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Charles II: January 1676

Pages 485-538

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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January 1676

Jan. 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news, but wishing him a happy New Year. Wind easterly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 1.]
Jan. 1.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon the wind came to the south-east. To-day most of the ships sailed, but the great ones stay for more settled weather. The Dutch East India, West India and Straits ships yet ride fast, but are all preparing. The English East India ships are not yet come into the Downs, 'tis reported they are at the Gunfleet. A topsail gale at S.E. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 1.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Understanding a patent is passing for making new Commissioners of the Customs, I make bold to acquaint you there has been a surveyor both for Rye and Winchelsea, each of whom had 40l. a year salary, and Rye was continued till about 4 years since. That surveyor being made collector for Rye informed the Commissioners a surveyor was needless. My request is that you would be my friend in procuring me to be surveyor for this port. If Winchelsea be added to it, I shall serve both for the same salary that was allowed to this town only. If you judge it procureable, I will appoint a friend to wait on you to discharge what is usual in getting out the warrant. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. 1.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Three weeks ago to-morrow came out of Cales two ships of this town in company with Capt. Courtenay's frigate and several other ships. They were ten days since parted by foul weather. One of them came in Wednesday night and the other yesterday. They tell no news of Algier or otherwise, except the expectation of the West India fleet. Both are bound for London, and, if you insert anything of them in the Gazette, pray leave out their names, for the wind is now easterly, and the masters may be blamed by their freighters for stopping here.
With us nothing is apparent of the damage done by the last great winds, only 'tis said some islanders of Portland saw a vessel turn round the island and a little after perish in Portland Race, and a mast and two or three other things are come ashore at Lulworth. A French man-of-war of about 40 guns came into Portland Road about a week since, where she and two or three strangers moored safe the last foul weather. 'Tis a rumour here, but how true I know not, that to the eastwards above ten rudders have been taken up. We had last week news of the loss of two of our town, one about Yarmouth and all the men drowned, the other from Malaga lost on the coast of Portugal, but all the men saved. We lost another this year before going to St. Valery de Somme, and are in doubt of two more ships of our town being lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 4.]
Jan. 1.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Last Wednesday arrived the Judith and Mayflower from Morlaix and the Little Rose from St. Malo. They came out four or five days before and rode some time in Torbay, being in the late stormy weather. A ship arriving at St. Malo from Marseilles, report was made of the Algerines taking upon the English, but without particulars. In France they speak confidently of so good an understanding with the Dutch that they doubt not of peace with them. The province of Brittany suffers very much, being under the King's displeasure for the late insurrections, by quartering of soldiers and many insolencies received from them, and Morlaix and St. Malo are not without fears they may have a taste of them, and are therefore considering of a way by a present to the King, as some others have done, to prevent the worst.
We have heard of some losses from the late very high winds to our neighbour ports, Poole and Weymouth, and also westward, but there has been no loss of any ship of this harbour, our ship from the Canaries being arrived in Penzance, which was much feared, but something damnified. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 1.
Pembroke.
John Powell to James Hickes. This week was put in the Bachelor of London with fruit from Alicante. Much wreck comes ashore daily here. [Ibid. No. 6.]
[Jan. 1?] Additional establishment of the Guards, forces and garrisons to commence on 1 Jan., 1675 [-6], adding several daily and yearly allowances, which had up to 31 Dec., 1675, been paid out of the contingent moneys, to the establishment, amounting to 1,237l. 9s. 2d. Sign manual. Countersigned "Danby," "J. Williamson." [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 1. Commission to George Churchill to be ensign to LieutenantColonel John Churchill's company of foot in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 148.]
Jan. 1. Commission to George Rooke to be lieutenant to Captain Charles Middleton in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir George Moore. I have yours of the 30th with an account of your having apprehended the Master of the Swan inn at Sittingbourne for dangerous words by him reported from the mouths of two persons of Sandwich passing from London homewards. At the same time came a part of the same information from another hand in the neighbourhood, both which having been communicated to his Majesty, he very well approved of your diligence and commands me to signify to you, that, in case the master of the Swan produces (as it seems he offers to do) the first two persons of Sandwich that reported it, he be then dismissed, and the two persons are either to produce their authors or be proceeded against according to the utmost severity of law. For seizing the first two reporters, I suppose you will find ways enough, when you once know their names, and I have, by the King's command, written to-night to Col. Strode, of Dover Castle, to assist you in anything in which you may need the aid of a justice in those parts. You will please likewise see what has been done to the two persons named in the enclosed note, who were also reporters of it, from the relation of two Sandwich men, and upon the whole let us know what is done in the prosecution of this abominable report. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 66.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Strode. You will see by the enclosed what informations we have received from Sir George Moore with the directions given on the matter. This is to give you so far the knowledge of it, that you may be ready, if called to for your help, to assist in finding out and apprehending the two Sandwich men. Noted, that copies of Sir G. Moore's letter, of Mr. Secretary's letter to him, and of the information were enclosed. [Ibid. p. 67.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Ralph Widdrington to be captain of a foot company in garrison at Berwick, whereof William, late Lord Widdrington, was captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 21.]
Jan. 2. William Banckes to Williamson. A New Year's letter of congratulation and compliments referring to his speaking French and German like a native. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 8.]
Jan. 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I acquainted you last post that the whole fleet in the Downs of above 150 ships were under sail except the Dutch. Good part of them are yet in sight being becalmed, and, 'tis thought will all come in again. There is sometimes a little breeze from the northward. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Jan. 2.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving news of the fleet similar to the last. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Jan. 2.
Dover Castle.
Col. John Strode to Williamson. I have just received yours of the 1st, and will be always ready for the apprehension of such villains whose want of punishment gives such licentious liberty to others. Had Sir G. Moore had the names as well as the place, they would have easily been found, but now I must attend intelligence from him. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 2.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon several vessels went hence for Nantes, Charente, and Bordeaux to lade wines, brandy, &c., for London. Four belonged to this place. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. We were yesterday in hopes of an easterly wind, which is much wanted, for many outward-bound ships are now wind-bound in Cowes Road. The Bordeaux ships that put in here the last storm are sailed for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 13.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant by letters patent of 31 Aug., 1660, to Sir John Keith, brother of the Earl Marischal, in consideration of his services in preserving the crown, sceptre and sword from the rebels, of the office of Knight Marischal of Scotland for his life, for a new grant of the said office to the said Sir John Keith and to John, his second son, for their lives and the life of the survivor, fee 400l., sterling per annum. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 383.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. After reciting the letter of 16 July, 1674, to them, calendared in S.P. Dom. 1673–1675, p. 308, intimating that the Bishop of Dumblane should be translated to the bishopric of the Isles and should be removed from residence in the diocese of Glasgow and should forbear from meddling in matters relating to the Church save in the diocese of the Isles, and that by a letter to the Duke of Lauderdale from the Archbishop of St. Andrews and the other bishops appointed to examine the said Bishop's case, he finds that in an address lately presented to them he made such declarations of his former carriage and an engagement that his future deportment shall be with all becoming duty and faithfulness to the King, his metropolitan and brethren, as have induced them to be humble suitors for the recall of the former order for his translation to the bishopric of the Isles, authorizing and requiring them to take off the restraint on the Bishop of Dumblane that he may enjoy that bishopric with all the rents, emoluments, &c. thereto belonging, as if the former order for his translation had not been granted, and also taking off the restraints to be put on Archibald Turner, John Robertson, and Andrew Cant, ministers at Edinburgh, and John Hamilton, minister at Leith, in regard of their late dutiful and submissive addresses for their restoration. [Ibid. p. 385.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Archbishop of St. Andrews. Intimating the recall by the last letter of the orders for the translation of the Bishop of Dumblane and his restoration to the bishopric of Dumblane. [Ibid. p. 387.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Argyle. Warrant dispensing with his ordinary residence in Glasgow, it being necessary for the service of the Church, provided that he duly observe and keep all synods and other visitations necessary for regulating the affairs of the Church in his diocese. [Ibid. p. 388.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Capt. John Gray for his life of a pension of 20l. sterling per annum in consideration of his loyalty and very necessitous condition. [Ibid. p. 389.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Gideon Brown, minister at Leigerwood, to the kirk of Smelholme in the diocese of Edinburgh. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 390.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of William Fogo, minister of Bothkenner, to the kirk of St. Ninians in the diocese of Edinburgh in place of George Bennett, deceased. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 391.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of John Skinner, student of divinity, to the kirk of Bothkenner. This and the two preceeding presentations Noted, as recommended by the Archbishop of St. Andrews. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 392.]
Jan. 3.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to [Williamson ?] By a letter from my son, Christopher, I find that the sense of the condition I stand in at present as to public affairs in Cumberland and Westmorland put you on giving the King the trouble of taking notice of some addresses to the Lord Chancellor concerning the alteration of the commission of the peace in Cumberland. It would appear very strange to any that understands not the temper of those that promote this affair that, after so much civility showed me by Lord Carlisle at his being last in the country, after my endeavours to give him all the satisfaction I could for my recommending Mr. Browham (Brougham) and Mr. Skelton to be put into the commission of the peace, and his seeming to be satisfied therein, he should without any new cause given by them or me move the Lord Chancellor that they might be put out of the commission and Mr. Eglianby (Aglionby) put in, concerning whose factious humour my lord is not a stranger. I have discoursed it freely with him even at my last being with him at London. His lordship knows he was put out of the commission by the King's particular command, and was convicted before Justice Wilde of a notorious riot committed by him while a justice. The original of these unhappy mistakes between the Earl and me I know has its rise from Sir George Fletcher, who for many years has endeavoured to continue a jealousy betwixt my lord and me, that by my lord's countenance he might make himself head of a faction in this county and Carlisle in opposition to myself and family. It is most necessary that by his Majesty's perfect knowledge of the truth of these things an end may be put to them. If it appear I have given any occasion for my lord to dislike my proceedings, or have contributed in the least to making this division in the public affairs of the county, I will own myself unworthy of any favour from the King. I am so much an enemy to faction, and know it is so contrary to his Majesty's service and the good of the country that, rather than I should be engaged to contend in this way any longer, I request you to present my most humble suit to his Majesty that the Lords Lieutenant in these counties may be eased of a deputy lieutenant so little agreeable to them as it seems I am, and that in civil affairs there may be the like dispensation for me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 14.]
1676.
Jan. 3.
Col. Richard Kirkby to Williamson. Since I last waited on you, I have never been able to stir out of my chamber, nor can I yet be confident of any speedy fitness to go abroad. Therefore I presume to remind you of my request on Mr. Elletson's behalf, for whom I desired your letters recommendatory to Lord Vaughan. He is a very well deserving person and of those good endowments that I doubt not you will be very well pleased in contributing your endeavours to his preferment, and so I humbly crave your speedy dispatch for him, that he may order his affairs and fit himself against the time the ships shall be in readiness. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 15.]
Jan. 3.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. At Hasebrough, about a dozen miles to the northward of this, is forced ashore a great ship from Hamburg with piece goods bound for London, which, it is feared, will not be got off. To-day we had news from Mount's Bay that a ship of this town from Rochelle with linseed and nuts was lost, the master and boy only saved. The yacht from Hamburg is still in our haven, some nobleman of France being aboard her bound for Calais. Her captain reports he had very considerable sums offered for the delivery of him from whence he came. The Nonconformists continue their meetings here on Sunday and Thursday every week as constantly and publicly and in as great or greater number than ever. I just now heard of a very abusive paper that is in town called the Insipids, which I am promised I shall see. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. There is more wreck on the coast, of which I suppose you will receive more particular notice from others. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 3.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Wednesday the homewardbound ships went out of this harbour, the wind being N.W., and last Thursday night a small vessel of 6 guns of this port from the Canaries with wine, mistaking the harbour, ran ashore in the bay some two miles to the westward of this. Her men were all saved, and 34 pipes of wine with some small cask landed, which was all the wine she had, and she overset, but is not as yet broken. The outward-bound ships you formerly had account of are still in port, expecting a fair wind, which is at present N.W. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Jan. 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last Thursday night came in here the Constant Endearour of London in seven weeks from Virginia with tobacco, bound home. They say they have made but an indifferent crop there, and that the Indians have risen at the top of the river Pentomecke (Potomac) about 5 or 600, and have cut off several English, and that they had entrenched themselves, and were not dispersed when they came away. When she was in 40 degrees of this harbour, they met with much foul weather, so that they have received much damage both in their ship and goods, all her steerage being broken, and the man that was at the helm washed overboard, and the anchor from the bow broken away. The last news they had from New England was that the Indians were still up in arms and had killed several English.
Last Thursday night was cast on the rocks just outside the harbour the Olive Branch of Falmouth from the Canaries; the wine most saved but some damnified and the ship much broken, but they have hopes to get her off to-day.
The Irish officers, that have lain here wind-bound these three or four weeks, put to sea last Saturday for Dublin. They have reported here that the King of England has given leave to the French King to raise 7,000 men in England, and so many in Ireland and so many in Scotland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 19.]
Jan. 4.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Here is some news of the Friends' Increase of this place, which sailed from the Tees 11 Dec., laden with lead, butter and other goods for London, and was forced with the night storm following, the wind S.W., to the northward, where she lost one of her company and cast much butter overboard, but at last got well into Leith, where she now is. Wind at S. and by E. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Jan. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived here yesterday, but brought over very few passengers and very little news. The wind is most easterly, the weather heavy and dull. I have, according to order, ever since 23 Dec., 1674, kept a register of the going and returning of all packet-boats. I desire to know whether to continue or forbear it. I have also taken an account of all his Majesty's subjects, soldiers deserting foreign services, since I received your commands of 16 Feb. last, not only of those landed here, but also, by the best information I could get, of those landed by the packet-boats elsewhere. I shall continue registering both, till you give me a writ of ease. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Jan. 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. All the outwardbound ships that continued a long time wind-bound in Cowes Road are now sailed with a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Jan. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 23.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 23i]
Jan. 4. On the petition of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London desiring to be empowered to make collections in the several parishes in the City and liberties during three months for relieving the great number of poor persons and that the money collected be paid into the Chamber of London and thence issued for their relief, his Majesty directs the Lord Chancellor to give order for a brief authorizing collections to be made as desired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 73.]
Jan. 5.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived here from Rotterdam a small ship, whose master reports that this fortnight and so for three or four days after one another, was there seen a perfect ship in the moon, with her foresail hauled up, her foretopsail on the cap, the mainmast having no sail brought to but standing, her mizenmast standing but no sail brought to, the ensign flying, the head of the ship towards the north east, the wind then S.W.
Last night the East India ships arrived from the Thames, and this morning two more, all outward-bound. The Dutch East India ships and the other great ships are yet in the Downs. Not a topsail gale at S.S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 24.]
Jan. 5.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Saturday Count Hamilton went to sea from Holyhead in the packet-boat for Dublin, and, 'tis hoped, has got to his port. Several of the new farmers of the Irish revenue have got their passage that way. 'Tis remarkable that but three ships from this port and none from Liverpool got their passage from Michaelmas to Christmas to Dublin, so that all being now gone from both ports and arriving there after Christmas will be a considerable advantage and consequently a good encouragement to the new farmers, whose farm is said to commence on Christmas Day. No news as yet of Lord O'Brien's arrival. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 25.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chaucellor and Senate of the University of Cambridge. Requiring them to confer the degree of D.D. on John Echard, M.A., lately elected Master of St. Catherine's Hall, and to suffer him to take the same by accumulation, he performing the requisite exercises, or giving caution for their performance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 190.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant on the petition of William Hobbs of Greenwich, mariner, for making the Friendship, formerly called the St. John, a prize taken in the late war and condemned in the Scotch Court of Admiralty, a free ship. [Precedents 1 f. 125.]
Jan. 5. Dispensation to Thomas Bard, High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, to come to London or elsewhere on his necessary occasions. [Ibid. f. 126.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for effectual acquittances and discharges to the new farmers of the revenue in Ireland for 10,000l. actually paid by them for the King's use, in the same form as the previous warrant of 10 Dec., calendared ante, p. 442. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 404.]
Jan. 6. Sir Thomas Lynch to Sir Robert Southwell. To-day Mr. Orgill, a West Indian merchant, told me that a peculiar sort of ironwork for sugar mills, invented by him and of great use in the plantations, is now at the Custom House, to be transported to France, but that he and other merchants are petitioning against the export, which I have intimated to you, that some remedy may be applied. If requisite, Mr. Orgill will wait on the Lords of the Council or yourself to give you more particular information. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 26.] Annexed,
The sugar merchants to the King. Petition for a stop to be put to the intended export of 12 iron cases to case the outside of the rollers of the engines, which squeeze the canes, invented by Andrew Orgill, which are shipped for Roven, and thence bound for the French sugar plantations, as the use of them is of great use in the Enqlish plantations, enabling them to sell sugar more cheaply than others, and for the prohibition of the exportation of such cases in future. [Ibid. No. 26i.]
Jan. 6. John Banckes to Williamson. To-morrow I intend to present my petition to the King and Council of my just complaints of the arbitrary proceedings at Hamburg both against his Majesty's Resident and myself. I shall pray you to take the Resident's two letters of 14 Sept. and 29 Nov. last with you to Council, and the register of the Court, if you think fit, that so S[amuel] M[issenden] and his complices may not continue longer in contempt of his Majesty's authority and in wronging his subjects. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 27.]
Jan. 6.
Whitefriars.
John Ogilby to Williamson. Having been long lame and prevented from waiting on you and doubting to receive great prejudice by Mr. Basset and Mr. Chiswel, who have robbed my book and falsely printed certain tables, I beg you to give leave to print the enclosed advertisement. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Jan. 6.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. A ship of this place is come from Holland. He was freighted for Amsterdam from France with wine, where he delivered his lading. Fifteen ships were in company on the same account all laden for Amsterdam, and they were together as far as the Downs, but were separated by bad weather and only three or four got thither, the rest not being heard of when he came away last Friday, so it is much to be doubted most of them are lost, there having been very fair weather since.
The master tells us he met a Dunkirk caper of 8 guns off Humber, and was on board her. The captain was very civil and told him he had taken several prizes so that he had bestowed 40 men in manning them, two of which were Hamburgers, one of which was a ship of 16 guns laden with sack from Malaga, and he intended them for Humber. Not being well acquainted with the coast, he got one of the master's men for his pilot. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Jan. 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind has varied round the compass yesterday and to-day. Now it is southerly. We have no news, none of our packet-boats arriving since my last. I enclose a relation of the hurricane, which I received last night from one nearly related to me in Barbados. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Jan. 6.
Dover Castle.
Col. John Strode to Williamson. As soon as I understood the names of the two persons accused for those abominable words of the Duke and the King, finding they were within the Ports in the parish of St. Peter's in Thanet, I directed my warrant to the serjeant-at-arms of Dover Castle, being sure he would do more than all the constables of the county. He apprehended them and brought them to-day before me. They are two common seamen, who voluntarily served in the late war with the Dutch. Their neighbours and the deputy of the town report them to be very honest ignorant fellows, and to me they seem ignorant enough. On their examination, which I enclose, they say they had the news from two women in Southwark, but not so as in the former information, but you will see their own confessions, and here they remain prisoners in the Marshal's hand. I attend your further instructions. My opinion is that, if you will find the bottom of it out, they must be sent to you to London. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Jan. 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S. At Cowes are two Canary ships bound for London, put in there the last easterly winds. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Jan. 6.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Since my last we have news of more wrecks. Last night arrived a ship's company that belonged to Helford, which came home from the Canaries and was driven over on the coast of Wales and cast away near Milford. The men were all preserved, but the ship, of about 120 tons, and the goods were all lost. Wind S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 33.]
Jan. 6. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation.—Difficulty in Holland and allies to send their passports to Sweden, till those of the Swedes be arrived, at least till de Lira (Lyra) return, which will be in a day or two. Sp [anish] passes for the Fr [ench] ministers are in de Lira's hands, to be put into Sir W. Temple's, who will send them forward. Holland's pass for Bishop of Strasburg is sent to the King to be disposed of. Is but one, and he has three plenipotentiaries. I have sent for three, &c. Send it to the Bishop under cover (?) as by his Majesty's commands. —Holland's ambassadors ask for passes from France and for all the allies mentioned in the States' resolution. Passes likewise asked by the King's ambassadors. Holland desires they may be in the same form Holland gives them in, and as the allies all resolve to give them. Spoken to M. de Ruvigny already, that is I yesterday by the King's command and the King himself this day.—Exceptions taken by Serinchamp, the Duke of Lorraine's envoyé, to the French passes:—1. Not called Duke of Lorraine, only Prince Lorraine. 2. Stiled there cousin not Prince, praying the same stile as with the last Duke. 3. No mention of baggage, papers, &c. The King has spoken to M. de Ruvigny already.—All the passes from France to be of one form, i.e. according to the mode agreed with Holland, &c. Neutral country about Nimeguen. The King interested to have it extended as high as Meurs from having asked it of the States and French, at least to Fosse Mariana. M. de Ruvigny says he has an answer that two leagues about Nimeguen is enough. Tell Sir W. Temple so as an answer from France.—Titles of the King of Poland. Gives only Serenissime to the King, so I have not adventured to open it. Take notice of that error to the Secretary and open the letter.—The Princess dead.—Germany. Duke Gottorp's letter. Dares not speak out his complaints. Had sent another letter. Query, if not to have a day set to consider of it? My Lords to take a day to look over this whole thing.—Prince William's affairs.—Ducker's dispatch. If Ducker to stay there or at least to meet Skelton at Wertheim or Frankfort &c. To stay, if he can, at Vienna &c., and Skelton to make haste what he can. At least let Ducker speak with him in his passage.—If Don Pedro Ronquillo to have copies of what has passed. Give him copies.—Bishop of Strasburg's pass come. To whom to be given. Send it to the Bishop as above.—Denmark, 21 Dec. Sir John Paul complains they in Sweden will not let our English packets and letters come over. Nothing yet answered by Denmark to the King's letter about this matter. Complain of it to the Ambassador here. Call upon Paul for an answer.—Brandenburg. From Dantzig the great complaints of intolerable exactions on all letters passing by Berlin. Whether upon the war in Pomeland (Pomerania) the letters all turned (?). Complain of it to Baron Schwerins here. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366,p. 61.]
[Jan. 6?] Notes by Williamson of a letter from the plenipotentiaries of 28 Dec., 1675—7 Jan., 1676, which is printed in the Life of Sir Leoline Jenkins, Vol. I. p. 354, with queries by Williamson, if one of them going to Nimeguen and the other staying was well resolved by them and about the execeptions to the French passports for Lorraine, and notes of a similar letter of the same date from Sir W. Temple, and of a similar letter from him dated 31 Dec., 1675—10 Jan., 1676. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 65.]
[Before Jan. 7.] Notice that a General Court of the Royal African Company would be held at the African House on 14 Jan. at 3 p.m. for declaring the state of the stock and the choice of the governor, sub-governor, and deputy governor for the ensuing year, in order to which the adventurers were desired to bring in their votes between 9 and 12 that day, and that another general court would be held on Tuesday, the 18th, at 3 p.m., for the election of 24 assistants, and that the adventurers are desired to bring in their votes alphabetically on Monday afternoon between 3 and 6, and that a list of the names of all the adventurers might be had any time after the 7th. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 34.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Order in Council for printing and publishing a proclamation against seditious libels. Ibid. No. 35.] Annexed,
Draft of the said proclamation. [Ibid. No. 35i.]
Jan. 7.
Bobbing Court.
Sir George Moore to Williamson. I received yours last Friday evening, and on Monday morning sent for James Goodin, master of the house at Sittingbourne, and examined him on oath concerning such words as should in his hearing be spoken against the King and the Duke. His testimony I have enclosed, on which I sent him to Mr. Napleton, clerk of our petty sessions, first taking his recognizance to prosecute, if the parties should be apprehended; if not, that he should appear at his Majesty's command to answer for himself. He with Mr. Napleton with my warrant went away immediately to Dover to Col. Strode, who granted them his warrant, and sent with them his sergeant-at-arms, who in St. Peter's, Thanet, found and apprehended the two persons, Stephen Wootton and Thomas Venterman, who immediately confessed they had spoken the words in Goodin's examination. As I shall be further directed I shall proceed, but the two men apprehended and in Dover Castle are but very poor fishermen as 'tis generally reported in the island. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Jan. 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This noon the Dutch East India ships sailed, the wind being S.E. and by E., a brave wind, and with them about 50 other outward-bound ships, but the East India English ships budge not.
'Tis reported his Majesty has publicly showed himself to the great enjoyment of his good subjects.
No Straits ships are yet come in, so those 8 packets sent me the first instant are by me. Little wind at S.E. and by E. [Ibid. No. 3l.]
Jan. 7.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came on the backside of the Goodwin Sands 100 of the Holland fleet of merchantmen outward-bound with their convoy, who are to join with nine of their East Indiamen that ride off the South Foreland. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Jan. 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 39.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 39i.]
Jan. 7. Notes by Williamson of a debate in the Privy Council.—Mr. Attorney—1. Justices of Peace very easy to give licences.
2. They cannot be forced to give any, nor an action lie against them.
3. As to licences granted now:—
i. If granted simply, then they may be revoked.
ii. If for a time certain (as now some are said to be).—If the statute had empowered them to give for a certain time (as in the case of the wine licences), then they could not have been revoked. But now that the time is ascertained though by construction of law only, it is doubtful whether (?) the licences.
1. For the time to come, they may forbear to renew, and in Middlesex all licences are out. In London it is alleged they have licences for a time certain. Here it is doubt whether it may be.
N.B. The primary intent of this law was to secure the duty. Query, where the officers of Excise have secured the duty for a time certain, and the Justices granting (?) so that here certain time granted, being for a time certain, it may be very doubtful, if here the licences may be recalled.
Mr. Solicitor.—1. Prays time to give his opinion, if it may please the King.
2. If the King commands it, offers it.
Lord Chancellor.—Whether the licence to sell coffee be an interest or an authority only. Wine licence is made by law an interest and may be assigned, coffee licence a power only.
Mr. Taylor (?) N.B. Denies that they have anything to object to the legality of the prohibition, &c., but fly to the King's mercy as to matter of leniency (?) to them. Pray favour (?) upon regulations, &c. Proposes, 1. the excisemen who give certificates to do it only with loyal men.
2. To take security to discover what they know or hear said prejudicial to the Government.
Securities to excise are usually for three years, licences for a year usually from December to December.
Garroway. Has a licence and divers others have from this last December to that of the next year, from the Lord Mayor as chief magistrate of the City, dated the very same morning the proclamation was ordered here, viz., 30 Dec.
N.B. Agreed by the King and Council that the chief magistrate may grant licences by the law, though ill expressed.
As to the duration (?) of the licence. It follows the certificate, must be or may be at least as long as a security is certified to be given for assuring the duty, &c. N.B. This was the end of the Act, to secure by re-admittance (?) the duty and to impose a licence as the means, but the meaning of the Act is not to license or empower the vending of the commodity, and, though no time be specified in the licence, yet necessarily the licence ought to be construed to be of the extent of the certificate. N.B. This is but reasoning out of the law, &c., because the licence cannot be longer than the certificate, for so the King would be without security; cannot be less, for so the retailer should be obliged to pay duty longer than he can sell it, &c., as a tenant attorning for a day owes rent for the whole term, &c., and yet they do not stand upon the point of law, &c.
Expedients:—1. Not in common rooms. 2. Good behaviour from the master of the house &c. to the extent of those of alehouses. 3. On any information found of words spoken &c. in any coffee house and not discovered by the master whether he were present or no, he to forfeit his recognizance. 4. Printed or written libels &c., letters &c. that are publicly spread or uttered in their house, the master to be answerable on bond.
The coffee-house. Conditions. 1. Ordered to prevent all libels, papers, scandalous &c. and unlicensed books &c. from being brought into the house, from being read. 2. All scandalous false reports &c. 3. If otherwise, then to give information within two days to a justice of the peace, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 40.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Appointment of George Frost to be gamekeeper within 20 miles of Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 103.]
Jan. 7. Warrant, after reciting a grant to Robert Child and Thomas Turnor of the office of clerks for writing and engrossing all leases of land and indentures for years which should pass the Great Seal, and that Child had lately died, and that it was uncertain whether Turnor was alive or dead, for a grant of the said office to Edward Seymour for his life and the life of Henry, his son, to take effect immediately if Turnor be dead, but, if he be living, on the determination of his interest. [Precedents 1, f. 127.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Proclamation offering a reward of 20l. to any who shall discover the persons by whom, or the places where the infamous scandalous libels traducing the government and stirring up to rebellion are printed or transcribed since the last general pardon, and a reward of 50l. to any who shall find the author or the person by whom they are sent to press. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 344.]
[Jan. ?] The Duke of Monmouth to the King. Petition, stating that by a reference of 14 June, 1674, his request for the reversion of certain leases in Ireland was recommended to the Earl of Essex to report thereon, who by order of 2 Sept., 1674, required the AuditorGeneral of Ireland to search and report concerning the schedule of particulars thereunto annexed, and that, since his report was in some particulars clear and in others doubtful, the petitioner by a second petition desired some of those that appeared most clear to be granted, whereon his Majesty granted another reference, upon both of which his Excellency has reported of the reasonableness of the petitioner's desires, and that there are several other particulars in the schedule hereto annexed set out by custodium to several persons and at the rents therein named, which with several other particulars in the first schedule not reported on are undoubtedly in his Majesty's dispose, and therefore praying an order for passing letters patent containing a grant, as well of the particulars whereon the petitioner has obtained his Excellency's report as likewise of the reversion in fee, to the petitioner his heirs and assigns of all the particulars in the annexed schedule or any ways named in the petitioner's first list not otherwise disposed of at the rents formerly and now reserved on the same, unless it shall appear to the Lord Lieutenant that the premises or any of them are otherwise disposed of by patent. At the foot,
Jan. 7.
Whitehall
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 1.] Annexed,
List of several things in his Majesty's dispose granted to the Duke of Monmouth. [Ibid. No. 1i.]
Report by the Lord Lieutenant that he conceives that such of the lands and other hereditaments in the schedule as are held of the Crown by lease, and are not already disposed of, may be granted to the petitioner, according to his desire, and in order thereto his Majesty may direct letters to the Lord Lieutenant to examine which of them remain undisposed of, and are not rested in his Majesty to be disposed of according to the rules of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and also such as are not annexed to the Sword or the Judges' places, and thereby authorizing him to pass letters patent of such of them as remain in his Majesty's hands to the petitioner and his heirs, to be held under such rents as the same during the continuance of the several leases thereof are or were liable. 29 March. At the foot,
Further reference thereof to the Lord Treasurer. Whitehall, 19 April. On the back,
His report agreeing with the Lord Lieutenant's report. Wallingford House, 22 April. [Ibid. No. 1ii.]
Another copy of the above reference to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 76.]
Another copy of the Lord Lieutenant's report and of the above reference to the Lord Treasurer. [Ibid. p. 101.]
Jan. 8.
Newhall.
The Duke of Albemarle to Williamson. Requesting him to present to his Majesty the underwritten names for his approbation to be deputy lieutenants of the county of Devon, and the county and city of Exeter, viz., Sir William Morris, Sir Edward Seymour, Sir Peter Prideaux, Sir Courteney Poole, Sir Copleston Bampfield, Sir John Northcott, Sir John Davy, Sir Hugh Ackland, Sir John Fowell, Sir Thomas Putt, baronets; Sir John Rolls, Sir Richard Edgcombe, K.B.'s; Sir Thomas Carew, Peter Prideaux, John Bassett, Robert Fortescue, Francis Drew, John Chichester, Arthur Northcott and Henry Norleigh; and for Exeter the Mayor for the time being, Sir James Smith, Thomas Walker and Nicholas Isaac. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 41.]
Another copy of the above names. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Jan. 8
London
Thomas Overbury to —. Having received an invitation from some of your burgesses in case of a new parliament to serve them in it, and having no reason to expect less kindness from you than others to whom I am more a stranger, I am induced to ask your voice and advice, for, as I have always been and shall ever be ready to serve your corporation, I would not willingly so far defer it as to be the least occasion of unnecessary differences amongst them, and on the other side am as unwilling to lose any opportunity that may enable me to contribute towards the buoying a sinking, if not ruined and undone nation, for I presume you are not less sensible in your corporation than we in the country of the great decay of trade and of the general poverty that has ensued thereon, which, if not quickly remedied, will soon reduce us to the utmost misery, our wool and woollen manufacture being already at so low an ebb that it will scarce afford the owner or artificer a livelihood. The like may be said of most other commodities of English growth and manufacture, whilst our money is being carried into foreign parts for toys and trifles we had better be without, which has already reduced us to so great want and beggary that, were not God merciful in affording us yet plenty of corn, our poor would starve and the rich be hardly enough put to it to live. These evils are sufficiently seen and felt, and greater yet justly feared, which are not to be prevented or remedied but by a parliament free from partiality and faction. I therefore heartily wish that God would put it into the King's heart to call a new one, before it be too late, and that the country would choose such as would make it their business to serve the public in promoting the general good of the people, not the particular interest or advantage of a party to the prejudice, if not ruin, of the whole, which we have at present more than ordinary cause to fear. I had not given you this trouble, but to wipe off the reproach I have lain under of being wanting to myself and my country in that coldness and indifferency I have hitherto shown on those occasions, having indeed always esteemed it both the interest and duty of countries and corporations, as heretofore, freely to choose their representatives, and that none ought so much as to propose, much impose themselves upon them in so great a trust, and am satisfied we shall never have a right constituted or true English parliament till it comes to that again. But while custom makes it necessary that to serve our country we must do as others do, I hope you will pardon this importunity, though after all I see not the least probability of a new parliament, but, whensoever it may please God to send us one, knowing of what consequence it will be towards the welfare or ruin of this nation, I cannot but concern myself therein. You will therefore, I hope, excuse this application in so extraordinary a juncture and nice and critical a season, the like whereof no former age hath known here, and future times I wish may never see. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 43.]
Jan. 8
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The weather continues fair, the wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Jan. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived early this morning, but brought no passenger nor any news. Wind N.E. Weather cold. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 8.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Concord of this port in three days from Rotterdam, where she carried corn. The master tells me of the great number of English ships in that port till these late easterly winds, upwards of 400 sail, three-parts of them laden thither on the same account as he, so that corn is now at reasonable prices in those countries. They had some whispering there at their coming away, as if De Ruyter's fleet had engaged the French in the Straits and had had the worst of it. The English Ambassador was received there with their guns and treated very civilly at his arrival. The late storms have had very sad effects with them, for, as well as the loss of many ships on their coasts, their former breaches being not yet fully made up, the waters about Haarlem and some other places are again broke in upon them to their great detriment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 46.]
Jan. 8.
Holyhead.
Richard [Owe ?] n to James Hickes. I have sent Lord O'Brien's letter over. This boat brings news that he intends over in a day or two. I must desire you to give me a line of the Lord Lieutenant's coming out of your town. [Surname of writer gone. Ibid. No. 47.]
Jan. 8. Notes by Williamson of the Judges' opinions about coffee-houses. Chief Justice North, the Lord Chief Baron, Rainsford, Wyndham, Bertie.—Lord Chief Baron:—Point of fact desired to be known. In Middlesex none are in being. In London there are some. Judges return in:—1. None can sell without licence according to the Act. 2. The Sessions is not bound to grant any particular person that asks it, but according to their discretion (?) even though a certificate be brought of security given, that is upon any unqualification. 3. No chief magistrate that changes may grant a licence. 4. Where licences are granted for a certain time, and that time not expired, whether such licences can be recalled &c. There is a doubt, and they do not think it convenient to say, when no unqualification in the party, whether the sessions can revoke it, that being an interest in the person, it being provided that the party taking a licence shall first contract and agree about a security &c. before he have licence &c. This is the cause of a doubt. 1 Query. Security being given for 3 years are the Sessions obliged to give a licence for 3 years ? 2 Query. The person dying within the 3 years shall the licence come necessarily to the executor? In a licence from the King. Universi:—That the King may put an end to all coffeehouses, when licences are expired &c. Doubt, whether where the licences are in being. Universi:—That the magistrate cannot licence according to that clause. That of those that have licences granted duly, security may be demanded for the good behaviour &c. and good order.
Lord Chief Baron:—Any man at common law might sell these liquors. The intent of the Act is to raise a revenue, not to licence a trade. Rainsford:—In the King's power to stop all coffee-houses, if he please, that is his ministers refusing to take a security or to agree, and that being, no licence can be given by the Sessions. Lord Chief Baron:—By the common law retailers of coffee may retail it as the shops do, i.e. for people to buy and go away, but to sit there and drink it, 40 or 50 in a room, may be a nuisance, and for that reason a licence may be refused. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 8.
The Chapter House. Oxford.
Certificate by the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Oxford, of their election of Dr. John Fell, Dean of the said church, to the bishopric of Oxford. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F., No. 72.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir George Downing. Once more we are to trouble you and your colleagues, the late Commissioners appointed to treat with those of Holland. The point of trade from enemy's port to enemy's port is at last over, and according to what you and they advised the King. There still rests that other of revisions, which I am commanded to transmit once again to you and your colleagues for your final opinion and advice as to the model and method his Majesty should insist to have agreed and settled for the practice and execution of that article between his Majesty and the States.
You know the words of the article, and enclosed you will find an extract from one of Sir W. Temple's letters; which shows what has passed between him and the Pensionary about it, and in what terms the thing is now left. It rests now that his Majesty say in what way he desires and insists to have the article practised on each part, and this is the point your opinions are asked in. You will communicate it to the rest of your fellow Commissioners and procure their resolution as speedily as possible, a case of some consequence having long depended on this matter in Holland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 68.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Viscount Ranelagh and his partners, showing that by the contract of 4 Aug., 1671, his Majesty covenanted with them, that in case any of the funds thereby assigned to them should be lessened, extinguished or diverted by any act of his Majesty, he would allow them a proportionable abatement out of the sums by them undertaken, that they do not doubt to make it appear that their demands grounded on the said covenant amount to more than 100,000l., that they are obliged by their contract to pay to his Majesty 80,000l., to Col. Lane's daughters 6,000l., and for purchase of the Customs of Londonderry 4,000l., at the times and proportions therein mentioned, which, amounting together to 90,000l., they are not able to pay by reason of the many and great remittals granted by his Majesty, and the payments made by them by his express command for the necessary carrying on of his service, though not comprehended in their contract, but that they are ready to discount the same out of their settled demands grounded as aforesaid, and therefore praying that the Chief Governor of Ireland might be directed, taking to his assistance the Commissioners of Accounts, forthwith to examine and settle the petitioners' demands, and, on their releasing to his Majesty so many of them as shall amount to 90,000l., to grant them such release and discharge of the said three sums as their counsel shall advise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 74.]
Jan. 8. Pass for Eberhard van Graffenthall, employed by his Majesty in certain matters relating to his service in Sweden, to embark at any port in order to pass to Stockholm. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 103.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant at the request of the Mayor and Capital Burgesses of Tiverton for changing the day of the market there from Monday to Tuesday. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 105.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General, after reciting that, for the better support of the children of the new royal foundation in Christ's Hospital, the King had sent letters of recommendation to the principal companies of merchants by whose mediation with the masters of ships employed by them able masters may be provided for entertaining the said children as apprentices for seven years, and that, for the better encouragement of the masters who so take them, the King is pleased to allow to each of the said children the usual pay of an ordinary seaman in the King's service, being 19s. each lunar month, to continue for the first three years of their apprenticeships and to be paid by an advance of the first year's wages in hand, and the remainder at the end of each subsequent year, on condition that the King, if required, may have the service of each apprentice the last of the said three years, allowing wages for the same equal to the profit in wages the master could otherwise make of him in his own employment, and that the number of children thus provided for, for the year ending 31 Dec., 1675, is 15, and for each subsequent year 10 and no more, according to which the said annual charge will for the said year amount to 185l. 5s., for the year ending 31 Dec., 1676, 308l. 15s., for the year ending 31 Dec., 1677, 432l. 5s., and for the year ending 31 Dec., 1678, wherein the number of the said children will be 30, 370l. 10s. and so on for ever, the said money to be paid at Christmas to the Treasurer of the Hospital, and to be issued by warrant from the President and Governors thereof for the said uses:—To prepare a grant, inserting therein a clause that the said moneys and also the sum already granted for the maintenance of the children of this foundation, while they remain in the Hospital, be so paid to the Treasurer that they may have the full benefit of the King's bounties without any diminution by fees, imprest, or other charge whatsoever; and, that the King may be always rightly informed as well as to the success of his bounty as to the number and quality of persons raised therefrom for his service, the indenture on putting forth each child is to be signed by the master taking him in the presence of the Master Wardens and Assistants of the Trinity House and there registered, and the said President and Governors, before receiving the said sum to be annually paid them, are to present to the Lord Admiral or the Lords of the Admiralty and to the Navy Commissioners a list, containing as well the names of all the children remaining in the said mathematical school, as the names, ages and date of indenture of each child bound as an apprentice and then resting in the King's charge, with the name and especial trade of the master to whom he is bound. [3¼ pages. Ibid.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 49.]
Jan. 8. Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to search for and seize all copies of a scandalous unlicensed book maintaining the lawfulness of Polygamy, of which several copies are said to be now stitching or binding in the shop or house of a bookseller in King Street, Westminster, and to bring them before Williamson, with the person or persons in whose shop, house or warehouse the same shall be found. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 109.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Proclamation extending the time for suppression of coffee-house to 24 June next, the owners having represented the loss they should incur on account of the quantities of tea and coffee in their hands, and having expressed their sorrow for former abuses in such houses, and their willingness to enter into recognizances to prevent them. Annexed,
i.Blank recognizance to be taken by coffee-house keepers, to allow no scandalous papers, books or libels to be brought into their house or to be read there, and to prevent all persons from declaring there any false and scandalous reports against the government or its ministers, and to give information of any such papers or reports. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 345.]
Jan. 9.
Cleonger.
Herbert Aubrey to Williamson. Requesting his kind endeavours with Sir John Duncombe, from whom he has received a letter threatening him with Exchequer process, if he does not declare his account by the first day of term. He has already paid into the Exchequer the money he agreed to pay the last term, and is now raising the residue by levying a fine on part of his estate, by selling what he dwells in, and selling all his personal estate. If he removes suddenly, all the hardship of the Exchequer cannot out of his estate raise so much money in three years, as now, having credit and liberty, he can do in three months. He will come up by the end of the term and make it appear he has effectually employed the time he asks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 50.]
Jan. 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. Last Wednesday the Dreadnought and Mermaid after being repaired in the dry dock were launched, and Thursday the Plymouth was put into their berth to be repaired. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Jan. 9. Warrant to Robert Ostler, messenger, to search for Mrs. Sampson, living at the sign of the Nag's Head near Mill Stairs, Southwark, and Mrs. Gardner, wife of Thomas Gardner, living at the sign of the Rose in Salisbury Lane, Southwark, and to secure them and bring them in safe custody before Williamson for spreading false and seditious news. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 109.]
Jan. 9. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation. Sir W. Temple's letter of 4–14 Jan. As to the King's ambassadors expecting the first visit from all others even arriving after them. Beverning and Haren sent to Sir William to discourse it with him. They declare they will do it as to themselves. They doubt whether others will or not, seeing at Cologne and Aix, 1673, the Swedes had first received even then the Hollanders arriving last and having signified their arrival. What shall be the rule in this case ? 1. Whether France, that settled this rule with the King in the Congress of Cologne and Sweden, who had it actually practised to them, shall not be insisted with to granting it to the King. M. de Ruvigny to be put in mind that their ambassadors have orders to do it, and so Sweden. 2. As to all other parties who may pretend not to be concluded by what we resolved or practised at Cologne, what shall be the rule towards them now? The first instructions to Sir W. Temple and Sir L. Jenkins to stand as to other ambassadors.
As to solemn entries at Nimeguen. What if any other ambassadors shall desire to make their entries, &c.? Monsr. Colbert did it at Aix and possibly may desire to do so now. The Emperor's ambassadors possibly may. Hollanders resolve to remit them to the mediators. The King to make none, and to persuade others to make none, if they can. As to Passes. The States refuse to allow Sir W. Temple to send their passports to the French Ambassadors till he has at the same time passports from France for their ambassadors and for those of their allies, mentioned in the States' resolution in the same form their's now run. M. de Ruvigny has been told of it.
England.—The examination about words spoken at Sittingbourne. Col. Strode's letter and Sir G. Moore's. Examine (?) the women, and see if they confess. If so, well; if not, send for the men to prove it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 69.]
[Jan. ?] Elizabeth, relict of the late Lord Clifford to the King. Petition, stating to the effect of her petition to the Queen, calendared ante, p. 465, and, as she has leave from the Queen to petition his Majesty, praying a grant of the reversion of the premises for 40 years to commence after the existing term of 31 years. At the foot,
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 52.]
Another copy of the above reference dated the 11th. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 77.]
Jan. 10.
Wallingford House.
The Earl of Danby to the King. Report on the reference of 16 June last to him of the petition of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London, that by a report from the agents for bringing in the assessments made on a conference they had with several of the commissioners for the 18 months' assessment in the City, and the receiver and solicitor for the same, he finds that the petitioners caused the whole sum charged on the City by the Act for the 18 months' assessment to be assessed, and have endeavoured that the utmost penny assessed should be answered, but by reason of many empty houses and tofts unbuilt (rateably assessed with inhabited houses) there has not been paid to the Receiver General so much as will answer the full charge of the said Act by 1,063l. 16s. 11½d. over and above the 800l. per mensem mentioned in the said petition, which his Majesty, when the assessment was first agreed to, promised to abate to the City out of the sum of 5,091l. 11s. 4d. monthly charged on the same by the said Act, so that there still falls short of the said tax not only the 800l. per mensem amounting to 14,400l. but the further sum of 1,063l. 16s. 11½d., in the whole 15,463l. 16s. 11½d., which he humbly conceives may be reasonably abated in regard of the many houses in the said City uninhabited, tofts unbuilt and other circumstances. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 53.]
Jan. 10.
Spring Garden.
Sir Robert Southwell to William Bridgeman. By command of the Lords of the Committee for Foreign Plantations, I am to enquire at the Secretaries' offices for such Acts as may have been transmitted from any of the said plantations and there remain attending his Majesty's pleasure, all which they desire to have that they may prepare them for his Majesty's view, and also to enquire with you how the foreign governors have complied with their obligation of taking several oaths before entering on their charges as: 1st, the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy; 2, an oath for the due execution of their commands; 3, the oath for the due execution of the Navigation Act, by which they are obliged twice every year to return true copies of the bonds taken by them to the officers of the Custom house, London, and, by a later Act for regulating the Plantation Trade, they are once a year at least to return a list of all ships that lade the plantation commodities there enumerated, as also of the bonds taken by them, which oaths are directed to be taken before such persons as his Majesty shall authorize. The Lords having sent to the Custom house find a very loose and imperfect return of these bonds, some of the governors having sent a few and many none at all, so they desire information from your office, whence any of these governors have been dispatched, to know which of them have taken or not taken the oaths they ought, that accordingly they may be written to for the better execution of the said Acts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 54.]
Jan. 10. H. Oldenburg to Williamson. I return the English of five letters of the six you put into my hands last Saturday. The sixth being in Danish and very illegibly written requires some assistant better versed in that tongue, whom I shall endeavour to find with what speed I can. I add a note lately received from Paris, "Tons ceux de la diete de Ratisbone out demandé la paix tons d'une ceux Cependant le Resident de Brandenbourg a supplié V Empereur de s'emploier pour faire defendre les marchandises de France, et faire sortir les Francois hors de l' Empire; ce qui n'a pas esté trop esconte." [Ibid. No. 55.]
Jan. 10.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Taking notice by the Gazettes of the sad losses by sea in other parts, I take notice how happy we have been on this coast. All this winter I do not hear of one ship lost, though we had a much greater trade than usual, chiefly by transport of all sorts of grain for Holland, which has been very advantageous to the public and the merchants, insomuch that, besides the return of goods from thence, the merchants have not only brought over all the English money that could be there exchanged, but have likewise brought over great quantities of dollars. All other affairs in these parts are in a very well settled condition. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Jan. 10.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. At present there are near 100 sail in the harbour most outward-bound for France, two for the Canaries, nine of London for Barbados, &c., about 12 or 14 from France with wine and brandy, one from France with rye for Rotterdam. (News of the St. Peter as in the next letter.) [Ibid. No. 57.]
Jan. 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 8th came in here the St. Peter of London from Malaga for Holland. Off the Straits' mouth they met with a Sallee man-of-war. They boarded him with about 100 men which they cleared again with the loss only of their doctor. They exchanged several broadsides, but at last the Turk was forced to leave them. They met since with much foul weather. The same day came in the Peter of London from Nantes laden with wines and brandy, homeward-bound. The day before they met with a French man-of-war, which took from them six hogsheads of wine and four butts of brandy and one pack of linen cloth, all to the value of 150l. It is supposed to be the man-of-war that was in at Dartmouth. Several other vessels are come in from France, which met with much foul weather, and a Danish ship from the West Indies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 58.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Benjamin Herbert to the [rectory] of Suckley, co. Worcester, void by resignation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 80.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Approbation of the Right Honourable Sir William Morris, P.C., Sir Edward Seymour, Sir Peter Prideaux, Sir Courtney Poole, Sir Copleston Bampfield, Sir John Northcott, Sir John Davy, Sir Hugh Ackland, Sir John Fowell, Sir Thomas Putt, Sir John Rolls, Sir Richard Edgcombe, Sir John Carew, Peter Prideaux, John Bassett, Robert Fortescue, Francis Drew, John Chichester, Arthur Northcott, and Henry Norleigh to be deputy lieutenants of Devonshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 20.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Approbation of the Mayor of Exeter pro tempore, Sir James Smith, Thomas Walker and Nicholas Isaac to be deputy lieutenants of Exeter. [Ibid.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John, Lord Belasyse, showing that he is indebted to his Majesty relating to the affairs of Tangier, 1,098l. 13s. 0½d., and that there is due to him greater sums as Governor of Tangier and Captain of the Pensioners and praying that the first sum may be set off against the sums due to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 76.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of the Duke of Monmouth showing that a grant of his of several leases in Ireland is obstructed by Col. Cary Dillon on pretence that he has prior letters patent and privy seals from the late King of those very parcels and praying that the Attorney-General may be ordered to examine his pretensions, Col. Dillon agreeing to the same. [Ibid. p. 77.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chancellor to cause the great seal to be affixed to an instrument of even date containing the ratification of a certain declaration on the articles of the Marine Treaty of 1 Dec., 1674, and of the Treaty of Navigation and Commerce of 17 Feb., 1667–8, between the King and the States General signed at the Hague, 20/30 Dec. last. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 110.]
Jan. 10.
Dublin.
G. Bodurda to Viscount Conway. I was not a little surprised at finding by your letter of the 1st to Lord Granard, as if you had honoured me with some letters, the receipt of which I had neglected to signify. Your last to me was of 14 Dec. which I immediately acknowledged, and I have troubled you with two or three since, wherein were letters enclosed from Lord Granard, and in my last but one I prayed your furtherance in getting Col. Spencer's company for his son, his Lordship conceiving it not amiss he holds a company whilst a troop is coming. My Lord's letter, as I take it, was likewise to acquaint you that the Earl of Drogheda was given over by his physicians, though I understand since he is not in so unrecoverable a condition as was then given out, and, as a symptom of it, I was told that, a ship of French wines arriving at Drogheda, he ordered 4 tuns to be laid in for him. I do not know that any of these letters came short of going by the packet for which they were intended, and hope it proved not so, for one at the post office whom I take to be honest, assures me there has been no mistake nor miscarriage on this side.
The wife of 679, I believe, is engaged as an instrument on behalf of the younger brother of 167, in his pretensions at the place where 158 and 179 eat together about this time twelve month and the last of them lodged there too. I will call one of them 35 and the other 36. The good old woman of the house, who, I suppose, knows little of these matters, I will call 37, and the wife of the brother of 12 I will call 38, though for the present I can only say that 679 and 35 are together every night, and 36 is at the house of 679 with 38, twice or thrice a week or oftener, and sometimes as often in a day. I understand 158 seldom goes there, but that, having direction from 178 to find out the state of affairs, he resolves to be a more frequent visitor. I find that 178 is nice in the point of honour in reference to the administration of the least interruption to be given to 35, and has instructed 158 to learn whether there be or is like to be an understanding between 35 and 36, and, as soon as ever it shall appear that no agreement is like to be, then 158 to deal with 38 about the matter upon the grounds written by 179 to 178, but without discovery or in the least pointing out the persons till further consideration, and this work 158 goes immediately about. He is of opinion, if 35 fail, 38 will be the fittest person that can be engaged. Though 178 has limited 158 to wait the final recess of 35, yet 158 assures me he will pursue in this matter such further directions as 179 shall find requisite to send him. I am certainly informed that, if 37 can hinder, 35 shall not succeed, neither do I think the project for the person in France will ever take place by dealing immediately with 37 but immediately with 36, nor will 248 of 124, if he pursue his design, be disappointed otherwise than by prepossessing 36 with hopes and apprehensions of better things. If the friends of the person in France have thoughts of effecting their purpose above board with 37, I cannot, when I consider the bigotism of 37, but think they will fail therein, and that 248 of 124 will be preferred by 37 and those that govern 37.
The packet of the 1st arrived Saturday night and that of the 4th yesterday. That which was hinted so long ago by 179 is now since these last packets talked of somewhat rifely, I mean concerning 159, but, notwithstanding all, he enjoys to this day the name and the real thing. We do not by these late letters find any day fixed for the Lord Lieutenant's setting out. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 2.]
[Before Jan. 11.] Notice to Williamson of a meeting of a Court of Assistants of the Royal African Company at the African House, Throgmorton Street, on Tuesday, 11 Jan., at 2 p.m. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 59.] Annexed,
List of the names of all the Adventurers of the said Company and also of the members of the Court of Assistants chosen in Jan., 1674–5, with note that the present sub-governor and deputy governor by the rules cannot be chosen in the same capacity, but may be chosen of the Assistants, and that no more than 16 of the Assistants can be chosen two years together. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 59i.]
Jan. 11. The information of Sergeant Woldgate against Justice Amfrevill and Mr. Cannon taken before Sir J. Williamson. Cannon denying to quarter the soldier, he complained to the sergeant, who went with him to his landlord to know why he would not quarter. Cannon utterly denied to quarter the soldier, unless he paid for his lodging. The above mentioned Justice being by told him he was a fool if he did, and bade him get a warrant and have him clapped by the heels, for he was a red coat rogue, and, if he was in his liberties, he would clap him by the heels immediately. [Ibid. No. 60.]
[Jan. ?] The information of George Feathersby against Cannon, an innkeeper in Fetter Lane. The said Cannon refused to quarter him. When he told him that the constable had quartered him there by the King's order, he answered that the King was a fool, and that there was none but fools and knaves about him. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Jan. 11. Peter Brunskell to Williamson. You desire to be satisfied that the business will answer the Colonel's good service to his Majesty and gratify him. His counsel puts him on it, and he will accept it as a full recompense. The patent lies in the Rolls Chapel. He delays taking out a copy because it's large, and as all other company's patents are. The petition shows as much in effect as the record itself, unless it be matter of form to draw it by, and there will be no need, unless the Attorney or Solicitor General require it. I crave a dispatch, for references are merely matter of form, and none was ever yet denied where the business may plainly appear pro bono publico et pricato. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Jan. 11. Bond in the penalty of 100l. given by Jacob Smyth of the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, for the appearance before the Privy Council or any person appointed by them of Elizabeth Sampson of the Nag's Head in Southwark. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Jan. 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Saturday evening came into the Tees a Dunkirk caper of 80 men and 4 guns. She came from the northward, and is said to have carried a dogger prize into Tynemouth haven. She came in with the wind E. and by N.; now it is N.W. with frost and snow. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last night came in one of our packet-boats. They bring no news. The master was at Helvoetsluys, and says the late tempestuous weather much prejudiced their walls thereabouts. The wind for a long time has been N.E. Yesterday it got northerly, bringing some snow. This morning it is much westerly, with sunshine and a thaw. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 65.]
Jan. 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. The Canary ships that put into the Isle of Wight with contrary winds bound for London sail to-day, as do others which have been stopped in the same kind. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Jan. 11.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived and stating that he had seen a letter from Falmouth giving an account of the fight between the St. Peter and a Sallee man-of-war described in Holden's letter of the 10th calendared ante, p. 506. [Ibid. No. 67.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 67i.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to pay to James and Francis Archer, who are travelling in foreign parts to improve their knowledge of fortifications in order to render them more capable of service as engineers, 50l. a year each. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 208.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Like warrant to pay to John Lingard 60l. a year, as firemaster in the Ordnance Office. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Circular letter from the King to the East India Company, the Muscovy Company, the Eastland Company, the Royal African Company and the Levant Company. After reciting that he had by letters patent of 19 Aug., 1673, founded in Christ's Hospital a Mathematical School for 40 boys to be instructed in Navigation and Arithmetic, until their age and proficiency shall have qualified them for being initiated into the practice of navigation and bound to some able commanders or masters as apprentices, and that, reflecting on the proof already given of the effects of this his royal bounty in the extraordinary proficiency of 15 of the said children first chosen into the said school, as represented to him after strict examination by the Master and Wardens of the Trinity House, from his inclination to perfect so pious and public a work by providing encouragement for a constant supply of able and sober masters for entertaining the said children, he had granted by letters patents now passing to Christ Hospital an allowance of common seamen's pay to be given to each master who shall take one of the said children as apprentice as therein expressed, and that the good-will and assistance of the principal companies of merchants may by their interposition with the masters employed by them further conduce to securing the said supply; most effectually recommending to them the promotion of this work, not doubting they will give their utmost furtherance and assistance therein as often as they shall be applied to by the Governors of the Hospital in that behalf. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 20.]
Separate copies of the letters to the above five companies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, Nos. 68–72.]
Draft of the above letter with alterations by Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 73.]
Draft by Williamson of the beginning of the above letter. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Titles of the several companies to whom the letters were to be directed. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir George Moore. I have yours of the 8th and thank you for the trouble you continue to take about the words spoken at Sittingbourne. We have found out the two women on whom that abominable speech is fathered by the two seamen. One confesses to have said the words in effect, and says she heard them from a certain poor market woman; the other denies them absolutely or anything like them. To-morrow at the Council the matter will be considered, and, according as the Lords think fit to proceed in it, I shall give notice to Col. Strode, as I have told him by this night's post, what he is to do with the two seamen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 69.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Strode. Giving an account of the two women as in the last, and informing him that he will let him know the decision of the Council to-morrow about the two seamen. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Warrant to Mr. Eles, the messenger, to search for, apprehend, and bring in safe custody before Williamson — Canon, an innkeeper in Fetter Lane, who is charged with having spoken several treasonable words. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 110.]
Jan. 12. The information of John Couch of the parish of St. Mary Savoy, taken before Sir J. Williamson. Thomas Jon, William Peate and Thomas Jenkinson have all, or most of them been employed in transcribing and writing libels. Mr. Temple, of the Six Clerks' office, told the informant that on reading the proclamation for the discovery of seditious libels he knew that the persons above-named and particularly Jon transcribed libels, that they have on the proclamation absconded themselves, and that he, Temple, knows where they are to be found. One Green, lately apprehended and at present a prisoner in Newgate, has been employed for some time in transcribing libels. Temple told the informant to-day that each of the above said persons have writ some libels. Mr. Couch knows where the above persons are retired to, that they are at Mr. Jon's, a kinsman of the above Jon, near the Falcon Stairs in Southwark, over against the Temple, and they have absconded themselves in the said Jon's house ever since Green was apprehended, lest he should discover them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 76.]
Jan. 12. Shorter similar information by Couch. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Jan. 12.
Dover Castle.
Col. John Strode to Williamson. Requesting a line or two to tell him whether the two seamen about whom he had written some days ago (see ante, p. 493) should be sent to the county gaol or sent up to London to produce the original of such licentious and scandalous reports. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Jan. 12. Warrant to Richard Gammon, messenger, to search for, secure and bring in safe custody before Williamson, Mr. Temple of the Six Clerks' office, who, as Williamson is informed, knows where certain persons lately employed in writing and transcribing seditious and scandalous libels are at present retired to. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 111.]
Jan. 12. Licence to the High Sheriff of Berkshire to repair to London and Westminster, or elsewhere as his occasions may require. [Precedents 1, f. 128.]
Jan. 12. Notes by Williamson about an action from Jersey apparently that in which Sir Philip Carteret was concerned, as to which see his notes calendared ante, p. 484. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 33.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The examination of John Temple, living at Mr. Hutchinson's, a bricklayer in Green Dragon Alley in the Strand, taken before Sir J. Williamson. The examinant says he has written this half year for Mr. Petit of the Inner Temple, that Mr. Jon and Mr. Jenkinson writ in the said Petit's office, and that, since Green was apprehended, Jon and Jenkinson have absented themselves from Petit's office, which gives the examinant reason to think that Green having been imprisoned for writing libels they have done the like and therefore abscond themselves, lest on Green's confession they might likewise be apprehended and imprisoned. The examinant does not know, nor has he ever seen any libels written by Jenkinson, Green or Jon, but that they three only writ in Petit's office and were very intimate with one another. Mr. Peate, who keeps a coffee-house in Sheer Lane has, the examinant says, been frequently with Jon both before and since he absconded himself, and he has told this examinant that he had been with Jon several times since he absented himself, and therefore the examinant believes Peate certainly knows where Jon at present is. Mr. Skinner living at Mr. Latham's in Chancery Lane, told the examinant that Jon was at Mr. Jon's, who keeps a tavern at Southwark, near the Falcon Stairs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 79.]
Jan. 13.
Grittleton.
Dr. Thomas Tullie to Williamson. I could not be unmindful of the many signal favours you have laid on me, though my sickness has brought me so low that I am not able to return you my thanks with my own hand. I doubt not that the reversion of Ripon has been in many men's eyes since I had it, and now my weak condition may have put them in a very fair way shortly to enjoy that, of which I have not yet reaped any profit, yet, might I but hope that my poor aged brother were to succeed me, it would be more welcome news to me than if I were to enjoy it myself. I have sufficiently experienced your readiness to gratify even those who never could plead merit for the least of your favours, and therefore may fear some more worthy person may have forestalled my market; if so, I humbly beg you would excuse my first, or rather my last petition. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Jan. 13. Certificate by the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of Doncaster that on the death of Richard Etherington, their late Recorder, they had elected John Boynton of Rawcliffe, Yorkshire, as Recorder. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Jan. 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 82.]
Jan. 13.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Strode. Enclosing the order of the Council concerning Wotton and Venterman, by which he will see how he is to dispose of them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 70.]
[Jan. ?] Sir John Shorter and others, owners, and concerned in the four ships taken and destroyed by the Dutch in the Elbe near Hamburg to the King. Petition, setting forth that the Hamburgers have paid 35,000l. into Sir Thomas Player's hands to be distributed by warrant from the Commissioners authorized by his Majesty for that purpose, and that, there being allowed by the report of the Judge of the Admiralty towards the freight of the said ships 1,340l. 9s. 4d., the petitioners, being the only parties concerned in them, have resolved to divide it equally to each ship and owner, and that, the petitioners having demanded their several proportions, they are denied them, some of the said Commissioners refusing to give their warrants for payment thereof, and praying express commands to the Commissioners to deliver to the petitioners sufficient warrant for payment of the said sum, or to show cause for their refusal. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 378, No. 84.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the above petition, that a copy thereof be delivered to the said Commissioners, who are speedily to return their answer thereto. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Jan. 14.
Fowellscombe.
Sir John Fowell to Williamson. These parts are yet in a very quiet temper, and I think with us no great occasion for suppressing the coffee-houses, for those ill-affected and liberal discoursers, that so often frequent these places with you, have very little credit with us. The great thing now complained of in this county is the decay of our woollen trade, which falls exceedingly heavy on this poor populous country, where so many thousands have no other way of subsisting, and I apprehend no disorders nor the least disturbances but what may be occasioned by the necessities of those poor people, wherefore it would, I conceive, be very seasonable for his Majesty to do anything in his power to quicken a little that dying trade, we never having been so sensible of the want thereof as at present. I presume to offer some things to your consideration which are in his power to do, which, I suppose, would tend very much to that end without any great prejudice to him, as first by his example to encourage the wearing and publicly to discourage the not wearing of our woollen manufactures by all his subjects, and, for encouraging the transporting of them, so that we may undersell our neighbours, if he would graciously for some little time suspend collecting that small duty on every piece of woollen exported, which though for the present may be some small loss to him, yet, I am confident, such an act would give so general a satisfaction to the nation, that it would in the end prove for his advantage, for, till we come plainly to believe that what is truly for the interest of the King is for the interest of the people, and that whatever is truly for the good of the people is for his Majesty's advantage, and that their interests are one, I doubt we shall never enjoy that happiness which is daily prayed for and endeavoured by me.
Sir William Courtenay of our county, of whom I suppose you have heard, if not known, is now gone for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 86.]
Jan. 14.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday came in from the Thames the Breton, Henry Cutting (Cuttance) commander. His purser came on shore last night and, hearing she was bound for Cadiz and Leghorn, &c., I requested him to deliver those packets to his commander, to whom I wrote that I was commanded to send them away the first opportunity, and that it would be taken kindly by you and be acceptable service to his Majesty. The captain sent me word to-day he would have a special care of the packets. He is Sir Roger Cutting's (Cuttance's) son.
Little wind at S.W. I had these packets since the 3rd, 4 for the Consul at Algiers, and 4 for the late Consul of Tripoli on board Sir John Narbrough's fleet. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Jan. 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 88.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 88i.]
Jan. 14.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. To-day the Earl of Meath went towards Holyhead in order to his transportation for Dublin. I hear not as yet anything of Lord O'Brien's landing out of Ireland. Your letters for him wait his arrival. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. Recommending Thomas, Lord Windsor, for an exchange of his lease for years of part of the manor of Stoke Court into one for three lives, on such reasonable fine and condition as they shall agree with him for, the late King's directions as to granting leases only for years to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 191.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Grant of a baronetcy to Charles Rich of London and Robert Rich of Stondon, Essex, second son of Nathaniel Rich of Stondon, to hold it to the said Charles Rich during his life, and after his decease to the said Robert Rich and the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 111.]
Note of the limitations in the above grant stated to be to Robert Rich and the heirs male of his body begotten on Mary, daughter of the said Charles Rich, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 90.]
Jan. 15.
Colchester.
Sir John Shaw to Williamson. I thought it my duty to give you an account of the late riotous assembly of the weavers in Colchester, who were tried last Friday at our quarter sessions for the town, where six of their ringleaders are convicted, five men and one woman. I do not believe all of them are worth 10l. They were assembled by the blowing of a horn about two in the morning, and so went round the town till they were three or four hundred in St. Mary's Churchyard, and thence they marched into St. John's Fields to the number of about 400, and, after proclamation made to command them peaceably to depart to their own habitations, they continued shouting and hallooing one and all, and, after the Mayor and officers were departed, they came shouting and hallooing through the streets, using many mutinous expressions of plundering Furley and pulling down his house, and were gathered about his house, but by the help of some townsmen they were dispersed, and the trained bands were raised, which were kept up about three weeks. On this conviction the Court were of opinion that one of the chief should be set on the pillory before the Bay Hall in Colchester, and at the same time three others to be there openly whipped and the other two fined 50s. apiece, which, I believe, is more than they are worth. The others that receive corporal punishment are likewise fined, but, I believe, are not able to pay anything. We conceived it was not fit such a mutinous riot accompanied with so many dangerous circumstances should be slightly passed over without some exemplary punishment that might be a terror to others, especially they being not able to pay any considerable fines nor in truth any at all. We had a very able grand jury, and likewise an able jury for their conviction, for else, for aught I know, they might have escaped, for, when I returned from the county sessions on Thursday night, I found there was no counsel retained for the King nor any person appointed to manage the evidence against them. If you think this punishment too severe or ought to have any moderation, I have respited the execution of the judgment, till I had acquainted you with the true state of the case. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 91.]
Jan. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news, the westerly winds having kept back the packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Jan. 15. Receipt by John Reeve for securities of John Walker of Tanworth, of Francis Gregory of Everdon, Northants, and for a bond of Mr. Basely, deceased, for money due by them respectively to John Mackarnes, with which the said Mackarnes has entrusted him. (Found in the pocket of Mackarnes' pocket-book.) [Ibid. No. 93.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no grant pass of Mr. Sexton's estate in county Limerick without notice to Mr. Fitzharris or Mr. Moore at the Duchess of Portsmouth's. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 20.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of Mr. Ashton's petition, praying a discharge of an arrear of 264l., which he owes as receiver for the hearth-money of Lancashire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 78.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Royal assent to the election of John Fell, D.D., Dean of Christ Church, to be Bishop of Oxford in the room of Dr. Henry Compton, promoted to the see of London. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 22.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Dr. John Fell, Bishop of Oxford, to hold with the said bishopric the Deanery of Christ Church and the Hospital of St. Oswald near Worcester in commendam. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 15. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Tripoli. Letter of 5-15 Nov. from several merchants, passengers on the Bristol Merchant taken by those of Tripoli, read. Agreed to take a peace of those of Tripoli on the terms offered by them confirming the main article against visiting our ships, and explaining it, if need be, in the terms we have done by the treaty of 1671 with Argiers. The King to give up to them the same explanation of the 12th Article of Argiers, i.e. to suffer English seamen &c. serving on stranger vessels to be sold &c., in lieu of which try to get what useful articles may be needed. Query, if in those we have with Argiers there be not some worth the asking from Tripoli, and query of the consul what he could wish further. The Lords to meet to-morrow to adjust this and frame an instruction for Sir J. Narbrough to be sent away with speed. Swedes and Denmark. The King ordered me to prepare the two letters for Duclos &c., &c., privately. Sir H. de Vic and Mr. Kirkton, secretaries to Sir Thomas Edwards, 1629, in France.
Jan. 16.—The King and Duke not there. Lords met about instructions for Sir J. Narbrough &c. I not there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 77.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions to James Murray, lieutenant of Sir John Moncreeff's company, to be captain, to Patrick Ogilvie of Murie to be lieutenant, and to Patrick Auchmoutie to be ensign, of the new company of foot lately ordered to be added to the regiment of Guard, whereof the Earl of Linlithgow is colonel. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, pp. 393–395.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Hugh Moncreeff to be lieutenant of the company of his brother Sir John Moncreeff in the regiment of Guard, and to George Murray to be ensign in place of the said Hugh Moncreeff. [Ibid. pp. 396, 397.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for paying over the sum of 20,000l. yearly reserved out of the present farm of the revenue of Ireland to be disposed of to such uses as the King should direct into England into the hands of William Chiffinch, to be employed in the buildings at Windsor Castle, and, if any letters be hereafter procured for disposing of the said sum or any part thereof to any other use, he is to look on the same as obtained by surprise and accordingly to have no effect. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 423.]
Jan. 16. Sir Lionel Walden to Williamson. Thanking him for his present. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 94.]
Jan. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday morning I received two packets for Mr. Bland and your letter. I made it my business yesterday to seek for a ship for Tangier, but there is none bound thither as yet in the Downs, nor none expected that we hear of. I will keep them till the wind is fair, and, if none come in by that time, I will send them by Capt. Cutting (Cuttance) who goes only to Cadiz to put a merchant ashore, and so directly for Leghorn. Every day from Cadiz they send to Tangier. The last two packets shall be left with the consul at Cadiz, who will undoubtedly take care of them.
The Roebuck arrived this noon in the Downs. Yesterday and today above 40 vessels arrived in the Downs from France. Not a topsail gale at S.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 95.]
Jan. 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Jan. 16.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Capt. Harris of the Quaker ketch coming into this harbour, two or three of his men out of malice, as it proves, inform against him above that he should strike to an Ostend man-of-war and by command went on board him, on which came down an order for his stop and for those men's examination, and by strict examination they are found in various and erroneous stories. so that, as it plainly appears, he never struck to them, but avowed rather to sink by their side. It is confessed on all hands they struck to him their French colours, then their Ostend colours. Capt. Harris demanded sight of their commission which the captain sent on board him with a civil invitation, which he accepted and was kindly received. This Capt. Harris is my countryman, and has acted on several accounts worthily and valiantly for his Majesty. Let not malice and envy prejudice the innocent. I request you to befriend him, if occasion. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Jan. 16. Warrant for the committal of Colonel Danvers to the custody of the Constable of the Tower for treasonable practices against the King and State, no person whatsoever to be suffered to have conference with him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 148.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Daniel Whetland or any other messenger in ordinary to search the sign of the City of Amsterdam behind the Old Exchange for parcels of a scandalous treatise affirming the lawfulness of polygamy, printed abroad, and to seize and bring away any that may be found with the author, importer or disperser of the same, being a foreigner who is said to lodge there. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 112.]
Jan. 17. Report by Sir Robert Carr on the reference to him of Lady Clifford's petition that he conceives his Majesty may without detriment to his service and revenue or to the interest of any other grant her request. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 98.]
Jan. 17.
Dover Castle.
Colonel John Strode to Williamson. Having received yours with the order of Council concerning Wootten and Venterman I have sent them up to you and with them the Marshal of Dover Castle to give you an account of them and their charges. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Jan. 17.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Of the ships that I wrote of last were in this port, many came from France and many were bound for France. On Thursday the wind being N. they made to sea, those homeward-bound went along, but those bound out, the wind turning, were forced in again. On Saturday those bound for France, the wind presenting, went hence. Some few vessels for the Straits are here, expecting a fair wind. The Dane, who came from a new found island, as he says, called St. Thomas, laden with sugars, tobacco, cotton and indigo intends some stay here. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Sir William Bowles, praying his Majesty to signify his pleasure to the Lord Chamberlain to settle on his other sons the office of Master of the tents and toils in reversion, recommendation to the Lord Chamberlain to give order for such a grant as is desired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 78.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Grant to George Penne, the younger, and his heirs of a fair to be held at Tollar Wiline (Whelme) Downs, near Hoarstone, in the parish of Corscombe, Devon (Dorset), from 18 to 25 May inclusive, with the tolls and profits thereof. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 112.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Smith, messenger, to search, take into custody and bring before the Privy Council John Stevens, a wiredrawer, living near Spitalfields, against whom information has been made on oath that he came last night with one Drinkwater into New Park, and having there taken and killed some of the King's deer, dangerously wounded John Mundy, who opposed them. [Ibid.]
Jan. 17. Warrant to Thomas Smith in the same terms regarding John Drinkwater, living with Parsons, a brewer in East Smithfield. Minute. [Ibid. p. 113.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant after reciting that Capt. Edmund Cooke having represented by his petition that, being taken by the Spaniards near Havana, 10 May, 1673, he lost his ship and cargo to the value of 1,200l. of his own goods, and has hitherto in vain solicited here and at the Court of Spain for relief, and that several English merchants, commiserating his low condition, have purchased a Flemish built ship called the Merchants' Consent, intending to trade under the said Capt. Cooke, if she shall be made a free ship, for making the said ship a free ship accordingly. [Precedents 1, f. 128a.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a petition of the Society of Governor and Assistants, London, of the new plantation in Ulster, which set forth that by the contract with Lord Ranelagh and partners it was provided that they should pay before 25 Dec., 1675, to the petitioners 4,000l. agreed by the King to be paid them in part compensation for the purchase of the customs of Londonderry, &c., and alleged that they had received no benefit by the said provision, and prayed that the same might be recommended to the Lord Lieutenant for the speedy payment thereof, a reference to the Lord Lieutenant and his report that the petitioners in consideration of the surrender of the said customs were to have received 6,000l., whereof they have had only 2,000l., and that by the said contract the remaining 4,000l. were directed to be paid them before Christmas, 1675, of which they have had no benefit, the said Lord Ranelagh having made several over payments, whereby he conceives himself discharged from the payment of this sum, and that, it being a just debt, payment of it may be directed out of the money to be advanced by the new farmers, or out of the yet uncharged part of the yearly revenue of Ireland, and the Lord Treasurer of England agreeing as to the settlement thereof on such part of the revenue of Ireland as is yet uncharged (if any); for giving order for payment of the said remaining 4,000l. with what speed may be to the petitioners out of such part of the said revenue, as is yet uncharged, if any. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 404.]
Jan. 18. The Marquis de Ruvigny to Williamson. Requesting the restoration of Capt. Maillard's ship which has been arrested by an officer of the Admiralty on pretence of piracy. The said Maillard had a good French commission, and it appears by the depositions taken before the Mayor of Rye that the said ship was attacked in Rye harbour by two Dutch shallops, which fired first and carried off by force from the said ship nine French seamen after killing one and wounding two. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 101.]
Jan. 18.
[Received.]
M. du Cros to Williamson. Since he could not have the honour of seeing him that morning, begging him to remind him of what the Marquis de Ruvigny has asked from his Excellency, a protection for himself and for his house during his absence. He is told that Monsieur Silvius is on the point of departure, and he will wait on his Excellency at what hour he pleases to receive his commands. [French. Ibid. No. 102.]
Jan. 18.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind southerly, sometimes rain and sometimes frost. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Jan. 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One packet-boat arrived last Saturday and another yesterday, but neither brought any news. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Jan. 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Jan. 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 106.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 106i.]
Jan. 18. Presentation of Thomas Cartwright, D.D., one of the King's chaplains in ordinary, to the Deanery of the Collegiate Church of Ripon, void by the death of Dr. Thomas Tullie. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 80.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Licence to Hugh Verman, quarter-master of Captain Edwin Sandys' troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment of Horse Guards, to be absent for six months in foreign parts, and to be mustered during such absence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 21.]
Jan. 19.
[Received.] Haigh, near Wigan.
Sir Roger Bradshaigh to Williamson. Col. Kirkby has acquainted me that you have promised that the nolle prosequi against Tildesley shall be withdrawn, and it is really just to do so, for I affirm he is no conformist notwithstanding his former suggestions, for the case now before you from Mr. Attorney is really the true matter of fact, so that, if it be practicable to withdraw it without the Attorney's hand to the case, I beg you will dispatch the order to Sir John Otway, his Majesty's Attorney for our county. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 107.]
[Jan. ?] The case concerning Mr. A.B. He was a preacher to the armies against the late King, a violent asserter of the Presbyterian government, and in those times came to be vicar of D. In 1662 he was suspended from that place for his Nonconformity. In 1670 the then bishop of that diocese gave him a licence during pleasure to preach anywhere in his diocese and likewise a certificate that he had before him done what was requisite by the Act of Uniformity, but he did not publicly read the same with the declaration according to that Act on any Lord's day within the next three months in the parish church where he officiates in the presence of the congregation in the time of Divine service, nor has he in any church at any time since publicly and solemnly read the prayers and service appointed in the Book of Common Prayer nor publicly declared his assent to and approbation of the said Book and to the use of all the prayers, rites, and ceremonies, forms and orders therein contained and prescribed. Shortly after he was so licensed, the said Bishop died, and since he has had no new licence. 1 Query, whether A.B. by the said Act after three months' omission to declare and read as abovesaid was not thenceforth utterly disabled from preaching in any church, chapel or public place? 2 Query, whether that licence was not determined by the death of that bishop? 3 Query, whether he ought to preach there without a licence from the present bishop ?
A.B. since he was so licensed has declared he is of the same judgment and principle he ever was, that he never wears the surplice in the church when he officiates, uses not the cross in baptism, reads not the Litany, omits the rites, ceremonies, forms and orders comprised in the Book of Common Prayer, but, that these things might not be required from him, he has procured a poor and ignorant scholar to be presented to this vicarage, whom he declares he can remove if he please. This scholar teaches a school and reads the prayers, all for 10l. a year, and is as a servant in all things to the said A.B., and A.B. constantly preaches forenoon and afternoon every Lord's day, and in all things manages the concern of the church and officiates there. Query. Is not this a plain and absolute evasion of the true intent and meaning of the said Act, and does that Act permit A.B. in such case to preach there or be received as conformable ?
A.B. not only still keeps up his old faction in the place, but will as heretofore govern the secular concerns of that parish, and, having procured himself to be made a trustee, is sole disposer of several considerable quantities of lands and moneys there which should be disposed to the uses of the church, school, and poor. He has caused several unreasonable sums, threescore pounds at a time, of some by way of subscription, of others as an assessment, to be collected through the parish to reimburse him for the charge of installing the poor scholar and the like. Notwithstanding he was ousted for his Nonconformity and another put in his place, he has still lived at and keeps a house and land worth 25l. a year, which was purchased by the parish for the use of the vicars there for the time being. He is a gentleman, pretends to be expert in the law, and keeps and will keep the said house and land, though much against the will of many of the contributers to the purchase thereof, all which considered and that he lives at the place and has not at any time sworn before the Justices at Quarter Sessions the test made in the Oxford Act prohibiting Nonconformist ministers from being (except in passing on the road) within five miles of any parish or place, wherein since the Act of Oblivion they were parson, vicar, &c. Query, whether on the whole matter it is not lawful and reasonable to bring an information against A.B. on the said Oxford Act notwithstanding his pretended conformity?
Query, if his Majesty upon misreport of A.B's conformity commanded a nolle prosequi to be entered by the Attorney-General on an information so brought, whether his Majesty may not now command it to be withdrawn, and that the prosecutor may proceed as if it had not been?
Query, after issue joined on the said information and the nolle prosequi entered but at the same assize when the cause stood for hearing, could that nolle prosequi hinder the prosecutor by law to proceed for the two third parts belonging to the poor and the prosecutor. Endorsed, "The true state of the case with Tildesley." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 108.]
Jan. 19.
Gravesend.
Sir Francis Leeke to Williamson. To-day a hoy anchored here intending to go for Hole Haven to take up men there for transportation into France contrary to the proclamation and a strict order to me of 15 Nov., 1674, to suffer no officer or person to transport themselves into the French service. I enclose a copy of the indent entered into by the Major and the master of the hoy, and have stopped the master and hoy to know his Majesty's pleasure. [Ibid. No. 109.] Enclosed,
Articles of agreement made 15 Jan., 1675[–6], between Edmond Maine, Major of the Duke of Monmouth's regiment of horse in the Most Christian King's service, of the one part and Stephen Barge, master and owner of the John and Elizabeth hoy, of the other part, prociding for the hire of the hoy for 31 days from the 18th instant for the transportation of men and such other things as the Major shall think fit from England into France. [Ibid. No. 109i.]
Jan. 19.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Since my last yesterday giving an account of Lord Digby's arrival nothing has happened worth notice, only to-day the wind is come up at south and blows a storm, so that many of the ships in the Downs drove and ride very hard. There are about 100 sail, most merchantmen outward-bound, and we are afraid, if the storm continues, a great many will come to damage. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Jan. 19.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. This morning a messenger from Portland brought news of a small vessel from Ireland of about 20 tons laden with tallow &c. bound for London cast away betwixt the passage and that. All the men saved, and the vessel on the beach not yet abroad, but we cannot yet learn its name and to what place she belongs. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Jan. 19.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yesternight Lord O'Brien came hither in safety to whom I delivered the packets addressed by you for him. The weather is at present so rainy that I suppose he will not go hence till to-morrow. Col. Fitzpatrick went hence yesterday towards Holyhead in order to embark for Dublin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 112.]
Jan. 19.
Chester Castle.
Alexander Rigbye to Williamson. Some ten years since there was a dispute betwixt the Governor of this place and the patent officers, which are only two, the constable or gaoler, and the surveyor. It was carried for the Governor in the Privy Council, and his Majesty was pleased not to take away the present patents, but resolved for the future no more should be granted, but that the Governor or Deputy should take that charge on them. Last Monday the surveyor died, which is the occasion of giving you this trouble that a right understanding may be had before any warrant issue to avoid further trouble. The place is not worth seeking after, being but 14l. per annum, but we would not be troubled with any stranger. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Jan. 19. Notes by Williamson. M. de Ruvigny told me, though but as in passing, that he had received orders from France as to the points lodged in his hands by us these last weeks. 1. That it was not the use that Electors sent any ambassadors into France, and therefore it was to be supposed they would not to Nimeguen. 2. That as to the first visit to the Mediators, the King thought it but reasonable, and accordingly their ambassadors had order in it. In saying had, methoughts he fumbled a little, and it looked as if it were only that they should have, &c. 3. As to passports. The King agreed to the word papers, in case it were insisted on, though he took that to be included in that of equipage, &c., but, if it were insisted on, he would agree to put it in. As to the clause of couriers, considering the Hollanders were at home, the Imperialists and all the other allies joined (?) immediately on their own confines, and that as to Spain there was but sending from Nimeguen to Brussels, and then they were for all their letters under the security of the standing accord that is between France and Spain, for these reasons the King could not find that clause at all necessary to the conclusion of the peace, and, not being so, he says it is certainly very inconvenient, for that under this pretence they may as spies discover any of his forces, &c. N.B.—Which is the exception the King of Denmark makes to the power asked for by the Swedes' ambassador. 4. As to the Duke of Lorraine. The King refuses absolutely to give Prince Charles the title of Duke of Lorraine, for that King, looking on himself, by virtue of the treaty of 1669 with the late Duke, as having right to the whole succession of that Duchy, thinks it would be a giving up of that right, if he should give the title of Duke of Lorraine to Prince Charles. That he is content that the whole matter of the succession and his pretence to it by virtue of that treaty should be treated of in the Assembly, but he cannot think fit to do anything before that might preclude him in his right.
He let fall by chance that the King had ordered M. de Pomponne to write directly to Sir W. Temple without saying anything hither, that he would know whether the States and allies would give out the passports for his ambassadors or not, for, if they would not, he would immediately recall his ambassadors. This seemed to come out by chance, before he went to the King and the Duke in the Bedchamber. For, after he came out from them, I did not find he was willing to say any such order was gone to their ambassadors.
Jan. 20.—M. d'Ruvigny was pressed by all means to write to the Most Christian King to remove these new difficulties, especially not to recall his ambassadors, considering particularly how the Envoy Skelton was going upon it (?) to Vienna would miscarry and the King's honour suffer.
This last business J. W. was sent for at night to tell M. de Ruvigny of, and to pray him to write about it. The King also wrote himself to Lord Berkeley about it. At the same time M. de Ruvigny put into my hand, with the liking of the King, as he said, 11 passes for the allies to be sent to Sir W. Temple. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 73.]
Jan. 19. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation. Mr. Skelton's letter 11–21 Jan. from the Hague. The States and the Prince absolutely refuse to give their offices in favour of Prince William of Furstenberg. Mr. Skelton gone forwards. They deny that Van Beuningen had any orders to promise their offices.
Sir W. Temple 11–21 Jan. As to passports. Copies of de Lyra's and Campricht's memorials about their masters' passports, &c. Those from Brandenburg and Lünenberg also expected by the States. Denmark scruples, but they will see to press them. N.B. The condition the Emperor means to put in M. de Strasburg's pass, not to serve (?) Mons. de Deshout (?). Dutch Ambassadors' journal at Cologne as to the first visit. N.B.—Remember the King what he has ordered in that matter as to others that will not visit ours first i.e. others not to see them, &c.
Sir L. Jenkins' from Nimeguen, 7-17 Jan., a duplicate, and 8-18 Jan.
As to first visits. To be proceeded (?) against the rest come, where the Spanish ministers, &c. should refuse to submit to our rule of Cologne as to the first visit.
Either an expedient or good reasons to justify our rule. Query, if the King keep to what he agreed last on this point i.e., that they follow the first instructions.
Mr. Skelton, 11–21 Jan. Has had a refusal from the States. Is gone on his way. What I writ yesterday to him.
Denmark. Paul, 28 Dec., 4 Jan. [Ibid. p. 81.]
Jan. 19. Postwarrant to Mr. Fryer to go to Norwich, Lynn, and elsewhere in Norfolk and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 114.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to [Sir W. Lawson]. Expressing his grief at having to bring this second complaint of the conduct of his son, Mr. Lawson, who, though under his own roof and as welcome to him as his nearest relation, governs himself so wholly contrary to the rules of Williamson's little family and the directions he had set him for his own good, that he thinks he ought not to be further answerable for him. [Draft or copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 114.]
Jan. 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind continues southerly and the days dark and dirty. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Jan. 20.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Last night came in here an Ostender with a French prize laden with salt, which coming to an anchor the cable broke, and they were forced to run ashore near Sandown Castle. The next high water she broke in pieces, only a little of her sails and rigging saved. All the rest of the ships ride well without damage. To-day proves very fine weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 116.]
Jan. 20.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. (News of the shipwreck mentioned in the last.) Yesterday was held at St. James' Church in Dover, before the Governor of Dover Castle, a court of Loadsmanage, which is for taking notice of offences committed by pilots or offences against them and choosing of pilots, &c., where the Governor showed himself a very noble judge and merciful, and encouraged those that had served his Majesty by making them pilots and removing them. So likewise he did the last Court about 20 months since. What happened these two days past, I beg your pardon, for I, as clerk to the fellowship of Deal, am bound to be there. A topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Jan. 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 15th. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir John Wynne, High Sheriff of Merionethshire, to be absent from his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 23.]
Jan. 20. Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley to deliver to Capt. Trelawny or to such persons as he shall appoint 200 fire-arms and 2 barrels of powder with shot and match proportionable for the use of the garrison of Tangier. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 21.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no grant pass of any remainder on estates tail in Ireland, his Majesty having granted such remainders to the Duchess of Cleveland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 20.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 3.]
Jan. 20. Pass for Eberhard van Graffenthall, whom the King is sending to Stockholm on his business. [Latin. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 114.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Earl of Winchelsea with his lady and family to go beyond the seas with 60l. in money and their carriages and utensils, provided that the said Earl does not resort to the territories of any prince not in amity with England, nor keep company with any person departed from England without the King's licence, nor use the company of any Jesuit, seminary priest or otherwise evil affected to England, and also that the said Earl return if recalled. [Precedents 1, f. 130.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council for printing and publishing a proclamation for priceing of wines for the ensuing year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 119.] Annexed,
Copy of the said proclamation. [Ibid. No. 119i.]
[Jan ?]. William, son and heir of the late Edward Peck, serjeant-at-law, to the King. Petition, showing that his father having purchased the lands in Essex of the late Sir Edward Greene, of Soupford, Essex, who had a grant of a baronetcy, with the usual discharge, in July, 1660, process has now been issued against the said lands for levying 1,095l. charged on the said Sir Edward for the baronetcy, and praying that, as his father purchased without notice of any claim when he made the purchase and as Sir Edward's son is beyond the seas and the petitioner is not able to produce the Privy Seal, he may have a warrant for a new Privy Seal discharging the debt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 120.] Annexed,
Certificate of entry in the Pricy Seal Docquet Book of the grant of the dignity of a baronetcy to Edward Greene, and of the usual discharge in respect thereof, July, 1660. [Ibid. No. 120i.]
[Jan. ?] Sir Peter Wyche to the King. Petition praying copyright for 14 years in certain geographical cards he has modelled and framed, representing the several kingdoms, countries and parts of the world whereby geography may be easily and familiarly learned by all sorts of people. At the side,
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting the petitioner's request. 22 Jan. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 78.]
Jan. 21. The information of William Brooke, apprentice in chirurgery to Mr. Molins, taken before Sir J. Williamson. Deposing as to the nature of the wounds received by John Drinkwater, lately committed to the Marshalsea for wounding one Mundy, who opposed him in the hunting and killing of his Majesty's deer in New Parks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 122.]
Jan. 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 123.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 123i.]
[1676, Jan. 21 ?] Claim by the town of Maidenhead by Edward Offley, their attorney, of the right of taking three oaks every third year in the King's woods within his manors of Cookham and Bray or within the seven Hundreds of Cookham and Bray for the repairs of Maidenhead Bridge by virtue of a charter of King James dated 4 Aug., 1604. Latin. On the back are receipts dated 21 Jan. 1675–6 to Mrs. Elizabeth Ryley for 1s. 4d. assessed on the landlord for trophy money for a house in the Great Sanctuary, Westminster, and also for the like sum due from Mrs. Dorothy Randolph, deceased, for trophy money for another house in the same place. [7 pages. Ibid. No. 124.]
[After Jan. 21.] Memorandum of letters of 12 and 24 Nov., 1675, calendared ante, pp. 400, 415, and 21 Jan., 1675-6, concerning a canonry of Exeter. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Exeter. Repeating his former recommendation by his letters of 12 Nov. last of Bernard Galard, M.A., for the first vacant canonry there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 22.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Widowes, messenger, to take into custody and bring before the Council Stephen Wootten and Thomas Venterman arrested for treasonable words within the liberty of the Cinque Ports and thence brought up to London. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 115.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal granting to William Peck of the Inner Temple, 1,095l. which Sir Edward Green, late of Soupford, Essex, deceased, in regard of his being made a baronet, 26 July, 1660, was obliged to pay in consideration of certain services to be by him performed. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General, after reciting the petition of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London (the purport of which appears by the Lord Treasurer's report of 10 Jan.) to prepare a pardon and release of the sum of 15,463l. 16s. 11½d. therein mentioned. [2 pages. Ibid. p. 116.]
Jan. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived last night. The master met with no news at the Brill, except that on their stricter examination they every day find their losses more and more by the late inundation in overflowing of lands, overthrowing and drowning of houses and destruction of people and cattle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 126.]
Jan. 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This noon arrived in the Downs the London from Bantam in East India. We hear not of any news, she being scarce at anchor. The East India ship Mary, outwardbound, is yet in the Downs, and about 100 outward-bound ships. The wind is variable between S. and S.W., a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Jan. 22.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. News of the London as in the last. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Jan. 22.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The vessel driven ashore between Portland and the passage, I wrote of in my last, appears now to be that ship the Gazette mentions in August last, to be carried into Cork by pirates, some of whom were there executed. The men in her now were, I hear, English, and bound with her for Rohan (Rouen). The Vice-Admiral's deputy has, I hear, saved about half the goods, of which there are two barrels of cochineal. The rest not pilfered away, the sea took again into her bowels from the beach. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Jan. 22.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Thursday Lord O'Brien went hence towards Billing. I suppose he will ere long be at Whitehall. Yesterday the Countess of Meath went hence to Neston intending to go aboard the Swan, but met there with the dogger, which immediately sailed thence with her for Dublin. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Henry Howard and Thomas Wyndham praying a lease of several farms and tenements in Troutbrick (Troutbeck) and Trostbrick, Westmorland, now in jointure to the Queen, for 31 years in reversion after the present estate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 79.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Proclamation fixing the prices of wines for the ensuing year as ordered by the Lord Chancellor and others. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 346.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 131.]
Jan. 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Being Sabbath Day I have no list of ships. A French privateer come in here reports that Argier has proclaimed war with the English. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Jan. 23. Warrants for making free the Hollandia, a prize taken in the late war, and condemned in the Scotch Court of Admiralty, and the Lady Margaret, to be registered by the name of the Advice of London. [Precedents 1, f. 129.]
Jan. 23. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation. Sir W. Temple 18-28 Jan. The first visit. Monsr. Pomponne's letter to Sir W. Temple in answer to the difficulties made by the States on the French passes, upon Monsr. de Lorraine's titles, &c. Has acquainted the Prince with it. He is of opinion that the difficulties will be insisted on. He delays to move the States without the King's orders. Query, what the King will direct.—Sir William must say to the States what the King of France answers and that his Majesty has himself already interposed, to have them removed, if possible.—The Prince prays the King will not lose what is done towards the treaty.—Say what the King has done, &c. as to France to bring them to reason in these points, &c.
Sir W. Swan 14–24 Jan. About a certain order of Court. Whether he as the King's Resident to stop the execution of it.— Nothing said. It's a private matter of the Company's
Mr. Skelton was at Amsterdam on his way. What should be said to him on what has happened of the French King's difficulties about passports?—Order him to stay where the letter finds him till such answer, &c. Let Don Pedro have it and Monsr. de Ruvigny and the Bishop of Strasburg. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 85.]
Jan. 24.
Hinton.
Lord Poulett to Williamson. Since my return to the country I have considered the Dorsetshire militia and find it needful in one part of the country to add one deputy lieutenant, wherefore I choose by your favour to propose to his Majesty Mr. Miller, of Priddie, near Weymouth, as a very proper person. As soon as you shall signify his pleasure therein I shall proceed accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 133.]
Jan. 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived a ship from Barbados, but brought no more news than the last ships brought. The East India ship Mary and all the Straits and other outwardbound ships are yet in the Downs, the contrary winds keeping at least 120 sail there. It blows all day fresh at S. and by W. There being sudden expectation of a N.E. wind, and finding no ship directly bound for Tangier, I have sent your two packets for Mr. Bland to Captain Cutting (Cuttance) who goes to Cadiz only to put one merchant there ashore, and then up the Straits, who says he will either leave them at Cadiz, from whence they may be sent every day almost, or himself deliver them to Mr. Bland, who is his near kinsman, but, if there come orders to the contrary or a ship bound directly to Tangier, I will send for them and send them that way. Three or four days after the first N.E. wind I shall come for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 134.]
Jan. 24.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The ships that were here have been at sea near 20 leagues off, and by a cross wind were forced back hither last Saturday. This week about nine or ten small vessels are come in here all bound for France, and two Irish vessels one from Middleburg bound for St. Antonio, and the other from Dublin for Nantes. Friday came in the Golden Hind of London from Barbados. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Jan. 24.
Falmouth
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 22nd came in here the Golden Hind of London in two months from Barbados. Two more came out with her, but are separated by foul weather. They reported the last hurricane lasted a long time and destroyed many ships, blew down many houses and destroyed many people, so that all sorts of provision are very dear, salt beef for 4l. per cwt. and all other victuals proportionally. Sugars are sold there for 15s. per cwt. and all other commodities very dear. The Royal Defence of London laden with tin and herrings for Genoa and other places in the Straits is by contrary winds put into this port again. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Jan. 24. Request that notice be given to Sir Stephen Fox if any person shall petition in Secretary Williamson's office for a patent for an engine contrived by Thomas Hatton of Blanckney, Lincolnshire, for the drawing of coal pits, mines or drowned lands and therein described. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of Sir John Robinson's petition praying that he may have so many fee-farm rents as may amount to 4,451l. 18s. 7d., being so much due to him on orders registered on the fee-farm rents, after satisfaction of such persons as are preferable to him, or, if [not] enough remain, he may be otherwise satisfied. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 79.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Grant to Sir Peter Wyche of the sole right of printing and selling certain geographical cards for 14 years. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 118.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Giles Eyre and his heirs of two fairs to be held on 12 April and on St. Matthew's Day at Downton, Wiltshire, as mentioned in an inquisition taken at Chippenham, 8 Nov. last. [Ibid.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for discharging Charles and Robert Rich from payment of 1,095l. the creation money due in respect of the baronetcy conferred on them. Minute. [Ibid. p. 119.]
Jan. 25. Viscount Cullen to Williamson. Expressing how infinitely obliged he is for his concerning himself for him, and begging him to give Mr. Portlock leave to acquaint him further with the particulars of the writer's business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 138.] Enclosed,
Account of Viscount Cullen's extraordinary expenses on his Majesty's account since the restoration.
First, raising a volunteer troop, which continued a considerable time, cost him at least 200l. Secondly extraordinary expenses all the time he commanded the militia troop, which was for several years, being very often commanded out on duty, and the pay being inconsiderable, at least 150l. Lastly, for going himself and sending sundry parties to search for Capt. Bans, at least 40l., and, when he had taken him, for his charge and trouble in keeping him in the writer's own house, till he sent him safe prisoner to the Tower, all at his own charge, and considering the trouble also, 100l., which he hopes will not be judged unreasonable. [Ibid. No. 138i.]
Jan. 25. Sir John Dawnay to Williamson. The Corporation of Doncaster having lately chosen Mr. Boynton for their Recorder, begging his assistance in getting him confirmed. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Jan. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Wind for the most part S. and S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Jan. 25.
Dover.
John Bullacke, Mayor, and three jurats of Dover to Williamson. We enclose the examinations of a person now in custody in our prison and beg your speedy directions. He is an indigent man, not having a penny, and has a child of about 3 or 4 years of age, which we have ordered the overseers of the poor to take care of till we receive your directions. [Ibid. No. 141.] Enclosed,
Examination of Lewis Maurice of Abbeville, France, taken 24 Jan. He landed at Bristol from the Barbados about 14 days since in an English vessel, intending to go into France, and coming to London was informed of a proclamation against Jesuits and priests, and he, being a Popish priest in orders, immediately came for Dover in order to his passage for France. As soon as he came there, he applied to the Mayor and other Commissioners there, and declared himself a priest and desired a pass for Calais, which was devied him. [Ibid. No. 141i.]
Examination of Lewis Maurice, of Abberille, physician, taken 25 Jan. He came from Bristol to London (as in the last examination), where he had a child, and so to Dover, and being in drink last night was brought before the Mayor by the clerk of the passage, and he desires his passage to France. [Ibid. No. 141ii.]
Jan. 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Jan. 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Only two ships arrived since my last, and only one more a French privateer bound a cruising. [Ibid. No. 143.] Enclosed,
The list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 143i.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Rosewell, Head-master of Eton. I have engaged Mr. Provost in favour of a poor gentleman's child, one Walsingham, who is about 11 years old. He is now with me ready to be sent down, but, before I would suffer his relations to bring him, I have desired to bespeak your kindness and care to him. I pray you to think of a good, careful, sober house, where he may be placed, till he can get into the foundation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 70.]
[Jan. ?] Robert Breton of London, merchant, to the King in Council. Petition, setting forth that his correspondent, Thomas Martyn, of Teneriffe, is sole owner of a small vessel now called the Advice, bought in 1672 soon after the beginning of the late war on purpose to trade for England, licence by proclamation having been given for foreign ships to import commodities, which made three voyages laden with Canary wine, and, being worn out in that employment, was docked last April and valued at but 10l.; where she had a new keel and several repairs, costing 202l., so that, when she went out of dock, she was almost wholly English built, and praying that she may be made a free ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 144.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the said ship be made free, and that one of the Secretaries of State prepare a warrant for the King's signature, making her a free ship. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Jan. 26. John Rosewell to Williamson. I am ready to receive the child you design for this school and will be sure to treat him with that care and kindness which it becomes me to use towards one for whom you are so far concerned. I have bespoke a place for his reception, where, I believe, he will be very well looked to, till by Mr. Provost's favour he shall be promoted into the College. I am sensible of the great obligations you have on me, and will endeavour to discover that I am so. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Jan. 26.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last post we had letters from Marseilles of the 11th instant, that that day they had an account from Messina that the fleets were engaged. What confirms us in the belief of it is, that we also received by the same post by a letter from James Davison of this town, master, bound for Venice, that going into the Vare (Faro) of Messina he fell in with the Dutch and Spanish fleet of about 30 sail, and passing through the Vare he met the French fleet of about 40 sail coming in from the Eastward and acquainted them that the Dutch fleet were come in to the Westward, at which they seemed well pleased, saying they were resolved to engage them. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Jan. 26.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The storms continue here, which brings us tidings of parts of vessels being seen floating on the sea, and some butts and other cask have been seen swimming on the sea by masters, who have come in here from the Western coast. Last Sunday morning a little before day was a violent storm, which forced the Greyhound of Bristol with linen cloth from Morlaix homeward-bound, over the bar of North Burry about 10 miles westward of this, the master and company not knowing where they were, nor the danger they were in, for, if it had not been just on the height of the flood, they had doubtless all perished, it being a most dangerous bar. So soon as day appeared, a boat met them and brought them into the pool near Llanelly without much damage, and there she rides, waiting for a fair wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 148.]
Jan. 26. List of the days and hours at which the post goes from and arrives at Nimeguen to and from various places. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. Understanding that their bishop intends to confer the chantership of their church, which is likely to become void, on Edward Lake, M.A., chaplain to the Dean of York, which he approves of, and having written to them on behalf of John Ceely for the first vacant canonry there, but understanding that the chanter ought by the statutes of that church to have the canonry, if he demands it, he does not wish this to be prevented by his letters in favour of John Ceely, but the canonry is still to continue annexed to the chantership. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27. p. 81.]
Jan. 26 near 5.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Governor of Gravesend. This bearer is particularly appointed by his Majesty at the instance of the Dutch Ambassador to inform you of a certain design now near to be executed on the river, and to signify his pleasure, that you be assisting to the captain of the Dutch convoy riding near you in the river in whatever he shall have need of, not only for defeating the design, but to secure, if possible, the authors and contrivers of it. The bearer will acquaint you with the particulars at large, to whom you are therefore to give entire credence, and to proceed to be assisting, as upon concert with the captain of the man-of-war shall be found necessary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 71.]
Jan. 26. Caveat at Sir Stephen Fox's desire that no letters patent pass for the sole use of an engine contrived by Thomas Hatton, of Blanckney, co. Lincoln, for the drawing (sic) of coal-pits, mines or drowned lands without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 20.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Licence to the High Sheriff of Monmouthshire to repair to Bristol or elsewhere, as his occasions shall require. [Precedents 1, f. 129.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for giving orders for payment to the Archbishop of Dublin and Viscount Granard, the present Lords Justices, of 100l. per mensem each for their entertainment out of the advance money payable by the new farmers or such other part of the Irish revenue as shall first be paid into the Exchequer there, the said allowance to commence from the date of their commission and to continue till the Lord Lieutenant's arrival in Dublin. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 431.]
Jan. 27.
Mereworth.
Sir Vere Fane to Williamson. I have often heard you speak kindly of Mr. Yeates, Rector of Crayford, which has encouraged me to beg your assistance on his behalf in a small affair. Marsh, a neighbour of mine, is a prebendary of St. Paul's. He is an ancient man and grows crazy and is not like to live long. I believe it may be in your power to recommend Mr. Yeates as his successor, if it be not already bestowed. The stipend is but 20l. a year, and a lease belonging to it, which Mr. Marsh lately renewed to the Lord Chamberlain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 150.]
Jan. 27.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Some few ships we see pass by light and loaden. Four fine ships are gone out of this port most laden with corn for Newcastle, and the rest of our ships are fitting out to sea and will be ready to go the next light moon. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Jan. 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Tuesday night arrived one of our packet-boats. An English gentleman that came over from Dort said that before his coming away it was reported and believed that the Prince of Orange's lieut.-general fell on a strong party of the French not far from Maestricht, where they had lodged themselves but the night before, and had given them a very great defeat with much loss to them, but he could name neither the commanders nor the place. Wind still southerly. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Jan. 27.
Gravesend.
Sir Francis Leeke to Williamson. This worthy person will give you an account that the Holland Ambassador's letter came so seasonably to the captain of that man-of-war that he is now with me and prepared against all surprises, which you will know by the letter Major Wood will show you. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Jan. 27.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Jan. 27.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. To-day the Quaker ketch, Capt. Harris commander, being bound for (sic) Tangier, put to sea for London by a particular order from his Majesty to answer to several of his men that allege he gave order for striking his topsail to a Spanish privateer, which he denies, and some of his men are on his side. He has been examined here by the Mayor, and their depositions sent up to the Lords of the Admiralty. I suppose some of his men speak against him out of envy because he has corrected them for their misdemeanours. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Bishop of Carlisle. The vicar of Stanwix has petitioned for the King's interposition in reference to a deduction made by his lordship in the allowance settled on his vicarage. His Majesty wishes to know what his lordship has to say in the matter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 191.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of Lady Dallison's petition, desiring a pension, his Majesty retaining a gracious sense of her husband's good services and sufferings. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 80.]
Jan. 28. Clause from a document. In case his Majesty's occasions within the said time should necessarily require greater or other payments to any of the uses in the scheme annexed, or to some use not therein mentioned, it is provided that the Lord High Treasurer shall make such payments, over and above the particular sums limited in the said scheme, by warrant from his Majesty under his sign manual and not otherwise. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 157.]
Jan. 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Newcastle set sail to-day for the Downs. Her commander declares the contrary of the news we lately had that Algiers had made a breach with us, for there was a very good understanding between us and them. [Ibid. No. 158.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 158i.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge University. Requiring them to admit to the degree of M.A. John Wicar, bred a scholar in foreign universities, and there admitted master of arts, who wishes to complete his studies at Cambridge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 192.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Approbation of William Miller, of Priddie, near Weymouth, to be a deputy lieutenant for Dorsetshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 21.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of James Clerk, praying a lease to make up to 99 years the term he has in the manor of East Moulsey with the fishing of Moulsey River from Cobham Bridge, and the ferries of Hampton Court and Hampton town. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 80.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Marmaduke Dorrell praying a lease of the extended lands of Dudley Rewse, late receiver-general of moneys given to his Majesty by divers Acts, who bequeathed all his estate to the petitioner, till the petitioner can get his papers and clear his accounts as such receiver-general. [Ibid. p. 81.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Oxford to Dr. John Fell, to commence from the time of the translation of the late bishop to London. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 23.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting demises by the late Queen Mother and her trustees of a parcel of land called Walliacke, in the Forest of Inglewood, Cumberland, and of other parcels of lands in the Honour of Penrith to James Long for two lives, both of which leases have since been purchased by Sir Christopher Musgrave, and are parcel of the Queen's jointure, who has power during her life to grant leases thereof for 31 years or three lives, for a demise of all the premises to the said Sir C. Musgrave for 31 years in reversion after the estates in being, and such others as shall be granted by the Queen and her trustees in pursuance of the said power, at the existing rents. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 119.]
Jan. 28. Pass for the Duchess of Cleveland and her two sons Henry, Duke of Grafton, and George, Earl of Northumberland, to go into France as well for her own occasions as for the better education of her said sons, with their retinue of about 40 persons and 20 coach and saddle horses, 100l. in money and all other baggage &c. belonging to her. [Precedents 1, f. 131.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proclamation explaining that the proclamation of 22 Dec. last, which declared the passes granted to the ships and vessels of subjects before 1 Jan. last, to be in force only to 1 May, after which new passes are to be granted for a year, extended only to ships trading in the Mediterranean, with reference to the treaties with Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 347.]
[Jan. ?] Thomas Turberville to the King. Petition for a commission of review, to rehear the cause between him and Mary Duke, alias Turberville, who pretended a nuncupative will of their brother, George Turberville, and, decision being against her in the Court of Delegates, set up a scroll which she pretended to be his will, and had sentence in her favour in the said court. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 159.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chancellor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 81.]
Jan. 29.
Exeter.
William Reade to Williamson. Having formerly by your favour obtained a mandatory letter, a copy whereof I enclose, from his Majesty to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter requiring them to elect me to the canonry next void in that church, and being lately informed that by the importunate solicitations of some you have been prevailed with to procure a letter of greater force and energy for another to the same effect, whereby the former one in my behalf seems not only to be superseded but rendered wholly ineffectual, I desire only that this favour be added to your former, that, since you were instrumental in procuring both the letters, you would signify your indifference which of them first takes effect, that so the Dean and Chapter may be left at liberty, without disobliging you, to elect whichever of the two they think fittest, for I doubt not but I have a better and truer interest in that body in general, and also in every member thereof than any who has yet appeared as a candidate. If you shall vouchsafe me one line to this effect, I shall hereby oblige myself to be fully responsible to you for any prejudice you may sustain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 160.]
Jan. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Jan. 29. Warrant for a grant to Joseph Roberts, of All Saints' parish, Canterbury, of the fines of 70l. paid by him on behalf of himself, and three other inhabitants of the said place, who were convicted on the statute against riots, for being present and acting at a riding, commonly called Skimington, in the said city, the said fines having been paid to and being in the hands of Sir Thomas Fanshaw, coroner and attorney in the King's Bench, and Roberts having petitioned for the return thereof, on the ground that he was ignorant of acting against any law. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 206.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting the letter of 1 April, 1674, calendared in the last volume p. 219, which directed a grant to the Earl of Castlehaven of a pension of 500l. a year until payment to him of the sum of 5,000l. therein mentioned, and a petition of the said Earl praying that letters might be passed under the Great Seal of England for settling the said 500l. per annum on the establishment of Ireland, and a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report in favour of granting the prayer of the petition: for a grant to pass the Great Seal of England of a pension of 500l. a year from Michaelmas last out of the Irish revenue as interest for the said 5,000l., till the same be paid at one payment, the same to be placed on the Irish establishment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 207.]
Jan. 29. Memorandum that the Bishop of London signified his Majesty's pleasure that in future no caveats should be entered for preferments in the Church, and that none entered in time past should be of any force, but such as specified the particular place or dignity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 20.]
Jan. 29. The Bishop of London to [Williamson]. To the effect of the above memorandum. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 162.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Grant to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's by their agents appointed with the consent of the Commissioners for rebuilding St. Paul's of a licence to raise stone in the Isle of Portland, and also to receive from persons using the piers, cranes, and ways repaired and maintained by them for transporting stone, a duty not exceeding 4d. a ton, as prayed in the said Commissioners' petition calendared ante, p. 467. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 128.]
Jan. 29. Warrant on the petition of Benjamin Barnes for making the Cornelia, taken in the late Dutch war, and condemned in the Admiralty Court of Scotland, a free ship. [Precedents 1, f. 131.]
Jan. 29.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. What I have at present to trouble you with is to acquaint you that one of the ablest citizens I know here made me a very fair proposition, and in my opinion much better than any of the kind I have met with hitherto, viz., that he will discover a thing in the King's grant to the value of about 200l. a year, that whoevever obtains the grant of it under the great seal of England shall, on making over the King's title to him, the discoverer, have 1,000l. paid down, and the discoverer himself will be at the hazard, charge and trouble to recover it at law. He says it neither concerns the Acts of Settlement nor any of that nature, but is freely in the King's gift, and that, unless watched at the Signet, others may put in for it, before he and I come to an agreement, and that, when it is discovered, he knows it will meet with opposition, unless passed in England, and that also, after the Lord Lieutenant comes away, though it be nothing prejudicial to him. This I look on as a very feasible thing, and I know the man that propounds it to be very knowing in matters of the city and worth 800l. a year in inheritance, so I may confidently recommend the doing it to you and the offer he makes as a very safe and good one, considering he takes all the hazard on himself and that things to be recovered at law in Ireland are troublesome and chargeable enough, but he is wary, for, before he discovers the particulars, he will be satisfied of my power to secure him that, on paying the 1,000l., he shall have the patentee's title duly conveyed to him, and, though I offered him my own bonds, yet, in regard I told him I must work it out by means of a person of quality in England, he would not put the matter into my hands, till he first saw something that might confirm him that the conditions I made should be confirmed by the grantee. Therefore, if you think this for your purpose and that I can serve you in it, let me with all convenient speed have your commands and something that may convince the discoverer that the conveyance shall be made to him on paying the 1,000l. as aforesaid, and in the meantime please cause a caveat to be entered at the Signet Office that no grant relating to the City of Dublin pass without your knowledge. I give you many thanks for commanding the Newsletter to be sent me as formerly on Mr. Bebington's application on my behalf. I hear no more of Mr. Graham's business since it was left to you and Lord Aungier in England. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 4.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that he consents that Edward Lake, one of the domestic chaplains of his Royal Highness, use his endeavours to obtain his Majesty's letters mandatory to the University of Cambridge for creating him D.D. by accumulation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 163.]
Jan. 30. Richard Watts to Williamson. The outward-bound fleet of above 130 sail is yet in the Downs. Yesterday arrived the Quaker ketch, Capt. Harris commander, from his waiting on the Governor of Tangier, and sailed to-day for the Thames. Several ships from the West Indies, Straits and other remote places arrive daily, all Europe being at present very silent and news barren.
About ten days ago arrived here a vessel from Holland, bound for the Straits (some say for Argier). The Dutch put an Englishman master, and, 'tis said, he has broken bulk and sold away at Deal and elsewhere a very considerable quantity of scarlets and other fine woollen cloth, linen, pepper, &c., and three days ago, his own men leaving him, he hired a pilot and seamen to carry his ship to Calais, where he made known she belonged to Holland. That governor secured the ship and imprisoned both master, pilot and seamen, a just reward for their bad action. 'Tis said that vessel, though a small one, was worth 20,000l. Wind daily variable, but most inclinable to S. and S.W. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Jan. 30. Notes by Williamson of proceedings at the Foreign Committee. Holland. Sir W. Temple's letter, 1 Feb. If the King expect an answer to his letter to the States in favour of Prince William.—Let it alone and rather not ask for any answer. M. de Pomponne's letter to Sir W. Temple and his answer. N.B. The King did not put in the clause of couriers, nor prescribed the form as now it is to the Confederates, much less to France, yet thinks it agreeing with forms used in like occasions as Cologne. Munster, Vervins, &c. The Duke of Lorraine's title. The Treaty of 1662 never spoke of as any part of the ground or right of seizing Lorraine in 1670.—Certainly he will and ought to have the title.—Query what more to be said to Skelton &c. Would be at Cologne yesterday sevennight. What I writ to him.—Nothing till something come from France.—Or to Ducker. Ducker to choose if he will, and to London (?) &c. as he himself will.
Mediation. Sir L. Jenkins. 19 Jan. French Ambassadors' letter to him and his answer. What further necessary to do to prevent public entries.—That point presses not so much yet.—The two leagues neutral country as good as nothing.—Four leagues at Vervins. The circuit is not for furnishing provisions, but for the Ambassadors' recreation and riding abroad.
Emperor.—Ducker's last letter 9—19 Jan. with a copy of the Emperor's to the King. What to do with the original, bring it or send it. If he himself to come. May he not give the King some lights? Prays a character from the King of Envoyé, to enable him to remain there.—The King does not think that fit—but even with that thinks it not worth the going back, unless Mr. Skelton carry something more strong with him, than what we had agreed at London. Will expect orders at Nimeguen. Would send the King's letter to Prince William in one of his own.
Sweden.—Swedish Ambassador's memorial calling for answer.— His own fault that he has not had an answer long since in writing. The Lords to meet to see the whole state of that matter, and, since he will have, let him have an answer in writing.—Has in his hands the passports from his Master &c. Query, if they do not run in the style of those at Cologne even with the couriers (?) and title of Duke of Lorraine.
Holland.—Dutch Ambassador's memorial of 22 Jan.—1 Feb. against those of Boston in New England.—Bring it to the Council. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 89.]
Jan. 31.
Rochester.
John Conny, Mayor, to Williamson. Endeavouring to have this day observed with that decorum as by all good men it ought to be, I understood that Samuel Fox, a tailor and a Quaker, notwithstanding the advice of some of my officers to shut his shop windows, refused to do it, whereupon I went myself with some of the Aldermen and Common Council and a constable and first desired, and then on refusal commanded the shutting up of his shop, which he still refusing, I commanded the constable to do it, which he did in my sight, but, on our going to the cathedral, Fox opened his shop again, in contempt as I judge. I thought it my duty to acquaint you with it, in case you think fit to have any course taken with him for example's sake. Not knowing how such obstinate demeanours may give example to others to be more so, I could do no less. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 165.]
Jan. 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. According to the Act of Parliament and the proclamation this day was held a solemn fast in Deal, all shops being shut with obstinacy from all manner of work. I never saw it so solemnly performed, there being now above 150 sail in the Downs, but yet the heathen-like Quakers would open their windows, but we suddenly shut them. The ship I told you of last post is indeed seized on and the master secured, but the pilot and Deal men came home to-day from Calais. Not a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Jan. [31.]
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning came into the Downs the Calais packet-boat. A great many passengers are come over, some of them captains and soldiers. It is thought they have left their commands. Wind S.W. [No day given, but postmark of the 31st. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 167.]
Jan. 31.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Thursday went out of this harbour Capt. Harris in the yacht, and last Saturday the wind came at S.W., and there came in 10 or 12 small outward-bound ships, among them a small Flushing caper. Wind now S.E. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Jan. 31. Commissions to Charles Neatby to be lieutenant, and to Edward Jacob to be cornet to Capt. Macarty. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 41.]
Jan.
[Received]
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. Last night I told you we were to have a common Council this morning. I am overjoyed the dispute betwixt the Lord Mayor, Court of Aldermen and Commons is quietly ended about the choice of the Judge of the Sheriffs' Court. The Lord Mayor nominated the Common Serjeant, and the four pleaders of Guildhall Mr. Richardson, an honest, loyal and quiet man, who is chosen and overpolled the Common Serjeant 40 voices. The great Player and Thomson, &c., find by demonstration they are not so powerful as they made themselves. I am sitting down to dinner with Sir Andrew King. We will drink your health. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 378, No. 169.]
Jan.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to pay to Richard Dolton 274l. 10s. as of the King's bounty for special service. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 22.]
Jan. Warrant for a grant to Edward Villiers, and Sir Edward Villiers, his son, for their lives successively of the office of Knight Marshal and Marshal of the Marshalsea in reversion after the determination of Sir Edmund Wyndham's interest therein. [Precedents 1, f. 128 a.]
Jan. Notes by Williamson of letters ordered in the Foreign Committee. To Sir W. Temple, taking notice of the States' resolution about exchange of passes. That the condition of the Duke of Neuburg's passes is not very decent, and not being so it ought to be no condition &c. Yet it is not enough the Deputies have said so, but it must be in writing, for certainly the words sur ce pied refer to all &c. But that, the Duke of Neuburg having prayed his Majesty's mediation, the King has actually asked passes from France for him and from Sweden &c., and this Sir William to say to the States, which will satisfy them, if this be real &c. Underhand as of himself to take notice to the Pensionary of the answer expected (?) upon Prince William's business, and to try as of himself to get their offices.
To Mr. Skelton, to proceed &c. with convenient speed.
Write to Emperor. The causes of Skelton's delay, thank the Emperor for his civilities in that affair in his of 10 Jan.
To Duke of Neuburg. Accepting the mediation—all good offices. To have his ministers ready. Passes are asked for. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 39.]
[Jan.] Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Asking his opinion on the enclosed affidavits, made by Francis Byam, Robert Coningsby and Richard Kingston, against Gardiner, an innkeeper at Salisbury. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 148.]
[Jan. ?] The King to Mistress Olfield. I understand there are some overtures of marriage between you and Edward, the son of Henry Clerke, and I shall be glad for both your sakes it may take effect, having great reason to believe the young man will prove as good a husband to you as a subject to me, being descended from a father, who, besides his laudable behaviour in all private occasions, hath also given sufficient testimony of his loyalty in respect to me. The kindness I have for him shall be derived to his son, for whose advantage I shall willingly lay hold on any fair and reasonable opportunity. And, though I know this my recommendation of him will have some weight and consideration with you, yet I shall rather rejoice to hear that your own choice and affection should be the principal motive of your meeting together in a happy state. [Precedents 1, f. 128.]
Jan.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 378. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
170 Jan. 1 3 0 0 E.
171 " 2 2 0 0 S.E.
172 " 3 2 11 0 S.S.W.
173 " 5 3 10 0 S.E.
174 " 6 2 7 0 S.
175 " 7 2 12 0 S.E.
176 " 8 2 6 0 N.E.
177 " 9 2 2 0 E.
178 " 11 2 3 1 E.
179 " 12 1 4 0 N.W.
180 " 13 1 8 0 S.W.
181 " 14 2 11 2 N.W.
182 " 15 2 11 4 N.W.
183 " 16 3 12 2 S.W. Several others came out of the West Country not spoke with.
184 " 17 3 20 0 S.W.
185 " 18 2 22 2
186 " 19 2 22 0 S.
187 " 20 2 25 0 S.
188 " 21 2 34 0
189 " 22 2 34 2 S.W.
190 " 23 2 34 0 S.W.
191 " 24 2 36 2 S.W.
192 " 25 2 36 0 S.W.
193 " 26 2 36 1 S.W.
194 " 27 2 42 1 S.W.
195 " 28 2 45 1 N.W.
196 " 29 4 52 1 W.
197 " 30 5 52 1 S.W.