that anything like this was contained in the said libel, not having said what were the contents of the said libel. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Dec. 8. The Mayor, bailiffs and capital burgesses of Newcastle under Lyme to the King. Petition for his approbation of their choice of Samuel Machin to be their town clerk in the place of Robert Croxton, deceased. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Dec. 8.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Eight or ten light colliers are now at anchor in this bay, which have been down to the northward, but these hard westerly winds forced them back again. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 186.]
Dec. 8.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Last night and to-day at least 30 merchantmen are arrived from several parts, amongst them Captain Packston from the Canaries, who tells us that by reason of dry weather the vintage has proved very good, and that for many years such good wines have not been known, but being less in quantity it is very dear. Also the Blossom from New England, Mr. Martin commander, who tells me that the rebellious Indians have done a great deal of mischief of late, burning several small towns and villages, and killing several people, both men, women and children, sparing none they meet with. They lie lurking in by-places, so that the New England people can do but little good upon them, for upon this war most of the Indian kings are united together, and by taking some prisoners they have found out that the French on the other side of them have enticed these Indians to this rebellion. Many ships are come from Bordeaux. The masters say that city lies under a great affliction by the soldiers, and that they would not suffer an Englishman to carry a stick in their hands, but they are taken from them, besides many times abused. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Dec. 8. Copy of letters of administration granted 9 Oct., 1673, by the Archbishop of Canterbury to Elizabeth Dawson, aunt and guardian of Elizabeth, Pretiosa, John and Charity Stone, infant children of John Stone, deceased, of the goods of the said John Stone, for the use of the said infants. [Latin. Illegible in places. On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F., No. 69.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the Duke of Monmouth to Thomas Newcombe, printer to his Majesty, to order the printing of 100 copies of a manuscript entitled An Abridgement of the English Military Discipline, and to deliver the original and copies to his order, the charge thereof to be placed to the King's account. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 41.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to George, Earl of Linlithgow, of the escheat of all the goods and gear of 51 persons therein named now in his Majesty's disposition by reason of escheat for their being at field conventicles and also of the escheat of the life-rents of the said persons. [Docquet. 2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 362.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to John Wood, one of the Regents of the College of Edinburgh, his heirs and assigns, under the reservation of the life-rent therein specified, of the lands therein described in the parochine of Benholme, Kincardineshire and of the right of patronage of the kirk of Benholme, on the resignation of Alexander Wood, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 364.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to James Menteath, drower, of Falkirk, for two years. [Ibid. p. 365.]
Wednesday, [Dec. 8.] Francis Sarsfield to Williamson. The enclosed only contains my name to be put by the Earl of Essex on the Irish establishment. I beg you to have the kindness to deliver it to him either by your own hands or by the Duke of Monmouth, my master, as shall be found most proper. [French. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 203.] Enclosed,
Francis Sarsfield, servant to the Duke of Monmouth, and by him recommended by the King's order to the Lord Lieutenant towards securing for him 100l. a year in Ireland. [Ibid. No. 203i.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth of his consent that Richard Lake, M.A., of Sidney Sussex College, should endeavour to obtain his Majesty's letters mandatory, being well informed of his good deserts; and that he would have some time ago been chosen Fellow of that society, had he not unwittingly procured letters recommendatory in his behalf, which is disallowed by the statutes of that college. [S.P. Dom., Car.II. 375, No. 188.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 38.]
Dec. 9. Sir William Jones to Williamson. Informing him that he would attend him that evening at the time appointed, unless he can without inconvenience change the time to what hour he pleases to-morrow afternoon, which would be greatly to his conveniency. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 189.]
Dec. 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The whole discourse here these ten days has been that his Majesty's ship, the Success, foundered at sea and every soul perished, but she arrived to-day in the Downs.
Letters dated 6 Sept. last from some Deal men on board Sir John Narbrough to their wives say that Sir John has burnt seven Tripoli ships, great and small, but that is better known at Whitehall.
Within these five days we have heard of more vessels and men lost the two late storms.
I advised you about four months past that at Dover, Sandwich, and adjacent places, small-pox and measles were very hot. Since it has been and yet is very breefe (sic) in our town, but not so mortal as at other places.
The Dutch East India, West India and Straits fleets are yet in the Downs, being bound by a N.W. wind, and also many English vessels, in all about 80 sail. A topsail gale at N.W. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Dec. 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. Two days ago sailed out of the harbour a small French vessel laden with salt, and a sloop riding near the shore by St. Helen's seized her and carried her for Ostend. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Dec. 9.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Leoline Jenkins, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty, and to the other Admiralty Justices to prepare a pardon to Owen Winter, John West, Abel Owens, William Coast, and William Dixy, condemned at the Admiralty sessions at Southwark for piracy and felony and sentenced to death. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 146.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Attorney-General. Begging him to give him half-an-hour there that evening at what hour he pleases after 5, to examine Stisted, the author of the false news he saw in the Lord Keeper's hand yesterday. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 66.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Dr. Barrow and the Senior Fellows of Trinity College. Interceding with them on behalf of Mr. Uvedale, a Fellow of the College, that they would dispense with his nonresidence for some time, he being employed abroad in the education of the children of several persons of quality. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 38.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, if it appears on the return of an inquisition taken by virtue of a writ of ad quod damnum that the grant will not be to the prejudice of the King or the neighbouring fairs and markets, for a grant to Sir Albert Conyngham and his heirs of four fairs to be held yearly on 29 May, 11 Sept., 11 Nov., and 17 March and of a weekly market at Mount Charles alias Tannytallow in the barony of Boylegh, Donegal. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 402.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, upon the surrender of certain letters patent granting to Adam Loftus the offices thereinafter mentioned, for a grant to Edward Brabason for his life of the offices of Ranger, Gamekeeper, or Master of the Game of hunting, hawking, fishing and fowling and Chief Ranger of all the King's parks, forests, chases and woods in Ireland, and of the office of Ranger of the Phœnix Park and of Keeper of Newtown Walk therein, with the yearly fee of 50l. per annum with all the lodges, houses, fees and profits appertaining to the said office, including the keeping yearly in the said park 12 horses, 20 cows and one bull with a reasonable quantity of furze for firing. [Ibid. p. 430.]
Dec. 10. Examination of John Blount of the Middle Temple, taken before Secretary Williamson. Mr. Stisted coming on Monday the 6th to the Palsgrave's Head, the examinant asked him what news, not meaning public, but as to a money affair in which Stisted was employed by him. Stisted answered that the news was that Tangier either is sold, or was to be sold, and being asked to whom, he answered, To the French.
Stisted then and there said he heard there was a libel on the Horse in the Stocks' Market, and that the Exchequer was shut up again, and that it was believed that all the goldsmiths in Lombard Street would that day shut up their shops, and turn themselves into the King's Bench. Stisted also told the examinant and the company of a great loss of ships and of the hurricane at Barbados.
He further said that the Duchess of Portsmouth had the week before sent over 17,000l. into France, and that it was reported that she should say that she was as much the King's wife as the Queen.
Stisted being admonished not to say any thing, but what he could bring an auther for, answered he had said nothing but what he was able to bring an auther for. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 193.]
Dec. 10. Examination of Thomas Gaudy of Claxton, Norfolk. To the effect of the earlier part of the above examination:—The examinant further saith that Stisted said that the Duchess of Portsmouth had returned into France 17,000l. which had like to have been intercepted, as he heard, and that he heard that the Duchess told the Queen she was as much the King's wife as her Majesty, but that she was married by a bishop. At the foot,
Declaration by Arthur Warde, of Hinton, Salop, that having read the above examination, he heard what is said in it, except what concerns the report of the Duchess' money being intercepted. [Ibid. No. 194.]
[Dec. 10?] E. Stisted to Williamson. Requesting him to procure the favour for him to be called that day, adding that Mr. Potts stays with him in the lobby. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Dec. 10.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly with fair pleasant weather. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Dec. 10.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. But one ship is arrived since my last. The Mary Rose is still here. The commander received orders to-day from Secretary Pepys, supposed to sail for Portsmouth or the Downs, but the wind blowing hard at S.W. she cannot sail out of the Sound. [Ibid. No. 197.] Enclosed,
Particulars of the ship arrived. [Ibid. No. 197 i.]
Dec. 10.
The Chapter-house.
Certificate by the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's of their election of Henry, Bishop of Oxford, to the see of London, void by the decease of Humphrey Henchman. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F., No. 70.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Licence to William Swift, High Sheriff of Worcestershire, to live out of his county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 18.]
Dec. 10. Caveat on behalf of the Duke of Monmouth that no grant pass of any forfeitures for forging debentures, bills of public faith, receipts or other writings. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 19.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Anne Sarsfield for a pension, in consideration of the constant loyalty, services and sufferings of her uncle, William Sarsfield, and her husband, Patrick Sarsfield, and of the sad condition she and her children are reduced to. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 69.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Grant to Charles Atherton of the office of Serjeant Plumber in reversion after Peter Brent. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 98.]
[Dec.] Memorandum that His Royal Highness has prepared a state of his deficiencies for which he ought to have a satisfaction by reprisals of lands remaining in his Majesty by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and in order thereto prays that his Majesty will refer his demand to the Lord Privy Seal and the Lord Lieutenant, and that Sir James Shaen, the Surveyor-General of Ireland, may attend their lordships who are to report what number of acres, &c., his deficiencies amount to. At the foot,
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Privy Seal and the Lord Lieutenant, they calling to their assistance Sir James Shaen. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 204.]
Another copy of the above memorandum and reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 68.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for effectual acquittances and discharges to Sir James Shaen, Sir William Petty, William Hill, William Rider, Robert Gorges, Thomas Hoar, Francis Soane, William Muschamp, Edward Richbell, Stanhop Mill, Laurence Stannian and William Hanway, the new farmers of the revenue in Ireland, for 20,000l. actually paid to the King's use as part of the advance money by them agreed to be paid for securing the payment of the rent of the said farm, as if the same had been actually paid into the receipt of the Irish Exchequer. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 400.]
Dec. 11.
Ludgate.
William Middleton to Williamson. I have lain here two years miserably enough. Nobody comes at me a month together to give me a cup of drink, but I have been glad to drink water four or five days together. I have nothing but rags about me and have been fain to go in a pair of old ship's shoes for twelve months together. If I have not to satisfy this keeper for my chamber now at Christmas, I shall be turned out to be in a lower ward, and there men lie upon the boards. I hope God will move you to help me in this my great extremity. I doubt not but you have my petition and papers by you, by which my sufferings for the King are set forth, I now being reduced to necessity, and arrived at the age of 70 and upwards and having no subsistence at all to live on. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 200.]
Dec. 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. After my letter last Thursday we had a very high tide again, but, the weather being calm, with some care and labour we preserved our marshes. No packet-boat has since arrived. The wind is somewhat southerly of west. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Dec. 11.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The Amity of this place arrived last night from Bordeaux, whence he came last Sunday sennight. He brings no news from thence, but says a Biscayer commanded him aboard and well beat him and two of his men that carried him aboard, and gave him no reason for it, and into the bargain took away from him two hogsheads of wine, nine birding guns and a musket. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Dec. 11.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. This week arrived here several vessels of this port, 5 from Malaga, 1 from Terceira and 2 from France; also one from the Canaries for London was forced in here by stress of weather. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster of the petition of Thomas Eyer, of Gray's Inn, for his Majesty's interest under some small rent to certain waste grounds, parcel of the Duchy, granted by his late Majesty to Richard Nevell at a considerable yearly rent under a nomine pœnœ for non-payment, whereof nothing has been yet paid, and the ground not improved, which was by him discovered to the Chancellor of the Duchy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 69.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Thomas Newcombe and Henry Hills, of the city of London, stationers, of the office of King's Printer, for the printing of all Bibles, Books of Common Prayer, of all Translations, Statutes and Proclamations, for the term of 30 years, to commence after the determination of the estates and interests heretofore granted in the said office to Robert Barker, and to Charles and Matthew Barker, with the fee of 6l. 13s. 4d., and with a prohibition that none other meddle in the said office. [Precedents 1, f. 123.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Chancellor and the Lord President and the remanent Senators of the College of Justice. There being lately presented to us a petition signed by Sir George Lockhart, Sir John Cunningham, John Ellis and Hugh Wallace, four of the debarred advocates, containing their submissions and acknowledgements touching appeals and protestations for remeid of law and the respect and submission due by them and all others to your persons and sentences and desiring we would accept the same as an evidence of their duty and loyalty, and thereupon restore them to their employment, as more fully appears by the enclosed petition itself, as we are resolved inviolably to maintain your jurisdiction and authority, and severely to punish all designs to the prejudice or derogation thereof, so we now declare that we will not suffer or allow any appeals or protestations to be used against any of your acts, interlocutors, or sentences, and we require and authorize you to discover all persons, who shall advise, countenance or be accessory to the contriving or presenting such appeals and protestations in future, and to punish all such attempts and designs according to our pleasure formerly signified, and, albeit we perfectly understand the present condition of that affair and what certifications and other restrictions those outed advocates are liable to, yet, being well satisfied with the declarations, acknowledgements and submissions in the said petition, and having regard to the abilities of those advocates for serving us and our subjects, we are graciously pleased to dispense with all certifications and other restrictions, not only as to those who have signed the said petition, but also as to all others who have been debarred, who shall subscribe the like petitions betwixt this and 10 Jan. next, and present the same to you, and we allow all such advocates who have already, or shall within the said time, subscribe the like petitions to re-enter to the exercise of their employment, and to enjoy all the liberties and privileges belonging thereto, as effectually as if they had never been debarred, and we confidently expect they will demean themselves as becomes dutiful and loyal subjects. Lastly, we require you to give all encouragement to the advocates who have remained in their duty, and that those restored live peaceably and in concord with them. [2½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 365.] Enclosed,
The said petition, of which the purport sufficiently appears from the above letter. [Ibid. p. 368.]
Dec. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 204.]
Dec. 12.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Dec. 12.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. In my last I could not give you an account of some vessels that came in Sunday night. The great ship was the Turkey frigate of 30 guns and 60 men, with piece goods from St. Malo for Cadiz. Another was the Anne, of Dublin, bound home from St. Malo with 36 passengers, 6 merchants, the rest Irish officers and soldiers from the French king's camp. Some have totally deserted the service. Three captains are going to raise men to recruit their troops. Three of Barnstaple from Croisic with salt homeward-bound. Friday came in one from Lisbon with wine and oil for London. Here are several other small vessels outwardbound. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Dec. 12.
Milford.
John Powell to James Hickes. The 10th arrived here the City of Tangier, Capt. White commander, with wine and fruit from Cales for London, and the St. Michael of Yarmouth, and the Jane of Glasgow, both from St. Martins. Other ships are here, but the weather is so bad no boat can go on board. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Dec. 12.
Milford.
John Powell to James Hickes. Yesterday sailed from here the Tangier frigate, Capt. White commander, and the Bachelor of London and a Southampton vessel, both from Alicante. I thank you for the newsletter I received the last post. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for payment to Bevill Skelton, Groom of the Bedchamber, Envoy Extraordinary to the Emperor, of 500l. for his equipage and 4l. a day for his entertainment, with such sums for intelligence, &c., as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 98.]
Dec. 13. Sir George Reve to [Williamson]. Before I left London, I showed you some conceptions of my own on this long prorogation, setting forth the dangerous consequences in dissolving this parliament before the King had strengthened his arms by making some strong allies abroad, and securing the City of London sure to him, and other considerations which you seemed not to dislike. I am since confirmed in that opinion by discourse of several sober persons of quality who have honoured me with their company since I came into the country, who tell me they would have contributed most cheerfully to a tax of 500,000l. to be paid in 12 months for the building of 20 ships, and expected no less to be granted this last sessions. This last week our fears were renewed by a general report that a proclamation was coming for a dissolution, which I left his Majesty and most of his great officers of state much averse to. If there be a tendency to any such purpose, let me have the honour of two lines from you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, No. 209.]
Dec. 13.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These three days since my last, it blows hard, and, though at least 100 outward-bound ships are in the Downs, no harm has been done or ship broke loose. The Dutch East India, West India and Straits fleets are yet in the Downs. The Mary Rose is hourly expected. A topsail gale at W. and by S. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Dec. 13.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came into the Downs the Kitchen yacht from Dungeness. Wind S.W., blowing very hard. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Dec. 13.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. This morning the Calais packet-boat ventured to sea with a very hard gale at W.S.W., but the Nieuport mail remains here still, the packet-boats being all on the other side, and, till the wind abates, we cannot expect them. Sir B. Gascon has been here three days waiting for his passage to Calais, his horses remaining still on board, and dares not venture over. He has hired a vessel to carry himself and servants, six horses and a chariot. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Dec. 13. Warrant to the Commissaries General of the Musters to pass Capt. Skelton, going as Envoy Extraordinary to Germany, with his three men, and Mr. Haward, his ensign, on the musters during their absence or till further order. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 18.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley for the appointment of Thomas Culpeper as engineer in the Ordnance office, with a salary of 100l. per annum. [Ibid. p. 19.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Royal assent to and confirmation of the election of Henry, Bishop of Oxford, to be Bishop of London. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 19.]
Dec. 14.
Poltimore.
Sir Coplestone Bampfylde to Williamson. Reminding him of a little concern between Steare and Sweetland, the latter of whom had killed a boy and all his goods were seized, and desiring that he would get for Steare the execution or two Sweetland had against him for 60 odd pounds. The bearer will fully inform him of the business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 1.]
Dec. 14.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. The winds blow so hard westerly that our boats cannot get out of the Maes from the Brill, the bar being so shallow, but, I believe, if they had the same liberty to go to Helvoetsluys as formerly, we might save some voyages, that port being deep water. It is possible there may be more passengers from the Brill, but the mail oftener misses. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Dec. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind continuing westerly hinders the arrival of our packet-boats, all of them being now absent. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Dec. 14.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Even now the Mary Rose arrived from the Straits. Yesterday came an order to me from the Duke of Monmouth to take out the horses, a present from the King of Spain to his Majesty. There were seven, but one is dead. They speak nothing but what the captain sent from Plymouth. It blows very fresh at S. and by W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 4.]
Dec. 14.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The wind continues at S.W. and keeps the Dutch East India ships still here, with about 200 more English merchantmen outward-bound, and many ships come in from the westward, among them the Mary Rose. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Dec. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Some days since I advised that an Ostend privateer had seized a small French vessel, which afterwards the master redeemed for a sum he borrowed here, and going with her to Havre, another Ostend privateer took her again, and, as they were carrying her to Ostend they were met by two small French privateers, who took both the prize and the man-of-war. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Dec. 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. One ship is arrived this evening, but, it being a great storm, no boat can go on board. She is reported to be a Yarmouth ship for West Indies. [Ibid. No. 7.] Perhaps enclosed,
Particulars of a ship arrived there on the 11th. [Ibid. No. 7 i.]
Dec. 14. Congé d'clire to the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Oxford, and letter missive in favour of Dr. Fell, Dean of Christ Church. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 20.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the restitution of temporalities to Dr. Compton, Bishop of London, to commence from the death of Dr. Henchman, the late bishop. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The examination of Eleanor Bourne taken before Secretary Williamson. Denying that she ever said to Mr. Stisted or any one else that she had ever heard that the Duchess of Portsmouth had said to the Queen or to any of the Queen's servants or to any one else, that she, the Duchess, was as much the King's wife or as much married to the King as the Queen was, save that it was not done by a bishop, or words to that effect, nor did she ever hear any such thing said by anybody else. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 8.]
Dec. 15.
Eastwell.
The Earl of Winchilsea to Williamson. I am not out of heart, though no ambassador except myself has escaped receiving some marks of his Majesty's favour, and been placed in some offices or near his person. I cannot be thought to have comported myself ill in my embassy, since I have had two letters under his Majesty's hand approving my services in that forlorn hope of embassies I had amongst the barbarians, which all knew to be full of danger of the plague and other misfortunes, yet, though I lost a daughter there of the pestilence in my house, and the marriage of my eldest son, who was also slain in the King's service, and, though none can say that I ever refused any hazard for his Majesty's service, I have been yet forgot, as if either I had deserved ill, or at least to have been buried in silence. However the Turkey Company gave me their thanks and a present of 800l. at my return. I then spent some thousands of pounds more than I need have done to keep up his Majesty's reputation there, without bringing any bills or desiring repayment. I have not had either bed or chair of state there as was usual, nor so much as the King's and Queen's pictures so long promised me. However I have since my return done the King all the duty and service in my power, and will do it whilst I live, and have been at great expenses since for his service, both in attending several Parliaments and on other occasions. I am grown now melancholy and not so healthful as I was, and I must live closer to pay my debts and provide for my poor children. Whatever becomes of me, I have the same zeal for the King.
When his Majesty was restored, there were few of my quality and age that had reason to have hoped more than I. Hope is a good breakfast, a tolerable dinner, but a very bad supper, as Lord Bacon used to say. I hope I have not gone backward since, though many others have been preferred before me. I must beg you to put the King in mind of me sometimes, for I am sure he is equally good to all his old servants, and I have, since Lord Southampton's death, had no friend that would remember me, and I am bad at remembering myself. In case his Majesty would employ me in some warm country, I might probably yet recover my health and live some years longer to serve him. There is no rough unhewn timber that may not be fashioned into some useful form by a master workman to be serviceable in a great fabric. Sure the King, my master workman, in so great a fabric as his three kingdoms needs not despair altogether of his old servant.
You promised me your favour and assistance when anything might offer itself. I take this occasion to remind you by the bearer, Sir Theodore de Vaux, whom I pray credit in my name, when he may have an occasion to wait on you. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 9.]
Dec. 15.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Just now arrived here the Thomas and Mary of this place in two days from Morlaix with lockrams, the usual loading from that port. She came out in company with some others, and off Torbay an Ostender of six guns boarded them, making bold with a little of their provision, and rifleing a French boy, a passenger. The soldiers are most quartered in Corwall (Cornouaille), none in Morlaix; only a little trouble upon them for killing a corporal by some unknown persons in the town. There happened a rencontre between the Marquis Uxsade and an Irishman, a commander in that King's army, the latter having the best of it, the other receiving some wounds, hardly escaping with his life. At Bordeaux the soldiery keep the place, and have demolished a church, and some part of the town, that the castle may have the better command of them. They now pay their taxes quietly, but cannot be said willingly. They have deputed some of their choice persons to present before the King, if it may be to mitigate something of his displeasure towards them. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell, Recorder, and the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex to reprieve Robert Trott, condemned for robbing Thomas Barnett, a butcher, till the next sessions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 147.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir John Holmes, in reversion after Sir Robert Holmes, of the offices of governor and captain of the Isle of Wight, of governor of Carisbrook and all other castles in the island, and of steward, surveyor, receiver, and bailiff of all lands &c. there, fee 13s. 6d. a day. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 140.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing Sir John Holmes to be governor of Hurst castle, Hampshire, who is to obey the orders of the King, the Captain General, or Sir Robert Holmes, governor of the Isle of Wight. [Ibid. p. 143.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Certificates that Sir Leoline Jenkins, one of the Ambassadors Extraordinary for the treaty at Nimeguen, and Thomas Chudleigh, secretary to the Embassy for the said treaty, both took leave of his Majesty on Monday the 13th. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, pp. 98, 99.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a contract of 4 Nov., 1641, betwixt the late King and John, Earl of Mar, whereby for 8,000l. sterling due to the said Earl for his resignation of his heritable office of the shirefship of Stirling and other heritable offices, and for the arrears of a pension due to him, the few meals, few farms, caynes, customs and other duties of the lands and lordship of Stirling were let to the said Earl for 25 years from the date thereof, and a ratification by his present Majesty of the said tack, dated 11 June, 1651, and that, notwithstanding, during the years of the late usurped authority, neither the said deceased Earl nor the late deceased Earl John, his son, received any benefit of the said tack, and a ratification dated 26 Oct., 1660, of the said tack and a new tack of the premises to John, Earl of Mar, deceased, for 10 years from the expiration of the former tack; for a new tack to Charles, now Earl of Mar, of the said few meals, &c., for three years after the expiration of the last tack of 10 years, and thereafter till the same be recalled and discharged by his Majesty at the yearly rent of 10 merks Scots. [3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 369.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that the debt of 8,000l. sterling mentioned in the last warrant had been fully paid by the two former tacks therein mentioned, requiring them before delivering the new tack to Charles, Earl of Mar, to receive from him, as representing his father and grandfather, an ample discharge of the said debt. [Ibid. p. 372.]
Dec.15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James Murray, of Philliphaugh, ad vitam ant ad culpam, of the office of sheriff of Selkirkshire. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 374.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James Murray, brother of John Murray of Philliphaugh, deceased, of the ward and non-entry of sundry lands in the shires of Selkirk and Mid Lothian, which pertained before to the said deceased, with the marriage of James, eldest son and apparent heir of the said deceased, and failing him by decease unmarried, the marriage of any other heir male or female of the said deceased. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 375.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection to Sir Joseph Douglas of Pompherstowne, William Fullerstowne of Fullerstowne, James Murray, eldest son of Sir William Murray of Dreghorne, and David Rollo, son of Andrew Rollo, minister at Doneing, for two years respectively, except that to James Murray, which is for six months. [Ibid. p. 376.]
Dec. 15.
The Council Chamber, Dublin.
Proclamation by the Lord Justices and Council, at the request of the trustees appointed for the '49 officers by the commission of 26 Oct. last, calendared ante, p. 364, publishing the tenor of the said commission and that the said trustees have appointed their first sitting to be 3 Feb. next, at the Green Chamber at the Custom house, Dublin, and that they intend to sit there every week, till they have discharged the trust committed to them. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 419.]
Dec. 16.
Wallingford House.
Report by the Lord Treasurer on the reference to him of the petition of Sir Christopher Musgrave, calendared ante, p. 320, that the land called Wolliacks, in the Forest of Inglewood, was demised by the late Queen Mother and her trustees, 17 Sept., 1661, to James Long for two lives at the yearly rent of 3l. 13s. 4d., and that several other parcels of land within the Honour of Penrith were demised by the same persons, 17 June, 1665, to the said Long also for two lives at the yearly rent of 6l. 17s., both which leases have been purchased by the petitioner, and that all the premises are now in jointure to the Queen, who has power to grant estates therein for 31 years or three lives, and that Wolliacks has been valued at 57l. 15s. per annum, and the other parcels at 64l. 8s. per annum above the said rents, but that the valuation of the last parcels is 10l. per annum more than they are now let for, and that an estate for 31 years in reversion therein cannot be valued at above 200l., if so much, and that he is of opinion, that, if his Majesty shall think fit to gratify the petitioner, it may fitly be done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 11.]
Dec. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The weather has been so bad, and the westerly winds so contrary that none of our packet-boats are yet arrived. Last night the wind coming southerly, the weather has proved fair, and another boat is hired to take away the mails and passengers. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Dec. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. We scarce yet know of the great damage the last high winds did, for almost every day on the account of masters as a public notary I protest against the seas, and find the winds more violent in the ocean than in the Channel.
To-day by the Duke of Monmouth's order I fetched six horses out of the Mary Rose. Two of them are a little lamish, being about a month without shoes. They are neat and full of courage. The winds have been so violent the packet-boats from the other side could not come over. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Dec. 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Dec. 16.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Several Frenchmen are now here that were taken about eight days past by an Ostend caper and put ashore near the Land's End. The ship was called the Star, of Havre, of about 70 tons, laden with linen cloth and other goods from Rouen for Dublin. Last Monday was cast away at the Lizard a ship of London of about 100 tons from Bordeaux loaden with chestnuts. All the men were saved save one, and some of the ship and tackle. About the same time I am advised of three or four more cast away on the north coast near Padstow.
The 14th came in the Joan of this place from Alicante. Five more came out in her company, and were separated 20 leagues westward of Scilly, wind S.W., so it is supposed they are gone safe up the Channel. They report that the Argier men-of-war are very thick abroad, and that they had carried in two Yarmouth men on suspicion that the goods belonged to Hollanders, and that the Dutch had sent an ambassador to desire a peace. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 15.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Henry, Earl of Ogle, of the office of governor of Berwick-on-Tweed, in place of William, late Lord Widdrington. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 144.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Order that Daniel Collingwood, appointed commander of Holy Island and Ferne Island, or any other who shall be hereafter captain of the said islands, shall obey the commands of Henry, Earl of Ogle, governor of Berwick. [Ibid. p. 145.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of Albemarle. Whereas John, Earl of Bath, has surrendered his commission of lieutenancy of Devonshire, which he has executed since the death of the late Duke of Albemarle, and we have constituted you lieutenant and custos rotulorum of the said county, our pleasure is that you confirm by your commission all the officers of the militia and the clerk of the peace appointed and commissioned by the said Earl, during the time of his lieutenancy and of his being custos rotulorum in trust for you, and likewise that you take special care that a good correspondence be always kept betwixt the officers and soldiers of the militia under your command and those of the Stannaries of the said county under the command of the said Earl as Lord Warden, in the same manner as it was settled between the late Duke of Albemarle, and the said Earl, the Lieutenant and Governor of the town and citadel of Plymouth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 18.]
Two drafts thereof, one dated the 10th. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 375, Nos. 198, 199.]
Dec. 16. Note that the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland desires that no letters or orders pass concerning the Earl of Anglesey's or Sir G. Carteret's accounts in Ireland, but that the law may take its course. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 19.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 205.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Lloyd praying a grant of a fine levied on Thomas Jones and others of Pembrokeshire for a riot. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 70.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of William Welch, merchant, setting forth that last August the petitioner ordered to be bought at Rotterdam on his account 6 cwt. of salt and two-thirds of 30 pipes of Spanish wine, and ordered the same to be shipped on the Hope of Grange Pans for Riga, where she arrived safe, and the goods were delivered to the petitioner's factor there, that, the war between Sweden and Holland being newly published there, the Swedes caused a seizure to be made of all the effects of the Hollanders, and under pretence thereof seized the petitioner's said goods, and that, notwithstanding that the petitioner's factor and the master of the said ship have demanded the same as English goods, and though sufficient proof thereof was tendered, the same are refused to be delivered: That Mr. Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for his Majesty's signature to the King of Sweden, effectually recommending the restitution of the said goods, and that the petitioner may receive satisfaction for his damages by reason of the undue capture and detention of the same. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 16.]
Dec. 17.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. Sir Gabriel Silvius having applied to the Lord Treasurer that 100l. paid to him in Holland by Alderman Backwell for the releasing of several prisoners of war may be inserted in the Privy Seal he is now passing in your office, that the Alderman may be enabled to pass his account and save the charges of a Privy Seal for the 100l., his Lordship has commanded me to write to you that such a clause may be inserted. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Dec. 17.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. As the bearer, his brother Henry Bodham, has a considerable debt of six or seven years standing due from Benjamin Scott, a merchant of Barbados, requesting Williamson to give his letter of recommendation to the governor of the island to further his agent in the readiest way to recover his right. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing particulars of a ship arrived. [Ibid. No. 19.] Enclosed,
The said particulars. [Ibid. No. 19 i.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Samuel Morland, praying a new lease of the great building at Vauxhall without the clause of reassumption and with leave to build on the waste. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 70.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Pass for Sir Leoline Jenkins with his servants &c. to pass into Holland. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 99.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrants to the Keeper of the Gatehouse to receive and detain in custody Edward Stysted, who is accused of uttering several false and seditious speeches in affront and dishonour to his Majesty's government, and to John Potts, messenger, to deliver him to the said Keeper. [Ibid. p. 99.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Approbation of Samuel Machin to be town clerk of Newcastleunder-Lyme. Minute. [Ibid. p. 100.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Whereas proposals were made between Thomas Rayner of St. Giles in the Fields, cornchandler, and Martha Randall, touching a marriage between Christopher, the son of the said Rayner, and Martha Browne, daughter of the said Randall, and the parties seemed to agree to the proposals, but, before the agreement could be perfected, the said Christopher and Martha Browne intermarried without the knowledge of Martha the mother, and the said Christopher and Martha, his wife, with the said Thomas Rayner have by their petition stated they are liable to the penalty of a statute of 4 and 5 Phil. and Mary, the said Martha Rayner being under the age of 16 at the time of the said marriage, and prayed for a pardon to themselves and to William Slater, D.D., Thomas Rhodes, John Anderson, and Sarah Rayner, who were present at the said marriage:—warrant for a pardon to all the said seven persons as prayed in the petition. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, No. 100.]
Note of the above pardon and of the names of the persons pardoned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 20.]
Dec. 18. Ann Cole to Williamson. As his poor pensioner entreating his sufferance where she may wait on him. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Dec. 18.
Wimborne.
Nicholas Taylour to Williamson. Your favour in procuring my dispensation from the Bishop of Winton for my absence from a small vicarage has put me on this petition that you would appear my friend that I may be the successor of Mr. Crutch, minister of Hinton Martell in Dorset, the presentation being on his death in his Majesty's gift, and consequently, as I hear, in the Lord Keepers. I have written to Dr. Lamplugh concerning the same business. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Dec. 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats which sailed from the Brill last Monday landed the mail and passengers on Thursday at Southwold, among whom was a lady with six or seven attendants, who, they say, was related to the Duchess of York. The master of this packet-boat says they have had very bad weather. The weather is fair and the wind still westerly. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Dec. 18.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. Requesting him to befriend him in obtaining the collectorship of Exeter, the collector having died last Wednesday or Thursday. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Dec. 18.
Bristol.
Sir Robert Cann, Mayor, to Williamson. The Port Morant Merchant from Jamaica was cast away last Tuesday within three leagues of this port, and the captain, master, and other of the mariners to the number of 14 were drowned. One of the mates being saved brought me the enclosed desiring me to give it conveyance. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Dec. 18.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. Giving an account of the wreck of the Port Morant Merchant. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Dec. 18.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. An opportunity offers, wherein you may oblige many of your friends, nor shall it be without a grateful acknowledgement by a handsome present for the favour. Mr. Simon Lloyd, the incumbent of the sinecure of Llannynis in Denbighshire, is lately dead. It is in the diocese of Bangor, where I am Chancellor. It is the custom in this diocese that the Archbishop has the first sinecure in his gift that falls after the instalment of a new bishop. Now this is the first. The person you are desired to move for is John Higginbotom, M.A., chaplain to Sir G. Shakerley in this castle, an ingenious civil man and a good preacher, and very right both in doctrine and life. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 27.]
Dec. 19.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Since my last there has been a very great storm, but the ships have ridden it out very well. In the night came in two French sloops, but this morning one of them broke away from his anchor and is gone for Sandwich haven, but we cannot tell yet whether he is ashore, but by the next post you shall have a fuller and truer account. Also to-day came in the English John from Barbados, but the master cannot give any account of what the Indians have done since my last news. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Dec. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. There has been severe blowing weather most of last week. We are told the Mary Rose from the Straits is gone by to the Downs. The enclosed has been recommended to me by the Duke of Monmouth for Capt. Coppow, the commander of the Mary Rose, who brought his Majesty a present of Spanish horses, supposing she had come in here, therefore pray give it to the Secretary or to his Grace himself. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Dec. 19.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wishing him a merry Christmas. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 30.]
[Dec. ?] The Mayor and capital burgesses of Tiverton to the King. Petition showing that the borough is a very poor place, in consequence of several fires by which it has been twice totally destroyed, and a third time greatly laid waste, that, there having always a market there every Monday, the inhabitants during the late troubles were persuaded that God's heavy judgement was on them for profaning the Lord's day by preparing for the Monday's market, and petitioned the late usurper to grant them a new charter, altering the market from Monday to Tuesday, which was done and so continued ever since, which has proved more convenient, and the greater part of the profits of the market has been set apart for the relief of the poor, but that lately several persons, taking advantage of the invalidity of the said new charter refuse to pay tolls and other dues, and therefore praying for a charter altering the market from Monday to Tuesday with such other alterations and privileges as may seem meet. At the side,
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 73.]
Dec. 20.
9 a.m. Greenwich. on board the Charles yacht.
Sir Leoline Jenkins to Williamson. Wind S.W. We are just setting sail, but have no hopes to get further than the Buoys in the Oaze Edge to-night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 32.]
Dec. 20.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. This week came in a small vessel of this port from Alicante. Going in there she was chased by a Turk two hours, but was preserved by two English merchantmen near her of some force. A small vessel with provisions for Scilly is here waiting for a wind. Sixteen or seventeen others are detained by cross winds. Several vessels are laden out of this port with corn for the Canaries, Holland, &c., yet corn is at a very ordinary price. Wind S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Dec. 20.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. By a vessel arrived last Saturday from Coombe, we are informed of a Londoner from Lisbon put into Watermouth within two miles of Coombe, which lost her cables and anchors in the storm, being bound for Bristol. She reports of another Londoner, also from Lisbon, being lost at sea four days before, the men being saved by another vessel, and that three great vessels are driven under Lundy Island, one a great Dutchman, but what the others are is not known, but all are supposed to be strangers, and ride there at anchor till the storm be over. About ten miles hence some casks of tallow and rugs are come ashore, which gives a suspicion of some rich vessel being cast away. Some vessels arrived at Barnstaple from market report they were in company of 60 French Bankers with four men-of-war, their convoy, who met with a fleet of Spaniards that took all the Bankers, but how true we cannot certainly learn. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Sidney Sussex College. Recommending Richard Lake, M.A., of that College for the first vacant foundation Fellowship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 20.]
Dec. 20. Licence to Roger Price to travel for three years. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 101.]
Dec. 20. Privy Seal for 300l. to Sir Gabriel Silvius, going as Envoy Extraordinary to Holland, with a clause for discharging Alderman Backwell of 100l. paid by him to the said Sir G. Silvius in Holland, in pursuance of the Lord Treasurer's directions for releasing several prisoners of war. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 20.
The Council Chamber, Dublin.
Proclamation by the Lords Justices and Council, after reciting that his Majesty has granted a warrant for a grant or demise of all his revenue in Ireland to Sir James Shaen, Sir William Petty, William Hill, William Ryder, Robert Gorges, Thomas Hoare, Francis Soane, William Muschamp, Edward Richbell, Stanhop Mill, Lawrence Stanion, and William Hanway for seven years from next Christmas and has also directed by like warrant a commission to be passed under the Great Seal of England, to appoint the persons therein named to be Chief Commissioners of the Revenue of Ireland to prevent any loss or damage which may happen before the passing of the said intended grant, and that the said commission with the said annexed warrant may not arrive soon enough from England for the said commissioners to settle the officers that will be necessary to be appointed for managing the revenue from Christmas next, appointing five of the said commissioners, being those now in residing in Ireland, to be commissioners of the revenue till the arrival of the said commission from England, and empowering them in the meantime to appoint such officers as they shall think fit for receiving and managing the revenue from Christmas next, till further course be taken therein by the said commissioners after the arrival of the said commission. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 422.]
Dec. 21. Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, who has been his footman for almost three years. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 35.]
Dec. 21.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. Since my coming hither the short days and violent stormy weather have kept me at home, and others from coming, so I can give you little account of affairs in these parts. I should not have so often moved his Majesty and his Royal Highness about the condition of Carlisle, if I did not suppose the King and kingdom's service much concerned therein, and I shall never put into the balance with these my own particular advantage. It is high time somewhat were resolved. I beseech you put his Highness in mind to move his Majesty in it. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Dec. 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news here, for the high winds at S.W. have kept several vessels of the place coming from Holland. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Dec. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind is now southerly, yet none of our packet-boats have arrived. Weather dark and rainy. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Dec. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. We have had nothing but sad storms this week. No shipping can stir. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Dec. 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Only two ships have arrived since my last. The weather has been for about eight days very tempestuous. We have advice of an Ostend ship laden with chesnuts cast away at Bude Bay near the Earl of Bath's house, and of another cast away on Scilly, a big ship. All the men were drowned but four. We also have advice that much wreck is seen floating near Falmouth. [Ibid. No. 40.] Enclosed,
List of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 40i.]
Dec. 21.
Milford.
John Powell to James Hickes. Shipping news. The weather continues very bad with high winds. Just now comes the news of two considerable vessels cast away near this, one from the Canaries, the men all saved, the other driven upon the rocks and broken in pieces, the men and goods all lost. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a new grant to Sir Edmund Wyndham for his life of the offices of Knight Marshal and Marshal of the Marshalsea on his surrender of the former letters patent to him of 1 Oct., 1667. [Precedents 1, f. 124.]
[Dec. 21. ?] An account of the value of all the gold and silver bullion coined in the Mint from 20 Dec., 1648, to 21 Dec., 1675, with the yearly medium thereof.
Coined. Gold. Silver. Total Value. Yearly Medium.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
From 20 Dec., 1648, to 21 June, 1660, being 11½ years 94,100 4 0 204,353 9 8 298,453 13 8 25,952 9 1
From 20 June, 1660, to 21 Dec., 1666, being 6½ years. 234,401 2 4 173,929 17 6 408,330 19 10 62,820 3 0
Since the late Act for encouring of coinage.
From 20 Dec., 1666, to 21 Dec., 1667. 111,756 13 2 5/12 53,385 12 4 165,142 5 6 5/12 242,115 4
From 20 Dec., 1667, to 21 Dec., 1668. 211,851 7 9 4/12 122,707 14 4 334,559 4 1 4/12
From 20 Dec., 1668, to 21 Dec., 1669. 114,921 2 6 4/12 46,397 11 5 161,318 13 11 4/12
From 20 Dec., 1669, to 21 Dec., 1670. 111,976 16 0 4/12 132,580 0 6 244,556 16 6 4/12
From 20 Dec., 1670, to 21 Dec., 1671. 184,836 7 21/8 124,171 4 8 6/8 309,007 11 107/8
From 20 Dec., 1671, to 21 Dec., 1672. 82,749 3 87/8 273,989 11 85/8 356,738 15
From 20 Dec., 1672, to 21 Dec., 1673. 121,095 8 304,929 12 426,025 1
From 20 Dec., 1673, to 21 Dec., 1674. 83,371 1 21/8 41,187 11 124,558 12 65/8
From 20 Dec., 1674, to 21 Dec., 1675. 51,375 16 5,754 3 57,130 0
Total of the nine years 1,073,933 16 10 7/24; 1,105,103 4 67/8 2,179,037 1 5 2/12;
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376 No. 42.]
Dec. 22.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. No news, most ships being laid up, and these winds hinder the return of those that are abroad, two or three at most in a week passing by to the northward. We hear of a ship of this town laden with wines lost upon the French coast. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Dec. 22.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last night came in here a packet-boat from Holland. The passengers report several vessels lost on that coast, some laden with corn, others from Bordeaux with wines. We have not in the least suffered by these winds either in our ships or goods. The master and four men of a Newcastle ship at anchor in our Roads came ashore in their boat to get two carpenters here to help them in some work aboard. They having got two towards evening put off to go aboard, but, the wind blowing hard, they could not fetch their ship, and are all given up for lost. We are well stored with speeches and votes, as the Earl of Shaftesbury's, the Duke of Buckingham's, Sir John Holland's and the Test, so that no endeavours are wanting to make the Court odious to the people, and all men being dissatisfied are too credulous, so that now but to accuse is sufficient to condemn. The want of your Letters of Intelligence and Gazettes to pleasure others makes me more barren to serve you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 44.]
Dec. 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About daybreak this morning the Dutch ships fired near 100 guns, which alarmed our inhabitants, most people concluding they were in great dangers, but at last we understood it was their New Year's Day.
Many knights and very great gentlemen are making their interest in all our port towns to get to be Parliament men, for now all the discourse is that his Majesty intends to call a new Parliament. Knights for the shire are busy making their party, and this is done publicly, which makes everybody believe that suddenly his Majesty will issue writs for that purpose.
This morning the Calais packet-boat came into the Downs with divers passengers, but not any news, unless it be about the great loss of shipping they hear of there.
Not a boat from any ship these three days, but now more moderate weather, more than a topsail gale at S. and S. and by E., and some few boats ashore. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Dec. 22
and 23.
Extract from the journal of Captain William Faseby, commander of the Charles yacht in his voyage to Holland with Sir L. Jenkins. 22 Dec. about 12 or 1 we came into the Maes, where a Holland man-of-war saluted us with five guns with his pendant flying, and we fired two shot to make him strike it. At the second he struck and saluted us with five more guns, as likewise the men-of-war at the Brill saluted us with their pendants struck, and about 3 or 4 p.m. we arrived at Rotterdam. The 23rd about 9, the Ambassador went ashore, they saluting him with several guns. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Gilbert Talbot, Master of the Jewel House, desiring that he may contract for 435l. 1d. per annum of fee-farm rents in Yorkshire and Cumberland in reversion after the Queen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 70.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Proclamation touching passes and sea-briefs. In consequence of the evils caused by employing the passes or sea-briefs granted for securing the vessels of subjects trading to the Mediterranean for protecting foreign ships, declaring that no pass or sea-brief dated before or since 1 Jan. last shall remain in force any longer than 1 May next, and that other passes in the form now established shall on demand and without charge be delivered by the Secretary of the Admiralty to the parties interested on their giving security for delivering up their former passes within 6 months after receiving the new ones, and further declaring that no pass or sea-brief hereafter granted (save where the ships shall be bound to Guinea or the East or West Indies) shall remain in force longer than one year from the date thereof, and that all passes and sea-briefs henceforth to be granted for ships trading to the Mediterranean shall be printed in the same form wherein they were issued by the Duke of York, when Lord High Admiral, with the day, month and year of the date in words at length and not in figures, passes or sea-briefs produced after the said 1 May next in any other form to be void. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 341.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 47.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Proclamation. After reciting that by the late peace between his Majesty and the government of Algiers, his Majesty agreed that none of his subjects on any English vessel should for the future be taken and sold as slaves or their goods made prize by any subjects of Algiers, and also that any of his subjects on foreign ships as passengers only and having authentic passports testifying the same should have the like freedom for their persons and goods, and that divers subjects conceal the ships of foreigners, with whom the government of Algiers is at war, by either wholly navigating such ships or serving in the same as mariners or soldiers, which gives just cause of complaint from the said government, and will endanger the security intended for the ships, persons and estates of his subjects; forbidding all subjects to navigate vessels of foreigners at war with the said government or to serve thereon, and declaring that, if any such be taken, his Majesty will not require any release of their persons or estates from the said government, and that they must expect to be excluded from the benefit of the said articles. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 342.]
Dec. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind at last getting southerly, one of our packet-boats left the Brill yesterday and was here by noon, but I can hear no news. Sir Anthony Deane was last Tuesday sworn our mayor here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 48.]
Dec. 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Dec. 23.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the Concord of London in 14 days from Lisbon. She came thence alone and met with no ships, but much foul weather. She has on board the body of Mr. Coulson, an English merchant, that lived there several years, and had got an estate of 15 or 16 thousand pounds sterling. He was resolved to home in this ship, and had settled all his estate accordingly, and made his will, in which he gave only 2,000l. a piece to his two sisters, and all the rest of his estate to the poor of the parish where he was born, which is some parish in Bristol. He also had taken leave of all his friends and English merchants for several days together, but man appoints and God disappoints, for, as he was at the water-side, taking boat to go on board, Hutchison, an Englishman, that lives there, came and privately stabbed him with a knife, and so ran to the church. He lived five or six hours after, and so died to the great trouble of all his friends. His body is now embalmed on board this ship, and they say the King will have justice done to the fellow though he ran to sanctuary.
We have had very tempestuous weather for several days, the wind most at S., which has occasioned, as we hear, several wrecks about the Lizard, as appears by several pieces of timber and chests coming ashore, some China oranges and musical instruments, by which they judge it to be some ship from Lisbon, and some report it to be the Charles of London, but no certainty. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Dec. 23.
Beaminster.
Verdict of an Inquisition holden in return to a writ of ad quod damnum, concerning a proposed grant to George Penne and his heirs of a fair to be held from 18 to 25 May in every year at Tollar Wilme Downes, in the parish of Corscombe, Dorset, that such a grant would not be to the prejudice of the King or of any one else or of any other fair or market. Prefixed is the said writ dated 8 Dec. [Law Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 51.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant, after reciting the letter of 25 Aug. last, calendared ante, p. 272, for raising 1,000 foot, 200 whereof were to be added in two companies to the Regiment of Guards, and the rest formed into a regiment to be commanded by Major-General Sir George Monro and also for raising three troops of horse, and a letter of the 11th instant from the Treasury Commissioners of the state of the revenue and the late supply, making it appear that the new levied troops cannot long be maintained without an extraordinary burden to the people; authorizing and requiring them with all possible speed to give orders for disbanding the said foot regiment and the said three troops except 100 men to be chosen out of the several companies, which are to be formed into a new company and added to the regiment of Guards, and who are to be distributed amongst the companies of the Earl of Linlithgow's regiment, till they be formed into a new company, and further to give the necessary orders for their rendezvous at the times and places of their disbanding, to appoint all musters to be carefully looked after at their disbanding, and to take care that the arms of the said regiment be delivered and laid up again in Edinburgh Castle. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 377.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. After reciting the last letter, authorizing and requiring them to use all possible diligence in causing the said regiment and troops to be fully paid the allowances granted them in their establishment at the times and places appointed for their disbanding, and they are to take special care that the country be completely paid all just accounts due to them for quarterings, corn, &c., and returning them a new commission for auditing their accounts.—
As to the finishing of Holyrood House, we approve of the finishing of it. You shall therefore make an estimate of the charge of it, and we will send you a warrant for the same. In the meantime you are presently to cut off all unnecessary allowances and expenses, that it may be finished with the least possible charge. [Ibid. p. 379.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission appointing 13 persons therein named commissioners to audit the accounts of the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland from August 1671, the time of the last fitted account, to 1 August, 1675. [2½ pages. Ibid. p. 380.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Consent by the Duke of Monmouth that Thomas Chapman, B.A. of Pembroke Hall, who has been given the direction of a school at Gilsborough, Northants, for the holding whereof it is requisite he should be an M.A., and desires his Majesty's dispensation, as he wants a year for taking his degree according to the Statutes, apply himself to the Secretaries of State for obtaining his Majesty's letters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 52.]
Dec. 24.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. We have advice from the westward that much wreck is seen floating on the coast, and that a Dutch ship, laden with lemons and oranges, is cast away upon the Lizard. [Ibid. No. 53.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 53 i.]
Dec. 24.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have news of a small vessel of Falmouth that in her voyage to Alicante with pilchards was, 30 Sept. last, taken by a Turks man-of-war and carried into Sallee with 8 men and boys, who are now there in slavery. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Dec. 24.
Milford.
John Powell to James Hickes. The Providence of Southampton from Alicante with fruit was by contrary winds driven into this harbour, where she lay one night in much danger, but is since by the help of boats brought into safety not without some damage. Last Monday near this harbour was cast away the Rose of Helford from the Canaries. The men were all saved and about 20 pipes of Canary wine. Much wreck comes daily ashore in those parts, and the wind and weather continue very violent. The Tangier frigate I formerly gave you an account of, is still in port waiting for a fair wind for London. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Dec. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have no tidings of two of our packet-boats, which should have been in course before that which came in last Thursday. Wind continues southerly. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Dec. 25.
Bristol.
Certificate by Sir Robert Cann, Mayor, and four Aldermen of Bristol, that the thirty mariners lately taken by the Turks in the ship Bristol Merchant, landed at Cape Bon and thence sent to Tripoli, are inhabitants of the city, and have left their poor families in great destitution and quite unable to redeem them; given in order to their obtaining assistance towards their redemption. [Ibid. No. 57.] Annexed,
List of the names of the above captive seamen, with the numbers of their families. [Ibid. No. 57i.]
Dec. 26. H[erbert] A[ubrey] to his brother, Herbert Westfaling. The private fire, which has been so cunningly hid and stifled all this while, is now broke out into an open flame, and the close designing party, as if they were infallibly assured of a Parliament to be dissolved and a new one chosen and their men and interest invincible, have already cantoned out the employments of the members for an ensuing Parliament. After the cabal had met at Stoke, they went to Croft, and attempted to secure the Bishop, and have done it effectually against them, for, after they told him what persons they judged fit to serve, he told them he was far from being for them, and that he must and would be against them. The names of those they hold fit to serve are:—for the County, Lord Scudamore and Sir Edward Harley; for Hereford, Mr. Gregory and Mr. Foley; for Leominster, Sir Herbert Croft and Mr. James Pitt; for Weobly, Col. Birch and Mr. Baskervile of Eardisley. Sir Herbert Croft, seeing so partial proceedings, secured his neighbours first at home, and came last Monday to Hereford. On Tuesday he went to Ho[l]m, and there met Sir E. Harley and Mr. Gregory, who have engaged my Lord so far that Sir Herbert could not get any satisfactory answer from him, though he made as friendly a tender of his service as was imaginable. This proving ineffectual, he returned to Hereford, to which he had sent to several gentlemen to come. Six deputy lieutenants and four other justices were present. The resolves of all were, that all gentlemen secure their interests, till it appear that the new members are to be chosen, and the gentlemen of the country to design who shall serve. This method dislikes Sir Edward, who has complained at Croft of Sir Herbert's intent to exclude him, and would fain come in now at Leominster, but that is unlikely, nor is he willing that Lord Scudamore should depend on the gentry (which, if he do not, he will hazard a shock) but owns he is engaged and will serve him. Thus you see what is the design of those that do not love the Church, and, I fear, are not well pleased with the present State. An essay of the first appeared on oath to us at our meeting. Tom. Broad being examined proved that Mr. Hopkins, Mr. Foley's chaplain, said, Mr. Westfaling should not serve for Hereford, nor Sir John Barneby nor Sir Thomas Williams for Weobly, that the Bishops should be excluded, that they were a dead weight, and that, whenever they gave their voices for themselves or by proxies, for the most part they were on the Crown side. This examination is taken before seven Justices, six of whom subscribed a warrant for Mr. Hopkins' apprehension, but it was not executed, but a letter was sent him to appear, which he did, and promised to find sureties to appear at the assizes and to be of good behaviour. He has not yet performed what he promised, and, I believe, the warrant must go out yet. You see what is designed, and how far the design is likely to be frustrated. No labour of mine shall be wanting to put a stop to the endeavours of those, who, I am confident, would disturb the government. Communicate this to all your good friends in London, and desire them to send down to secure their friends, that they be not drawn away. Tell Ned Cornewall I have had no letter from him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 58.]
Dec. 26.
Oxford.
Francois de la Motte to Williamson. Thanking him effusively for the five pieces he has sent him by the Bishop of Lincoln, adding that he reads English passably and understands books, and that he is even given ground to hope that he will pronounce it well enough for the chair. [French. Ibid. No. 59.]
Dec. 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The violent winds continue at S.S.E., and the seas swell so much that it is very dangerous to go off, though some vessels have made wafts, some broke one cable, and others received inconsiderable damage. The East India English ships now here ride in or near Margate Road, and have smooth water there, and several other merchantmen are with them. The Dutch East India ships yet in the Downs ride it out. Of English and foreigners there are above 120 sail, yet not one ship broke loose. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Dec. [2]6.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came in a mail from Flanders in a storm at S.E., which has been very extreme, but notwithstanding the great fleet in the Downs all ride well. Many ships come in, but we cannot give account of what they are till the storm is over.
Postscript.—Since I wrote, a Dutch man-of-war of about 30 or 40 guns is come in. [Dated 6 Dec., but there is another letter of Lodge's of that date, and the postmark on this is 27 Dec. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 61.]
Dec. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.E. We continue to have very stormy weather, which has been for many days past, but do not hear on this coast of any sea losses this whole winter. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Dec. 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. All along the coast to the westward both on the south and north we hear of several ships cast away, in Mount's Bay five or six rudders being driven ashore, it not being known what ships they come from, no men being saved. Several are cast away near Padstow, the Land's End and near Falmouth, so that the sea is full of wrecks. Here yesterday three ships were cast away to the westward of the Royal Citadel, one a Dutchman laden with salt, one of Hull from Bordeaux with wine and brandy, and the other a Dover Dunkirk ship. Five ships are arrived in Catwater to-day, it being a storm we know not what they are. We daily expect to hear of more wrecks. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Dec. 26.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The ships I wrote of last continue here still, the weather having been a long time very stormy, which has occasioned, they say, several wrecks. Wednesday came in the Concord of London, after much hazard from Lisbon, and three or four on Thursday, the Alicante Merchant, of Plymouth with fruits, which lost her rudder off Scilly and was like to be cast away at the Lizard, but was by wonderful Providence preserved, being cast off the rocks by the sea, the tide being ebb, one Ousley of Plymouth from the Canaries and one from Bordeaux, which gives a sad relation of the continual barbarousness of the soldiers there. Last night came in a great vessel from the Canaries, which came out with several others, but they were dispersed by the storms. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Dec. 27. Sir R. Franklin to Williamson. I received the six dozen of as good wine as I dare say ever was drunk. Brother Kit, your gossip, my wife and I, who are much your servants, daily drink your good health, of which I hope you find the good effect. May you be as well and happy as I wish. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Dec. 27.
Moore.
Sir Christopher Musgrave to [Williamson]. Your commands were no sooner received than communicated to Mr. Knatchbull, the Lord Chancellor's secretary, who, I hope, by your interposing, will be prevailed on not to commissionate Aglionby, that has been branded by the King and Council, nor that my father's recommendation shall bring a disgrace upon Mr. Skelton and Mr. Browham (Brougham) by turning them out of commission. I perceive it has been insinuated they are not qualified. I am certain my father will answer the point to his Majesty, when a fit season offers. I am well assured you will move the Duke in my particular. The Chapter at Carlisle meeting in January, you will please to settle Mr. Ardrey in his prebend. I have sent the order of Council relating to Aglionby. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 66.]
Dec. 27.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day we have a very violent storm at S. and by E. Some ships are forced from their anchors, and are making for Ramsgate Pier, and several drive, especially two of the greatest of the Dutch East India ships, whose anchors came home to the great fear of what might happen thereby. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Dec. 27.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. I have nothing of late to acquaint you with but the continued storms we have had, which still continue, by means whereof it is supposed there may be several wrecks. [Ibid. No. 68.] Enclosed,
John Jeffery to Hugh Acland. Yesterday and Friday were cast away in our bay nine ships, some belonging to Apson (Topsham), some to Foy, some to the Allawaite (Isle of Wight) and some to Hull. 26 Dec. Marazion. [Fragment. Ibid. No. 68 i.]
Dec. 27.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 23rd came in the Alicante Merchant of Plymouth from Alicante. Four more came out with her, which she lost 10 days before she came in. After she came into the Channel, she had a cruel storm, wind S., in which she lost her rudder and received some leaks, so that in much danger she recovered this harbour. There was a certain report there, before they came away, that the people at Madrid had cried "Long live Don John of Austria," and that the King had sent for him to Court, contrary to the Queen's inclination or her party's. They also say that the Dutch are endeavouring by all possible means to make a peace with Argier, and, to induce that government to it, they tell them that the English have now all the trade in the Straits, and that, if they break with them, they cannot want prizes, but for all that they are not inclinable to it. The 27th came in the Providence of London from the Canaries. She says they have made a good vintage, yet wines are very dear, and that many ships were come in laden with corn, which made the price fall much. We hear of many wrecks betwixt this and the Land's End. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Dec. 27. Commission for Theophilus Blechingdon, late ensign to Capt. Charles Middleton, to be ensign to Capt. George Littleton's company of foot in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 148.]
Dec. 27. Commission for Edward Brett to be ensign to Capt. Charles Middleton's company in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
Commission for Timothy Brien to be quarter-master of the Holland regiment commanded by the Earl of Mulgrave. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 19.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Vowell (Fowell) to preserve the game within six miles of Fowell's Combe, parish of Ugbrooke, Devon. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 102.]
Dec. 28.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Friday and Saturday six vessels of this place arrived from Rotterdam. They all speak of violent storms and much shipwreck on the Holland coast. The wind has been eastward of south the last five or six days, with showers, now S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 70.]
Dec. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. After mine last Saturday the two packet-boats which had been so long wanting arrived and the third by noon on Sunday, which left the Brill the day before, but they brought little or no news. Yesterday was very stormy, to-day very calm, but the wind southerly both days. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Dec. 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday happened a violent storm at S.S.E., at least 120 ships being in the Downs. In it four small vessels and a pink broke loose and went to sea, and one more got into Ramsgate pier. There is great care for the five former. In the storm the Dutch East India Admiral's anchors came home, and she drove into the midst of our ships, but did no considerable harm. The boatswain, being very forward and careful, missing his hold tumbled overboard and was drowned. Two Dutch men-of-war came in even now. A topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Dec. 28.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The storm yesterday continued till 12 last night and then abated, and to-day we have very fine weather, and the ships that were forced from their anchors are come into the Downs again to get their anchors and cables. Another Dutch man-of-war came in from the westward which met with very bad weather, so that he was not able to bear sail, but came in with his topmast down. There has been very little damage here. [Ibid No. 73.]
Dec. 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. We have had little else but stormy weather these many days, yet do not know of any sea losses. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Dec. 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. To-day arrived a French man-of-war of 54 guns, which was like to be cast away, but now is got into Catwater. I saw to-day a letter from Mount's Bay giving an account that many of the Bordeaux fleet were cast away there in this storm, so many that the writer could not give an account of the number, the bay being at least 20 miles round. The general discourse in these parts is of wrecks. [Ibid. No. 75.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 75i.]
[Dec. 28?] Account that James Gooden of Sittingbourne and a seaman on that day related that the King was either murdered or desperately wounded by the Duke of York, and that the Duke was fled into France, and that the whole city of London was up in arms, but that they said, when questioned, that they had the relation from two men that came from London that same day, who live at Sandwich or thereabouts, who said it was very true, since they had it from a kinsman of the King's secretary. The said parties would very willingly have pursued those that first related the story, but the constable who had them in custody refused to let them have liberty, and would not pursue them himself. The minister of the parish of Sittingbourne and several others can testify the same. Noted, as received from Mr. George Legg, 1 Jan., 1675–6. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 76.]
Dec. 28. Caveat by desire of Lord Townshend that no grant pass of the bonds alias porthonds forfeited for coals exported till his Lordship have notice. [S.P. Dom., Entry, Book 45, p. 19.]
[Dec. ?] Request by Lord Townshend that the above caveat be entered. [S.P. Dom, Car. II. 376, No. 77.]
Dec. 28.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Shipping news. We have had much stormy weather on this coast. Last Saturday was cast away at Dunourley (Dunworly) Bay eight miles from this a small vessel of Youghal laden with oranges and lemons; all the men saved. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 206.]
[Dec.?] Elizabeth, relict of Thomas, Lord Clifford, to the Queen. Petition showing that the Queen had granted and commanded her trustees to grant (who were also authorized by the King) to Ralph Freeman in trust for the petitioner's husband a reversionary lease for 31 years of the lead mines in the wapentake of Wirksworth, Derbyshire, and the lot and cop there with the office of bar-master, and that he has since died, leaving the petitioner with nine children indifferently provided for, and praying for a further lease of the premises for 40 years after the said 31 years. At the foot,
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Permission from her Majesty for the petitioner to endeavour for the King's authorizing her Majesty's trustees to grant such further term as is petitioned for. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 78.]
Dec. 29.
Bridlington.
[T. Aslaby] to Williamson. We see now and then some small vessels passing, some corn laden for Newcastle and Sunderland, and others coal laden. Wind S.W. and gallant weather for the time of year. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate there. Recommending for the degree of M.A., to be immediately conferred on him, Thomas Chapman, B.A., of Pembroke Hall, who has had the direction of a school granted him at Gilsborough, Northamptonshire, for which he is not qualified, unless he has taken the degree of M.A., for which he wants a year according to the Statutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 21.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, to preserve the game within ten miles of Euston, Suffolk. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 102.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Proclamation ordering the suppression, after 10 Jan. next, of all public coffee-houses, for sale of coffee, chocolate, sherbet or tea, and the withdrawal of their licences, these houses having produced evil consequences from idle and disaffected persons resorting to them, and by leading tradesmen and others to mis-spend their time, and occasioning the spreading of false reports to the defamation of the Government and the disturbance of the peace of the realm. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 343.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 80.]
Dec. 30.
Bobbing Court.
Sir George Moore to Williamson. Yesterday I had notice of two men living at Sandwich that lay the night before at the Swan at Sittingbourne, and reported for a certainty that the King and the Duke of York had a falling out, and that the Duke had stabbed or wounded the King so that he was either dead or dying, and that the Duke was fled into France, and that the whole city of London was up in arms and much more to this purpose. I granted out my warrant for apprehending the master of the house in whose company it was spoken, and who reported it himself the next day, and the two originators of this discourse, but, they being gone on their journey, I have the master of the house ready to bring them forthcoming, when I shall have answer to this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 81.]
Dec. 30.
Egham.
Information of Lambert Barringer, junior, that William Venden of that parish about two months ago killed a hind calf in that parish, and that the informant had helped Venden to carry it to his house. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Dec. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind, what there is, is most westerly. No packet-boat from Holland since my last. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Dec. 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 84.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 84i.]
Dec. 30.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 27th came in the St. Peter of London with nuts from Bordeaux. They report that the soldiers remain there still to the charge of the inhabitants and much to the hindrance of trade. No wines are to be had there, the merchants being afraid to go into the country to buy, and what is in the city the soldiers will [not] let go, so that ships must either come away without freight, or take such goods as they can have. The 29th came in here the Serpent, a French man-of-war of 12 guns, bound for the West Indies on some particular business for the King. The Quaker ketch came in from Tangier. She has been driven away in the last storms as she was cruising off that place. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Dec. 30.
Bristol.
Sir John Knight to Williamson. On behalf of the wives and children of the crew of the Bristol Merchant taken by pirates of Tripoli (see ante, p. 460), begging him to be a means that on a peace with these pirates they may be released, or that such other method may be used for their redemption as shall be thought fit. Two of the poor women are going on behalf of the rest to apply themselves at Whitehall. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Dec. 30.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The storms continue here with much violence, which gives us daily news of vessels being cast away. One of 40 tons, of Bordeaux, bound homewards from the West Indies with tobacco and indigo, was cast away last Saturday in Oxwich Bay, six miles westward of this. The men were saved and part of the loading, besides what the country stole. The men were so feeble, having had no meat for several days, that they were forced to be carried on shore on men's backs. A considerable vessel was cast away betwixt Newport and Bristol, laden with logwood, elephants' teeth, &c., and 14 men were drowned. Some say they were from Guinea, some from Jamaica, bound for London. Near Milford a Canary vessel was cast away, the men saved and part of the goods came ashore. Another vessel near the same place with sherry from Cadiz was cast away and men and goods all lost. Three or four colliers coming from Bridgwater and Minehead to Wales to load coal were cast away on the Welsh Grounds, and one laden collier just by this town was split to pieces, the men of all of them saved. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 87.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Barbara, Countess of Suffolk, praying a lease for 99 years of some Crown lands now in lease for 31 years, without fine, paying the reserved rent from the time of her entering on them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 71.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Ralph Pigot, for a grant of the arrears of hearth money in Cornwall, due at Lady Day and Michaelmas 1663, in the hands of the then sheriffs or high constables, amounting to about 500l. [Ibid.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Certificate by Williamson that Bevill Skelton, appointed Envoyé Extraordinary to the Emperor, took leave of his Majesty the 29th. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 102.]
Dec. 30.
Jersey.
J. Poingd [estre] to Sir T. Morgan, governor of Jersey. I wrote to you not long since on an occasion which seemed favourable to remove the impost on Jersey stockings, but I believe the letter found you not at London, so we were deprived of your assistance.
There is another very pressing cause to renew the trouble we meant to put upon you, for your passports are slighted and our merchants and seamen exceedingly abused by those small picaroons, Ostenders or Biscayners, which are everywhere about us, so that it seems almost impossible to avoid them, as you will see by the testimonials herewith. You are too good a friend to this your government, and too well acquainted with the dishonour to his Majesty and prejudice to his subjects by such barbarous villains, not to be effectually sensible thereof, so I request you in the name of us all to assist Mr. Vice-Chamberlain in the necessary addresses to his Majesty for a fitting and full remedy to this evil. Doubtless he will be moved to any reasonable remedy proposed, the speediness therein is what concerns us most, for our commerce is almost at a stand, our merchants are so disheartened. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 32.]
[Dec. ?] The Commissioners for rebuilding St. Paul's to the King. Petition, they having hitherto in laying the foundations used the old stone only, but being now about to contract for a quantity of new Portland stone for carrying on the work next summer, praying liberty for themselves or those they contract with to raise stone in his Majesty's quarry in the Isle of Portland or elsewhere on his common there, and to bring the same from thence, they paying the same duty as by other quarrymen there has been accustomed.
And, whereas great sums have been expended by the Commissioners both in the former and the late repairs, and in making, maintaining and repairing the piers, cranes and ways thereto for bringing away the stone, which yet by the promiscuous use of them by all persons who send stone from thence, have been so worn out that it has been a perpetual charge to them to repair them, and they are at present so ruinous that it will be a considerable expense to put them in order, the Commissioners have resolved (if it seem good to his Majesty) to put them in good repair and to leave them in the guard of whomsoever they shall contract with to furnish them with stone, they being obliged to maintain them during the contract, and in the meantime to pay yearly 10l. per cent. for all that shall be expended on the present repairs and so in proportion for a less sum or shorter time, and further praying in consideration thereof power to themselves or those they shall contract with to take a reasonable duty, not exceeding 4d. a ton, from all that shall use the said piers, cranes and ways for transporting stone, during the rebuilding of the cathedral, excepting only such stone as shall be brought from thence for his Majesty's own buildings. At the foot,
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of the petitioners, and Further reference to the Lord High Treasurer, his Majesty having been satisfied by the above report as to the point of law, to consider the convenience or inconvenience it may be to his service to gratify the petitioners. 4 Feb., 1675–6. Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 87 a.]
Other copies of both the above references and of the above report. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book46, p. 72 and p. 82.]
[Dec.?] Nicholas Oudart, Latin Secretary, to the King. Petition for a lease of Seawood Park, near Musland, Lancashire, for 99 years at the ancient rent of 4l. a year, now at his Majesty's disposal as appertaining to the Crown of old, the petitioner having faithfully served the Crown since his youth, and being a great sufferer, and being now with his family reduced to very great straits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 88.] Annexed,
Note by Cuthbert Gerard that a lease of Seawood Park at the ancient rent is most proper, because may be the tenants will attorn without suit, if not, a trial by ejectione firmæ will be cheaper than an information and trial after, and it is not secure to proceed by information, the Auditor justifying the rent to have been several times paid to the Crown. The King's right to what is past should be included, that a gain may be had out of the arrears. Endorsed, "Mr. Nicholas Oudart." [Ibid. No. 88 i.]
Note by the same that, if a park be grantable of very good land at a very small rent, the discoverers agree to give the procurer of the grant a third part of the profits of the park, a lease whereof is desired for 31 years. [Ibid. No. 88ii.]
Dec. 31. Reference thereof to the Lord High Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 72.]
Dec. 31. Capt. John Mutlow to Williamson. Lord Craven has commanded me to acquaint you that the King has given orders for James Warde to be ensign to my company. My Lord entreats you to get the commission drawn to-day, as our muster begins to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 89.]
Dec. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. A small pink of London homeward-bound from Bordeaux was forced in by stress of weather. The master reports above 100 sail came out together, all English for several English ports. Foul weather dispersed them. He knows of none that is miscarried. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 90.]
Dec. 31.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The only news here is of wrecks. [Ibid. No. 91.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 91i.]
Dec. 31.
The Quaker ketch, Falmouth.
Thomas Bragg, gunner, and the carpenter and boatswain of the ketch to ———. Giving particulars of their meeting, 11 Nov., a vessel, between Tangier and Rochelle, which hoisted French colours, detained some of their men sent in a boat to her, then hoisted Ostend colours, and ordered the ketch to strike her topsail, and, on the captain's refusing, cut the ensign down without resistance by the captain, who instead of fighting him commanded the topsail to be struck and went aboard their vessel to the great dishonour of the King. [Ibid. No. 92.]
[Dec. 31?] Establishment for pensions for reformed officers and disabled soldiers from 31 Dec., 1675 exclusive, amounting to 3l. 9s. 7¼d. per diem and 1,270l. 5s. 6¼d. per annum, with an additional allowance for one extra day each leap year, with a revocation of the former establishment of 4 Dec., 1674. Sign manual. Countersigned, "Danby," "J. Williamson." [Ibid. No. 93.]
Dec. 31. Commission for Edmond Yarbrough to be lieutenant in Lieut.Col. John Churchill's company in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 148.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Commission to James Warde to be ensign to Captain Mutlow's company in Lord Craven's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 20.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal, granting the 1,095l., which Sir Thomas Samuel in respect of his being made a baronet is obliged to pay, to Lord Cornwallis. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 111.]
Friday morning, Dec. [3, 10, 17, 24, 31]. Anne, Countess Marischal, to Williamson. The Duchess of Portsmouth forgot, when she saw you the day before yesterday, to speak to you of this, which she has desired me to write you of. She had requested his Majesty that on the removes of bishops, the bearer, Mr. Hawkins, the minister of the Tower, might have one of the first preferments, which the King has granted, and bid her let you know it, that a caveat may be entered that none may go before him. He christened the Duke of Richmond, and is a very honest worthy man. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 94.]
Sunday morning, Dec. [5, 12, 19, 26]. E. Delaval to Williamson. The King received my petition last night very graciously, and told me he would read it, and give it you, and that, except a pension, he would do anything in his power for me, but, as for pensions, he was going to take them away. I beg you will remind the King to give you the petition while the business is fresh in his memory, and pray speak a good word or two for me to persuade him I have no design on any timber trees. I desire also you would dispatch my business as soon as you can, that it may come before the Lord Treasurer now, whilst the Duke of Albemarle is in town, who goes away next week, and who, I believe, may prevail with the Lord Treasurer to be my friend. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Dec. Dr. Richard Lee to the Earl of Carlisle. Requesting him to speak to Secretary Williamson, now in Council, in his favour, that he would so report the matter of his petition to the King, that he may have a grant of the deanery of Lincoln, when void by death or otherwise, the deanery being in the diocese where the writer lives, and the dean being four score years old. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 96.]
[Dec.] Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Carlisle. The King approves his nomination of Sir Richard Graham as deputy lieutenant of Cumberland and Westmorland, and Sir John Ballantine as deputy lieutenant of Cumberland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 147.]
Dec.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 376./No. Date. King's. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
97 Dec. 1 2 11 0 W.
98 " 2 2 11 1 W.
99 " 3 2 11 2 W.
100 " 4 2 13 0 W.
101 " 5 2 13 0 S.W.
102 " 6 2 14 0 N.W.
103 " 7 2 14 3 N.W.
104 " 8 2 14 0 N.W.
105 " 10 2 18 1 S.W.
106 " 11 1 19 3 S.W.
107 " 12 1 25 2 S.W.
108 " 13 2 28 0 S.W. The Mary Rose just now arrived in the Downs.
109 " 14 2 28 2 S.W.
110 " 15 3 28 0
111 " 16 3 28 3 S.W.
112 " 17 3 28 3 S.W.
113 " 18 3 32 4 S.W.
114 " 19 2 42 7 S.W. All the outward bound ships are remaining in the Downs. To-day came into the Downs the Anna and Mary from the Canaries.
115 " 20 1 42 4 S.W.
116 " 21 1 42 2 S.W.
117 " (fn. 1) 22 1 S.W.
118 " 23 1 42 0 S.
119 " 24 1 42 0 S.W.
120 " 25 S.S.E. The same ships in the Downs as the 24th.
121 " 26 1 42 0 S.
122 " 27 S.S.W. The same ships in the Downs as the 26th. Stormy weather.
123 " 28 1 45 0 S.W.
124 " 29 2 48 0 S.W.
125 " 30 1 45 0 S.W.
March 10. Robert Clarke to Major Lindfield, M.P. [for Ipswich]. Richard Chandler, a lieutenant, this week took two men out of this town and four Scots, travellers, and carried them on board a vessel riding near Hollesley Bay, and said he had 16 more on board and was bound for Holland. Mr. Gawdy and Mr. Mann desire you to advise with Secretary Williamson, in case he should come ashore, as it is said he will, to Woodbridge and thereabouts to get more men, and to give directions about it. [Last figure of year date illegible. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 126.]
March 10.
Stoke Nuton (Newington).
Statement by Jane Whitehorne that at six in the morning when the King went by, a piece was shot off and broke her window. Thomas Ward and Thomas Woodman saw it. It came out of Wilson's house. His wife suered (sic) a Frenchman. [Dated 1675, probably new style. Ibid. No. 127.]
March 18.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I have received yours of the 17th with the enclosures as well from the Lord Keeper, Lord Treasurer and yourself as the relation of what passed in the Common Council on the 12th. His Majesty hopes that Saturday will compose this business, at least give it a better aspect than it has, but I do not find him as yet inclined to anticipate his return for the reasons in the enclosed letter, but he concurs that there ought to be a Council, and after that a Common Council before the middle of Passion week, but thinks that may be as well done if the Lord Keeper order a Council and send a summons both to Mayor and Aldermen and such as are to represent the Common Council to appear there by Saturday, the 27th, at 4 p.m., at which time his Majesty will be there. This is the substance of the enclosed letter. [Ibid. No. 128.]
March 20.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I have received yours of the 19th and am much in apprehension that this difference is nourished from a deeper root than the bare disposing of that charge, but sure the Lord Keeper takes the right way to strive to allay animosities, and sure that wherein the King is concerned most is not who has the right to bestow the office, but whether the Common Council can be held and votes passed after the Lord Mayor and Aldermen dismissed it; that may be attended with sad consequences.
As to what you write of the Swedes, they have sure passed the bounds of neuters long since, and I believe the Most Christian King is very willing the world should believe it so, and, if Denmark declare too, I cannot see how we can imagine a sudden composure of so many differences and amongst so many princes of great power and interests. I do not see but that the cards are as much shuffled as they were in the late German war, and, it may be, will ask as much pains to sort them again.
We have here Swedish weather, snow and frost and the coldest winds I ever felt, which is no small alloy to the satisfaction we expected. However I find his Majesty not at all inclined to change his day, which will be Saturday next, as I told you in my last. [Ibid. No. 129.]
March 22.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received two from you of the 20th. The first was very welcome, as it seems the animosities seem a little to abate, though we cannot hope a total extinction so suddenly. His Majesty continues firm to his day for returning on Saturday and leaves totally to the Lord Keeper, Lord Treasurer and yourself to give such order for the meeting of the Council and appearance of those of the City as you shall judge proper, he himself resolving to be there by 4 p.m.
The business of Llandaff was dispatched before yours arrived, Dr. Lloyd, of Battersea, having been particularly recommended by his Grace of Canterbury, and I found his Majesty resolved to have one of that country. However he has been so long omitted, I hope to see Dr. Barlow, a man of that merit and that age, better seated than in so poor a bishopric, one hardly worth the first fruits and removal. I am sure I will on all occasions serve him all I can. We have here no variety of weather and consequently not much of sports. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 130.]
June 10.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley, Mayor, Silas Taylor and John Rolfe to Sir Capell Luckyn and Thomas King, burgesses for Harwich or either of them. We desire you to speak to the Dutch ambassador, that he would take some course for succouring his countrymen that come hither for passage to Holland. Their numbers are great and the necessities of many of them greater, which has brought no small burden on this town, some of them staying here several days before having an opportunity to pass. So much is the pressure thereby that it is a great injury to our own poor, whom we are bound to provide for, as well as a pestering of the town by such strangers. If the Ambassador will not take effectual order, more than by words and promises, we desire you to proceed further according to what you shall think most expedient in order to disburden us from these grievances. [Ibid. No. 131.]
[Aug.?] Theodorus Lattenhower, Hollander and M.D. to the King. Petition praying for a patent for 14 years for his invention of engines for raising water in greater quantity with much more force and facility than any yet extant, and very different from any hither to invented, and most useful for draining mines, drowned lands, &c., one of which was lately presented by the petitioner to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen for quenching fire, which made a plain proof of its great power before them, so that they gave the petitioner 100l. and bespoke several engines of him. At the foot,
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. At the side, Report by Sir Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, that the said engines may be of great use in quenching fires, and that they were very serviceable in the late fire in Southwark, so that by means thereof St. Thomas' Hospital and a great part of that parish was saved, and that the patent desired will not be in any sort contrary to law, 1 June, 1676. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Sept. 22. Rules and instructions for the Lord Lieutenant, being another copy of those calendared ante, p. 306. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 336, p. 1.]
Dec. 10.
Westminster.
Warrant to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe, for payment to Nicholas Staggins, appointed Master of the Music in place of Lewis Grabu, and also appointed musician in ordinary in place of Richard Hudson, deceased, in consideration of his two liveries for the said places for the year ended St. Andrew's Day, 1674, of 32l. 5s., and for delivery to him on the next and all succeeding St. Andrew's Days during pleasure of 28 yards of camlet to make two gowns, of two furs of budge for the same, each of 4l. price, of 6 yards of velvet to guard the same, of 16 yards of damask to make two jackets, and of 6 yards of velvet to make two doublets and for payment for the making, lining and furring of the premises. Sign mannal. Countersigned "Arlington." [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F., No. 71.]
[1675? Dec ?] Note by Richard Coling that the Lord Chamberlain's warrant for Mr. Staggins' livery is dated 3 Nov., 1675, and his Majesty's being dated in December, after St. Andrew's Day, a year's livery is lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 133.]
[Dec?] Memorandum about Staggins' liveries, as Master of the Music from Michaelmas 1674, as the Wind Instrument from Michaelmas 1672. A warrant dated 3 Nov., 1675, must direct to him liveries as Master of the Music for one year ending at Michaelmas 1675, as the Wind Instrument for year ending at Michaelmas 1675. [Ibid. No. 134.]
1675.
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Col. George Smythson and Capt. Francis Wilkinson, praying a portion of satisfaction for their losses out of the farm of 12d. per chaldron or otherwise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 84.]
1675.
[Oct. ?]
John, Lord Lovelace, lieutenant of the parks of Woodstock, to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner is informed that one or more patents are now passing in the Earl of Lichfield's name for the reversion of the petitioner's said office, which he conceives will be to the great prejudice of his title and interest, and therefore praying that no such patent may pass till his Majesty be clearly informed of the true state of the case. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 135.]
[Nov. ?] Report on the petition of John, Lord Lovelace, that his patent for the lieutenancy of Woodstock being during pleasure, he will be much discomforted by the grant of a reversion of it, and therefore recommending he should have a new patent of it for life if the aforesaid patent be passed. Endorsed, "Earl Rochester, Lord Lovelace." (For these two papers see ante, pp. 341, 367.) [Ibid. No. 136.]
[Nov. 6.?] Act for the better assurance of such as claim under ancient fines and recoveries. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 368.) [Ibid. No. 137.]
[Dec. ?] A Coffee-house Conversation. Some days before the poor coffeehouses fell under persecution two French gentlemen went to Garraway's near the Exchange, when some company invited them to their table, and the conversation began.
1st Coffist. Pray tell us, if you know, what news the late notable express brought.
Frenchmen. We know not of any.
1st Coffist. Have you not heard of the courier arrived three days since with a retinue that marked him for a man of great quality? 2nd Coffist. I saw him and his attendants alight from their post horses, terribly weather-beaten, having rid in the late storms. 1st Frenchman. I now understand. Was it not in Bedford Street, Covent Garden? 1st Coffist. Yes. 1st Frenchman. Then I will tell you that the person you saw was indeed an extraordinary courier and one of great quality. 2nd Frenchman. In truth it was not a courier, but a very illustrious "courreuse." 1st Frenchman. The courier you saw alight, booted and spurred, covered with a great coat and still more covered with mud was the fair Duchess of Mazarin herself. 2nd Frenchman. It was in very truth that new Queen of the Amazons, who is so come from beyond the mountains, to conceive a martial race by your Alexander. 4th Coffist. She could not have taken a better way of recommending herself, both for vigour and soundness, than by riding astride, booted and spurred, 500 miles on a post horse in the depth of winter. 1st Frenchman. That notion would be pleasant enough over a bottle of Sillery, but over these cups of coffee, which, we are told, inspire only grave and politic reflections, I would have expected something more serious. 1st Coffist. Indeed the arrival and reception of this Duchess at Court does afford matter for politic reflections. 3rd Coffist. I have heard this matter variously discoursed of already. Some say, that the nation, already too sensible of the amorous excesses of their Prince, may be more inflamed by such an accession of great expense that way as this appears likely to prove. Besides, her great beauty, quality and adroitness, of which there is so great a character in print, seem to furnish occasion for apprehending a greater power in her over the King, if once he come to love her, than any other of his mistresses have had. 4th Coffist. They are fools, in my opinion, who fear that, for, since our good King has a weak side towards women as great as Henry IV, his grandfather, I think it much more honourable for Great Britain to have its monarch subdued by a famous Roman dame, than by an obscure damsel of Little Britain or by a frisking comedian. For point of expense, no woman was ever likely to be so cheap a mistress as she, who having fair pretensions to great sums due to her, if he be able to pay her Grace well, it is likely she will have contentment. And who will blame him to take his pennyworth, if he can, out of so fine a creature, and a duchess already to his hand, no small convenience? 3rd Coffist. But there are reflections on this subject of a far higher nature. A great wit and profound statesman as well as lofty poet, who is wont to swear fearfully on such great occasions, protests, that the French King, finding Carwel too weak both as to extraction and interest, to wed thoroughly the concerns of France, has sent the King over a new mistress that shall do it to the purpose. 1st Coffist. This is a speculation indeed too poetical. 3rd Coffist. I shall then tell you another, more reasonable and not so far fetched. It is said for certain that the ingenious gentleman, Mr. Ralph Montagu, so lucky in remote contrivances, having made a great acquaintance with this Duchess, when she resided at Chambery, has by concert with Arlington prevailed with her to come over, they hoping that the King taking to love her, she may be a means of ruining the Lord Treasurer, who is thought to be much strengthened by the Duchess of Portsmouth. 1st Frenchman. These gentlemen are not too well informed, who persuade themselves that a niece and heiress of Cardinal Mazarin, having claims to money at Court, can be engaged to take part against the Minister who is in favour and holds the purse. 3rd Coffist. Some more favourable to this affair say, that the Duke of York undertakes her reconciliation with her husband, she being so near akin to his Duchess, and that this good occasion has brought her hither. Others are knavish enough to say that her great beauty has given his Highness a grudging to her Grace in another way. 2nd Coffist. His own Duchess is full as handsome and younger. 1st Coffist. True, but all things are possible in this world, and, though devotion has given his Highness a new turn, the bowls, you know, will still to their bias. 2nd Frenchmen. I shall content myself with telling you, that the Duchess of Mazarin is in reality so charming, that, if your King kisses her but once, I hold her of Portsmouth as done for. [2½ pages. The Frenchmen speak broken English at first, afterwards French. S.P.Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 138.]
1675. Collections of remarkable proceedings in several Parliaments out of Baker, Rushworth and Wilson, under the headings of Sovereign Power, Popery, Grievances, Supply, Articles, Impeachments, Sentences &c., Parliaments, Privileges of Members. Imprisonment of Parliament Men, and Punishment of them in and out of Parliament, King Aggrieved, Proxies, Loans, Benevolences, &c., Tonnage and Poundage, Property, Subject's liberty in his person, Protestant Religion, The King's word, The King's heart, Recess, The King's servants, Billetting of Soldiers, Petition of Right, Passing of Bills, The laws and government of England, King James' description of the Government at that time, Precedency challenged by Scots and Irish nobles, Good laws. [59 pages. Ibid. No. 139.]
[1675 ?] Advertisement sheet by John Seller, hydrographer to the King, of divers atlases and works on navigation (one of which, the Atlas Maritimus, was printed in 1675), made and sold by him at his shop at the Hermitage Stairs, Wapping, and in Exchange Alley, near the Royal Exchange, London. [Printed. Ibid. No. 140.]
List of proclamations concerning Jesuits and other priests and Popish Recusants, the first dated 18 Oct., 1591, and the last 5 Feb., 1674–5. [Ibid. No. 141.]
List of grants of the several offices of the Mint, granted since the restoration, the warrants of which all passed the respective Secretaries of State, the first dated June, 1660, and the last Oct., 1675, with memorandum that before the restoration all offices in the Mint were granted without docquets from the Lord High Treasurer. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Statement that, though engine looms for weaving, called broad looms, are very advantageous, the Weavers' Company have since brought in bills to put them down, the last about 5 years ago [in Jan., 1670–1], and that in Aug., 1675, a multitude of weavers raised a riot, and did much damage to the engine loom weavers, yet the Weavers' Company rather encouraged than prevented it, with descriptions of the advantages of engine looms and the evils that would result from their suppression. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 143.]
Memorandum that the Duke of Monmouth, in pursuance of the order of 30 March, 1674, that the colonels of all regiments should observe his orders, and that of 11 Aug., 1675, that he should assign quarters for troops and companies, at the time of the late riots about London and Southwark, gave several orders for changing the quarters of several troops and companies, and also orders for such duty to be done by the troops as he found needful in that exigency and for sending parties to patrol at night in and about the City, and directed some of the troops to assist the civil magistrates in suppressing the tumults, but, if there should be no civil magistrate on the place, the troops themselves shall suppress those disorderly persons and deliver them into safe custody in order to their prosecution. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Notes by Williamson. The two Delaunay's daughters—often private with him—two hours shut up close Sunday &c. The Gentleman (?) of the Horse ordered to get into them at any rate &c. Helsius, the Secretary, thought to be gone to Flanders Friday last, has been in the country with a bag of 100l. to a Parliament man. 140 French pistoles given away by Fonseca, gathered and bought up of the goldsmiths. Don P. Ronquillo sets him on to gain one about the Duchess of Portsmouth. He has a woman that speaks nothing but English. He from her knew that Ruv[igny's] secretary is gone to Fr[ance] about &c. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Notes by Williamson. A bason and ewer of 30l. and half a pipe of sexe (?) to Nipho by Fonseca's hand. Sir R. Hanson (?) and he two hours yesterday shut up. Dined there. 400 given away yesterday, and N.B. infinite necessity in that family. 150 to Fonseca to give, 50 to Donells &c., borrowed privately and Pardini knew nothing of it, of Staley (?) the goldsmith &c. Pardini called to pay it. Mademoiselles Delaunay, two hours to-day and one Sunday last &c. Spies upon people of quality. Elsius, the secretary of languages, gone privately to Brussels yesterday. A man with a tourbin (?) Wednesday shut up long with him. 30,000 crowns in six payments, the last to be in March next. (For this and the previous paper see ante, pp. 149, 268, 292.) [Ibid. No. 146.]
State of the case touching the providing of copper blanks for making farthings and halfpence. In 1671 an agreement was made for furnishing them. The beginning of 1672, the King of Sweden laid an increased duty on copper, which raised the price thereof, and consequently an allowance of the 2½ on the pound weight of copper imposed in Sweden since his contract was made to Mr. Cronstrome, but he was to give timely notice if any alteration was made in the duty and alter his price accordingly. Letters from Sir Edward Wood say that the increased duty was taken off in April, 1673. Mr. Cronstrome however endeavours to make out the contrary by an order of the Chamber of Accounts of 11 Oct., 1673, and by an order of the Royal Council of Exchequer of 23 May, 1675, the last certified by the Grand Chancellor, 20 Aug., 1675. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 147.]
Request by the Earl of Rochester that the caveat against a pardon to Mr. Croxton, calendared ante, p. 244, be removed. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Statement by Sir Philip Musgrave. The Justices in Westmorland are qualified by one commission and all have equal authority in one part of the county as another. Till about the middle of King James' reign all the quarter sessions were held at Appleby Castle. After this some sessions were begun at Appleby and adjourned to and concluded at Kendal, till the times of usurpation. After the restoration the Custos Rotulorum judged it would conduce more to his Majesty's service that the justices living about Appleby and those about Kendal should sometimes meet at both places, but those in the barony of Kendal would not hearken to this, though the Custos and some other justices went from Appleby and attended at the Kendal sessions, but the others pretended that of right they ought to keep their sessions at Kendal and would do it, though there was no adjournment from Appleby, which is conceived to be contrary to the practice of all other counties and to the law. This gave offence to all the justices except three, and the matter was discoursed at Appleby assizes a twelvemonth ago before the judges, and it was desired that the justices living about Kendal would join with the rest to hold one general sessions at Appleby for the whole county next Easter, and all the other justices would do the same at Kendal at Michaelmas after. The judges approved of this and desired it should be so settled, and last Easter half the justices about Kendal came to Appleby and were very well satisfied, three only would not appear nor send in any examinations or recognizances, but two would hold another session at Kendal. The last assizes Judge Littleton was told by the Custos of these disputes, and he spoke to the justice, who is the only person that causes these differences, that he would agree with his fellows, but he would not. Notwithstanding, the others resolved to go to Kendal at Michaelmas, as they had offered, and the judges approved, and they did so, but the three resolved, if they could, to cross the ends of the rest, and that nothing should be done on the day appointed for the quarter sessions at Kendal, but that business should be brought before them the next day at a session appointed by themselves. The Mayor of Kendal was dealt with not to suffer any justices to sit in their hall the first day of the sessions, but at last he was better advised, and they met according to the King's commission, but all public business was withheld from them, and next morning they discharged the sessions till a new summons. Then came the other three and would have held another sessions, but the Custos commanded the clerk of the peace not to produce the King's commission, so a private session was only kept and thereby much public business left undone.
It is reported that the three resolve to continue this dispute with their fellows, and to engage the freeholders to take part with them; the greater number will not submit to the less.
The way to prevent the distraction that will attend these doings is for some person in authority to write to the Custos that there be but one public sessions held for the whole county next Easter and that at Appleby, and that the dispute be heard and put an end to by the judges at the next assizes.
Cumberland, the adjoining county, has but one general sessions for the whole county, which is as big again as Westmorland. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 149.]
Arguments as to whether the King can legally grant offices by patent, with a non obstante to the Act of 25 Car. II, cap. 2, which requires all who hold office to take the oaths, sacraments, tests, &c., on pain of deprivation of office, and other penalties, and opinion in favour of his power to dispense with a penal law by a non obstante. Endorsed by Williamson: "The Test. That the King may dispense with that law." [3¼ pages. Ibid. No. 150.]
J. A. to ————. I have been several times to wait on you according to your appointment, but could not do it, because, I suppose, your concerns are great. Wherefore, if you have anything to command me, you may do it by the bearer, which is all at present from your Honour's most humble servant. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Lists of members of the House of Commons, headed by the King, the Duke of York, the Lord Keeper, the Lord Treasurer; the Secretaries of State, the Speaker and Sir Robert Carr. meaning probably that the members in each list could be influenced by the person heading it, and another list of members with names of miscellaneous persons against them, also probably meaning that they had influence over them. The first two and the last lists are in Williamson's handwriting. [Ibid. Nos. 152, 153, 154.]
Hanna, widow of Thomas Bagelley, late Master Glazier of the Works, on behalf of herself and her daughters. Petition for permission to remain in a house in Scotland Yard, for building of which materials were granted to Thomas Bagelley as compensation for 1,700l. due to him from the late king, until 1,636l. 16s. 4d. due to him and his son for work done and moneys advanced and for six years' salary and living from Christmas, 1668, to their deaths be paid. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Joseph Augustine du Cross to the King. Petition for a lease for 21 years from 25 March, 1676, of the benefit of the improvement of 800l. a year in the revenue from the exportation to foreign parts of sea stone and pit coals, which he asserts may be effected by a new way of management propounded by him. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Monsr. du Cros to [Williamson?] Enclosing the letter of Lord Cavendish, which requests his good offices with the King in favour of the writer. His Lordship would have waited on his Excellency himself, had he allowed it. Has desired that Lord Cavendish should be under obligation to his Majesty and his Excellency for whatever it shall please his Majesty to do for himself or his wife, who is not undeserving of his Majesty's protection. [French. Ibid. No. 157.]
Edward Fauconberge, deputy chamberlain of the Exchequer, to Lord Treasurer Danby. Petition for permission to retain his place, having served the king and his father and grandfather in the safe custody and the sorting and transcribing of ancient records 50 years, but Philip Hildyard, who succeeds his father as chamberlain, threatens to displace him, though the deputy chamberlains were never displaced by the death of the upper chamberlains, unless he will pay him 60l. a year for his place, which is illegal and more than it is worth. (See last volume of the Calendar, p. 537.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 158.] Annexed,
Extracts from grants by the Chamberlains of the Exchequer of the office of deputy chamberlain from 1569 to 1660, when Henry Hildyard granted it for life to Edward Fauconberge. [Ibid. No. 158i.]
Another copy of the above petition. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Jeremy Gohory and Andrew Gallwey to the King. Petition for a grant of the fines of 40 marks apiece imposed by Judge Rainsford at the Berkshire Assizes, 21 Feb. last, on five persons found guilty of a riot in disturbing the Mayor and minister of Newbury in the parish church there. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Petition almost identical with the last, except that the first petitioner is called Jearminin Gorin. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Several officers and gentlemen formerly of the King's, the Queen's, and the Duke of York's troops to the King. Petition for the arrears of the former benevolence assigned them, and for the continuance thereof, it being stopped for the last two years, as they are otherwise left to starve, especially since the proclamation [of 14 May, 1675] forbidding them the French service. With numerous original signatures. [Ibid. No. 162.]
A person of honour to the King. Petition for an order to Lord Chief Justice Hale (Lord Chief Justice from May, 1671, to May, 1676) for her enlargement, that she may have freedom to answer any accusations against her and for condign punishment on those who have closely imprisoned her in her own house, prevented her communicating with her friends, and have beaten and almost murdered her, to accomplish their wicked designs. Noted, L[ady?] H. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Thomas Price to the King. Petition for release of a debt of about 2,500l., due from him as Receiver-General of the Royal Aid for Herefordshire as his account now stands before the Lord Treasurer, and in arrear from his employing unworthy persons in execution thereof; a grant of 500l. made to him [20 May, 1671] having been of no advantage to him, and all his estate having been entered upon for his debts. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Similiar petition stating his debt at 2,870l. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Sir Robert Robinson, late commander of the Royal Oak, to the King. Petition to be settled commissioner of Deptford and Woolwich, or Sheerness, or to have some other mode of supporting the honour of knighthood, conferred as a reward for his 14 years' services therein detailed, especially in taking prizes from the Dutch in 1665 and 1666, in a late desperate engagement with the Dutch under De Ruyter, and in the safe convoy of the East India fleet from the westward to the Buoy of the Nore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 376, No. 166.]
Col. Henry Stanihurst (or Staniers) to the King. Petition for the continuance of his old allowance and for payment of the arrears thereof, and for what more his Majesty may think fit to allow him, he having promised him a larger allowance in consideration of the loss of his employment at M. de Louvois' request. (See ante, pp. 59, 90.) [Ibid. No. 167.]
M. la Varenne to the King. When his Majesty, with the late Queen Mother, did him the honour of signing his marriage contract, he was promised 1,000 Jacobuses, of which he has received nothing, and, though his Majesty promised to continue the pension of 150 pieces granted him by the late King, his master, he has received nothing of it for 14 years. The late King borrowed of him 350 pieces by a letter of exchange he sent him to Newcastle, which his Majesty had at the prayer of the late Queen ordered Lord Fitz-Hardinge to pay him, but, that Lord having been killed soon afterwards at sea, the order was never performed. Lord St. Albans has a letter for 2,000Jacobuses given him by the late King to satisfy the bill of exchange, which was for 1,000 pistoles, though his Majesty received only 150, and yet he has received no benefit from that royal liberality. He has also received nothing under the late Queen's will, though his Majesty granted her servants 2½ years of her jointure. He always trusted his Majesty's promises. The suppliant, whose need is pressing, begs his Majesty's favour. [French. Ibid. No. 168.]
John Warner, of Winchester, to the King. Petition for a letter to the electors to choose his son, a child of St. Mary's College near Winchester, to a fellowship in New College, Oxford, for which he is eligible. (The son took his B.A. 1674, his M.A. Jan., 1677-8.) [Ibid. No. 169.]
Captain John Wetwang, late commander of the Newcastle, to the King. Petition for an order to the Lord Treasurer to settle on some other fund the payment of 500l. granted him 26 June, 1674, from moneys arising on sale of prize goods in theArms of Rotterdam, for his service in taking her, there being no such money arising from the said prize goods. [Ibid. No. 170.]
1675. Notes by Williamson about Ireland. The setting of the Farm, Sept., 1675. The casual revenue not worth above 6,000l. per annum. The last farmers offer 10,000l. per annum for the casual revenue, and in all 230,000l. N.B.—They have great arrears due from the Kingdom of Ireland. Duke of York: They have had, it's said, 240,000l. defalcations, &c. Lord Lieutenant: Have had 180,000l. defalcations. Quit-rents, 70,000l. per annum.
The King demands, 1. Advance without interest or exchange. Answer: Never done by any before. N.B.—This would make their farm near 7,000l. worse per annum. 2. To submit to the abatement of quit-rents, not exceeding 5,000l. per annum. Answer: Their bargain would be just so much worse, and yet, being only on barren land &c., they submit to it. Agreed to, that the King may abate 5,000l. where he pleases, provided they be heard first, and as to the abatements before made. 3. As to the times of payment, 30, 60, 90 days after due, one-third in 30, one-third in 60, onethird in 90 days of the 241,000l., &c. and as to the surplusage over and above 241,000l. as it comes in. 4. Casual revenue to be managed by the King's officers to the profit of the undertakers. Answer: They never meant to meddle with fines, forfeitures &c., only to have power to inspect what comes in. 5. The King contents himself with 240,000l. per annum for all and leaves the surplusage to them. Answer: They refuse the surplusage and ask rather 3s. per pound of what they refuse. 6. Without defalcations. Answer: No defalcation out of the 241,000l. Not for quit-rents, not for officers, not for foreign war, being a year of peace for every one of war. 2. A guard of the Irish seas. 3. The respite days in case of war to be increased by 30. 4. Prizes taken by Irish &c. to be brought in there, and commissions to such as shall ask them. They consent to advise upon four free ports and reliefs too. (Names of the proposed farmers.) Advance money. English interest if possible, the quit-rents, 5,000l. without being heard. Years of war, as of peace. Debts next Christmas will be 60,000l. certainly, possibly 50,000l. more. N.B.—The undertakers not to levy any part of the revenue not now in charge save by the King's consent. They pass by all concealments. A competent number of the undertakers to reside in Ireland. Two commissioners of the King's nomination to sit and act with the undertakers for fear of their failing. N.B.—The nature of the security is to be taken on a proportion to what money of the lessor's the farmers may be judged to have at one and the same time in their hands. Chimney money, in January next a year due, 25,000l. Quit-rents, 25 March half a year due, 35,000l. Excise, 60,000l. per annum, comes in daily, i.e. monthly, 25 March 3 months, 15,000l. Customs, 90,000l. clear, a quarter's at 25 March, 22,500l. so that they will have 100,000l. at once in their hands. Again at Midsummer a quarter more in their hands, in all at Midsummer they will have received of the King's 150,000l. and the King has but 60,000l. of this all the time.
Query, keep them to 40 days after due, as a better security upon them against breaking. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 207.]
Notes by Williamson about the Irish expenditure. Deducting out of the revenue in Ireland, Interest, 6,000l.; Civil list, 22,205l.; Military list for 60 to 90 in a company, 174,031l. 17s. 6d.; Pensions, old, 10,402l. 2s. 3d.; pensions, new (Mr. Hyde), 2,222l., Sir Timothy Tyrrell for 3 years 1,000l.; Reserved by the King per annum to such uses as he appoints, one of which is 5,000l. to the Duke of Ormonde, 20,000l., so that only 4,138l. 9s. 2d. will remain in the King's hands to dispose of. Out of this he gives to the Hospital, Col. Dillon, Earl of Carlingford, Sir J. (?) Bealews (Bellew), Grace, McCarty, Lord Dunsany, then will remain only 2,318l.
Civil list from 25 March, 1676. Courts of Exchequer, King's Bench, Chancery and Common Pleas, Clerk of the Crown &c., King at Arms &c., 22,205l. 1s. 1d.; Military list, 174,031l. 17s. 6d.; Pensions, 10,402l. 2s. 3d.; total, 206,639l. 0s. 10d. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 208.]
[1675 ?] Charles, Earl of Mountrath, by his guardian, Alice, Countess Dowager of Mountrath, to the King. Petition, stating that by the annexed report of the Lord Lieutenant wherewith the Lord Treasurer agrees, it seems reasonable that the intended grant to Col. Fitzpatrick of the quit-rents of the petitioner's estate in the Queen's County should be suspended, at least till the petitioner be heard, and that, in case his Majesty shall release the said quitrents to the petitioner, it ought to be part of the 1,000l. per annum which his Majesty has reserved power to discharge, whereon all the petitioner can obtain from Secretary Williamson is a letter to suspend the said intended grant, till the petitioner be heard, and therefore praying that the said quit-rents, amounting to about 200l. a year, and payable out of coarse lands and therefore liable to an abatement of near one half, may be excepted out of Col. Fitzpatrick's grant and may be granted to the petitioner and his heirs. See ante, pp. 367, 368. [Ibid. No. 209.]
The Earl of Inchiquin's case. His father in recompense of the Presidency of Munster had 8,000l. granted him, and was in the first place appointed by a clause in the Explanatory Act to be paid out of the mesne profits of the Doubling Ordinance &c. Divers persons, viz., Secretary Coventry, Mr. Legg, Mr. Darcy and Capt. Bayly, who were in the same fund, but after his Lordship, have been otherwise satisfied, and have assigned their interests in that fund to his Majesty, whereby by his prerogative he is to have prior satisfaction and his Lordship is consequently postponed. Sir Timothy Tyrrell had 3,000l. in the same fund, but after his Lordship, and has lately prevailed with his Majesty to satisfy him by 1,000l. per annum on the Irish establishment. If his Majesty will put that 8,000l. on the establishment to be paid by 2,000l. per annum or less, it will be a less favour than that to Sir Timothy. [Ibid. No. 210.]
[The King] to [the Lord Chancellor of Ireland]. Warrant, after reciting that the manor of Portlester, Meath, by the death of George Fitzgerald of Tecroghan without heirs male of his body devolved to the Crown, and that Maurice Eustace, a minor, about July, 1673, and the March following, by several petitions besought a grant of the said manor or liberty to place deficiencies thereon, thereby rather affirming than denying the King's title thereto, and that the King by order in Council of 30 July, 1673, declared his title to the said lands, and by another order of 13 March, 1673 [-4] on a second petition dismissed it, and has since resolved otherwise to dispose of the said lands, yet is informed that the Lord Chancellor, 25 Feb. last, by the default of the Attorney-General, granted an injunction to quiet the said minor in the possession of the said manor, grounded on a decree pronounced by him about 1 Dec., 1671: since it may prove very prejudicial to have the said minor established or quieted in possession, requiring the Lord Chancellor forthwith to hear whatever shall be offered to him to make out the King's title, and upon consideration thereof to grant a supersedeas to the said injunction, if by the rules of law or equity he may do it, and thereupon to restore the possession of the said lordship and manor to Sir Maurice Eustace. [Draft. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 211.]
Sir James Graham to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner served the late and present Kings since the very beginning of the late unhappy troubles and suffered extremely both in person and estate by a long and sad imprisonment from the time he was taken, soon after Worcester fight, till the restoration, and that the Earl of Essex appointed him deputy governor of the town and garrison of Drogheda in the absence of the deceased Earl of Drogheda [died 11 Jan., 1674–5], in which he has served 18 months without receiving any pay or salary, and praying a grant to be governor of the said town and garrison, and an order to the Lord Lieutenant not only to pay him such a sum as his Majesty shall think fit in consideration of his charges in the said employment, but also to establish an allowance of 13s. 4d. per diem on him, such as was formerly paid to Sir Henry Titchburn in that employment. [Ibid. No. 212.]
The remainder, who are but few alive, of the reformed officers, who served his Majesty both at home and abroad and were suspended from his royal benevolence these four years past to the King. Petition that the petitioners may be established for the future, with the arrears already due to them, on that branch of the Irish revenue remaining undisposed of in Lord Ranelagh's hands or otherwise, as his Majesty shall think fit, according to his late gracious promise to Lord Dongan, since the suspension of his benevolence these four years past has reduced them to a miserable condition. [Ibid. No. 213.]
1675. Paper about the Navy. 200,000l. 100,000l. by 2,000l. weekly from Michaelmas 1675, to Michaelmas 1676, whereof victuallers 500l., tickets 500l., current service 1,000l. 100,000l. by 5,000l. fortnightly from Michaelmas 1675, to Michaelmas 1676 (sic), for stores only, to pay the debt and keep workmen employed in repairs. Lord Treasurer moreover to satisfy the victuallers' excesses above 500l. per week and quarterly pay the yards and seamen's wages. With notes on the back by Williamson. 144,000l. repairs of the bodies of the ships. 90,000l. for stores to all the said ships for six months' service, as given in to the House of Commons by Mr. Pepys, and with a further note by the same as the manner in which Sir T. Clutterbuck has been paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 29.]
1675.
About Dec.
Notes by Williamson. Argiers. As to passes. A list of the names of all the consuls, ambassadors, &c., to be sent to the Consul at Algiers. A form of a pass such as the said ambassadors, &c., shall give on this occasion to be settled and let the same be sent to each consul, &c., and a copy of it to the Consul of Argiers. Severe instructions to the consuls everywhere, on one hand to be ready to grant their certificates and passes, on the other to be watchful not to be imposed on, and [not ?] to grant such certificates to those that are not truly passengers, &c. [Ibid. p. 33.]
Notes by Williamson about Ireland. Queries to Lord Ranelagh. 1. As to the 24,000l. lent him by the King, why not paid as the King meant and ordered it for clearing the December pay? II. As to the passing his account. Whether to allow of compounding, where he produces discharges for the value, whereas he certainly paid but 10s., 8s. or 5s. per pound? Whether to allow his accounts, where he produces acquittances upon assignments given by Lord Ranelagh, whereas it is certain some of those assignments can never be paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 43.]
Queries by Williamson whether a case relating to trade is to be received directly by the Committee of the Privy Council for Trade, or whether all business considerable before that Committee should not, according to the course of the Council Board, be first brought to the Board and then sent down by them to the Committee. [Ibid. p. 47.]
Notes by Williamson as to whether a parish in the county and diocese of Gloucester is a peculiar or not. The question seems to have arisen from the Chancellor of the diocese having excommunicated the incumbent for having married without a licence. On the back are some notes by Williamson about inventions, such as printing instead of writing, jacks instead of turnspits, looms for stockings, sawmills, engine to split deals. [Ibid. p. 49.]
Notes by Williamson on an action in Jersey in which Sir Philip Carteret was concerned, it being apparently brought by a woman to recover land of which he and his ancestors had been in possession for 50 years, with notes of the opinions of the Attorney and Solicitor General thereon. [Ibid. p. 53.]
[1675?] Extracts of provisions in treaties between England and France, Spain, Holland, Denmark and Sweden arranged under the heads of:—What treaties are in force, if subjects of one power may take commissions against the other, if to allow ports to their ships being prizes, if to carry enemies' goods, if to assist enemies, if to carry passports, if to trade with enemies, if to be visited at sea and how, what things are contraband, what warning before a breach, if to include one another in treaties, if to assist each when attacked, when to give letters of marque, if to convoy one another's merchantmen, as to the increasing of impositions, as to the granting to each other what any other nation shall obtain, as to what caution to be given by privateers, and what liberty is to be given to men-of-war. Some in duplicate. (The latest extract is from the treaty of 1674 with Holland.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 377.]
Similar extracts differently arranged and omitting some of the above heads. [Three copies. Ibid.]
Similar extracts of the provisions to the above heads in the the treaties between England and Portugal. [Ibid.]
Similar extracts of the provisions as to the above heads in the treaties between France and Spain, Holland, Sweden, Denmark, Portugal and the Hanse Towns. [Two copies. Ibid.]
Extracts from the treaties between France, and Spain, England, Holland, Sweden, Denmark, Portugal and the Hanse Towns as to what cautions privateers are to give. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 377.]
Extracts from the treaties between England and Spain, France and Holland, and from the treaty between Spain and Holland relating to free trade with enemies. [Ibid.]
Table giving a summary of the above extracts and of the clauses referring to each subject in each treaty. [Two copies. Ibid.]
Notes by Williamson on the above subjects. [Ibid.]
Account of moneys received by John Taylour for letters patent, privy seals and signets from 24 June, 1671, to 25 March, 1675.
Yearly summary of the above accounts to 24 June, 1674, the total amounting to 78l. 2s. 8d., with note of sums paid to Mr. Moore, leaving 8s. 2d. then due, which with further receipts in the next quarter was finally paid to him 6 Oct., 1674. [Ibid.]
Twenty receipts by John Moore dated from 24 July, 1671, to 6 June, 1674, for the above sums paid by Taylour to him for his master's use. [Ibid.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Dated 23 Dec.