BHO

Charles II: March 1676

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Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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March 1676

[Mar. 1 ?] Establishment for a chaplain for Landguard Fort at 2s. per diem, to commence 1 March, 1675[-6]. Sign Manual. Countersigned, "J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 75.]
March 1. Warrant to Sir Thomas Twysden and Sir Francis Pemberton, Justices of Assize for the Home Circuit, to respite judgment, in case Henry Hutchins charged with committing a robbery in Kent, long a prisoner in Newgate and now removed to Maidstone, be found guilty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 150.]
Another copy of the above warrant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 76.]
March 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Charles Legard to be chaplain to the garrison of Landguard Fort, Suffolk. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 154.]
March 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to James Halsall to be governor of Calshot Castle, Hampshire. [Ibid. p. 157.]
March 1. The ship Hound, formerly called the Arms of Skelling, a Scotch prize, made a free ship. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 134.]
March 1. Notes by Williamson about Lord Ranelagh's undertaking. 1662 the charge was 187,000l., &c., 1666, April, 186,894l., 1669, September, 172,000l., &c. On this last Lord Ranelagh proceeded. His undertaking began Sept., 1670. Receipts in all — disbursements in all —. He has laid out more than the establishment, 166,000l., &c. In arrear when he began 146,000l., so he has paid (?) the establishments and further the sum of 312,915l., &c. Due to the King when Lord Ranelagh began 250,000l., so that he might say there has been ill management in the King's affairs before his undertaking.
Query statutes (?) of Jersey and Guernsey and the terriers, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 115.]
March 1. Answer of the Duke of Ormonde to Lord Ranelagh's paper presented in Council 1 March last. (Printed in Carte, Life of Ormonde, Vol. II., p. 454). [16 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 13.]
March 2.
Custom House.
The Commissioners of the Customs to Sir Robert Southwell. Returning the papers concerning the regulating of the giving of passes with such additions and alterations as they think convenient, and stating every bond should be with one good surety and with a penalty of 50l. for a ship under 100 tons, but for a ship above that 100l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 77.] Enclosed,
Alterations proposed in the regulations for passes, the names of places where they are to be granted, &c. [Ibid. No. 77i.]
March 2. Col. John Russell to William Bridgeman. Requesting him to prepare a commission for Capt. Copley to command Sir Thomas Daniell's former company in the King's regiment of Foot Guards. [Ibid. No. 78.]
March 2.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to [Williamson]. I have a weekly account from my son of the frequent trouble you have on my account and his, in the matter betwixt Lord Carlisle and us. I heartily wish Lord Carlisle would make good his offer to have the grounds of the misunderstanding betwixt him, myself and my son heard before you, by which my son may have opportunity to vindicate me and himself. It is time this were done, for I have struggled, as long as I am able singly, in the public affairs in these parts, and must now retire, if I be not assisted in my old age. I have several times acquainted his Majesty and his Royal Highness with the truth of affairs, and a little time, added to what I had spent already, would make me incapable of serving the Crown so as I have done.
His Majesty said to me last summer he would send my son's company to Carlisle. I dare not press his Majesty in anything, but that garrison is very weak at present. [Ibid. No. 79.]
March 2.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Two or three vessels of this town are newly arrived from Holland, one from Rotterdam, the master whereof tells us there were 300 ships there, several of them foreign built, all from England laden with corn. They hear of no great brags of the late fight with De Ruyter and the French. The generality in Holland believe they have got the worst. The conventiclers continue their frequent meetings here, both Quakers, Presbyterians, &c. [Ibid. No. 80.]
March 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind has been inconstant several days, yet mostly easterly. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. I have ever since 23 Dec., 1674, according to order kept an account of the goings and returnings of the packet-boats, and also a register of all soldiers, his Majesty's subjects, deserting foreign service, since I received your commands of 16 Feb., 1674-5, and shall continue to keep both till you give me a writ of ease. [Ibid. No. 81.]
March 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E. The two French men-of-war that rode at anchor in St. Helens Road, of which I advised, sailed last Tuesday, and a few hours after we heard several great guns go off, so it is believed they met some Dutch ships. The biggest had 60 guns, the lesser 40. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 82.]
March 2.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Upward of 200 ships still remain at Falmouth mostly outward-bound, having been there about 10 days. Here is likewise a report of an English pirate stopped at St. Ives of very considerable value. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 83.]
March 2.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to James Hickes. A worthy neighbour of mine had a pleasure boat built at Amsterdam, but she proves too big for the purpose, so he intends her for some other employment, if she can be made free. I request you to advise with Secretary Williamson about it (for they say it belongs to the Secretary's office) whether it can be done, and what the charge may be. [Ibid. No. 84.]
March 2.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The vessels I wrote of in my last continue here still and several others came in outward-bound. Monday came in a French man-of-war of 30 guns from Havre, convoy to a large French vessel for St. Domingo. Tuesday came in one of Poole from Avera (Aveiro) with oils bound home. Here are near 250 sail and more coming in daily, many bound for St. Tuball's (Ubes) and thence to Stockholm &c. A Dutch vessel being in St. Malo's road at anchor bound for Amsterdam, a sloop manned with English came by night, boarded her, set the skipper and the rest ashore and carried her away. The skipper landed at Plymouth, and from thence was recommended to a merchant of this port, where he came and made inquiry after such a vessel. This merchant but two hours before had an account from St. Ives of such a vessel, that came in there. He acquainted the skipper, and sent one or two with him, recommending him to some of that town, where in fine they secured the pretended English captain and most of his men and boat on shore, and went on board and secured three more men there, and brought the vessel into the pier and the men were all laid into gaol. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 85.]
March 2.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. I wrote you last post concerning a piracy committed by some Englishmen off Morlaix, which I had from the skipper himself last Monday he being then here, and having a letter of credit on a merchant of Penryn went there next day to take up some money, and telling him how he lost his hoy, the Arms of Waterford, the merchant told him about an hour before he received a letter from St. Ives that there was a hoy there, that had French commodities to sell and that he might have a good pennyworth. The merchant and skipper apprehending this might be the skipper's hoy he and a guide took horse and rode there, and managed so well that they have secured the captain, who is reported to be called Jackson, and soon after manned two boats and secured the vessel and all the men being 10. What damage they have done to the hoy or what goods they have embezzled I shall give account of in my next.
The wind continues S.W., so that the fleet here of about 160 sail and more coming in are still detained. Two French men-of-war are here, bound for the West Indies, but have passengers and merchants' goods on board. [Ibid. No. 86.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Newcastle. Acknowledging his commands of the 25th, and enclosing his Majesty's approbation of the three gentlemen he proposed to be added to the deputy lieutenants in that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 79.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Approbation of Sir John Molyneux, – Perkins, and William Cartwright to be deputy lieutenants of Nottinghamshire with direction to the Duke of Newcastle to issue out their deputations. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 23.]
March 2. Commission to Lionel Copley to be captain of Sir Thomas Daniell's late company in the King's regiment. [Ibid. p. 24.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Thomas Lynch, late Governor of Jamaica, in which employment he received nothing but the salary the country paid him, and therefore praying to be assigned the Major-General's salary of 300l. per annum till his four years' service and salary be paid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 92.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Chamberlain of the Household of the petition of Michael Mohun, John Lacy, William Cartwright, Nicholas Burt, William Wintersell and Robert Shatterell, some of his Majesty's company of comedians, praying that the Lord Chamberlain may be directed to call for their articles and to consider them, who is to ask the Attorney-General for his opinion concerning the said articles. [Ibid.]
[March ?] The Earls of Suffolk, Scarsdale, Carlisle, and others, Adventurers of the Fishing Trade, to the King. Petition for letters patent for incorporation with the powers and immunities contained in the annexed paper, they having raised a common stock for setting up the fishing trade. At the foot,
March 3.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord High Treasurer. At the side, Reference by him to the Attorney-General, 20 March. Wallingford House, and
His report in favour of the petitioners, but with a query touching the proposed allowances out of the Customs of 20l. per annum for 7 years for every ship to be employed and of 50l. per annum for the maintenance of an orthodox minister for ever at the place where the Company shall settle the fishery. 8 April. On the back,
Further reference by the Lord High Treasurer to the Commissioners of the Customs. 16 May. Wallingford House. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 87.] Annexed,
Heads of the proposed patent incorporating the Company of the Royal Fishery of England, granting them besides the above allowances, freedom from customs on their fish and also a grant of the moneys formerly collected for a fishery by virtue of the commission of 22 Aug., 1661, with other privileges. 5 pages. [Ibid. 87 i.]
Another copy of the above reference of 3 March. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 93.]
March 3.
Spring Gardens.
[Sir R. Southwell] to Charles Bertie. Sending him by command of the Lord Treasurer, the several papers relating to passes framed by the Committee of Trade with the amendments of the Commissioners of the Customs. They must be returned before Monday, when the Lord Treasurer meets the Committee for Trade at Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 88.]
March 3.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. This morning is rain which is very pleasant and welcome. Several laden colliers came into this harbour yesterday with the wind at S.E., where it continues. [Ibid. No. 89.]
March 3.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Several very rich ships are come in this morning from the Straits and elsewhere, which are gone for the Thames. [Ibid. No. 90.]
March 3.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 91.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 91 i.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners for rebuilding St. Paul's. Whereas you have represented that according to the tenor of former letters to you, you have proceeded in laying the foundations of the East end and quire and have raised on the same the outside walls near 10 feet above the ground together with two of the coynes of the dome necessary for the abutment of the said work, and whereas it is by you conceived expedient that the rest of the foundations of the dome should be also laid for the greater security of the superstructure, to the end therefore that our first intentions may be pursued of fitting up the East end in the first place for Divine Service, and that nevertheless the whole work may be carried on according to the best rules of art, we hereby authorize and require you to proceed forthwith upon laying the foundations of the dome, and such others as you find requisite to be adjoined, as room can conveniently be made from time to time by taking down the old ruins and disposing the materials, and that together with the same you proceed vigorously with the quire and principally with the pillars and middle nave of the same and with the vaulting of the caves within ground, which bear the pavements of the church. And, because it will be convenient to preserve the said vaultings from injury of weather, you are also authorized to lay a temporary roof on the cornice of the said middle nave, by which means also place may be made for the present for the worship of God without hindering the progress of the works. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 26.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 92.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Lieutenant of Northamptonshire for the payment out of such part of the militia money as is remaining in their hands of 490l. to Viscount Cullen, being the amount expended by him some years since in apprehending Adam Baines, and in regard of other matters relating to the King's service as one of the deputy lieutenants of Northamptonshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 24.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a Privy Seal to the Trustees of the Queen Consort, after reciting a lease by King James, dated 27 June, 1623, to Robert Parker of all the lead mines in the soke and wapentake of Wirkesworth, Derbyshire, parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, with the lott and copp within the said soke and wapentake and the office of Barmaster within the same for 31 years to commence from Lady Day then last past, and a lease by King Charles I. dated 7 May, 1631, to David Ramsay of all the said premises for 31 years to commence on the determination of Robert Parker's said term, and a lease by the present King dated 11 June, 1661, to Edward Vernon for 7 years to commence on the determination of David Ramsay's said term at the yearly rent of 144l. for the said mines with the lott and copp, and of 2l. 13s. 4d. for the said office of Barmaster, and that the said premises are since granted to the said trustees for 99 years from Lady Day, 1664, in trust for the Queen for her life and afterwards in trust for the Crown, and that the Queen, and by the King's authority and command the said trustees 20 Dec., 1670, have leased to Ralph Freeman at the nomination of Thomas, Lord Clifford, deceased, all the said premises for 31 years to commence after the determination of Edward Vernon's said term, under the same rents as in Vernon's lease, and that the Queen had consented that her said trustees should grant a further lease of the premises to Elizabeth, Lady Clifford, the relict of the said Lord Clifford, or to her nominee for 40 years to commence after the determination of Ralph Freeman's said term under the rents last mentioned, which the trustees conceive they cannot safely make without the King's consent; directing and authorizing the said trustees to grant a lease of all the said premises to Richard Prowse, the nominee of Lady Clifford, for 40 years to commence on the determination of Ralph Freeman's said term at the said yearly rents of 144l. for the lead mines with the lott and copp and of 2l. 13s. 4d. for the office of Barmaster. [Nearly 3 pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 137.]
Copy of the Privy Seal directed by the above warrant. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 379, No. 93.]
March 4.
Warden Hall near Birmingham.
Frederick de Blewston to Williamson. Having had the honour to give you intelligence from beyond the seas in the name of Wasserburg, I find myself obliged to continue it, the occasion presenting itself, here in England, where I have been naturalized. Hearing of a cabalistic letter sent to Mr. Halfpenny, of Birmingham, and supposing it was only to disturb a community like that of Birmingham which is not a corporation, and where there is no justice within 8 leagues, and which is well enough known in the civil wars, I used my utmost endeavours, not without some expense, to deprive the common people there of a subject for making malicious remarks and now enclose it to you. I beg you not to mention my name. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 94.] Enclosed,
The said letter to Richard Halfpenny which is another copy of the letter to the Mayors of Chester and Dorchester and to Mr. Barker, calendared in the last volume, pp. 547, 549, 554. [Ibid. No. 94 i.]
March 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday evening arrived one of our packet-boats with many passengers, who only inform us of the diligence of the Dutch in fitting out their ships and preparing their army for the campaign. The wind is mostly southerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 95.]
March 4.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived in the Downs eight ships from Smyrna and other parts of the Straits, but bring no news. Pleasant weather, not a topsail gale at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 96.]
March 4. Warrant, after reciting the King's intention to grant to the Earl of Ossory 14,000l., in consideration of the great losses and charges sustained and the many debts contracted by him in the king's service, for a grant to him, his executors, administrators and assigns, of a pension of 2,666l. 13s. 4d. per annum to commence from 25 Dec., 1676, for three years, and of another pension of 2,000l. per annum to commence from 25 Dec., 1679, for three years, both to be charged on the Irish revenue and declaring that, notwithstanding the letters of 15 Jan. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 515), giving directions touching the disposition of the 20,000l. reserved to the King by the present intended establishment, no more of the said 20,000l. should be applied according to such directions than what shall remain after the several pensions thereinbefore granted be fully satisfied. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 209.]
March 4. The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Heads of Colleges in Cambridge. As he understands that his former command about opponents performing their duty in divinity disputations has proved thoroughly effectual, and thinks it of equal consequence that the exercises required by the statutes of colleges should be performed within the same, recommending to the persons concerned to cause the directions of the college statutes concerning any academical exercises to be regularly observed, and particularly that each person, who is required by his college statutes to perform any exercise whatever, should perform it or undergo the penalty from time to time, till he either perform it in person, or on some reasonable cause procure it to be performed by another person. These letters are to be published in the full congregation of the University, and entered in its registry and in that of each particular college. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 192.]
March 4. Warrant for a grant to William Hopkins, M.A., of the place of canon in Worcester cathedral, void by death of Dr. John Breton. [Ibid. f. 82.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Cullen. I am ashamed your late commands have rested so long in my hands. I now return them, I hope to your satisfaction, but what you may particularly receive in this occasion is that his Majesty did the thing with all the readiness and goodwill you could have wished. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 80.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Pass for Don Mattheo de Cardenas, who brought a present of horses to the King from the Duke of Arcos in Spain, and is about to return home with four grooms on board the Bilboa Merchant bound for Bilboa. [Precedents 1, f. 134.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of the office of Chief Remembrancer of the Exchequer in Ireland to Richard Aldworth for his life from and after the determination of the interest of Francis Godolphin, the present patentee thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 438.]
March 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Last Friday anchored at Spithead several merchantmen both English and Dutch, which weighed next day and went to Cowes where they continue. There came with them three or four Dutch men-of-war as convoy, now at anchor in St. Helens Road. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 97.]
March 5. Memorandum that Sarah Stone, of St. Bartholomew the Great, having died intestate and without kindred, her estate has been granted by his Majesty towards there building of St. Paul's. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Another copy thereof, adding that Mr. Lax, curate of Trinity Minories, is dead and that the same is granted to the Bishop of London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 98.]
March 5. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox for delivering up to his successor as paymaster his two office rooms with chimneys and a closet next St. James' Park and a lodging room without a chimney, and for his reserving for his own use the other parts of the house now in his possession for the dispatch of his affairs and to keep his clerks together till all his accounts are declared, and, whereas he is out of purse about 200l. for making conveniencies in the said house, he is to keep the residue of the said house, not only till his accounts are declared, but also till the said 200l. shall be reimbursed him by his successor. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 140.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Sir John Munro, of Fowlles, for two years. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 431.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that great sums of money are due from the Earl of Anglesey, Lord Privy Seal, formerly Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, from Sir George Carteret, Vice-Chamberlain of the Household, who succeeded the said Earl as Vice-Treasurer, and from Sir Richard Bellingham, son and heir of Sir Daniel Bellingham, their deputy, signifying his pleasure that he cause the Attorney-General to prosecute in equity the said persons for all such sums as shall in equity appear due to the Crown from them or any of them, and the said parties are all to appear gratis and the Barons of the Exchequer are to proceed to a decree that their judgment may be known, but the execution thereof is to be respited till the King be informed thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 422.]
March 6.
Council Chamber.
Report of the Committee for Trade about the Rules for granting passes. 1. No passes be granted but in London, Dover, Rye, Chichester, Southampton, Poole, Weymouth, Lyme, Exeter, Dartmouth, Plymouth, Fowey, Falmouth, Penzance, Barnstaple, Bridgwater, Minehead, Bristol for Bristol and Gloucester, Swansea, Milford, Colchester, Ipswich, Yarmouth, Lynn, Boston, Hull, Stockton, Sunderland, Newcastle, Berwick, Whitehaven, Lancaster, Liverpool, Chester and Beaumaris.
2. In London passes be granted only by the Lord High Admiral or the Lords of the Admiralty or the Commissioners of the Customs, and in the outports by the chief magistrate thereof with the consent of the chief officer of the customs.
3. No pass be granted to any vessel unless she has been viewed by the officer therein mentioned and a certificate from him, stating her name, build and burden and certain other particulars, be produced.
4. No pass to be granted, unless the vessel is in the port where the pass is demanded, at the time it is demanded.
5. No pass to be granted, unless it appears by such certificate that the master and two-thirds of the mariners are his Majesty's subjects, except as to ships bound to Greenland, in which case one moiety at least of the mariners to be English.
6. No foreigner who is a master to have a pass, unless he be naturalized or a denizen, and those who pretend to naturalization or denization to have no passes till they prove that their real and constant residence is in England, and that their families, if any, are here, and, in case of those that pretend to denization, that their constant residence with their families has been in England for one year before demanding such passes.
7. No pass to be granted unless the register of the place to which the ship belongs has been examined to see whether a former pass has been granted her, and no pass to be granted till the former one, if any, be delivered up.
8. That every master before receiving a pass give a bond for returning it within the time limited by rule 15, except in case of shipwreck or capture.
9. Form of oath to be taken by the master before a pass is granted giving the names of the owners of the ship and their abodes, their respective shares, what place she belongs to, and whether she had a former pass, and that he is the sole master, and, if she be foreign built, giving the time she was bought and that the ship for which the certificate is returned is the one concerning which the oath is made, and that the name he calls her by is her true name.
10. If a pass be demanded for any foreign built ship bought since Jan., 1673–4 and not made free, not only the master but the proprietors, or as many of them as possible, are to make oath of their propriety in her, and of their respective shares, and state when she was bought and for what sum, and who are the rest of the owners and their abodes, and, if a pass be demanded for any such ship in any of the outports, no pass is to be granted, till such oath and that of the master, and the certificate of the officer that surveyed her be transmitted to the Commissioners of the Customs in London and their approval had thereon. If any of the proprietors of such foreign built ship appear to be foreigners, no such pass or approbation to be granted, till the Commissioners are satisfied that they are truly inhabitants and not sojourners only come over to serve the turn of foreigners beyond sea during the present wars abroad. Whether such propriety is claimed by foreigners or natives, due examination is to be had of their quality, value and worth, and of the probability of their having such propriety before granting such pass or approbation.
11. No pass to be granted but to ships belonging to some port or place in England, Wales, or Berwick.
12. As far as conveniently may be, no pass is to be granted except within the port to which the ship belongs, which by this regulation has power to grant passes: (With long statement of the conditions and safeguards under which a pass may be granted to a ship requiring one, which is not in her own port and cannot conveniently repair thither.)
13. The annexed form of pass printed on parchment with blanks be used in London and the like passes printed on the same sizes of parchment be sent to all the out ports authorized to grant passes, and none other be used, whereby they may be distinguished from former passes.
14. The annexed printed forms of oaths for masters and proprietors and of certificates to be made on viewing the ship and of bonds to be entered into by the Masters are to be used.
15. The passes of all ships entering out of the East or West Indies or to any portion of Africa beyond Cape Verde or to any part of the Mediterranean are to determine on their return and being unladen in any port of England, Wales, or Berwick, and to that end they are to be obliged in their bond on such return to deliver up their old passes, and passes for ships for all other parts to continue for one year only.
16. A perfect register be kept of all passes.
17. Care to be taken for giving the like necessary instructions for regulating the granting of passes in Scotland and Ireland, Tangier and other plantations, Jersey, Guernsey and the East Indies and for keeping the like register of the same, copies thereof to be transmitted to the Secretary of the Admiralty.
18. The orders of 21 July last touching passes be superseded and annulled. [7 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 99.] Annexed,
The said form of pass. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F., No. 77.]
March 6. Opinion of the Attorney-General on the reference of De Witt's petition, calendared in the last volume, p. 572. Stating the rules of the law of England regulating the payment of the debts of a deceased person.—If one executor be an alien and another an English subject, the executor in England may by the said laws be sued as both, the appearance of one being the appearance of both and judgment against one, judgment against both. All aliens naturalized by Act of Parliament are to all purposes as natural born subjects and enjoy their rights and privileges. An alien admitted an executor or administrator in England on taking the oath duly to administer the estate according to the laws of England cannot afterwards administer or dispose of the same according to any other laws different from those of England without manifest perjury which is abhorred by all laws, nor without being liable to pay over again out of his own estate what he shall so unduly dispose of, if he or his estate can be found in England. As the laws of England give full credit and allowance to the justice of other nations for what is determined in relation to the estates of English subjects remaining in foreign parts, so it is fit and agreeable to justice and the law of nations that estates in England should be determined according to the law thereof, and that persons who have disposed or administered estates in England according to the laws there should not be questioned in any other nation for doing what was done in England according to the justice of that kingdom. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 100.]
March 6.
Derby House.
S. Pepys to Sir R. Southwell. On my late observing to his Majesty and the Lords of the Admiralty that the Reserve and Speedwell, designed for the Newfoundland convoy of this year, are under dispatch for their voyage, and desiring therefore to know whether he thinks fit to give any particular instructions to the commander-inchief of the said convoy suitable to or different from those given last year to Sir John Berry (which his reports on those instructions may possibly offer occasion for) his Majesty commanded me to cause the said reports to be considered before the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Foreign Plantations, in order to which I desire you will take the first opportunity of informing my Lords herein, being ready to attend them with Sir John Berry's papers when you shall think fit to call me. [Ibid. No. 101.]
March 6.
The Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I beg your pardon I have not sooner given you a list of the Justices and deputy lieutenants of Middlesex. There is a plentiful number of them, many of which may well be spared. I have likewise sent you a note of Sir Robert Peyton's gang. Those crossed are out of commission already. I wish the rest were so. It is of great consequence to his Majesty, and to the good government of the city and the adjacent parts that nobody be in commission either military or civil, but such as are faithful and love and affect the government, and will be active when any occasion shall happen, the whole kingdom taking measures and precedents from hence. In the usurped time of government they would trust nobody but such as were thorough paced for them. The City is now in a quiet and calm condition since the dispute is ended between the Lord Mayor, Court of Aldermen and Common Council about the disposal of the judgeship of the Sheriff's Court. The Recorder last Common Council was very ill used, and baited at by some of the factious party there, which has occasioned him to think of resigning. As I am informed, he intends suddenly to do it to Sir John King. The Recorder has these 18 years behaved as a very honest and loyal person to his Majesty's concerns; I wish he was made a judge. None of the justices of the Tower Hamlets being present when the Lord Chancellor signified his Majesty's pleasure of putting the laws in execution against Recusants and preachers and conventicles, next day I gave the High Constable a warrant to acquaint every justice, a copy whereof is enclosed. The preachers in the Hamlets have all been made acquainted with his Majesty's pleasure; some already have taken leave of their congregations, others have promised to lay down, such as will not I will take up and Oxfordize them. To-day and to-morrow the judges keep the assizes in Southwark for Surrey, where I am concerned, else I would have waited on you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 102.] Enclosed,
Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets, to Thomas Partridge, High Constable. Warrant, since the Lord Mayor and Aldermen and the Justices for Middlesex attended his Majesty last Friday at the Council but none of the Justices for the Tower Hamlets were there, desiring him to give notice to the several Justices residing in the Hamlets that the Lord Chancellor signified his Majesty's pleasure to have the laws put in execution against Recusants and the preachers that keep conventicles, and further to take an account of all the petty constables what meetings are in their respective precincts and the preachers' names to be returned to himself or to the next Justice that they may have notice to forbear, to prevent the laws being executed on them. 25 Feb. [Copy. Ibid. No. 102i.]
March 6.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Yesterday and to-day arrived in this road five ships of this town from the Straits, three laden with lemons and oranges, the other two with piece goods, all bound for Amsterdam. Our conventicles continue their meetings as public as ever and in as great or greater numbers, both on Sunday and Thursday. I wish I could be in favour with your clerks for a letter or Gazette, if but for once a month. [Ibid. No. 103.]
March 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived three of the eight East India ships from the Thames, the others are expected this afternoon or to-morrow. Several ships arrived from the Straits but came not near Sir John Narbrough. A topsail gale at E. variable to S.E. [Ibid. No. 104.]
March 6.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. By my last I informed you of the report of an English pirate at St. Ives. This vessel about a fortnight since coming out of St. Malo bound for Holland just outside the port met a small English sloop, which put seven men on board her and sent the master on board the sloop to be kept prisoner by the two men remaining on board her, but the master going into the hold by the command of those two, as he came to the hatchway, thrust his keeper down into the hold, and finding a handspike made use of it, and commanded the other down likewise. He then made fast the hatch, and loosing his stays sailed into St. Malo, where he presently got passage for England, and he has now secured the vessel and goods at St. Ives. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 105.]
March 6.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Most of the great fleet that was here went out last Friday morning, the wind being N.W., but before noon it came dead, so that they were all forced in again with some others from Plymouth bound for France. Shipping come in daily, yesterday four or five from the Straits. This morning came in a Scotchman of Burntisland with wines and brandies from Bordeaux for Jersey. He complains that off Belleisle he met three Biscainers of two or three guns each that robbed him of four hogsheads of wine, took away his money and clothes, beat him with a cutlass black and blue and burnt the merchant's brother with light matches. Several ships are now under sail, the wind being N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 106.]
March 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson, Yesterday came in here the John Bonaventure of London, from Gallipoli laden with oils, &c., and two more from the same place. They came from Malaga about 14 days ago, where they left a great fleet that was not ready. Capt. Jackson, that was secured at St. Ives, now shows a French commission or at least a copy of one, and so pretends the ship was bound for Holland, and that the goods belong to Hollanders, and so a good prize.
There is now in port above 200 sail, bound for Guinea, Virginia, Barbadoes, the Straits, France, &c., and the wind this morning springing up at N.E., most of them are putting to sea, some being under sail already. [Ibid. No. 107.]
March 6.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. This morning arrived the Primrose from Jamaica, which brought me both the enclosed letters. [Ibid. No. 108.]
[March?] Dame Priscilla, relict of Sir Walter Littleton, late Chancellor of Lichfield, to the King. Petition, stating that her husband spent above 500l. in rebuilding a residentiary's house in the close of Lichfield, on an agreement with Bishop Hacket approved by the dean and chapter that he should have the next nomination of the residentiary after Mr. Harrison, who being now aged and sick, she put in her claim to nominate Edward Fulham, a worthy prebendary, but Dr. Wood, the present bishop, refuses to make good the agreement of his predecessor, and requesting his Majesty's command for the admission of Mr. Fulham after Mr. Harrison's decease. [Ibid. No. 109.]
March 6. The King to the Bishop of Lichfield. After reciting the above petition, earnestly recommending him to fulfil the agreement and to cause Dame Littleton's presentee to be admitted to the house on the death of the said Harrison. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 82.]
March 6.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Captains Roomcoyle and Heath showing that his Majesty having granted them a pardon for embezzling prize goods, which by reason of their absence in his service they could not perfect, and that, some of the papers having been lost, as they suppose by the negligence of their solicitor, the Clerk of the Signet refuses to proceed without further direction and praying an order to that effect, his Majesty declares his pleasure that the pardon should proceed wherever the stop may be, and commands Sir J. Williamson to signify the same to the Clerks of the Signet and the Privy Seal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 93.]
Tuesday morning, March 7. Lord Duras to Williamson. Yesterday evening I was so unfortunate as not to be able to find you to speak to you about the favour the King has been pleased to do me, which is, to give me the title of Earl, in order to beg you to have my warrant signed. I therefore give you this trouble in order to beg you to have it done to-day, because Mr. Legge is going to-morrow morning to Sir George Sondes', and I am about to get into my coach to go thither, which prevents me from asking you in person, for it is necessary he should bring it me to-morrow. I must tell the manner in which the King wishes it, which is, that I offer to Sir George Sondes to take the title, and that after his death it should come to me, but, that if he does not wish to take it, I should have it at once. The King therefore, wishes the name to be left in blank; for I do not know myself what the good man will wish to do, or what name he will wish to take. I beg you, if there is a way, that the warrant should be so drawn that, if he wishes, he shall take the title, and that after his death I shall have it, and that, if he does not wish it, that it should serve for me, if it can be done like that, and, if it can, I beg you to have it signed to-day and to order it to be given to Mr. Legge. Lord Arlington, to whom I spoke about it yesterday evening, told me he did not believe the warrant could be drawn so, because Sir George Sondes' wishes were not known, but that, if it could not be done, he would propose an expedient to you. I therefore beg you to have the kindness to find one, and Mr. Legge will speak to you to know what you have done, or Bridgeman, who will deliver you this letter, for it is the same thing to give the warrant to him or Mr. Legge. He will also speak to you of another matter, which I beg you to do, namely to have the warrant changed for me, which I have had for my Irish business, and to have it made like Lord Ossory's, because it was the Lord Chancellor who drew it, and consequently it secures us much better. Bridgeman will give you a better account of the business. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 110.]
March 7. Col. Samuel Sandys to Williamson. I received yours to a great satisfaction, but doubt the business had the worse success, being introduced by my unfortunate hands. The letter is not private, for I live 14 miles from the place, and I am very well assured another copy of it was sent up to a person of quality which the honest men in Tewkesbury have been not a little troubled at having no account of. I hope I may say the country will take their measure according to the judgment given of this letter, for many have acted in his Majesty's service, and, though the law was on their side, have raised themselves enemies, whereof I have done not a few, and those we look on as persons whose design is to disturb the government are too much countenanced. I pray God they may be stopped, before it is too late. I had not the least prejudice to the author of the letter, but a kindness, till I saw the copy of it. If I misunderstood it, I beg his pardon, but should be happy to know its doom to give some honest men satisfaction, it not being a little inquired after. [Ibid. No. 111.]
March 7.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind continues easterly, which keeps several vessels here in harbour. [Ibid. No. 112.]
March 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday towards evening arrived one of our packet-boats from Holland, which brought few passengers and little news. They reported the Prince of Orange's army was still in winter quarters and would not take the field till May. The wind having been long southerly and easterly is at present northerly, weather fair but too dry. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 113.]
March 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Dutch menof-war that my last informed were at anchor in St. Helen's Road are since gone to sea. [Ibid. No. 114.]
March 7.
Plymouth.
George Dyer to Williamson. In his master's absence enclosing list of ships arrived. The wind being N.W. the remaining part of the outward-bound fleet here sailed yesterday. [Ibid. No. 115.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 115i.]
March 7. Warrant for the reprieve of Alice Philips, a prisoner in Aylesbury gaol, sentenced to death at the late assizes for Buckinghamshire for the murder of her bastard child. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 143.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland for the payment of the fees of the Duke of Lenox's patent. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 431.]
March 8. Order in Council that the Committee for Trade having that day presented the following rules for preventing the fraudulent procuring of passes, approving thereof and ordering that as well the Lord Treasurer as the Commissioners of the Admiralty cause them to be observed and put in execution in all the ports therein mentioned. (Then follow the rules which are a copy of those calendared ante, p. 9.) [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 116.]
March 8.
The Custom House, London.
The Commissioners of the Customs to Sir R. Southwell. We received yours of the 6th with the enclosed paper containing heads for a proclamation proposed by the Committee for Trade, which we have considered, and return them with such alterations as we think may be convenient. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 117.]
March 8.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Two days since came into Portland Road the Henry and Sarah of London. The captain that went out with her died. She came from Jamaica, 17 Dec., and was one of the ships that went to Surinam to carry off the planters there. The captain says that between 60 and 80 negroes, that came to Jamaica from Barbados, broke out in rebellion and went away towards the woods, which was discovered by a negro that belonged to Lord Vaughan and met them at their going away, whom they would have had to consort with them, and that the Governor had sent two parties of whites of about 60 each to go after them. This ship had not above 20 tons of freight home.
Postscript.—I should have sent the above the last post, but he went away before it came to the posthouse. Since on the 9th came home the Dorothy of this port that had been at New [found] land Marseilles and Nantes. Being bound for Nantes, under the Cardinals three Ostenders and a Biscayer came on board him. The Biscayer did nothing to him, but the Ostenders took from him 907 pieces of eight and 100 pistoles, besides 6 barrels of wine and other things to the value of 6l., pretending he was their prize because bound from one French port to another. They fired several shots at him before they came aboard, and shot his pilot, a Frenchman, supposed to be since dead. They called on him several times to strike his colours, which he refusing, they poured in several volleys of small shot and forced his boat to go aboard them. The master owns that, after they had shot several shots at him, he returned one upon them, and would have fought them, if his men would. He had 12 guns, the Ostenders one 8, another 4, and the other 3 and the Biscayer 3. 11 March. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 118.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Lewis, Lord Duras and the heirs male of his body, of an Earldom of England, by the name of Viscount — and Earl of —. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 141.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the grant of an Earldom of England to Sir George Sondes, K.B., by the name and title of Baron of Throwley, Viscount Sondes of Lees Court, and Earl of Feversham, to hold the same for his life, and after his decease the same to descend to Lewis, Lord Duras, and the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Ibid. p. 142.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Grant to Sir Allen Apsley or his nominees of the office of Registrar of the Court of Chancery, to hold the same after the determination of the interest of the Earl of St. Albans and Baptist May during the lives of three such persons as he shall nominate. Minute. [Ibid.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Passport to James, Marquis of Montrose, who is going beyond the seas. [Latin. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 432.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting a reference to him of the petition of John, Lord Kingston, setting forth that, notwithstanding the provision made for his reprizals by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, he was still greatly deficient, the truth whereof appears by his report, and a reference of another petition of the said lord to the Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer and the Lord Lieutenant, and their report of 28 Feb. (calendared in the last volume, p. 578), which shows that there is still due to the said lord 1,597l. 10s. a year and to him in trust for Edward Roberts 402l. 10s. a year, making in all 2,000l. a year, and that the said lord had informed the King that Lord Ranelagh is for valuable considerations equally interested in the reprize due to him, and thereupon has besought that the grant for the said reprizals might pass to them jointly, and that the King consenting thereto has thought fit to grant to the said Lords Ranelagh and Kingston and their heirs a further satisfaction of Lord Kingston's deficiencies for himself and the said Edward Roberts out of the forfeited and undisposed of lands in Ireland as well those in the King's hands as any others that shall be discovered which yet remain concealed: requiring and authorizing him to cause one or more effectual grants to be made to the said Lords Ranelagh and Kingston, their heirs and assigns, or to their nominees, and particularly the said 402l. 10s. yearly to the said Edward Roberts, his heirs and assigns, in fee-farm of such and so many lands in Ireland, whereto the King has any right or title or which have been vested in him by the said Acts or whereof the rents and profits shall be found to be detained from him, as are of the clear yearly value of 2,000l. sterling, in full satisfaction of the reprizals due to the said lords and the said Edward Roberts, under such yearly quit-rents for each parcel as Adventurers and Soldiers are to pay in the respective provinces, wherein such parcels lie, or such quit-rent as the Lord Lieutenant shall think fit, not exceeding the yearly quit-rent to be reserved by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation for the like quantity of lands in the respective provinces where the said lands lie, and further that none of the said lands whereof the said lords or their agent has or shall present any notes or lists to the satisfying of the said Lord Kingston's deficiencies be granted to any person whatever till they be fully satisfied the said 2,000l. a year: and further, after reciting that it is alleged that divers of the lands granted to the said Lord Kingston by former letters have been sold to divers persons and that the quit-rents out of the lands so sold are chargeable as well thereout as out of other lands still in his possession and so subject to more than their just proportion, and that divers of the lands so granted to him by former letters patent or the counties or baronies where they are said to lie are misnamed in the said letters patent, authorizing the Lord Lieutenant to give orders to the Barons of the Exchequer for the apportionment of such quit-rents, and, if Lord Kingston should desire it, to accept from him surrenders of any of the said lands and of any other lands passed to him in pursuance of the said Acts and to regrant the surrendered lands to him in fee-simple by their true denominations under the respective quit-rents before mentioned, and in such letters patent no mention is to be made of such surrenders, and further authorizing him to cause commissions to be issued for finding out the King's title to any such concealed forfeited lands and the extent and yearly value thereof and the yearly quit-rents payable out of each parcel. [5¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 417.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 14.]
March 9.
Robes Chamber.
Report of the Commissioners of the Admiralty approving the rules for passes made by the Committee for Trade with two slight alterations, and suggesting that in accordance therewith the forthcoming proclamation should declare that the passes granted in pursuance of the treaties with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli with those to the East and West Indies should remain in force during the voyage, and not terminate within a year of their respective dates, as specified in former proclamations. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 119.]
March 9.
Pembroke Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. In obedience to your commands I inquired what Cumberland and Westmorland men were in our University, and enclose a note of their names, degrees and qualities. The name of the person I wrote about is Gascarth. He was born near Keswick, and is really a very sober and civil man, and is accounted as good a scholar as any in the University of his standing. We have but one more belonging to our society, named Bankes. He is judged by many to have very brisk and ingenious parts, but wants encouragement, his friends having proved very unfortunate as to their worldly concerns. He has lost a year and has been forced to discontinue, not being in a condition to procure so small a sum as to take his B.A. degree. If you please to exercise your favour towards him, he may commence this Midsummer. He very well deserves a degree, having made very considerable proficiency for one of his time. Mr. Gascarth is better able to subsist of the two, having the half profits of a Fellowship. I have done as much as I possibly could for both, having nothing to live upon since my father's death but the slender income of a Fellowship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 120.] Enclosed,
The said list, giving the names of 8 members of St. John's College and of two of Pembroke Hall. [Ibid. No. 120 i.]
March 9.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Most of the laden fleet of colliers from Newcastle and Sunderland passed by here yesterday and last night. Fifteen laden ships are anchored in this bay, the wind blowing very hard at N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 121.]
March 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the Duke of Albemarle came here, and went away about one at noon to-day. Wind northerly and cold. [Ibid. No. 122.]
March 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The four ships for Bantam, which came into the Downs the 6th, are yet there. The other five for the Coast and other parts of East India are not yet come. Of late no homeward-bound ships are arrived. The wind in 24 hours has veered to all points of the compass, but now blows very fresh at N.E. We have had no rain for about six weeks, barley season will be very backward. [Ibid. No. 123.]
March 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 124.]
March 9.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Monday and Tuesday went out the great fleet from this port, the wind being E. and N.E. ever since. Very few are left behind. On Monday came in a ship from Gallipoli bound for London, which came out of Messina three weeks since, and tells us of the sad condition that place was in before it was relieved by the French. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 125.]
March 9.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last Monday and Tuesday put to sea all the outward-bound ships here, wind at N. and N.E., which has continued so ever since. Tuesday much shooting was heard off the harbour, so that it is thought that the capers that were at Plymouth may have met with the French fleet that put out here. Wind now N.E. The ship at St. Ives I formerly wrote of is secured by the Vice-Admiral, the men are at liberty, and the captain pretends a French commission. [Ibid. No. 126.]
March 9. Notes by Williamson at the Committee for Trade. French imports per annum. All our exports to France are but 171,000l., i.e. woollen manufactures 63,000l. all other manufactures 84,000l. From France come linen 507,000l., silks 300,000l., wine and brandy 200,000l. N.B.—The East India Company have caused to be built 30 ships capable to bear from 50 to 60 guns each by private men, encouraged by a gratification of 1,200l. per ship to the builders. They place a surveyor to see the work well done. Wool pays the greatest rent of any commodity of England. In fine cloths Holland interferes with them, in coarse Silesia interferes, &c. We had the manufacture admirable of gold and silver lace, which led the King of France to set up the fashion of points and silk laces, &c. When we had brought in the general wear of fine cloth, France caught up the fashion of droguettes. When we had come to imitate droguettes as good as they or better, they let them fall and so have we. N.B.—When the States set up the manufacture of cloth, the great opposition they found was from the shopkeepers, who apprehended, if the manufacture of cloth were in the country, every man would go and buy of the weaver, and so would shopkeepers and silkmen oppose shutting out French silks, &c. Earl Clarendon in the head of the Council of Trade. Address to the King, to the two Houses of Parliament. The King writ a letter to the Lord Mayor after the plague. The last session came to a vote for it. N.B.—The importance of the strict execution of the laws for burying in linen:—considering the great number of morts, so much more wool shall be expended, which is our own produce, and so much less linen which is foreign manufacture.
Propositions by Sir G. D[owning]. (Vide Order of Board, 6 June 1673, for wearing English manufactures, &c., and of July 1675.) 1. The King declares to wear only stuffs in summer, cloth in winter, if lined with silk, then with silk of English manufacture. 2. No warrants for any prohibited goods from France for whatever person, and the King's half of prohibited goods to be burnt. 3. The ladies to wear only English silks or stuffs mingled with silks. 4. All laces of white thread and of silk lace worn to be of English manufacture, and, if possible, to get the King and Queen to wear laces instead of points, &c. How to execute it. The patterns of stuff, cloth and silk to be chosen just contrary to what is then in wear in France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 127.]
March 9. Warrant to Robert Knightley, high sheriff of Surrey, to reprieve Thomas Townsend, condemned at the Southwark Assizes for stealing a horse not exceeding the value of 40s., this being the first fact laid to his charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 149.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Gloucester. This is only to remind you of the trouble you have given yourself of that infamous libel, that, when you have hunted it as high as you can, we may have an account with whom it is last lodged, that his Majesty's pleasure may be had for the effective proceeding against him, be he author or dispenser. I have desired Mr. Fowler to remind you of it, and that you will transmit copies of any further examinations you may have taken therein. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 81.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Alderman Henry Fowler. On the same subject as the last and desiring him to speak with the Mayor about it. [Ibid.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Sandys. I have been long your debtor for a more formal answer to yours, which brought me the enclosed copy of a letter written by Sir Th[omas] O[verbury]. The matter had been spoken of to the Lord Chancellor, but, though there are just exceptions to be taken to the tenor as well as to the scope and aim of the letter, yet I do not find the King cares to have any public notice taken of it as from him, but rather to let it fall. I confess I had not expected such a stile from that hand. (See last volume, p. 498.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 82.]
March 9. Pass for Sir Ellis Leighton to go to France, who is repairing to the Ambassador Extraordinary there on the King's affairs. [Precedents 1, f. 135.]
March 10.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of the Merchant Adventurers of England, showing that they understand that the king of Denmark, being at war with France and Sweden, requires that ships, goods and men belonging to his Majesty's dominions be accompanied with such passport and certificate as was concluded at Copenhagen between England and Denmark, 11 July, 1670, which form of passport and certificate being very intricate, and in many circumstances not feasible, and the petitioners' concerns being very considerable up the Elbe and the East Seas, and they having at present two ships in the Thames ready to sail for Hamburg, which by reason of the many persons concerned in them are not capable of observing the said formality, praying that his Majesty would order such a passport as might be sufficient for the security of their concerns:— referring the above request to the Committee for Trade. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 128.]
March 10.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Lord High Treasurer and the Commissioners for the Admiralty cause punctual execution of the rules prepared by the Committee for Trade, and approved by the Admiralty Commissioners for preventing fraudulent procuring of passes for ships, pursuant to the treaties with Spain and the United Provinces. Printed. Annexed,
The Committee for Trade to the King. Submitting the 18 rules approved by them, which are calendared ante, p. 9, for granting of passes.
Form of the bond to be given by masters of ships, before granting them a pass, obliging them to return the said pass.
Form of the oath to be taken by the master of a foreign-built ship made free, that it is made free and belongs solely to the subjects of the king, and that he knows no other name by which the said ship has been or is called.
Form of the certificate of the officer for the navigation for a foreign-built ship made free, that it has been made free.
Form of the oath to be taken by the master of an English-built ship, that it belongs to British subjects, and that he knows no other name by which she has been or is called.
Form of the certificate of the officer for the navigation for an English-built ship.
Form of the oath for the master of a foreign-built ship not made free, that it has been purchased by and wholly belongs to British subjects.
Form of the certificate of the officer for the navigation for a foreignbuilt ship, not made free, whether or not it was bought before Jan. 1, 1673[-4].
Form of an oath of the proprietors of a foreign-built ship, bought since Jan. 1, 1673[-4], and not made free.
Certificate by the Commissioners of the Customs that a ship belongs to British subjects and requesting favourable treatment for the Master thereof, and permission for her quietly to pass and negotiate. On parchment.
The Earl of Danby to the Commissioners of the Customs. Directing them to observe the above rules, and forms of certificates, oaths and bonds, herewith transmitted to them, and to cause the same to be signified to and duly observed by all other officers of the Customs therein concerned. Newmarket, 7 April.
Order in Council that the Lord High Treasurer and the Lords of the Admiralty and the Secretaries of State cause the rules for granting passes in pursuance of the treaties with Sweden and Denmark prepared by the Committee for Trade (which rules are set forth in the order) to be observed and put in execution. Whitehall, 22 March. Annexed,
Form of certificate that an oath had been taken that the vessel for which the pass is desired belongs wholly to British subjects as also her lading, and that the said goods and no other were put on board for the voyage, and that no goods are hidden under false or counterfeit name.
Form of certificate from the Commissioners of the Customs or the Chief Magistrates of an out-port that the ships and goods belong to British subjects, and requesting favourable treatment for the same. On parchment.
Form of certificate from the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London similar to the last form but one.
The Earl of Danby to the Commissioners of the Customs. Directing them to govern themselves by the above rules in what is to be done by them touching passes to be granted in pursuance of the treaties with Sweden and Denmark. Newmarket, 7 April.
March 10.
Whitehall.
Order in Council approving of the rules prepared by the Committee for Trade and approved of by the Lords of the Admiralty, relative to ships' passes to be granted to the King's subjects trading with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli in pursuance of the treaties with those countries, which rules are set out in the said order. Annexed,
Form of the pass from the Lords of the Admiralty in pursuance of the said treaties.
Directions for masters of ships where to go for passes, in pursuance of the above treaties, with statement of fees to be paid thereon. [All printed. 30 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
Three more printed copies of the above. [Ibid.]
Other copies in manuscript of the forms of bonds and oaths of the masters of English and foreign built ships, of the certificates of the officers of the navigation and of the oath of the proprietors of a foreign-built ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, Nos. 129–134.]
March 10.
Whitehall.
Two other copies of the above Order in Council and the other documents, relating to the granting of passes in pursuance of the treaties with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli. At the foot,
Order in Council approving of the alterations proposed by the Committee for Trade in the fifth of the above rules so as to make such passes continue for one year only. Whitehall, 22 March. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, Nos. 135–136.]
Copy of the report of the Committee for Trade presenting the rules for passes for Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, and two copies of the said rules. [Ibid. Nos. 137–139.]
Another copy of the list of fees on a pass signed by his Majesty pursuant to the treaty with Denmark, on one signed by the Commissioners of the Admiralty, and on one procured at the Custom house. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Two other copies of the form of pass to be granted in pursuance of the treaties with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli. [Ibid. Nos. 141–142.]
Draft of the above directions for masters where to go to procure passes, with note [by the Committee for Trade] that having presented on the 8th instant rules for taking out passes and judging it may not be proper to have the same made public, but that it will be sufficient for the parties concerned to have notice where to apply, they offer the above heads and propose they should be printed and pasted up at the Custom house. [Ibid. No. 143.]
March 10.
East India House.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I presume you have heard that Thompson, Nelthrope, Farington, Page, the bankers in partnership, have lost their reputations. They have summoned their creditors to meet to-morrow to receive their propositions.
Yesterday the Recorder gave in his answer to the Court of Aldermen, that he is not willing to resign without a present of 1,000l. I hear the Chamberlain is dipped with the above named. We shall now, I hope, be quiet in the Common Council, the leaders failing. [Ibid. No. 144.]
March 10.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Wednesday several vessels, both light and laden, sailed from the Tees for London, Holland and Norway with the wind W. and by S. It has since gone about northerly, and is now come S.W. [Ibid. No. 145.]
March 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About one this afternoon the four Bantam ships sailed with their flags, admiral, vice, and rear, but in sight their flags were all struck, supposed to be passing by Walmer Castle, and then immediately coming in sight of Dover Castle. A fresh gale at N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 146.]
March 10.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 147.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 147 I.]
March 10. Presentation of George Burton, M.A., to the Vicarage of Armington (Ermington) with the chapel of Kingstone, Devon. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 82.]
March 10. Warrant to Thomas Bard, high sheriff of Buckinghamshire, for the reprieve of Philip Clarke, labourer, prisoner in Aylesbury gaol, condemned to death for stealing a mare of small value. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 150.]
March 10.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Æneas, Lord McDonnell, for three years. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 433.]
March 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the reference to him of the petition of Rose Cassells, and the letter of 20 Oct., calendared in the last volume, p. 356, for bestowing a pension on her, and that he had reported that the most proper course will be to pass letters patent under the Great Seal of Ireland to her for the same, with which report the Lord Treasurer of England agrees, for causing such letters patent to be passed containing a grant of the yearly sum of 200l. sterling to her for her life of the King's gift and special bounty, to commence from Michaelmas last. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 424.]
[March?] Suggestions by merchants as to the rules relating to passes in general, that the numbers of ports where passes could be procured should be reduced, that English-built ships should not be obliged to be viewed by the surveyor, that English-built and foreign-built ships made free, if abroad, should have passes granted them, and that masters be not obliged to give bond to return their passes except in case of capture or wreck or selling the vessel and that the passes be not limited in time and also as to the rules relating to passes granted under the treaties with Algiers, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, Nos. 148, 149.]
March 11. Sir George Downing to Williamson. For the better enabling him to draw the text of the Treaty Marine with France, desiring him to favour him with a copy of the paper he had from the Commissioners that treated with the Dutch, which explains the business of trading from one port of an enemy to another port of the same enemy as also a copy of the last paper concerning revisions. [Ibid. No. 150.]
March 11.
Gloucester.
Alderman Henry Fowler to Williamson. I had yours of the 9th today, and in answer assure you that we are not wanting in our diligence concerning that infamous libel, which we cannot trace further here than the persons already examined, but we have taken care to have something done effectually at Hereford, and, when that is remitted hither, we will not be wanting in our duty. Mr. Mayor is now very ill, otherwise you had received a letter this post from him, and therefore he desires your pardon. You may remember in my former I craved your sense concerning our conventicles. As you are silent in that particular, I crave your direction in the next, which I hope you will write me in a post or two, for they increase very much to the great grief of the most loyal subjects and scandal of the church. [Ibid. No. 151.]
March 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday forenoon one of our packet-boats arrived, the passengers few and the news less. The wind has been of late mostly northerly, but to-day it blows very fresh at East. [Dated 1676 but endorsed as received 1675–6. Ibid. No. 152.]
March 11. Notes by Williamson about trade. Fashions of ribbons, stuffs, &c. run round the world. What is grown old in France is brought in new into England, from England to Ireland, to Barbados. We in England have as good designs; can work as cheap in England. What the French sell all along for 24 we at the very first sell for 16 or 18. The great silver (?) and gold stuffs are made at London and Canterbury. Our people would offer for 7s. what the French ordinarily sell at 9s. A French merchant last summer was prevailed with to take off from a weaver a silver stuff for 10s. and put them off as French made for 15s.
Heretofore this trade to France in these stuffs, &c. was carried on by Englishmen. Now of late it is carried on by Frenchmen come over and dwelling in private chambers &c., as particularly four or five in Throgmorton Street.
French stuffs not made here nor that well can be, lutestrings, alamodes. 1, because we have not in England silk proper for it, it being prohibited to be conveyed out of the country, i.e. Lyons, as wool is from England. 2, because it has a particular lustre or shining given to it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 153.]
March 11. Pardon to James Colleton, charged with the murder of Elisha Bridges. (Calendared erroneously under 28 March, 1675, in S.P. Col., America &c. 1675–1676, p. 193.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 151.]
March 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Conant. I have been long watching an opportunity to let you see I have not forgotten wholly as what service your good example does the church, so the obligations I have to your ancient kindness, while I was a member of the University. I hope I may live to sign a paper of more consideration to you. In the meantime I send you the copy of one the king has signed lately in your favour. The original I shall keep, till I hear what friend you have here in town with whom I may confer about the means of making it effectual to you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 82.]
March 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Lichfield. Recommending John Conant, D.D., Minister of All Hallows, Northampton, on account of his constant and painful preaching and the good example of his life, for the first vacant prebend in Lichfield cathedral. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 25.]
March 11. Warrant for the reprieve of John White, condemned to death at the last Surrey assizes for horse stealing. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 148.]
March 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. These parts affords nothing of news. Wind E.N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 1.]
March 12. "A Brief Description of a literal and practical Commentary to be collected out of the best annotators and others and affixed to the text of the Holy Scriptures," to be completed in two convenient volumes by Mr. Davis. With the sixth chapter of Genesis with annotations as a specimen of the intended work, with the approbation of six bishops and of a number of clergy both of the Church of England and Nonconformists, with propositions for the printing of the proposed work, and with an advertisement of the names of persons in various country towns who will receive subscriptions from subscribers to the projected work and transmit them to London. Licensed by Anthony Saunders, Lambeth Palace, 12 March, 1675[-6]. [8 pages. Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 2.]
March 12. Note by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. England—Col. Sandys' letters of 7[March] and 18 Feb.—Commend his zeal. Say it is a factious letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 124.]
March 13.
Loddington.
Dr. J. Bentham to Williamson. My confidence of your constant kindness to me and my son at Peterhouse emboldens me to make this humble and necessary petition. The Master, Dr. Joseph Beaumont, I am informed, has no absolute vote and is obliged to confirm the major votes of the Fellows, which are commonly granted by favour and not by merit, for it is unusual in the college publicly to examine the candidates, and I am advertised that, if the Master require a public examination, he will be opposed and over voted by a factious party out of favour to one, who, they fear, cannot or will not adventure that severe trial. I therefore humbly entreat you to write to Dr. Beaumont for a peremptory requiring of a public and strict examination of all the competitors for the next Fellowship, which will become void this week, and the election must be within eight days, so it will happen in Easter week, and that he will cause the best deserving to be preferred first, or whatever else your wisdom shall think fit in reference to my son, for you promised me he should have fair play and not be hindered by a mandate, which he cannot possibly have, such are the divisions in that college, except the Master and his friends be assisted in so good a cause, and, if faction or favour may bear sway, it will be every whit as prejudicial and as great a discouragement to ingenuity, sobriety, industry and learning, if not far greater, than the granting of mandates or dispensations against the statutes can be. I hope you will dispatch a few lines to the Master, as soon as you can, the time of election being so near. One word of yours to Mr. Barnes, chaplain to the king, and very lately made prebendary of Worcester in Dr. Bretton's room, and Fellow of Peterhouse, if he be still at Court, will be of no small concern to my son. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 3.]
March 13.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last Saturday arrived here the Duchess of Cleveland with her sons, the Duke of Grafton and the Earl of Northumberland, accompanied by several persons of quality, who for the most part attended her only to the waterside. This morning she and her sons went on board her yacht about 4, wind E.S.E., very fair weather, and 'tis believed they may arrive at Calais this afternoon. Sir Ellis Leighton, being here, bound for Calais, also took the opportunity of this yacht. [Ibid. No. 4.]
March 13.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. I suppose your Honour has had a more particular account of the vessel that was stopped to St. Ives. He that brought her in there shows the French King's commission for his so doing. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 5.]
March 13.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Since Wednesday, the wind continuing E., above 40 sail have come into this port, most bound for France. The homeward-bound ships, of which I write in my last, continue here. Wind high E. I lately wrote to Mr. Hickes and should request his answer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 6.]
March 13.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. A letter that came last week from the Master of the Swan of Swansea advises his owners here, that having sold his coal, &c. at Brest and being on his way to Rochelle with part of his lading, 14 Feb. he met an Ostender near Belle Isle, whose captain gave his name as Joseph Peters of Ostend. He caused the Master and some of his men to be sadly beaten, and took 100l. worth of goods, though both ship and goods belonged to inhabitants of this place. The said captain had robbed four English ships before, and the day after met a Londoner from Nantes, from whom he took above 3,000 livres, and met another Londoner, whom he also robbed of his money. These abuses are great discouragements to merchants to venture abroad, not knowing what way to be redressed though they are no enemies to his Majesty's subjects. [Ibid. No. 7.]
March 13.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no grant pass of the mansion house called Waltonmease, Old Windsor, Berkshire, nor of the messuage called Winsor under Ore in New Windsor, nor of Shaw's farm in the said county without notice to Thomas Wyndham. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 22.]
March 13.
Whitehall.
Pass for Owen Martin, a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber, to go beyond seas for some time and to return. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 149.]
March 13. Warrant, after reciting a former grant to the Marquis of Winchester by his then name of Charles, Lord St. John, of the office of Warden and Keeper of the New Forest during pleasure, which the King has now thought fit to determine, for a grant to Edward Noel, the eldest son of Baptist, Viscount Campden, of the said office of Warden and Keeper of the New Forest as also of the manor and park of Lyndhurst, the Hundred of Rudbergh alias Redbergge, and also of the rent of 40s. a year heretofore paid by the Abbot of Reading with the appurtenances (the deer excepted), with a further grant to him of the herbage and pannage, turf, fern and heath of and in the said Forest, and all the rents, profits, &c., to the last-mentioned premises appertaining (excepting thereout as is excepted in the said grant to the Marquis of Winchester), under the following yearly rents, viz., for the herbage and pannage 3l., for the turf, fern and heath, 20s. and for other the said rents and perquisites, 40s., to hold the premises during pleasure. [2 pages. Precedents 1, f. 135.]
March 14. The Fellowship of Merchant Adventurers to the King. Petition, showing that but for regard to the national value of their company, established 250 years before, they would surrender their charter, and trade individually, as their knowledge would give them advantage over others, that a general licence to others to export woolen manufactures would so lessen all the Merchant Companies in the eyes of all foreign powers that they would probably lose all their privileges and jurisdictions, especially in Germany and the Netherlands, granted on condition that only the Company should import any English woollen manufactures into their dominions and they to the mart towns only, and, if liberty of trade be granted to unfree persons and they land their goods without the mart town, Hamburg will hold themselves justly absolved from their obligations to the Company; that the ban of the Empire made in Queen Elizabeth's days against all English subjects is not repealed, but only dispensed with in favour of the town of Hamburg, and that this dispensation will undoubtedly expire when they dissolve their concordat with the Company; that the Company has hitherto been protected by the town of Dort, but, if interlopers may carry woollen manufactures elsewhere, it is reasonable to fear that the persons and goods of the Company at Dort may be exposed to the severity of the States; that a former suspension of their charter proved of no advantage to the woollen trade, that they are willing to admit others on such a fine as his Majesty shall like, and to allow them to ship their goods as they please during the present war, if they take them to the mart town. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 8.]
March 14.
Welbeck.
The Duke of Newcastle to Williamson. Thanking him for speaking to his Majesty about the deputy lieutenants in that county. [Ibid. No. 9.]
March 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E. These parts affords nothing of news. [Ibid. No. 10.]
March 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. To-day also arrived two Dutch men-of-war, bringing with them a French prize of about 160 tons, laden with wine, brandy and salt. [Ibid. No. 11.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 11I.]
March 14. The King to [the Governors of the Charterhouse]. Requiring them to admit Benjamin, son of Bernard Mander, to the first vacant scholar's place in the hospital at the King's disposal after those who have previous letters in their behalf, and, in case he be superannuated or die before he obtain it, the place is to go to his younger brother, Valentine. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 193.]
March 14. The King to the Commissioners of the Customs. As he understands that ordnance, gunpowder and other provisions of war are frequently exported, ordering them henceforth to permit no more to be shipped without licence from Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, f. 152.]
March 14.
Whitehall.
On the Lord Treasurer's report on the petition of the town of Northampton, calendared in the last volume, p. 582, his Majesty directs that the Lord Treasurer give order for a grant to the petitioners of so much timber as is therein specified, and also for remitting to them the duty of hearth-money for the said term of 7 years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 95.]
March 14. The King to the Chief Justice in Eyre on this side Trent and to the officers of the Forest of Dean for the time being. Warrant, after reciting that Sir Baynham Throckmorton has represented by his petition that he and his ancestors have, time out of mind, held the manor of Haethway, Gloucestershire, of the Crown by the service of Master Forester in fee of the Forest of Dean, and in right thereof have always used to take, hunt and kill for their own use in the said forest 10 fee bucks in summer and 10 fee does in winter, and that in the last Eyre for the said forest in the 10th year of the late King, the petitioner's father put in his claim to the said fee deer, notwithstanding which some of the officers of the said forest have lately hindered him from taking his fee deer on pretence that the said claim ought to have been allowed, which from the shortness of the sitting of the said Eyre could not be done, and that, the said fee deer having been constantly used till lately, and being the chief ornament and pleasure of his seat, he has besought that he and those claiming under him might have the said fee deer according to his father's claim, a reference of the said petition to the Chief Justice in Eyre on this side Trent, and his report of the truth of the said claim by the petitioner's father, and that on a bill exhibited by the petitioner against the Attorney-General several aged witnesses deposed that Thomas Baynham, the petitioner's great grandfather, and Sir William and Sir Baynham Throckmorton, his grandfather and father, and he himself have all successively been Riding Foresters of the said Forest and have enjoyed the said fee deer, and that the same is the only honourable perquisite of the said office; that the petitioner and those claiming under him may henceforth take, hunt, kill and carry away to their own uses yearly the said 10 fee bucks in summer and 10 fee does in winter in the said Forest, till a Justice Seat shall be held for the same, and the petitioner or those claiming under him in a legal way according to the forest laws may justify his claim to the said fee deer, or that the same at such Justice Seat be determined against him or them, or be neglected to be prosecuted, and commanding that, due notice being given to some sworn forester or keeper, the said Sir Baynham Throckmorton and all claiming under him be permitted at all seasonable times to hunt, kill, and carry away to their own use the said fee deer. [2 pages. Precedents 1, f. 136.]
March 14.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Mr. Joshua (sic) Williamson. All our West India ships, upwards of 20 sail, are gone to sea with a fair wind. Saturday last came in the Expedition, of London, from Nevis laden with sugar. The master reports that in those parts they will have a good crop this season. The same day came in the Seaflower, of Chester, for Bordeaux. Sunday last came in the Elizabeth and Mary, of London, laden with herrings and butter from Killybegs bound for France. She lost her foremast and received much damage in her sails and rigging in a violent storm on the 4th. The same day came in the John and Jacob, of Bristol, from Virginia laden with tobacco. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 15.]
March 15 John Aubrey to Williamson. In the latter end of this manual you will find the Doctor's Idea and also the Reformed Library Keeper and the Bibliotheca Augusta. This idea was first printed by the doctor on one side of a sheet of paper, and I wish it were so done again, it being a synopsis. I cannot yet find his discourse Contra Longomontanum, but, before you return from Newmarket, I will have it for you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 12.]
March 15.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Last Saturday went through Hastings Bay to the southward twelve Dutch men-of-war, some of 70 guns, who told the fishermen there they were going to De Ruyter. Yesterday morning went from Dungeness homeward 16 or 17 Dutch merchantmen and men-of-war from Lisbon, &c., which lay there wind-bound 7 or 8 days. This morning went out of this harbour 23 vessels, some for London from Morlaix and elsewhere, and others for Holland, laden with corn from France. [Ibid. No. 13.]
[Mar. 15.] The Bishop of London to [Williamson]. Signifying the King's pleasure that no letters should pass in favour of any person to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's for any place in that quire. [Ibid. No. 14.]
March 15. Memorandum of the above letter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 22.]
March 15. Warrant to Robert Knightley, high sheriff of Surrey, for the reprieve of Richard Hall, condemned to death for stealing a mare, this being his first crime. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 151.]
March 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Edward Villars praying letters to the Lord Lieutenant directing the payment of 1,000l. per annum for 7 years, according to his Majesty's grant to the petitioner, out of the 20,000l. reserved out of the revenue of Ireland for such uses as his Majesty should direct. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 95.]
March 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir George Lane declaring his willingness to surrender his patent for the place of Secretary at War in Ireland if his Majesty will in consideration thereof allow the salary of 25s. per diem belonging to the said place to be secured as a pension to the petitioner's son for life and that the petitioner's arrears may be paid him on the present establishment. [Ibid. p. 96.]
March 15. Pass for Ehler Jacob Kellers, a native of Oldenburg in Germany, to pass to his own country. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 153.]
March 15.
Westminster.
The King to the Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for payment to the persons thereinafter named of the sums therein particularly mentioned for wares delivered by them and work done for the funeral of Edward, late Earl of Sandwich, killed in the King's service at sea, 28 May, 1672. [7 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 441.]
March 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The last post I missed, being from home and not well. Please let your pleasure be signified to me about those two registers I have so long kept here, viz., that of soldiers, his Majesty's subjects, deserting foreign service, and that of the passing and repassing of the packet-boats. I do not in the least press for a release of any labour, whereby I may perform duty to his Majesty or service to you, but the paucity of such deserters of late and the regular proceedings of the packet-boats afford at present but few objects for observation. The master of the packetboat, which came over in my absence, could not inform me of any news from the other side. Wind northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No 15.]
March 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The five outward-bound East India ships expected these ten days are now coming into the Downs. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 16.]
March 16.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came in the five East India ships bound for Surat. One of them struck on the North Foreland, but came off without damage. [Ibid. No. 17.]
March 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. These parts affords nothing of news. [Ibid. No. 18.]
March 16.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 19.]
March 17.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 20.]
March 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About the arrival of the East India ships as in his last. Wind very variable between S.E. and S.W. 3 p.m. Not a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 21.]
March 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The four Dutch men-of-war which lately brought in here three French prizes, went to sea and left their prizes here, and have since brought in another French prize. They are now gone with their four prizes to Holland. [Ibid. No. 22.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 22i.]
March 17. The King to [the Master and Fellows of] Catherine Hall, Cambridge. Dispensing with the statute of county in favour of Nicholas Gouge, B.A., of that college, who has been unanimously pre-elected to a Fellowship which he cannot otherwise enjoy, as he has received an ample certificate in his favour from the Master and all the Fellows save one, and their request for the said dispensation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 193.]
March 17. Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the petition of Edward Villars, calendared ante, p. 29, in the same words mutatis mutandis as his report calendared in the last volume, p. 575, on the similar petition of Lord Duras. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 96.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
Reference of the above report to the Lord Treasurer. [Ibid. p 96.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for paying either out of the advance money for the new farm of the Irish revenue or out of any other part of that revenue 500l. as a free gift to Thomas Taylor, who has by the Lord Lieutenant's direction drawn out several large books containing a complete account of the disposition of all such lands as were returned forfeited in Ireland according to the Down admeasurement as the same were disposed of by the Commissioners of the late Court of Claims, which work will be of great use in discovering such concealed forfeited lands there as are unjustly detained, which, when discovered, may be applied to the satisfaction of the interests there yet remaining unsatisfied, and will likewise promote the final settlement of that kingdom. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 425.]
March 18. The Earl of Oxford to [William Bridgeman]. As the King has let Mr. George Carew be his quarter-master, requesting him to draw his commission. With endorsement by Bridgeman. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 23.]
March 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind and weather have been favourable, yet that packet-boat, which should have come from the Brill last Wednesday is not arrived. The wind is most easterly. The man-of-war flyboat is intended to be launched at Woodbridge next Tuesday, to which Mr. Pett, the builder, has invited me. [Ibid. No. 24.]
March 18.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. Mr. Aldworth, the town-clerk, died the 16th, one by all Church and King's men thought leaning to the Nonconformist interest. Several competitors offer. The Court suspended the election, and the Marquis of Worcester sent a letter to the Mayor to desire their cautious choice of a man for the King and Church. [Ibid. No. 25.]
March 18. Commission for George Carew to be quarter-master in the Earl of Oxford's own troop in his regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 25.]
March 18.
Northumberland House.
Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the reference to him of Sir George Lane's petition calendared ante, p. 29, in favour of granting the prayer of the petition regarding the grant of a pension to his son in consideration of the petitioner's surrendering his place, and as to the arrears claimed by the petitioner that they have already been stated and reported to his Majesty, and he submits it to his Majesty to do therein for his relief as he shall think good. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 97.]
March 18.
Whitehall.
Reference of the above report to the Lord Treasurer. [Ibid. p. 98.]
March 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a reprieve to John Woodrough, of Woolberston, Northamptonshire, fellmonger, accused of felony for taking to the value of 6s. from the wife of one Richardson of King's Cliffe in the said county, and also for committing a rape on the said Richardson's daughter, in case he be convicted and condemned. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 154.]
March 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.S.E. These parts affords nothing of news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 26.]
March 19. Grant to Sir Thomas Doleman, of the place of one of the Clerks of the Council, in reversion, and the like to William Bridgeman after Sir T. Doleman. Minutes. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 155.]
March 20. Bernard Howard to Williamson. Mr. Radford informs me that, after you told him that Mr. Benson had orders from you to let him see the sequestration books, he assured him he had no such order. Since the speedy view of them is of importance to me, pray order your servant to recollect himself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 27.]
March 20.
St. John's College. Cambridge.
Dr. Francis Turner to Williamson. I am desired by the Seniors and empowered by this whole society, in which are several of your countrymen, to present you with their most humble and express acknowledgements of your great favour to us in the late transaction about the dispensation for Sir John Otway's son. I assured them from you, as Mr. Vernon had done before from our Chancellor, that they were left perfectly to the freedom of their election, which was very good news to a college where the very name of propriety has ever sounded as high as in the House of Commons, for we have above twenty fellowships of the same nature with this, and the very noise of alienating but one of them alarmed the whole North, who could hardly receive a greater satisfaction than they do in the unanimous choice we have made of the little master of arts I mentioned to you, I think verily the best scholar chosen these 40 years, and excluded for ever, if not chosen now, whereas 30 fellowships lie open to Sir Otway.
Mr. Ardrey's business, it seems, was absolutely passed long ago at the same time that Dr. Novel, joined in the same letter, had his Grace. There only wants a proxy, which I find nobody can be till the gentleman himself has named somebody, or signed and sealed a blank form, leaving space for a name, and such a form I have enclosed. When that is done, Mr. Grigg, of Pembroke Hall, will be the proxy himself rather than it should be delayed. I spoke to Mr. Grigg about the person after whom you asked me to make inquiry, but he assures me he has already given you a full account of him. [Ibid. No. 28.]
March 20.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Thursday was the great horse course at Niblingcoats, run by four horses. Sir Ralph Warton's won and Squire Beamont's was second. 'Twas near run betwixt them, there being not above a length difference. All the odds were on Beamont's horse. Legerd was third and Osbaldeston last. There was a great number of gentry and much silver and gold won and lost.
A Dane has come in here with deals from Norway. The Master can give us no account of the war betwixt them and the Swede. He says the Swede has three or four capers out, but he met with none at sea, and that two French capers lay all this winter in their harbours in Norway, and offered not to molest any of their ships. [Ibid. No. 29.]
March 20.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Desiring that Mr. Hickes would answer a letter he wrote him some posts since concerning making free a small Dutch pleasure-boat. [Ibid. No. 30.]
March 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Governor Leverett. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America &c. 1675–1676, p. 361.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 83.]
March 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, for the delivery to the Bishop of Rochester, Lord Almoner, or to his SubAlmoner, of 133l. 6s. 8d. for alms on Maundy Thursday, and the rest of this week. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 155.]
March 20.
Whitehall.
Grant of a baronetcy to William Barker of Bocking, Essex, and the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Ibid. p. 156.]
March 21.
Newhall.
The Duke of Albemarle to Williamson. I formerly troubled you about a grant the King made me by the concurrence of his Royal Highness for the next prebend at Worcester in behalf of Mr. William Hoar of St. Saviour's, Southwark, my father's and my friend. Secretary Coventry pleaded then a former grant. His turn being now served, I desire you to enter my grant at the Signet Office and to take care nobody come between him and home. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 380, No. 31.]
March 21.
Northampton.
Dr. John Conant to Williamson. Returning his most humble thanks for his most obliging letter with a copy of what his Majesty has been pleased to sign in favour of him. [Ibid. No. 32.]
March 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The last two days there have been several showers. The wind has gone round with the sun, and is now S.E. [Ibid. No. 33.]
March 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night one of the outwardbound East India ships weighed and sailed, the wind then wavering from N.E. to N.W., and this morning the other 4 weighed, wind S. and S.S.W., and are not yet out of sight. 3 p.m. Little wind at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 34.]
March 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 35.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 35 i.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Edward Backwell going on the King's special service to the Prince of Orange. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 156.]
March 21. The King to the Mayor and Aldermen of Bristol. Recommending John Rumsey of Gray's Inn, barrister, for the office of town clerk, vacant by the death of Mr. Aldworth. [Precedents 1, f. 137.]
March 21. Warrant, after reciting a licence dated 25 Oct., 1669, to Sir John Clayton and George Blake to build a double lighthouse at St. Nicholas' Gatt, and lighthouses at Cromer, Flamborough Head and on Farne Island, and to receive by way of voluntary contribution and not otherwise towards the maintenance thereof any sum not exceeding the following rates, viz., for every loaden ship 1½d. per ton and 1d. per ton for every light ship passing by the places where the said lighthouses should be erected, for 60 years at the yearly rent of 20s., all which said lighthouses are built, but only that at St. Nicholas' Gatt is lighted; for a licence, since the said recompense is not paid according to expectation, and many pay nothing because there is no certain rate and proportion mentioned in the recited licence of what shall be received for each lighthouse, to the said Sir John Clayton (the said Blake being dead) during the residue of the said term to receive by way of voluntary contribution of subjects ¼d. per ton and of strangers ½d. per ton for their ships whether loaden or light passing by the said lighthouses when burning in respect of each one so burning. [Precedents 1, f. 137 a.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. On reading the petition of Thomas Killigrew and others, grantees of the office for licensing pedlars, which set forth that some years since it was his Majesty's pleasure following the example of King James, to erect an office for licensing pedlars and petty chapmen, thereby to discriminate the honest from dissolute persons using the said calling only to commit villainies, but that the said office is not put in execution, and prayed his Majesty to issue his proclamation, as his late grandfather did, for putting in execution the said office, his Majesty, taking the same into consideration and another petition of like tenor in the names of the honest and industrious pedlars and petty chapmen, appointed the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Privy Seal, the Duke of Lauderdale, the two Secretaries of State and Mr. Speaker a committee to consider the petitioners' request and to report thereon. With note, that it was agreed the committee meet at the Council Board Tuesday, 28 March, at 3 p.m. [Two copies, S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, Nos. 36, 37.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Another copy of the order in Council approving of the rules therein set out for granting passes in pursuance of the treaties with Sweden and Denmark, calendared ante, p. 21. [Ibid. No. 38.]
March 22. Order in Council that Mr. Palmer deliver a pound of tin blanks to the value of 16d. and 17d. a lb. to the officers of the mint, and have the use of the mint dyes for stamping them and that within a week they produce a pound of half-pence and farthing blanks, to be the counterfeits of Mr. Palmer's, and deliver some of them to him, and then that both parties attend the Lord Treasurer. Noted, "Minutes concerning tin farthings sent up from the Treasury Chamber, but the Lord Treasurer said they were mistaken." [Ibid. No. 39.]
March 22
Received. March 23 Read.
Thomas Peirson, of London, merchant, to the King and the Privy Council. Petition, stating that the petitioner was employed as agent general for the Company of Royal Adventurers at their Castle of Cape Corse in Guinea from 1667 to 1671, when by combination between the Dey of that country and Gilbert Beavis, the Company's former agent there, he was violently assaulted, wounded and carried away prisoner, and they took the said castle and therein of the petitioner's estate to the value of above 5,000l. besides the goods of several merchants entrusted to him to dispose of, that during his service there he was forced out of his own estate to disburse about 3,800l. to preserve the Company's fort and trade, which with the interest thereon and four years' salary is still due to him for want of which he is almost totally ruined, that the said Company sold their fort, trade, and the remainder of their stock (after their wages and salaries paid) to the now Royal African Company, and a new charter was granted to them by a new name, though the members of the new Company consist mostly of persons who were members of the old Company, that the said Company of Royal Adventurers sent over Captain Holditch to recover the said fort, and for that purpose sent several presents in his Royal Highness' name to the Dey, but they were saved, for Beavis was dead before his arrival and so the Castle was delivered up without any difficulty, that Holditch was to pay off all the debts and arrears of salaries save only the petitioner, whom he was to send over to account with them here, which he did, but, when the petitioner came to England, he found a new charter granted to divers persons not concerned in employing him, nevertheless he gave in his accounts and pressed the liquidating thereof, but was sent to the Committee of the Company of Royal Adventurers, which made some objections to his accounts, whereon he offered to refer it to any indifferent persons to examine them according to the course of merchants, and offered to give a bond to abide the judgment of such referees, which was seemingly consented to by both Companies, but, when the bonds came to be sealed, the Royal African Company refused to do so, alleging they were not liable to make satisfaction, as they never employed him, and the Committee of the Royal Adventurers refused to submit to reference unless the other Company joined therein, alleging that whatever was due the Royal African Company was to pay and that they had received about 7,500l. from Cape Corse which they had no title to till the petitioner's and the other debts and salaries were paid, whereby the petitioner has been put to great charges; that nevertheless the petitioner has been compelled to pay to some of his private correspondents, members of the Royal African Company, great sums for goods of their's taken from him when the castle was surprised, and is now pressed by other members of the now Company to give them the like satisfaction, which he is not able to do except by the money due to him from the Company, and praying that a day be appointed for hearing of this cause and that the present Company may not use their charter to defeat the petitioner's right, which he is willing to submit to the arbitration of any indifferent persons his Majesty may appoint. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 40.]
March 22.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The St. Malo Merchant of our town came in yesterday, having left St. Malo last Monday. The master says that last Sunday came into St. Malo a ship of and from Dublin, which by the way met an Ostender who boarded her and found a woman there, which the master of the Irish ship said belonged to Jersey, but the Ostender, searching her papers, discovered she was a Frenchwoman, took from her the value of 100l., and wounded the master in two or three places with a sword for not discovering the truth, and plundered him of some things. A vessel is come in from Cherbourg, another from Bayonne and another from Morlaix, but they bring no news save that at St. Malo is the news of the birds mentioned in the late Gazette. [Ibid. No. 41.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation to the kirk of Stirling of Dr. William Pearson, minister at Dunfermline. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 433.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation to the kirk of Balmerinoch of James Gairden, minister at Maryculter in the diocese of Aberdeen. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 434.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of John Ramsey, minister at Markinshe, to the kirk of Kirkforthar by decreet annexed to Markinshe. [Docquet. Ibid.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter of remission to John Armestrang of Sorbie for his being accessory to the stealing of 15 sheep on the last day of January, 1676, from the lands of Pearciehill in the shirefdome of Nethesdale, he giving a bond for payment to the tenants and possessors of the said lands, from whom the said sheep were stolen, of the true worth thereof. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 435.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Matthew Brisbane for two years. [Ibid. p. 436.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the Duke of Monmouth has by his petition represented a reference of his former petition to the Lord Lieutenant, who in obedience thereto required the Auditor-General to search the records and report concerning a schedule annexed thereto, to which the said Auditor has made a return, and, forasmuch as the said return is in some parts clear and in others doubtful, so that to ascertain the whole by commissions of inquiry will take a very considerable time to the prejudice of the petitioner, if so long delayed from passing a grant for such part as is undoubtedly clear according to the particulars in the schedule hereto annexed, and prayed that orders might be given for passing letters patent containing a reversion in fee of the premises in the said schedule, and whereas the Lord Lieutenant on a reference thereof reported, 15 Oct. last, that he conceived that such of the lands and hereditaments in the said schedule thereto as were not already disposed of might be granted to the petitioner according to his desire, and in order thereto his Majesty might grant letters to the Lord Lieutenant to examine which of the lands and hereditaments therein contained remain undisposed of, thereby authorizing him to pass letters patent of such of them as remain in his Majesty's hands to the petitioner and his heirs, with which report the Lord Treasurer of England fully agrees, we herewith transmit a list of the leases in the said schedule and direct you forthwith to examine which of the lands and hereditaments therein contained remain undisposed of, and of such of them as remain in our hands we require and authorize you to cause grants to be passed by letters patent under the Great Seal to the said Duke of Monmouth and his heirs to be held under such rents as the same during the continuance of the several leases thereof now or lately in being are or were liable to. Annexed,
A list of the leases of which the recersion is desired by the Duke of Monmouth containing particulars of 24 leases, the annual rent whereof amounted to 202l. 6s. 3d. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 434.]
March 23.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that he consents to the application of Mr. Pooley, B.A., of Queens' College, Cambridge, to his Majesty for letters mandatory to the College, for admitting him to a Fellowship, a statute of the College allowing no more than two Fellows of one county at the same time, and he being a Suffolk man, of which county there are already two Fellows. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 42.]
Thursday,
March 23. Somerset House.
Bernard Howard to Williamson. Begging him to oblige him with a post-warrant westward through Salisbury, and to enclose it to him by noon to-morrow that none may know which way he intends. [Ibid. No. 43.]
March 23.
Billing.
Dr. Lively Moody to Williamson. Returning his humble and hearty thanks for what he has already done for him. [Ibid. No. 44.]
March 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Tuesday at Woodbridge was well launched his Majesty's ship, the Kingfisher. In my absence one of our packet-boats arrived and to-day another, but neither brought any news. The newsletter failed last night. The wind is about N. and E., blowing so fresh as to set back several ships that sailed hence yesterday. [Ibid. No. 45.]
March 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The East India ships that went out of the Downs last Tuesday were not past the Isle of Wight, when the N.E. wind came up about 12 last night. Much more than a topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 46.]
March 23.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Last Saturday the Castle, a small vessel of Helford, was cast away in the North Channel about 10 miles from this betwixt St. Ives and Padstow bound for France from Holland. The vessel and goods were all spoiled, but the men were preserved, who, it is thought, were not so careful for the preservation of the vessel and goods as they might have been. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 47.]
March 23.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The Castle of Helford came out of Holland with another vessel bound for St. Valery. The master of the other vessel, the Mary of Ross, being so much in debt in France, delivered all the best of his goods into the Castle, and so intended to run his vessel ashore, which he did about Dover, and thought she would never come off again, and intended to meet the Castle at the place appointed by the two masters. Now the Castle was at Helford Thursday and Friday, and put to sea on Saturday, and pretended she was bound for Dieppe, but intended for Padstow, and in the way there ran ashore in a small sandy cove, where she is like to be cast away by the men's carelessness. Several goods are saved in the men's chests as Holland, fine threads, tapes, whalebone, fine calicoes, &c. The officers of the Customs have been at Helford, where they have searched the owners' houses and have found some madder, two bales of pepper and other dye wood. The master and some of the men have been examined before a justice. What they have saved in the vessel is kept for the proprietors, but what the officers have secured in the owners' houses is brought into the King's warehouse. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 48.]
March 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords of the Admiralty for payment to Sir William Jennings, who has been given leave to go abroad for two years, of his pension or half-pay as captain of a second-rate ship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 25.]
March 23. Caveat that no patent pass concerning the aulnage by Lady Portland till Sir Robert Thomas be heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 22.]
March 23. Post-warrant to Bernard Howard to go and return to and from Salisbury and any town beyond it. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 161.]
March 23.
Whitehall.
Grant to Edward Villiers of the office of Clerk of the Pipe in reversion after the determination of the grant of Sir Robert Crooke in possession and of the grant of Hugh Clifford in reversion. Minute. [Ibid.]
March 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, as soon as the temporary payment of 5,000l. per annum to the Duke of Ormonde out of the particular quit-rents assigned for his satisfaction by letters patent of 2 Aug., 1669, shall cease, for payment out of the said quit-rents first to the daughters of Col. John Lane, deceased, of 6,000l., secondly to Laurence Hyde, Master of the Robes, of 8,888l., thirdly to Sir Timothy Tyrrell, of 3,000l., and fourthly to Roger, Earl of Orrery, of 8,000l. in lieu of his present pension. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 432.]
March 24.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news, the wind having been the last two days where it now is with a fresh gale at N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 49.]
March 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The wind being at N.E. unexpectedly came in a vessel from New England last night. The master says that biscuit bread is there at 25s. per cwt., and that those people are very much skirted by the natives and dare not go a mile out of the towns, and that all provisions and other things are at six times the value they were a year ago. Undoubtedly those people are at a great strait.
Here is one Capt. Randall, who lived not above three miles from Deal, who lately cracked. He says he is now going over to New England on his Majesty's account to treat with those people. [Ibid. No. 50.]
March 24.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Last night came in here a vessel from Malaga, by what I can gather from the master bound for Holland. The same tide came in a pink from Guinea laden with elephants' teeth and logwood, bound for London. To-day the Earl of Shrewsbury came over in one of his Majesty's yachts, and this tide the Marquis of Montrose is going for Dieppe, and is likely to have a very good passage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 51.]
March 24.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 52.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. 52 i.]
March
[before the 25th].
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Lieutenant of Northamptonshire for applying towards the rebuilding of the town of Northampton whatsoever any remain undisposed of from the sum raised in the county for defraying the charges of the militia under the Act of 14 Car. II. c. 3 for ordering the forces in the several counties. [Draft. Dated, March, 1675–6. Ibid. No. 53.]
[Before March 25.] "An Essay to demonstrate that the management of the Customs for the future by the Patent Officers, viz., collectors, customers, comptrollers and searchers, is a better constitution than either by Commissioners or Farmers, and thereby will also save his Majesty 24,000l. per annum, and improve his revenue many thousand pounds," showing that various advantages will be the result of the proposed changes and that there will be a great saving if there are duplicate officers in all the ports, one set being the patent officers, and the others those appointed by the Commissioners of the Customs. Endorsed "1675–6." [6 pages. Ibid. No. 54.]
[Before March 25.] "An establishment or list containing all the payments to be made for civil affairs to begin from" 25 March, 1676, showing the payments made to each person, the totals being:—
£ s. d.
Court of Exchequer 3,646 14 2
Court of King's Bench 1,407 10 0
Court of Chancery 1,297 19 11
Court of Common Pleas 1,307 10 0
Officers attending the State 1,289 1 10
Incidents 2,187 0 0
Officers of the Customs 238 6 8
Creation Money 544 11 8
Perpetuities 489 15 6
Temporary payments 8,997 11 4
Concordatums 4,500 0 0
To uses to be appropriated by Sign Manual 20,000 0 0
45,906 1 1
Noted: Payments for extra ordinaries and by concordatums, for freights and transportations, carrying of letters and other expenses, gifts and rewards, sea service, repairing and upholding the King's houses, maintaining forts, finishing needful undertakings of that kind, erecting more strengths of like nature in other fit places, diets and charges of keeping poor prisoners and sick and maimed soldiers in hospitals, printing, riding and travelling charges and all other payments, amongst which the repairs of fortifications and provision of hospitals to be chiefly taken care of by concordatum of the Lieutenant and Council not to be exceeded without special directions from the King or the Privy Council in England and the concordatums to be every three months certified over to the Privy Council, 4,500l. And the King's pleasure is that no payment or allowance be made by concordatum but by warrant drawn and signed as therein mentioned and by fault either by exceeding the sums limited, by anticipation or otherwise or by not observing this the King's direction in every point, that all such sums as shall be otherwise allowed and paid there shall be set insuper as debts on the Lieutenant and the Under Treasurer upon his account to be defalked to the King's use from their several entertainments, and that this establishment be duly paid and be not exceeded nor any of the payments which are noted to be but temporary be continued or renewed to any other in concurrence, reversion or otherwise.
"An establishment or list containing all payments for military affairs in Ireland to be duly paid by the Vice-Treasurer and Treasurer at War," to commence from 25 March, 1676, showing payments for officers general, including the Lord Lieutenant, of 8,623l. 18s. 8d., for officers of the Ordnance of 1,616l. 9s. 0d., for Horse, consisting of the King's guard and 24 other troops, of 51,870l. 12s., and for Foot, consisting of a company of Foot Guards, the Royal Regiment of Guards, and 74 companies, of 84,150l. making a total of 146,260l. 9s. 8d.
"An establishment or list containing the several pensions to be paid out of the revenue of Ireland," amounting to 10,400l. 2s. 2d.
General totals:—
£ s. d.
Civil List 45,906 1 1
Military List 146,260 19 8
Pensions 10,400 2 3
In all 202,567 3 0
Whereas we have thought fit to reduce and bring the charge of that kingdom into three lists, the first containing all payments to be made for civil affairs, the second containing all payments to be made for military affairs, and this above list containing such pensions as we are pleased to allow, our will and pleasure is that the payments in the said civil and military lists shall be in the first place satisfied before any of the payments provided in the list of pensions, and that, in case in any one year the revenue shall not be sufficient to satisfy all payments in this establishment mentioned, then such deficiency shall fall on this list of pensions, and an equal abatement is to be made thereout, the Countess of Tirconnell's pension only excepted, according to such proportion as the said revenue shall fall short of satisfying all the above pensions, after the sums due to the said civil and military lists shall be discharged, and it is our further express will and pleasure that no pension be added to this list, except a vacancy first happen sufficient to answer the same. [21 pages. 3 copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, Nos. 16–18.]
March 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Williamson. Requesting him to order two passes to be prepared for Robert Home, ensign to the King's own company in the King's Regiment of Foot Guards, and Mr. Pope, ensign to Capt. Richardson in the same regiment, to be absent 6 months in foreign parts, and to be allowed on the musters in the meantime. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 55.]
March 25.
Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. I question not but the person you mentioned will be found very sufficient. He was admitted under my tuition, and I ever found him to be of a very good tractable disposition. He was respected by the Fellows of the College, and some of them have taken particular notice of his exercises, which he always performed mighty well. The 10l. you named will defray the expenses both of his journey and degree, and I am confident he will show himself thankful. Our countrymen rejoice to hear they are like to find a person of so great desert and interest to apply themselves to. [Ibid. No. 56.]
March 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind is mostly N.E. or thereabouts, blowing very hard. Yester-morning it forced back that packet-boat which last Wednesday night was bound for the Brill, and still detains her here. Several light colliers for Newcastle are put in here for shelter. [Ibid. No. 57.]
March 25. Letter to [the University of Cambridge] for the admission of Simon Blenkarne, practitioner in physic, to the degree of M.D., on his performing the usual exercises, and paying the fees. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 193.]
March 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Acknowledging the honour his Grace does him in the place he still allows him in his memory and good wishes, and enclosing a copy of a relation received that morning from Sir John Narbrough of the lucky hit he had lately on those of Tripoli. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 84.]
March 25. The King to the Master (sic) and Fellows of Queens' College, Cambridge. Recommending John Pooley, B.A., of that College, for the first vacant Fellowship there, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 26.]
March 25. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to John Barlow, of Stebedge, Pembrokeshire, and the heirs male of his body, with a discharge and release to him of his creation money and with a non obstante of the Privy Seal directing the application of 20,000l. accruing by the creation of baronets to the use of the Great Wardrobe. [Precedents 1, f. 137 a.]
March 25. Warrant for a grant to Elizabeth and Anne Whynyard, daughters of John Whynyard, of the office of Keeper of the King's Royal House within the Palace of Westminster with the usual fee of 6d. per diem, to hold the same in reversion after John Whynyard, their father, successively during their lives. [Ibid. f. 138.]
March 25. Considerations relating to the improvement of Ireland. "In obedience to your Lordship's Act of Council of 20 Jan., 1672[-3], (sic) we have spent several days in considering how the wealth in general of this kingdom, as the money thereof in particular, may be increased, and in order thereunto have first set down . . the state of this kingdom in reference to trade. Second, we have noted such inferences from the same as show the several causes of the smallness of trade, want of money and the general poverty of this nation, and in the last place we have offered such general remedies and expedients . . . as may be obtained and practised without any new law to be made in Ireland." Then follows the report which is identical, except for some verbal differences, with ch. 14 in Sir W. Petty's Political Anatomy of Ireland, where the date of the Act of Council is given as 20 Jan., 1675[-6], and the date of the report is given as 25 March, 1676. (See Hull's Economic Writings of Sir W. Petty, Vol. I. p. 213.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 19.]
[After March 25.] Note of a caveat dated 7 March, 1675, at the Marquis of Worcester's instance for Mr. Glanvill to have the next prebendary's place at Worcester, of the like dated 24 Nov., 1675, for Mr. Barnes, recommended by his Royal Highness, and of the like dated 25 March, 1676, for Brian Turner, chaplain to the Earl of Carlisle in his embassies abroad, at the said Earl's instance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., 380, No. 58.]
March 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The Hunter, which has ridden a considerable time in the Downs, is now away, bound to the Swale. A topsail gale at E. and by N. [Ibid. No. 59.]
March 27.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning one of our neighbours received a letter from his Majesty's ship Henrietta, dated the 6th instant at Leghorn, which says they are to go to Cadiz, Tangier, and one place more and so for England, but not one word of the fight, so I give the less credit to the letter.
At the foot of my weekly letter I am commanded to give an account of the wind and weather, which I have done these three years past. Much more than a topsail gale at E. and by S. [Ibid. No. 60.]
March 27.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news and requesting an answer to his letter to Mr. Hickes concerning the making free of a small pleasure-boat built in Holland. With note by Williamson that this cannot possibly be done, being now against a late Order in Council. [Ibid. No. 61.]
March 27.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. My last gave an account of the ill usage a vessel of this port had from the Ostenders, and we have daily complaints since of vessels having received injury from them, either by beating the master and men or taking what piece goods they meet with. [Ibid. No. 62.]
March 27. "Clause to be inserted in Lord Yarmouth's commission of lieutenancy," being an extract from the commission appointing Lord Townshend Lord Lieutenant. Latin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 63.]
[March 27.] "A Psalm of Thanksgiving to be sung by the children of Christ's Hospital on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in Easter holidays at St. Mary Spittle for their Founders and Benefactors," consisting of 6 verses, two of which were sung on each day, beginning "The vast and noble orbs above God's Majesty portray" and with a chorus "With Heaven's design the Earth doth join Jehovah to admire," and "A true report of the great number of poor children and other poor people maintained in the several hospitals under the pious care of the City of London the year last past."
Christ's Hospital.—Children put forth apprentices and discharged out of Christ's Hospital 57, 15 whereof were placed apprentices to commanders of ships out of the Mathematical School founded by the King. Children buried, 13. Children remaining in the care and charge of the Hospital in the house and divers places in London and the suburbs and at nurse in the country, 530. They being so many, and the charges of keeping them so great, and great losses having been sustained by the late dreadful fire, it is hoped good Christians will freely contribute towards their maintenance, the certain revenue of the hospital being little more than the moiety of the necessary charges.
St. Bartholomew's Hospital.—There have been cured at the charge of the said Hospital this last year 1703, many of whom have been relieved with moneys and other necessaries at their departure, though the greatest part of its revenues was consumed by the late dreadful fire. Buried 131. Persons remaining under cure 225.
St. Thomas' Hospital.—Cured and discharged this last year 1931, many of whom have been relieved with moneys and other necessaries at their departures, though great part of its revenues was consumed by the late dreadful fire. Buried 122. Remaining under cure 246.
Bridewell Hospital.—Received this last year vagrants and other indigent and miserable people, many whereof had clothing and other necessary relief and were sent by passes to their native countries, 1,124. Maintained therein and brought up in divers arts and trades 143, notwithstanding that the hospital and all the houses in the precinct thereof which was the greater part of its revenues, were wholly consumed by the late terrible fire, besides the great loss since by the fire in Wapping.
Bethlem Hospital.—Brought in last year distracted men and women, 25. Cured of their lunacy and discharged 22. Remaining under cure 71. The charge whereof is very great, and the revenue of the Hospital so small as not to amount to one-third of the yearly expenses thereof, and the buildings are old and ruinous and not capacious to receive and contain the great numbers of distracted men, for whose admission daily applications are made. The Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council have granted sufficient ground whereon to erect a more large and commodious house for keeping and curing the said distracted persons, towards building whereof the Governors have paid above 10,000l., and to finish the same will cost above 5,000l. more, which good and pious work cannot be finished without the liberal contributions of well disposed Christians.
Printed by William Godbid. [Three copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, Nos. 64-66.]
March 27. The King to the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. Recommending [Robert] Harsnet, M.A., student of Christ Church, Oxford, for the prebend now possessed by [Robert] Harrison after the decease of the latter, in consideration of the services of his father, Roger Harsnet, serjeant-at-arms, in the late times, especially in adventuring his life in the garrison of Lichfield. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 83.]
March 27. Leave of absence for 6 months to Richard Pope, ensign to Capt. Richardson in the King's regiment of Foot Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 24.]
March 27.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Chancellor. A patent is passing in the names of Sir James Hayes and Sir Peter Apsley, but at the Countess of Portland's request, for the licensing of white clothes to be transported. Sir Robert Thomas would have entered a caveat in my office, but his Majesty notwithstanding signed the bill, and has further commanded me to signify his pleasure to you, that, when the same shall come to your hands, you cause notice to be given to Sir Robert Thomas, that he may set forth what he has in opposition to the patent, in the passing or stopping whereof you will proceed according to the weight or weakness of the reasons offered. [Precedents 1, f. 138.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring to the Committee for Trade, notice of the meetings of which is to be sent to Prince Rupert, a proposal made to Lord Treasurer Danby that, on account of the mischiefs resulting from the counterfeit copper farthings and half-pence, those coins be made of tin of the true intrinsic value. With note of its presentation to the Committee of Trade and their proceedings thereon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 67.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Order in Council after reciting a proposal made that day by the Committee for Trade that no foreign masters, mariners or seamen be made denizens, first, because by denization they have title to trade as Englishmen, and secondly because their ships are not tied to be English built but only of English property to enable them to trade to the plantations, and, if any such persons by surprise obtain letters of denization, yet that there be in all such letters a clause making the same void when such persons are discovered, that the Secretaries of State take particular care that such a clause be inserted in all grants of denization made hereafter, and further that the Commissioners of the Customs use their best endeavours for the discovery of such foreign masters, mariners and seamen that shall by surprise or otherwise obtain letters of denization, to the end that the same may be vacated and no passes or seabriefs granted to their ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 68.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. After reciting a reference by an Order in Council of the 22nd instant to the Committee for Trade to consider of some recommendatory pass from his Majesty to secure the return of merchants' ships and their navigation from port to port, as to which no provision is made in the treaties with Denmark and their report of that day which advised as a temporary expedient that, when his subjects shall present his Majesty with a certificate from the chief magistrate of the place that they have made oath before him that they and such others are the owners of such a ship English built now in such foreign port, and that the lading to be taken in there is for their account or the account of other subjects, and that none of the parties now at war has any interest in the said ship or lading, and, if the ship be foreign built and made free, then producing Sir John Shaw's certificate with oath that such is the same ship for which the pass is desired, and, the property of the ship and her lading being attested as aforesaid, then his Majesty might grant his passes recommendatory to all his allies declaring the property of the said ship and goods to belong to his subjects and desiring all parties concerned to let them pass free and without molestation; approving of the said report and ordering that Secretary Williamson be authorized on the request of any of his Majesty's subjects to prepare recommendatory passes for his Majesty's signature according to the tenor of the said report. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 69, 70.]
March 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Your orders concerning wind and weather have always been observed and are still continued. The wind being easterly has blown very fresh these ten days. I gave an account how it forced back Wednesday's packet-boat, which went not away again till Sunday morning, all the three packetboats being by these winds at that time on this side. [Ibid. No. 71.]
March 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E. Fair weather. These parts affords nothing of news. [Ibid. No. 72.]
March 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The wind is N.E. somewhat hard, but fair weather. To-morrow will be brought here from Exeter a woman and a girl, who were condemned there for poisoning their master and mistress and their daughter. The mother and daughter both died. They being of this town they are to be executed here next Thursday, the woman to be hanged and the girl burnt according to Lord Chief Justice North's sentence. [Ibid. No. 73.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 73 i.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Commission to Col. John Russell to command in chief all the forces left behind for the safety and peace of the Government in and about London and Westminster during the King's absence at Newmarket. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 26.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Leave of absence for 6 months to Robert Home, ensign to the King's company in the King's regiment commanded by Col. John Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 27.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward Cornewall and Herbert Aubrey for relief, they having been security for one Davis, receiver of the hearth-money for Herefordshire, who by reason of several casualties is insolvent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 99.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Mayor of London to be communicated to the Aldermen. His Majesty, having been informed that a rumour has been spread about in the City, as if he had changed the resolution he so lately declared to you in Council for causing the laws to be put in execution against conventicles and unlawful meetings in order to religious worship, has commanded me to let you know that he looks on such reports as scandalous and malicious, and on all that shall either raise or spread them as his enemies. Therefore he has commanded me in his name to remind you of the orders he himself lately gave you in Council, to put the laws against conventicles in execution, according to the directions there delivered, and he commands all his officers and faithful subjects to be assisting to you herein. [Precedents 1, f. 139.]
Memorandum that the substance of this letter was delivered by his Majesty himself, 28 March, 1676, after Council, in the presence of the Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, the Bishop of London, Secretary Coventry, the Lord Mayor and Sir John Robinson. [Ibid.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Capt. Lawrence Wright, commander of the Phœnix. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that together with Col. Philip Warner, whom he is to transport to Barbados, he take on board one servant, such as he shall bring, and suffer him to be with and wait on the said colonel during the voyage. [Ibid.]
March 28. Warrant to Sir Christopher Wren, as Sir Philip Howard, who has a house adjoining Scotland Yard, has desired the use of a free passage through Scotland Yard to his house, and also liberty to erect a pale in Scotland Yard before his house the full length of the wall thereof, and to stand at the same distance from his wall as another pale does near it on the same side of Scotland Yard, to give effectual order and see the same done accordingly in all the particulars above mentioned. [Ibid. f. 140.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Pass to John Clark of Penniecook, who is going beyond the seas. [Latin. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 436.]
[March?] Lord Ranelagh and his partners to the King. Petition stating that during the five years of their undertaking, ending last Christmas, they paid several sums much sooner than they were obliged to by their contract and also, having disbursed several sums for the necessary carrying on of the service by the King's express commands though not comprehended within their covenants, they conceive they may with reason demand interest thereon, which should they do, their account of interest only would amount to upwards of 33,000l.; that the petitioners, well remembering that, as they made several payments much sooner than they were obliged to, so in other payments they did not comply with the times stated in their contract, are resolved not to trouble his Majesty with so large a demand conceiving it reasonable that, as they ask interest on one hand, they ought to allow it on the other; that their demand of interest may be stated with great ease and clearness, but what is to be expected by way of discount out of it cannot be settled without the last difficulty and trouble, if at all, by reason no receipts in Ireland are ever dated, so that the times of payments cannot be ascertained except by depending on the memories of the receivers, and that the petitioners therefore, desiring nothing more than to have a speedy settlement of their demands, that they may be enabled fully to finish what remains of their undertaking, are willing to waive all demands of interest on account of any payments made by them which by their contract they were obliged to, and humbly praying and no ways doubting that his Majesty will give positive and effectual orders to the Lord Lieutenant and the Commissioners of the petitioners' accounts in Ireland to allow them interest according to the rates there for such sums as shall appear to have been paid by them for the necessary carrying on of the service and by his express commands, the same not being comprehended in their contract, which they the rather insist upon because it is well known they have during the whole time of their management most readily engaged themselves and their credits to supply his Majesty's occasions, though not obliged by their covenants, taking up very considerable sums for which they gave a far greater interest than what is now asked. At the side,
March 28.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Treasurer of England and the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 20.]
Another copy of the above reference, with memorandum that this reference was renewed of the same date to the Lord Lieutenant only. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 99.]
March 28. Warrant to the Lord Lieutenant in favour of Lord Ranelagh and John, Lord Kingston, to the same effect as that of 10 April calendared post, p. 68, except that the latter is in favour of Lord Ranelagh and Robert King, brother of John, Lord Kingston, who had died. With memorandum by Williamson that he showed this draft to the Earl of Essex, who owned it to be by his direction, in the presence of Sir John Werden who likewise agreed to it. [Draft. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 21.]
March 28. Lord Ranelagh to Williamson. Mr. Aldworth this morning by the Lord Lieutenant's order delivered a letter to Mr. Bridgeman, which his Excellency desired might be signed as what he approved of. It is a letter of great consequence to the King's service, for without it the army will still want their December pay. I therefore earnestly request you to get it signed now at Council, and, if what Mr. Aldworth said is not a sufficient delivery of the Lord Lieutenant's opinion, I beg you to receive his approbation from his own mouth. Noted at foot by Williamson, "My Lord Lieutenant agrees to it 28 March, 1676, at the Council Board." [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 22.] Enclosed,
Draft of the next letter with note by Richard Aldworth that the Lord Lieutenant having perused and approved of this draft directed him to put it into Secretary Williamson's hands in order to be dispatched. [Ibid. No. 22 i.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas Lord Ranelagh and his partners have represented that they shall not be able to pay according to their contract what became due to the present Military List of Ireland between 30 Sept. and 26 Dec. last both by reason of the great remittals and defalcations granted by the King, as also of the payments made by them by his express command for the necessary carrying on of his service, though not comprehended in their contract, unless they are allowed a satisfaction either out of the advance money or out of the rent of the present farm of the revenue there proportionable to what their just demand, when settled, may amount to, over and above the sums which they have agreed to discount with the King, ordering that the said Lord Ranelagh and partners be fully satisfied out of the revenue there whatever their demands shall be found to amount to over and above discounts, and, though what is to be so paid cannot be exactly ascertained till their accounts are examined and settled, yet, they having computed the same to amount to 24,000l. or thereabouts, over and above discounts, and the King being desirous that the said pay should be paid with all convenient speed, requiring him to give all necessary and effectual orders to the Vice-Treasurer to pay by way of imprest to the late Commissioners of the Treasury there 24,000l. out of the first money arising from the present farm of the revenue, provided they undertake by an instrument under their hands and seals to repay whatever their said demands, when settled, shall fall short of the said sum of 24,000l. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 433.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for effectual acquittances and discharges to the new Farmers of the Revenue for 12,000l. actually paid by them for the King's use, in the same form as previous warrants of 10 Dec. and 5 Jan. calendared in the last volume, pp. 442 and 492. [Ibid. p. 439.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting that the Duke of York is deficient of his satisfaction according to the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and that by an Order in Council of 1 Oct. last the distribution of any lands in Ireland for making good deficiencies, &c., was forbidden till the common stock of debt and credit viz., the claims made and the lands to satisfy them, were cast up, and that the King 23 Feb. last had declared in Council that he would exempt out of the said general rule the case of his said brother concerning the reprizals due to him by the said Acts, and, it being also in accordance with the King's intentions and the express words of the said Acts, that he should in the first place be satisfied before all others, authorizing and requiring him in the first place to give all necessary and effectual orders for stating the Duke's deficiencies, and for ascertaining the quantity of the said land wherewith he is to be reprized and also for placing his deficiencies when so settled on any lands and hereditaments whatever belonging to or vested in the Crown by the said Acts, and to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to the said Duke and his heirs of so many of the said lands and hereditaments as shall be sufficient to reprize and satisfy him for the deficiencies due to him, and also to cause such commissions to be issued for finding the King's title to any of the said lands and hereditaments and for ascertaining the quantity thereof as shall be desired by him or his assigns. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 439.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas several subjects in Ireland have been of late much disquieted by reason of some application to the King for a grant of all penalties and forfeitures incurred by the grantees or patentees of any hereditaments or of any titles or of any annuity, pension or employment who have not enrolled the same in the Irish Chancery within the time fixed by the Act of Explanation, warrant for issuing a proclamation declaring that it is not the King's intention to take to himself, or to grant to any other such forfeitures and penalties, and the said proclamation is also to signify the King's pleasure that all persons who have not enrolled any such grants or patents may and shall at any time not exceeding two years from the date of such proclamation be allowed to do so without any penalty or forfeiture or prejudice for having omitted those enrolments. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 1.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas John Moore, a sergeant in the Irish Foot Guards, in Dec., 1666, stricter commands being then given concerning the gates of Dublin by reason of some robberies committed there, was commanded the 5th of that month to go the first round with the tattoo and to lock up the said gates, and did so, till he came to Ormond's Gate, where Nicholas Hill, a private of Moore's Company, was sentinel, where Moore gave order for locking the gate, which Hill not only opposed affirming it should not be locked, but in further contempt of the said order and of all military discipline assaulted Moore with his musket clubbed, and struck his halbert out of his hand, which Moore taking up and turning the point towards Hill, he, pressing on further to assault Moore, ran himself on the point, whereon Moore locked the gate and proceeded on the round, and whereas Moore, having notice that Hill was dead of his wound, acquainted his officer with what had happened, who committed him to the Marshalsea, and whereas the Coroner held an inquest, who, proceeding by the strict rules of common law without any regard to martial discipline, found the said fact manslaughter, Moore being then in restraint and no one appearing for him, and whereas no one appearing to prosecute, and the truth of the matter appearing to a council of officers, he was discharged, and returned to his duty, and was afterwards commanded to sea, but the Coroner returned the inquisition into the King's Bench, where the Clerk of the Crown presented an indictment against Moore for the traitorous murder of Hill to the Grand Jury, where, Moore having no notice, it was found and process issued thereon, on which Moore was outlawed for treason, which was not known to him till lately, and whereas he then surrendered himself in order to reverse the outlawry and put himself on his trial, but the Chief and other Justices, on consideration of an Act called the Statute of Baltinglass touching attainders for treason, would not permit Moore to reverse the same, and whereas Moore applied last January to the Lords Justices, who, finding the facts to be as alleged, referred the case to all the judges of the kingdom, who reported 15 Feb. last that it seemed to them the fact by law could be no more than manslaughter, and perhaps excusable in martial discipline, but in regard of the said statute they doubted if Moore could be admitted to reverse the outlawry but reported he was a fit object for pardon: warrant for a free pardon to Moore for the said offence and of the outlawry thereon, with directions that the said outlawry be vacated and taken off the file. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 7.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the erection of the lands specified in the schedule thereto into a manor in favour of Capt. Redmond Barry and his heirs with power to hold a court leet and court baron and all other usual powers and privileges. Annexed,
The said schedule containing the lands of Rathcormack and other lands in the parish of Rathcormack and barony of Barrymore, and lands in the parish of Goutrow (Gortroe) in the same barony, in the parishes of Castletown and Glanworth in the barony of Fermoy and in the parishes of Glanworth and Kilgullane in the barony of Condons. [1½ page. Ibid. p. 9.]
[After March 28.] Copies of commissions to Col. John Russell dated 25 May, 1671, 9 March, 1675, and 28 March, 1676, and to the Earl of Craven dated 23 Sept. 1671, 8 Aug. 1674, and 29 Sept. 1674, to command the forces in and about London during the King's absence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 74.]
March 29.
Gloucester.
Henry Fowler to Williamson. We have with all diligence hunted that infamous paper as far as possible here and have bound over Baldwin to the sessions at Hereford there to prefer an indictment against Curtis from whom he first received it at Hereford, to deliver it to Clarke of this city, and to-night I have written effectually to Hereford and desired the Mayor and Justices there to be as careful in it as may be, and, after they have done what they can, to bind over Curtis to our sessions at Gloucester that we may have them all face to face. When the Hereford and Gloucester sessions are over, you shall have the full account of all. In the meantime I beg you to send me a word or two of advice. I am again your humble petitioner in the matter of the conventicles, which are so great an offence to all his Majesty's most loyal subjects and the deflowering the beauty of our profession. Let me have your advice in it; for it is not to be expressed how men's minds are disordered about them. Our sessions being at hand I entreat you to write hither by next post. The Mayor, being still under some indisposition, begs your pardon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 75.]
March 29.
Bristol.
Richard Ellsworth to Williamson. Mr. Robert Aldworth, town clerk of this city, being dead and no one yet chosen in his place, I could not but acquaint you of it for the future better and well being of this city and its government, for, it being even as factious as it is great and populous, and the greatest part, if not all, of those now in authority knowing little more than their occupations and trades and what they take at trust from their town clerk's lips, and not thoroughly purged of the old leaven, as is the true loyalty, prudence, learning and skill in the laws of their town clerk, such will be the good or ill government of the city, and the putting the laws in execution against rebellion and seditious meetings, or their disuse or laying to sleep, as I have known it of late done, and the rather, because the Recorder comes not hither above once a year to sit on the gaol. Therefore I humbly submit to your prudence, whether it may not be convenient for his Majesty to send his letter to the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council commanding them to be circumspect in their next choice.
The Presbytery faction increase and have dared of late to set them up a pulpit again which some time past was pulled down, which is doubtless known to the Mayor, and how he or the Alderman of the ward can connive at it I know not, inasmuch as its sufferance gives that party greater encouragement.
The Bishop took his journey this morning towards the North with all his family. [Ibid. No. 76.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Roger L'Estrange, Surveyor of the Presses, or his deputies, or any of the messengers in ordinary to make strict search in all suspected places for unlicensed pamphlets or books called "A Letter from a Person of Quality," and "Two Seasonable Discourses" and "The Naked Truth," and for the authors, printers or publishers of the same or any of them, as also for two speeches of the Earl of Shaftesbury and the Duke of Buckingham, and for the printers or publishers of the same, or either of them, and to seize them and bring them in safe custody before himself or a Justice of the Peace, and also to seize and bring away all such copies of the said books as they shall discover. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 161.]
Minute thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 77.]
March 30.
[Read.]
Several merchants of London desiring free export of woollen goods to the King. Petition in answer to that of the Fellowship of Merchant Adventurers, calendared ante, p. 26, controverting its statements, showing the importance of cultivating home produce, and the disadvantages of confining trade abroad to the company's mart towns; stating that in the six months' suspension of the charter, they exported 10,000 cloths more than the company has done since during the like period, and setting forth the advantages to be derived from free trade, and entreating a liberty of trade during the war, or, if this cannot be granted, that the company will take from them the stock on their hands, which they encouraged them to buy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 78.]
March 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The easterly winds have been so averse to our packet-boats getting to the Brill that of late they have been able to do but little. Last Tuesday arrived a mail of Mr. Paine's sending over by a vessel he got there, ours not being able to get thither. Last night the wind got into the North and many passengers that would not venture in the late stormy contrary winds went on board one of the packet-boats which is sailed from hence, the wind continuing N. The wind altering and the weather proving so fair has caused many ships to proceed on their voyages. [Ibid. No. 79.]
March 30.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Last Tuesday passed through this for Falmouth two cartloads of very fine thread and one barrel of gold ore, as it is supposed, being seized by the officers of the customs at Falmouth; being part of the goods landed out of the Castle, lately cast away between St. Ives and Padstow, and found in the country near Padstow. Wind E.N.E., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 80.]
March 30.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 28th came in here the Speedwell of Yarmouth from Bordeaux with two or three others. They report that the King will remove all his forces this summer, and leave that city to its former trade. The Neptune of Topsham and the Hopewell of Weymouth with several others from Croisic report that the French King is making great preparation in those parts for carrying on the war this spring. Other shipping news. The wind for 3 or 4 days past has blown very hard at E. and S.E. and so continues. Five or six hundred pounds worth of goods more is secured by the officers that was landed out of the Castle, besides what I gave an account of in my last. [Ibid. No. 81.]
[Mar. 30.] Francis Gwyn to Williamson. Coming through this town of Bristol I found a particular friend of mine, John Rumsey, standing for the place of town clerk there. He being recommended by the Lord Chancellor and Attorney-General to the King, and the King having recommended him to the Mayor and Aldermen, makes me beg the favour of a word from you to Sir John Knight in his behalf. Though he is already our friend, as much as we can see through his politic reservedness, yet a word from you would make him ours as zealously as I am. [Undated, but endorsed 1676 and with postmark of 31 March. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 82.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to Sir William Purves of Woodhouselie, his Majesty's Solicitor in Scotland. I enclose the copy of a letter written 22 Dec. last in St. Martin's Road by Joseph Harris, commander of the Quaker ketch, informing the Secretary of the Lords of the Admiralty that George Dreddan, master of the Jannett of Glasgow, living at Musselburgh, had stood in contempt with him against the power and authority of his Majesty, for which he was forced to give his bond to appear and answer when called upon, and for his performance thereof another bond was signed by John Hunter and James Carbreathe, the masters of the James of Irvin and the James of Glasgow, allowing only 28 days to Dreddan for his appearance in case he should be out on a voyage, as you may see by the enclosed copies of the two bonds, that you may employ a notar to give legal intimation of his Majesty's pleasure to the said Dreddan to repair hither with all expedition to answer for his contempt, and at his arrival to present himself to the said secretary, Mr. Pepys, from whom he shall have notice of the day of his appearance, and, in case of his being on a voyage, the notar is to leave copies of the letter and bonds and of this letter with his wife, if he be married, or at his ordinary place of residence, that the notar may give an account of his diligence by a formal instrument, and you may thereafter send it to me, that his Majesty may know he was duly warned to make his appearance. You are also to give notice of all this to the said Hunter and Carbreathe that they may be advised of their hazard, in case Dreddan fail to appear. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 437.]
March 31.
Yarmouth.
John Dawson to Williamson. I am informed by our bailiffs that one has listed several soldiers and intended to carry them beyond the seas. I sent to the haven's mouth and ordered it so that all masters then ready to go away should not carry any of them, and our magistrates have imprisoned the person that listed them, which I am desired to acquaint you with and to know if you have any further directions. The gentleman's name I cannot understand, the bailiffs being now in bed. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 83.]
March 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. After the last four days of very great winds at N.E. is now come pleasant weather. The earth being refreshed with moderate rains the husbandman is very busy sowing barley. These high and contrary winds have been against ships coming in. Not a topsail gale. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 84.]
March 31.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived In reference to what I wrote in my last, yesterday were executed on Castledown just over Catwater the woman and girl for poisoning their master and mistress and their daughter. The woman, who was hanged, died without confessing the least of what she was charged with; the girl confessed the whole, saying she was put upon it by the woman. She was burnt, dying very penitent. Out of this town and parts adjacent came at least 6,000 people to see this execution. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 85.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 85 i.]
[March ?] Resolutions passed in the committee on passes for ships that they shall be granted on the oath of the master in the case of an English built ship and in the case of one foreign made free, or foreign not freed, but belonging to his Majesty's subjects, on the oath of the master and owners; that officers of the Custom House shall then deliver the passes, which must be produced before the ship can clear; that a vessel now abroad may have a pass, if limited for a year only, renewed, on the oath of an English owner or part owner, and that the old pass be delivered up on taking out a new one, &c. [Ibid. No. 86.]
March 31.
10 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. Yours of last night by express I received about 9 this morning, and accordingly have to-night signified his Majesty's pleasure to Sir W. Temple in the point of delivering the Swedish and Dutch passports in the very terms I received it from you, and shall, under his Majesty's good pleasure acquaint the public ministers here with his mind in this matter.
Nothing has come from abroad since the letters by the Flanders and Holland mails which his Royal Highness carried with him, which, if they fall into your hands, I beg you to return to me.
All things are very well and quiet in town, and likely, I hope, to continue so; you shall be sure to hear if anything happen otherwise.
We have had a Council this afternoon, where the difference betwixt Mr. Bankes and the Company of Adventurers held the whole time. I am sorry the King himself was not present to hear many particulars relating to the temper and carriage of the Company at Hamburg which might have been of consequence for him to have notice of. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 85.]
March. Appointment of Mr. Clapthorne to be a poor knight of Windsor. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 142.]
March.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 380. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
87 2 2 1 0 S.E.
88 4 2 4 8 S.E.
89 5 2 4 4 S.
90 6 2 4 0 E.
91 7 2 4 0 E.
92 8 2 4 0 N.
93 9 2 4 0 N.
94 10 2 0 0 E. The four East Indiamen are now under sail.
95 11 2 0 0 E.
96 12 2 0 0 E.
97 13 2 0 0 E.
98 14 2 0 0 E.
99 15 2 0 0 W.
100 16 2 7 0 S.E.
101 17 2 11 1 S.W.
102 18 2 11 2 S.W.
103 19 2 6 1 N.E.
104 20 2 5 0 N.E.
105 21 1 0 0 S.E.
106 22 1 2 1 N.E.
107 23 1 0 0 N.E. Four more sail gone through the Downs outward.
108 24 2 0 2 N.E.
109 25 2 0 0 N.E.
110 27 1 0 0 N.E.
111 28 1 0 0 N.E.
112 29 1 0 0 N.E.
113 30 1 0 0 N.
114 31 1 0 0 N.E.