BHO

Charles II: April 1676

Pages 55-95

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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April 1676

April 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A packet-boat arriving early this morning brought us news that the Prince of Orange marched from the Hague last Monday to Rotterdam and on Tuesday towards Flanders with all the forces he could draw together, leaving most of the towns in Holland to the guard of their own burghers. The northerly wind we have had ever since last Wednesday evening blows this morning so fresh that most of the ships which have been getting out of this port these two or three days are now returned, and a great many are still without. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 115.]
April 1.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. No news has happened here for a long time, because the wind has been at N.E. and E. a long time. All the ships that come down go through, so that we cannot tell what they are. [Ibid. No. 116.]
April 1.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The wind being N.E. hinders the arrival of several ships we expect, so I have but little to present you with at present. I pray that you would move the Lord Treasurer and the Commissioners on my behalf for the place of Collector here, the present Collector being suspended last Lady Day. I understand the business very well, and can do it more to the advantage of the King's receipt than it has been done, giving good security. Besides, I have not received any return for the doings and sufferings of myself and family, which is sufficiently known. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 117.]
April 1.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yesterday Captain Kempthorne arrived in the Monmouth yacht from Dublin, and is ready to sail again this tide for Dublin, taking aboard Lady Powerscourt. [Ibid. No. 118.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Henry Fowler. I am glad to hear by yours of the 29th that the Mayor and his brethren continue their care in the search after the first dispersers of that abominable libel.
As to the conventicle, you are not to doubt of the law in the matter, and, as to his Majesty's mind, that sure has been fully made known by the judges at the assizes, where they had order to give that matter of putting the laws in execution against Dissenters of all kinds most particularly in charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 86.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Sandys. I have spoken again to the king in the presence of several of the lords about that scurvy libel you sent me a copy of. Though he appeared much offended at it, as all the lords thought he had great reason to be, yet it was found so written that he did not well see how to resent it on the author as it deserved, at least nothing has been yet resolved particularly in it. I was commanded by him to thank you for your continuance of your zeal and concernment for his service and the public. [Ibid.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. I trouble his Majesty through your hands with what came to me by the last Flanders post, at least so much as he has not already seen from your packets. You will please at your leisure to let them be returned to me. There's nothing new in the town that I can hear of. [Ibid. p. 87.]
April 1.
Newmarket.
Proclamation that all passes for ships for the East and West Indies or beyond Cape Verde granted before the present date are to determine on the return and unlading of the vessels in England; all those for the Mediterranean, granted by virtue of any other treaties than those with Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli before 25 March, 1675, are to determine at Michaelmas, 1676, and all such granted after that day and before the date of this proclamation, on 25 March, 1677; but that the passes of all vessels in port in England, when this proclamation is issued, are to be void, and also those of ships which happen to come into port before the expiration of the times fixed, and all passes to ships entered to any other part of the world or coastwise are to expire 29 Sept., 1676. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations, Vol. 3, p. 348.]
Draft of the above proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 119.]
April 2.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of 31 March. Your papers have been restored to Mr. Chiffinch, who, I doubt not, has returned them to you by this time. I have acquainted his Majesty with what you wrote of the Hamburg Company, who is sensible enough of what they may do, but the notice being only in general I could not press him for any particular instructions on that point. We are here without knowing well what to do. The ground is too hard either for hunting, racing, or any sport, but barely taking the air, which his Majesty does more on foot than horseback. It is too early yet to discourse of how long we shall stay, but I believe most people are of the opinion we left a very good town when we came from London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 120.]
April 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E., fair weather. These parts affords nothing of news. [Ibid. No. 121.]
April 3.
Euston Hall.
The Earl of Arlington to Williamson. I received in yours of the 1st your kind excuses for not seeing us at our departure, as I left you mine, having missed you the day before. I thank you for the continuation of Mr. Yard's extracts of the news, which I hope you will command him to pursue as long as we are abroad, which to-day's news from Newmarket says will not be long. The truth is the northerly wind with the want of rain makes the country less pleasant than we promised ourselves it would be. [Ibid. No. 122.]
April 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday loosed out of this bay 6 or 7 light vessels and stood northward, the wind being E.S.E. It is now W.N.W. A white frost. [Ibid. No. 123.]
April 3.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. This place continues healthful. As to the season it is a very great drought, which has continued some weeks past. The wind for several days has been N.N.E. and E. To-day it has come about to S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 124.]
April 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. and brave April showers, which we very much wanted. [Ibid. No. 125.]
April 3.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind a long time E. and N.E., very dry and sometimes lofty, now due E. [Ibid. No. 126.]
April 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 1st came in here the Mary of Dover in eight days from Bordeaux, laden with wines and brandy, homeward-bound. They came out with 7 or 8 more. They report that 5 or 6 days before they came out all the forces in that city were drawn away for Catalonia, and that the new citadel was finished, commanding the whole city and well furnished with men and guns, but the inhabitants have very much suffered in their estates by pulling down their houses and quartering of soldiers and paying the fines laid upon them. The better sort of the city repent their late rebellion, and say the common sort of people were the cause of it, but they are the sufferers.
The Success of London came in from Rochelle, who reports that the Dutch had taken Madagascar and all the other places the French had in the East Indies, and that on the governors' and officers' engagements the Dutch had lent them three great ships to bring home their men, on condition the ships might be free. The said ships were arrived before the vessel came away, and had landed their men and were loaded with salt and wines for Holland. Other shipping news.
A seaman that lately came from St. Sebastian reports he was there when the Virgin Mary of 24 guns and 165 men, Capt. John Devell, commander, came in and made his boast that he had made an English ketch strike to him, which is supposed to be the Quaker ketch. Wind still E. and S.E., and has been so for 4 or 5 days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 127.]
April 3.
Bristol.
Sir John Knight to Williamson. The town clerk of our city being lately dead a letter from his Majesty has been obtained in behalf of Mr. Rumsey that he might be elected, and since, I hear, the Mayor defers the election in hopes of a letter one Mr. Nathaniel Huggatt endeavours to get in his favour, who is a person for whom the factious strive. If he should obtain a letter to that purpose, I am sure he will carry it, and by that means the factious will be countenanced, and the laws more disobeyed than ever, and indeed he is not a fit person. My request, therefore, is that you will be a means to stop the passing of any such letter, and that the city might be left at liberty to make an election of an able person, well affected to his Majesty and a lover of the Church of England. The Marquis of Worcester opposes Mr. Rumsey and gives a bad character of him. If such a letter might be speedily sent down to the Mayor and Common Council, it would be of great advantage to his Majesty's service for the future. [Ibid. No. 128.]
April 3.
6 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Here is a Capt. Hatton with a lieutenant and ensign raising volunteers by virtue of a commission from the Duke of Monmouth as general of the English forces in France, for the French king's service, but he beats no drums, only takes as he meets with them those that are willing to serve, but supposes he will not get many. I understand they design to ship here or at Milford what men they get, but, there being a former order in Council not to permit any ship to carry out any English subjects into any foreign service, I beg you you will order any of your clerks to advise me how to act, in case they desire their transportation here.
We have very fine weather and a most forward spring in these parts as ever was known, but rain is wanting, the wind now N.W. though very little. [Ibid. No. 129.]
April 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting the reference to him of the petition of Sir Robert Reading and Jane, Countess of Mountrath, praying that the payment of 500l. yearly out of the concordatum money of Ireland granted them in consideration of their expenses in erecting lighthouses there and in compensation for their not demanding any duty from the ships of subjects passing by the same might be continued, and his report, finding that his Majesty by letters patent of 13 Nov., 1665, caused certain lighthouses to be built by Sir R. Reading in or near the ports of Dublin, Carrickfergus, Waterford and Kinsale and certain lights to be maintained therein, that on surrender of the said letters patent all the said lighthouses by letters patent of 16 July, 1667, were granted to Richard, Earl of Arran, in trust for the petitioners, and for the maintenance of the same to receive of all vessels belonging to subjects trading to or from any of the said ports 1d. per ton outwards and from all ships belonging to strangers 2d. per ton outwards and inwards for the term of 61 years, that it being represented by the English House of Commons on the complaint of several shipowners of Chester and Liverpool, who made frequent voyages to the said ports, that the payment of the said duties was a grievance to their trade, and it being reported by the Commissioners of the Treasury and others of the Privy Council to whom the matters were referred that the petitioners had expended on the said lighthouses 2,600l., his Majesty by order in Council directed that 500l. per annum be allowed them out of the concordatum money for keeping the said lighthouses and by letters patent of 19 July, 1672, in consideration of the expense the petitioners had been in erecting them and of the loss they were likely to sustain thereby instead of the benefit intended to the said Countess for her many faithful services, and also because the petitioners according to the said order in Council had by deed covenanted not to take from the ships of subjects any composition money or duty towards maintaining the said lights, granted to the said petitioners the sum of 500l. per annum for the residue of the said term to be paid quarterly by way of concordatum with directions that the said payment be inserted in the establishment accordingly as a standing concordatum, and therefore, if his Majesty be pleased to continue the said allowance, submitting to his consideration either to grant it out of the said concordatum money, or, if he should think fit, in regard the concordatums are already so straitened that they can scarce defray the necessary expense of the Government, to place it on any other fund of the Irish revenue that may be proper, and also that the Lord Treasurer had considered the above petition and report, and represented that he did not know wherein to direct the said payment more properly than whereon it is already placed: ordering and directing that the said 500l. per annum be paid to the said Sir R. Reading out of the concordatum money allowed by the present establishment of Ireland according to the letters patent of 19 July, and that the same be placed accordingly on that fund as a standing payment. [2/14 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 18.]
April 4.
10 p.m.
Sir J. Williamson to the King. The enclosed are what came by the Holland mail come in this morning. It is only to be observed that the Ambassador's letter of 7 April N.S. ought to have come by the last packet, which arrived on Sunday. Where the miscarriage has happened I cannot imagine, since that day's mail from the Hague brought a letter from his Secretary.
The Swedes Ambassador, having been with me this morning, made one part of his errand to me to wonder how it came to pass that Sir W. Temple should scruple the interchanging of their passports. I acquainted him with your having entirely approved of what your Ambassador had done, and for what reasons you had judged it your part as the common general mediator to discountenance any separate step that should be offered by any of the parties towards a particular accommodation, or anything that might look like it. For example I told him you had not long ago refused absolutely to the Elector Palatine your simple recommendation though in never so general terms towards the Most Christian King for a separate accommodation with that Crown. This, I told him, as your Majesty judged fair and equal between the parties and suitable to that common confidence that all the parties in war had lodged in your hands, when they received your mediation, so, I told him, it was what had ever been practised by general mediators in all negotiations of this kind. He seeming to differ in the point, I prayed him to remember what had been the opinion and endeavours of Sweden, when they were mediators at Cologne, as to your separate treaty with Holland, how they had resolved to oppose it. The Ambassador not willing to remember an instance so much in their disfavour, I offered to produce the proofs of it out of my journal of Cologne, which I presume, in all humility however, to put into your hands in confirmation of your own royal judgement in this point, which your Majesty will find by the enclosed is now over by the States having given new ones to be interchanged at Gottenburg for like doubles from Sweden. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 130.]
April 4.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The 1st came in a small ketch of this place from Rotterdam who says the day before he came from thence arrived there the Elizabeth of this place, who met with an Ostend caper on the Holland coast, which commanded the master and his merchant on board the caper, and beat the master and put him and the merchant into a little hole, till they had taken what they thought fit from on board their vessel, and afterwards took from the master and merchant their clothes, money and watches to the value of 50l., as their letters likewise confirmed.
The wind has been much easterly, now S.W., with the continuance of an exceeding drought and white frost in the morning. [Ibid. No. 131.]
April 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday arrived one of our packetboats, but brought no account of whither the Prince was marched with his army nor any other news. The wind was yesterday mostly southerly, to-day N.W. Both days have almost cleared our harbour of the ships that were put in here. [Ibid. No. 132.]
April 4.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day the wind came S. and by W. which has brought betwixt 20 or 30 merchantmen from several ports homeward-bound. Off Rye they met with several Ostend privateers who boarded several of the smallest and plundered them, and had done more mischief, had not Capt. Low, commander of the Prosperous, a stout ship, fired at them, which made them forbear boarding others. [Ibid. No. 133.]
April 4.
Rye.
Francis Lightfoot to Williamson. I have a letter from you of 14 April, 1674, wherein his Majesty gives orders to examine vessels for officers and soldiers who shall endeavour to transport themselves into France and to make stay of them and to give you an account of it, and one from you dated May, 1675, with the proclamation to the same purpose. On the 2nd came in here a smack much like the Barking fishers, wherein were 28 persons bound for France to serve. Yesterday I acquainted the Mayor with it, who has taken the sails from the yards to secure them from going out, on which the master most and the commander are very angry with me, and have given me very threatening words, but I acquainted them that I had much honour for the Duke of Monmouth, but was obliged to follow his Majesty's commands. The commander was after very civil, but the master has given me very abusive language. His name is John Hodges, the commander's Richard Cooshin, who is to-day gone up to London. The persons on board would very willingly be set at liberty, being as several of them affirm against their will, as the people of the town report. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 134.]
April 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W., fair weather. No news. [Ibid. No. 135.]
April 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind N.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 136.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 136 i.]
April 4.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. All our fleet are gone to the West Indies, Spain, France and other parts. Very few remain in port. Last night came in the Taunton Merchant from Virginia for Barnstaple, laden with tobacco. Wind W., and good weather. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 23.]
April 4.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting that Thomas Nugent has contracted with Walter Nangle of Kildalky for the purchase of the lands of Kildalky, barony of Lune, Meath, consisting of 568 acres, the said Nangle having been declared an innocent by the late Court of Claims and decreed to the same, and that, in regard of the many scruples arising on purchases in Ireland, he has besought a grant of whatever title the King may have to the said lands, a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report with which the Lord Treasurer agrees, requiring him to examine whether the said lands were in the full and peaceable possession of the said Nangle in 1641, and were decreed to him as an innocent by the Court of Claims and whether the said Nugent has a good title thereto from the said Nangle, and, in case the said allegations appear to him to be true, authorizing and empowering him to pass letters patent containing a grant to the said Nugent and his heirs of all the King's title to the lands purchased by him as aforesaid, but, in case it shall appear there be any prejudice to the King's service by passing such letters patents, then the passing thereof shall be suspended, till the King be informed of the state of the case and his further pleasure be signified. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 25.]
April 5. Lists of London and Middlesex prisoners condemned at the gaol delivery of Newgate holden at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey on that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 137.]
April 5.
Bexley.
William Denny to [Williamson]. At the Norwich Assizes, August, 1673, I was condemned in 20l. for two months nonresidence, and in March 1673[-4] at Thetford Assizes in 60l. for 6 months. The informer was Gregory Lovell. The penalty is 10l. per mensem. The informer's 40l. I have paid. The 40l. due to the King he has been pleased to grant me, on the Lord Treasurer's report of the equity and reasonableness of my request. I suppose you have the grant with you, and I would desire you, as soon as you can, to draw me an order for a Privy Seal that I may discharge the records in the King's Bench. If more particular instructions are necessary, please let me know. Mr. Benson will send a letter to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 138.]
April 5.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday arrived a vessel from Sicily. The master assured me that the French had no more command from the town than the length of their guns, and that the Spanish army lay in sight of Messina. A fresh gale at N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 139.]
April 6.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of the 4th at 10 last night and immediately sent them to his Majesty. He went so early abroad and both he and the Duke so early to dine at Chippenham that I had not the opportunity either of seeing them or getting them into my possession, or else had by this post returned them to you. I think the effects of our mediation are universally believed not likely to be very advantageous to us, and we are like to fare like those part frays too early, displease both parties. We have store of Privy Councillors here, but as yet no council, but, whether the arrival of the Lord Lieutenant, who is expected here to-night, may produce one I know not, but Newmarket is not a clime for such congregations. [Ibid. No. 140.]
April 6.
Newmarket.
H. Thynne to Williamson. Since sealing the enclosed a second packet is arrived, which, as soon as it has been showed to his Majesty, shall be returned to you with the former. [Ibid. No. 141.]
April 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The letter from your office failed me last night, but I know not where the miscarriage was. The wind was yesterday and to-day most easterly. The ships taking the opportunity of fair weather have left our harbour very naked. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. [Ibid. No. 142.]
April 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. No news. [Ibid. No. 143.]
April 6.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. From Bridport it is said that the affections of the people there are for Mr. Wadham Wyndham to be burgess in the room of his deceased brother, Col. John Strangewayes. Wind S.E., but little. [Ibid. No. 144.]
April 6.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W. and by S. Weather somewhat cloudy. [Ibid. No. 145.]
April 6.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the grant to Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General of Ireland, dated 18 Sept., 1675, of the lands of Lackenshoneene and Gurteen and of other lands in Tipperary comprised in a lease dated 24 Feb., 1662–3, to Sir John Stephens, deceased, together with other lands therein mentioned (calendared in the last volume, p. 300) and that the said grant as far as regarded the said lands was void in law, because of the omission to recite therein two subsequent leases of the same lands to the said Stephens by which the first lease to him was surrendered, a petition of Sir John Temple praying for a new grant of the said lands, a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report in favour of granting the petitioner's request, with which the Lord Treasurer agreed; authorizing and requiring him to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to the said Sir John Temple and his heirs of all the lands comprised in the said two subsequent leases and of the reversion thereof at the rate of 40l. per annum, and clauses are to be inserted therein discharging the said lands from all other rents and obliging Sir John Temple, his heirs and assigns, to secure the Crown against all demands for defalcations that may be made by the new farmers of the Irish revenue by reason of the said grant. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 2.]
April 6.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant. Whereas the Lord Mayor and citizens of Dublin have informed us, that several of our royal predecessors for the portage, murage, and pavage of the said city granted them several charters for receiving the inland customs, commonly called the customs of the gates, for such things as are brought into the said city and suburbs to be exposed for sale there and for such things as are carried out of the said city, as to the validity of which charters some doubts have lately arisen, and have besought a grant and confirmation thereof, and whereas the matter was referred to you, who reported, 20 March last, in favour of such grant and confirmation being given, with which report the Lord Treasurer has agreed, we authorize and require you to cause effectual letters patent to be passed containing a grant and confirmation to the said Lord Mayor and citizens for receiving the said customs for ever in as ample a manner as they had been formerly granted to, and enjoyed by them, inserting therein a proviso that the profits of the said customs for 7 years be disposed to such public uses for the benefit of the corporation as the Lord Lieutenant and Council for that time being shall direct. [Ibid. p. 4.]
April 7.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. Since my last your packet of the 5th is come and delivered to his Majesty. Your former is to-night returned from the Duke, but I send it not back, because I hope, so many of the Committee of Foreign Affairs being here, they may think it reasonable an hour or two should set apart to consider of the answer of the Confederates and Sir L. Jenkins' letter, but I shall either bring or send the paper safe to you as I find they intend a stay here or a Council. We talk of returning this day sevennight, but whether a day's rain may not alter that resolution I know not. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 146.]
April 7.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind W. and S.W. in the morning and easterly in the afternoon with the continuance of drought. [Ibid. No. 147.]
April 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived since his last, except a French privateer of 8 or 10 guns that came in that evening. [Ibid. No. 148.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 148 i.]
April 7.
[Read]
Sir John Shorter and others concerned in the four ships destroyed by the Dutch in the Elbe to the King and Council. Petition to be allowed a copy of the answer of some of the commissioners appointed to distribute the compensation paid by Hamburg for ships burnt in the Elbe given in without due notice to the rest, whereby they are prevented from obtaining 1,340l. 9s. 4d. ordered them in lieu of their loss of freight for the said four ships amounting to 5,000l., and also for the appointment of a day of hearing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 149.]
[April 7 ?] Answer of Sir William Holcroft and others addressed to the King, to the petition of Sir John Shorter; showing that the balance in the hands of the Commissioners is only 766l. 14s., and that it should be distributed amongst all the parties concerned, by way of interest, rather than to a few by way of freight, the Judge of the Court of Admiralty not having allowed the 1340l. 9s. 4d. to the petitioners, as alleged, but craving time to consider as to the proportioning of freight or whether any freight be due at all. [Ibid. No. 150.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bayliffs of Yarmouth. I have had for some days yours of 31 March, giving account of your having made stay of Mr. Charles Clinton for having listed and transported persons into the Dutch service contrary to the proclamation. This being the first Council day I could get time to produce it in, an order has been passed, which you will receive from the Clerk of the Council. Your diligence has been much commended by the Lords, and I am commanded to let you know so much. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43,p. 88.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Rye. Similar letter to the last in reply to his letter stating that he had made stay of 28 persons passing over to the French service. [Ibid.]
April 7.
Newmarket.
The King to the Earl of Stamford. Whereas the game in and about Leicestershire is much destroyed by disorderly persons with greyhounds, mongrels, setting dogs, guns, trammels, tunnels, nets, and other engines, he is to have special care that no persons use any of the said unlawful means or engines within 12 miles of his house called Bradgate in that county, and is to seize and detain any of such dogs or engines, and to certify the names of the offenders to the King or the Privy Council. [Precedents 1, f. 140.]
April 7. Notes by Williamson of proceedings at the Foreign Committee. Stay of persons going to serve France at Rye, of like at Yarmouth going to Holland. Arguments of the Attorney and Solicitor General and the Lord Chancellor about Weyman's application for a patent about his new invention of polishing marble, &c. Hamburg money, Shorter, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 125.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of William Yorke of Limerick, merchant, for relief, setting forth that the New Exchange, being freighted by himself and other Limerick merchants with butter and salt beef for Flushing, was met by a Dunkirk privateer, to whom the master showed his passes, which were in due form, and an order of the Court of France for her release on a former capture by a Calais privateer, yet the privateer, on pretence that the ship was not the same as that mentioned in the order, carried her into Dunkirk, where she is still detained; that Secretary Williamson effectually recommend to M. Ruvigny the petitioner's case in order to his receiving satisfaction, and also write to Lord Berkeley, ambassador extraordinary to France, desiring him to solicit there, that the ship and goods may be restored or satisfaction made for the same. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 25.]
[After April 7.] [The Commissioners of the Customs to Sir R. Southwell]. 1. They find on perusing the rules for passes which they suppose were intended to relate only to the treaties with Spain and the United Provinces that in the preamble of the report of the Committee for Trade, the words are that they present the following rules as necessary, &c. not mentioning to what treaties the passes to be granted relate.
2. In the Order of Council relating to the rules the words are "for preventing the fraudulent procuring of passes pursuant to the treaties with Spain, the United Provinces and all others except those with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli," whereby they are made rules for the treaties with Sweden and Denmark as well as Spain and the United Provinces. The like mistake is in the Lord Treasurer's order.
3. In the 6th Rule for granting passes pursuant to the treaties with Sweden and Denmark it is said that the form of a pass, &c. printed on parchment with blanks hereunto annexed be made use of and no other, and there are no blanks annexed to the said rules.
4. Whether it is expected that the Commissioners should print all the rules, &c.
5. The Commissioners desire to be furnished with the treaties with Sweden and Denmark. (See the Lord Treasurer's letter of 7 April, calendared ante, p. 21. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 151.]
April 8.
Newmarket.
H. Thynne to Williamson. Just now yours of the 7th came to me with the enclosed narrative of Sir J. Narbrough's action at Tripoli.
This afternoon his Majesty went to Euston, where he intends to stay till Monday. He had appointed Friday next for his remove from hence to the Duke of Albemarle's house, and thence on the Monday following to London, but whether the rain we now have may invite him to a longer stay is not yet known. [Ibid. No. 152.]
April 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday arrived a packet-boat which left the Brill Wednesday, but brought no news. If at Newmarket has fallen as much rain last night and this morning as here with a westerly wind, I believe it may incline to a longer stay there. [Ibid. No. 153.]
April 8. Caveat that no pardon pass for David Thomas, or for any forfeitures of his estate or recognizance without acquainting Sir Edmund Wyndham or his son, Thomas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 22.]
April 8.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin, to [Williamson]. Thanking him for all his great civilities and respects, and particularly for his last favour of the narrative of that very seasonable hit of Sir J Narbrough at Tripoli. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 26.]
April 9.
Drayton.
The Earl of Peterborough to Williamson. I have received a surprising order, such as Lord Cullen did not himself desire, to pay to him 490l. of the militia money, although it is not only restricted by the Militia Act to be expended entirely on the subsistence of the county troops, trophies, ammunition, salaries of officers of musters, etc., but is so small that it requires much management to suffice therefor. The money Lord Cullen aims at was from a month's tax granted some years ago for the militia, but afterwards reappropriated by Parliament to the King, part of which still remains with the treasurers, of which an account could very difficultly be obtained, and which I once begged for myself from the King, but by some mistake failed to obtain it. I have consequently no power over this money, but it is now wholly under the orders of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 154.] Enclosed,
Lord Cullen to the Earl of Peterborough. I had no intention to request anything that was in your hands, but as the town of Northampton begged for some money of the King's remaining in private hands, I applied for the same, and beg your approval, that I may get the money deposited with Sir Thomas Cave, and remaining in his son, Sir Roger's, hands. [Ibid. No. 154i.]
April 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.E., fair weather. No news. [Ibid. No. 155.]
April 9.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. There came in yesterday a barque from Limerick and another from Rochelle. Neither bring any news. Last Thursday night died Col. John Strangewayes at his house at Milborne Port about 16 miles from this, who was son of the late Col. Giles Strangewayes, and colonel of a regiment of foot militia of this county in the room of Col. Buishop, deceased, so that by the deaths of Col. Buishop and this Col. Strangewayes both burgesses' places in Bridport are vacant. A Mr. Boreman of London is likely to be in Col. Buishop's place. Last Thursday the wind came to the westward, and so has continued, so that we expect in ships from Virginia and elsewhere. [Ibid. No. 156.]
April 9.
Newmarket.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland for payment of 1,000l. sterling to the Marquis of Athole, Lord Privy Seal, out of the fines imposed by the Privy Council. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 438.]
April 9.
Newmarket.
Warrant for a gift to David, Earl of Northesk, his heirs and assigns, of the lands and barony of Cappeth, comprehending the dominical lands town and manor place of Inchtuthell as the same were sometime possessed by umquhile Francis, Earl of Erroll, and his tenants, and also all of the towns and lands of Drummathertie, Aird and Little Fardell and other lands with the salmon and other fishings, all in Perthshire, which formerly pertained to umquhile Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Inchmarten, umquhile William Ogilvy his second son, Sir James Strachan of Thorntowne, umquhile John, Earl of Middleton, or some of them, which now are in his Majesty's gift by reason of recognition, to be holden by the said Earl at the rents and services therein specified. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 439.]
April 9.
Newmarket.
Memorials of protection to Viscount Kingston, Patrick Hamilton of Little Prestoun, Sir Francis Ruthven and Andrew Skeen of Ruthriestown respectively, each for two years, except that to Hamilton, which is for three. [Ibid. p. 441.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Pass to Alexander Bruce who is going beyond the seas. [Latin. Ibid. p. 441.]
April 10.
London.
James Houblon to Williamson. In obedience to your commands I impart what we have from Sir John Narbrough, written from Marseilles, 7 April, by Mr. Lans, viz., that, a bark arriving there the 6th in 12 days from Malta, the padrone said that he left two English frigates there, who related that Sir John being to the eastward of Tripoli met with 4 Tripolines with whom he and only another ship so warmly engaged that he killed 600 men and pursued them into Tripoli where the government sent out to him to treat, and that he had concluded an honourable peace with them, they having delivered all the English slaves, &c. This we give credit to, because Sir John had dispatched convoys for Smyrna and Scanderoon in February and according to our advices from Malta, he left himself only two men-of-war. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 157.]
April 10.
Newmarket.
H. Thynne to Williamson. I return all the papers you sent Mr. Secretary except the States-General's answer to Sir W. Temple's memorial, Sir W. Temple's letter of 7 April, Sir L. Jenkins' letter of 29 Jan. and the Swedes' protest against the separate treaty betwixt England and Holland, all which Mr. Secretary thinks it necessary to be kept here, because there are so many of the Privy Council here that it's probable they may meet before his Majesty leaves this. They shall be kept safe and returned to you at my arrival at London.
His Majesty holds his resolution of leaving this on Friday, of making some stay at the Duke of Albemarle's and being in London Saturday evening. [Ibid. No. 158.]
April 10.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last week passed by a great many light ships to the northward, the wind being S.E. On Saturday last it came N. and blew hard and brought 14 sail into this bay, and yesterday morning they loosed and stood northwards. The wind is now much southerly. We have a very great drought, having had no rain these two months, but the little that fell last night. [Ibid. No. 159.]
April 10.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. No news. Fine springing showery weather, wind gentle at N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 160.]
April 10.
11 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. Since my last of Saturday night I have had nothing to trouble his Majesty with, no further foreign news being come, only this afternoon I have had sent me from the City from two several hands, men of good fashion on the Exchange, a piece of news about Sir John Narbrough, which I do not hear has come to any other hands but theirs. I enclose the papers of it, as I received them, and doubt not on so fair a prospect as our last from himself gave us but that this or better may in a post or two more come confirmed to us.
The Queen sent Sir Richard Beling to me this morning to desire his Majesty may be reminded her vessel, the Soudados, is now quite ready to sail, that is, next Saturday the Queen, as far as it depends on her, would give the captain orders to sail, and therefore her desire is that his Majesty would give order that Mr. Sheeres may have his dispatches finished for that time, if possible, if not, that at least all diligence may be used to get him ready as fast as possible, which I beg you will move his Majesty in and obtain such orders as are suitable to his pleasure therein, or that at least I may return the Queen an account by the first of my having acquitted myself of her commands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 89.]
April 10.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that by the report of himself and the Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer of 28 Feb. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 578) it appears there is still due to John, late Lord Kingston, deceased, 1,597l. 10s. a year and to him in trust for Edward Roberts 402l. 10s. a year, making in all 2,000l., and that by an order in Council of 1 Oct., 1675, the distribution of any lands in Ireland for making good deficiencies, &c. was forbidden, till the common stock of debt and credit, viz., the claims made and the lands in the King's hands to satisfy the same were cast up, and that, 23 Feb. last, the King had declared in Council he would exempt out of the said general rule the Duke of York and Lord Kingston concerning the reprizal due to them, and that the said Lord Kingston had, as Viscount Ranelagh was for valuable consideration interested equally with him in the said reprize, besought that the grant for the same might be passed to them jointly, and that the said Lord Kingston has since died and that his son and heir, Robert, now Lord Kingston, being under age, is incapacitated on a conveyance of the premises to execute a partition thereof, authorizing and requiring him, the said Duke being in the first place reprized and satisfied for the deficiencies due to him by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, to cause in the next place in preference to all others one or more effectual grants to be passed to the said Viscount and to Robert King, brother of the late Lord Kingston, in behalf of the said Robert, Lord Kingston, their heirs and assigns, or their nominees, and particularly the said 402l. 10s. to the said Edward Roberts, his heirs and assigns, of such and so many lands in Ireland vested in the Crown by the said Acts remaining yet undisposed of and applicable according to the rules of the said Acts to the late Lord Kingston's satisfaction as now are of the clear yearly value of 2,000l. over and above all quit-rents, charges and incumbrances in full satisfaction of the reprizals due to the said Lord and to Edward Roberts, to be held under the like yearly quitrents as are payable by Adventurers and Soldiers in the respective provinces in which such lands lie or such quit-rents as the Lord Lieutenant shall think fit, not exceeding the quit-rent to be reserved by the said Acts of the like quantity of lands in the provinces wherein the same lie, and authorizing him to issue such commissions as shall be necessary for finding out the title to and value of such forfeited and concealed lands. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 5.]
Draft thereof, dated 5 April, with note by the Lord Lieutenant that he approves thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 24.]
April 11.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of the 7th and 8th and showed the King the enclosed paper which Mr. Thynne will see carefully returned to you.
I find great endeavours will be used to have those men at Rye and Yarmouth set free, and it is told the King there was a standing order to disband the common men, whenever they were taken, and retain only the officer. If there be any such order, it is more than I know of, at least, I am sure, more than I remember, but his Majesty, I perceive, will give no directions in the matter till his own arrival, which is resolved to be on Saturday night. On Friday he lies at Newhall and dines there the next day. We have had no Committee of Council since our arrival, nor, I believe, shall before our departure. However I keep the papers mentioned in my last to be ready, in case any consultation should be resolved on. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 161.]
April 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news, but the continuance of an exceeding drought. [Ibid. No. 162.]
April 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arriving yester evening brought me the enclosed account from my friend at the Brill dated 17 April. The upper part is cut off being an account of some affairs betwixt him and myself. These two days the wind has been southerly and so continues. This morning close and foggy weather. [Ibid. No. 163.]
April 11.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday about post time arrived the Barnardiston and Cesar from the East Indies. They speak no news. The Barnardiston went up this morning, but the Cæsar is yet in the Downs. I thank you for Sir John Narbrough's news. Many gentlemen have seen it with great rejoicing. Scarce a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 164.]
April 11.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving similar news to the last. [Ibid. No. 165.]
April 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. Fair weather. No news. [Ibid. No. 166.]
April 11.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. This evening three French privateers are come in. [Ibid. No. 167.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 167 i.]
April 11.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. The wind continues W. Pleasant April weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 168.]
April 11.
Newmarket.
Warrant for swearing William Legge as Groom of the Bedchamber, but he is not to enjoy the profits thereof till the determination of the interest of one of the present Grooms and that of four other persons, grantees in reversion, or that of any five of them. [Precedents 1, f. 141.]
April 11.
Newmarket.
[Secretary Coventry] to Samuel Pepys. Directing him to inform the Lords of the Admiralty that it is his Majesty's pleasure there should be a stop of further proceedings in a process preparing against one Jackson in the Admiralty concerning piracy, till he comes to London, which is resolved to be next Saturday night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 37.]
April 11.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. The Industry of New England from Virginia arrived here Friday night, and last night set sail for Liverpool. Wind S.E., rainy weather. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 27.]
April 12. Receipt by John White to John Barker, reeve of the manor of Balderton, for 7l. 15s. 3d. for part of the rent due to the Queen for the same. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 169.]
April 12.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning the Cæsar weighed and is gone for the Thames. About 8 this morning a man-of-war of about 16 or 18 guns with a white ensign supposed to be French, chased a vessel not half so big and came within half a mile of her, keeping playing her chase guns. At last the small one hauled up her sails and the great one tacked and sailed eastward. Then the small one gave him a gun when the great one was a league from him, and the great one presently chased him again, and so they jeered one another about 3 hours in perfect view of Deal. The long glasses made the small one a Hollander. It blows fresh at S.E. [Ibid. No. 170.]
April 12.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 171.]
April 13.
9 p.m. Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of the 12th to-day since dinner, and have showed your papers to his Majesty and the Duke, and, if I can retrieve them this evening, shall bring them with me to London. I set out to-morrow, but shall not be there till Saturday. As to the business of Shrewsbury, a letter came from the Mayor 4 or 5 days since relating the particulars according to the Recorder's letter you enclosed. His Majesty commanded me to thank the Mayor for his care, but took no particular resolution what should be done. Possibly on his return it may be aired in Council. We have been almost all day, morning and afternoon, in the field, and his Majesty is at this time at the Cockpit by candlelight, and so farewell Newmarket. [Ibid. No. 172.]
April 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats arrived here about noon to-day I received this account, that the French after making so great a devastation in the land of Waes, and hovered about Ypres, as if they had intended to have sat down before it, suddenly marched and lay down before Valenciennes. The seamen and passengers on board from that land heard last night the noise of very many great guns. They say that the Spaniards, fearing for Ypres, had reinforced it with 4,000 men. The wind has been these two days and continues somewhat southerly of east, weather fair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 173.]
April 13.
Rye.
Michael Cadman, Mayor, and five others to Williamson. In pursuance of the orders concerning those going for soldiers beyond sea and stopped here, we have caused them to give 20l. bond to appear before the Council the 26th instant, which bond is enclosed, and we understand since the men are gone towards London in order to their appearance. Enclosed is also a petition lately delivered us from some seamen late in this harbour, which we heartily recommend to your wisdom for redress. The other persons that were going over sea, before the order came, were all gone except the 12 that gave the said bond. [Ibid. No. 174.] Enclosed,
The said bond. [Ibid. No. 174 i.].
Robert Cowley and seven others to the Mayor and Aldermen of Rye. Petition, showing that the petitioners being English subjects, commanders of several free ships now in that harbour belonging to his Majesty's subjects as by their passes and seabriefs may appear, when peaceably trafficking through the seas on their lawful occasions, have been by Dutch, French, and Ostend capers plundered of their goods on the coast of England, they having no respect to articles of peace, passes or anything else, and praying that by address to his Majesty or otherwise course may be taken for the defence of his subjects against those capers. [Ibid. No. 174 II.]
April 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. Rainy weather. Yesterday morning came to Spithead the Norwich which brought Lord Hamilton from Ireland bound for France to his command. They put in here by contrary winds, but about 5 or 6 in the evening, the wind coming fair, they set sail, and, as the wind stood, may be at their port this forenoon. [Ibid. No. 175.]
April 13.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 8th. Wind N.W. Fair weather. [Ibid. No. 176.]
April 13.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. We congratulate the good success of Sir John Narbrough in the Straits. On Monday, the wind coming N. and N.W., the ships that were here went out. Tuesday and yesterday, the wind being S. and sometimes S.E., eight of those for France were forced back again. Some other small vessels came in likewise. They talk of great preparations both at Ostend and in Britanny. They saw 7 or 8,000 Scotch and Irish landed at St. Valery, and about a place called Abdaville (Abbeville) some 20,000 soldiers ready for their march. [Ibid., No. 177.]
April 13.
London.
A proposal for the advancement of trade upon such principles as must necessarily enforce it, by Robert Murray and Company. The money current in his Majesty's dominions consisting only of foreign bullion, we cannot at all times secure sufficient to supply our occasions, so men are forced to stand still in their occupations. Money being no more than a deposit for such commodities as men part with, if in lieu thereof a credit can be raised on a substantial fund it will in all respects answer the use of money. Such is the credit we propose to issue, which all may easily obtain by depositing their dead stock on the terms of 6 per cent. per annum, to which purpose magazines are prepared at Devonshire House, Bishopsgate Without, for the reception of any goods for which credit shall be given to 2/3rds or ¾ths of their value, and, because it is intended to take deposits no longer than 6 months, all persons accepting the said credit may at the expiration of 7 months repair for payment to the aforesaid places, and at any time view the fund on which the credit is raised, and, if the goods deposited be not redeemed at or before the time contracted for, they shall be sold to the best advantage of those interested and the surplus made good on demand and in the meantime the credit being current, will be as serviceable as money itself. To render this credit current no more is required than what is practised in banks where men deposit money and obtain the bank credit, the money remaining in the cash chest or else being employed by the banker for his benefit, and, if he miscarry, the fund that should secure the credit is gone, and, whereas he receives money, we receive wares and merchandize, which are always to be found in the magazine and are not so liable to be embezzled, robbed or seized, wherefore it is a better security than a money bank. (With further explanations and illustrations.)
When the magazines, &c., now preparing are ready, notice shall be given in the City Mercury. [Printed by A. M. and R. R. for Dorman Newman at the King's Arms in the Poultry and Jonathan Edwin at the Three Roses in Ludgate Street. Licensed 13 April, 1676. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl of Peterborough. I had yours of the 9th about the sum assigned out of the militia money of Northamptonshire to Lord Cullen in reimbursement of the like sum laid out by him on certain services as one of the deputy lieutenants on his Majesty's command several years since. You are most right that it is meant to be out of the remainder of the month's tax, if any such there be, and not out of the week's tax which is appropriated to other uses by the law. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 90.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir George Downing. You will receive from Sir John Nicholas the order of the Board concerning passes, rectified in that point to which exception was taken by the Commissioners of the Customs. They may, if they please, cause the rules to be printed, taking care that all the copies be put into their hands. [Ibid. p. 91.]
April 13. Caveat that no grant pass for erecting presses for printing, &c., without notice to the Stationers' Company to be given to Mr. Newcombe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 23.]
April 14.
London.
[Sir J. Williamson?] to Madame Foster. I receive your letters very regularly, and thank you for those of the 3rd, 6th, 7th, 10th, 14th and 17th instant. Only continue to oblige me with the care of my little affairs, and sometimes add what passes in your quarters. I told you 8 or ten days ago that I would be ready to furnish the expenses of the journey you consider it fitting to make for the wines.
I care little for all you tell me of the conversations of certain people. I should be wretched enough, if the good or bad will of such persons could give me or take away from me people's esteem. I frankly admit, that, if such a conversation had been with me, I would not have believed I ought to co-operate with what is being done in that business. I would not have done it, had it been my brother. Mark the end of it. Time will show. [French except the words in italics. In the hand of one of Williamson's clerks. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 178.]
April 14.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Here has been more rain this morning than for several months. The wind has been to-day from S.W. to N.E. sunways about. [Ibid. No. 179.]
April 14.
Yarmouth.
Edmund Thaxter and Thomas Bradford, bayliffs, to Williamson. We have the order of the Council in yours of the 7th, and, before it came, we had taken security of Mr. Clinton to appear at our sessions, which being to-day he did accordingly, and, according to your order we have taken security in a bond of 100l. for his appearing before the Council the 26th instant. [Ibid. No. 180.]
April 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. That from Virginia reports that Col. Washington commanded a body who met the Indians. He fought them, beat them and drove them into their garrison which he took, and put all in it to the sword. [Ibid. No. 181.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 181 i.]
April 15.
Easton.
Lord Hatton to [Williamson]. Being here at Lady Grey's house near Northampton I received a letter from some of the jurats of Guernsey, by which I perceive that out of some particular piques between some of the officers of the garrison and some of the jurats they have troubled his Majesty and the Council with their little animosities, and, because our inferior officers had joined with merchants of the island in buying a French ship and goods brought in there by an Ostend privateer, they, I am informed, lay all that concerns that ship to the charge of the officers, and give such an account of the whole matter as the purchasers hope to make appear a very injurious one, when their agent, who is now at London to solicit for them, shall be heard. But these jurats, not content with this, of which an account was required of them, have thrust into their letter a complaint of my officers for having meddled with the goods of another ship which was cast away there, concerning which they had made some orders, which my officers complained to me of as injurious to them and to me, but, because I had rather those that depend on me should suffer some wrong than do wrong, I immediately ordered them to observe whatever the jurats should direct, and, had they not been more desirous to cavil than to receive a reasonable satisfaction, they could not but know before their letter was writ that I had so ordered my officers to do, but I am pretty confident that, before this answer to the Council came out of the island, my orders were not only received but observed. Therefore it is wholly their fault that his Majesty and the Council are troubled at all with this latter business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 182.]
April 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. None of our packet-boats have arrived since my last. Wind mostly N.W. and the day dark and cloudy. [Ibid. No. 183.]
April 15.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The Elizabeth of this port came last night into our road, letters by whom inform us that there has been lately a great mortality of men, women and children especially of the old Virginians. The distemper first a cold, then headache, fever and a pain across the stomach, some judging it cousin german to the plague. They report no new thing of late with the Indians, but at their first coming to Potopon, from which they last came, the Indians had been too hard for the English, killing near 200 of them with the loss of about 30 of theirs. This ship had 7 weeks and odd days passage. Tobacco was then 15s. per cwt. and scarce. The wind is now easterly and to the north of of that these 30 hours. [Ibid. No. 184.]
April 15.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. My last informed you of the death of Mr. Aldworth, our town clerk. To-day Mr. John Rumsey was elected in his place, a worthy person and of considerable interest in the loyal party here. [Ibid. No. 185.]
April 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Your two packets, one for Tangier, one for Argier, arrived this morning. Finding the Quaker ketch here ready to sail for Tangier I went to Captain Atkinson, her commander, and desired his care of that to Mr. Bland, and finding in the Downs 16 lorendrogers, I durst not venture the King's concerns with them, but desired Captain Atkinson's care in that to Algiers, who has promised to be very careful.
Notwithstanding the great care taken the loorendrogers are in abundance, the Downs never empty of them. The Greyhound and Quaker ketch are in the Downs and 17 others, of which 16 are loorendrogers. The wind is most uncertain, but now 2 p.m. N.N.E., a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 186.]
April 17.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Four light ships are at anchor in this bay, wind N.N.E. Last night we had some rain. [Ibid. No. 187.]
April 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., a fresh gale, fair weather. [Ibid. No. 188.]
April 17.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 189.]
April 17.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. This morning came in the Joan, of Falmouth, from Rochelle. They report that the French are fitting all their merchant ships thereabouts, for that King intends to load on his own account there, Morian (Marennes) and other ports of Britanny 15,000 tons of corn, as the report is there for the Sound, but some think for Messina. Several ships put to sea to-day for France, the wind N. A French man-of-war of 12 guns is come in here. She belongs to the squadron that cruises to the westward. They say 10 more are at sea, but they have not met with any purchase. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 190.]
April 17.
8 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. All things here are quiet, the weather very temperate and fair, wind S.E. blowing pretty brisk. [Ibid. No. 191.]
April 17. Presentation of Timothy Ellison to the rectory of Market Bosworth, co. Leicester, void by death of Abraham Spence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 83.]
April 17.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Nathaniel Herne, Governor of the East India Company. His Majesty, being informed that endeavours are using to have Mr. Childe and Mr. Papillon chosen Governor and Sub-Governor of the Company for the ensuing year, has commanded me to let you know they have behaved very ill towards him, and that therefore he should take it very ill from the Company, if they should choose them, which I am commanded to signify to you, to be forthwith communicated to the Company, as by his Majesty's order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 91.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 192.]
April 17. Caveat in favour of Lord Gerard and Mr. Wyndham that no grant or remittal pass of 1,000l. collected for trophy money in Yorkshire supposed to belong to the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 23.]
April 17.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Col. Roger Molyneux, showing that from the rising of the Scots to the end of the war he was in the King's service, spent above 16,000l. in raising and equipping soldiers, was never reimbursed and never received any pay or reward, and was sequestrated and imprisoned, and praying a grant of all prefines on all writs of covenant and entry in Chancery at the yearly rent of 1,000l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 100.]
April 17. Dispensation to George Llewellin, high sheriff of Montgomeryshire, to go into Salop or elsewhere on his private affairs. [Precedents 1, f. 141.]
April 17.
Dublin.
Susanna Durhame, his kinswoman, to Williamson. My husband and I are come hither from the island of Boffin, the furthermost place of this kingdom, in expectation of some comfortable news from you of an employment for him, several foot captains being lately dead. If you had spoken to the Lord Lieutenant no doubt a commission would have been given for him, his condition being well known to his Excellency. (Account of his appointment to Innis Boffin as in her letter of 11 May, 1675, calendared in the last volume, p. 114). His Excellency promised him an employment, but he has been out of the kingdom ever since. I will not repeat his services, sufferings, &c., or his Majesty's letters in 1660 and 1661, &c., but only again earnestly request you to effectuate something for him, the livelihood of me and my children depending much thereon. Lord O'Brien, now at Court, can give you an account of him, and, I am confident, will further what he can for his advantage. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 28.]
April 18.
Pall Mall.
H. Oldenburg to Williamson. To satisfy you further about the book in question I acquaint you more plainly than I could this morning that, as I told the bookseller, the book was very unfit, not only to be translated but to be vended in French, as looking like a libel against the King, so I considered, that, if I might do my duty to the public by preventing the dispersion of scandalous books, and yet show myself honest to private men, I should incur no blame. I reasoned that by restoring the book to the owner and forthwith informing you of the perniciousness of it, the matter could be duly inquired into by your authority, and I might have hereafter more such opportunities of discovering to you the like extravagancies, before they were divulged, which I thought I could not do, if I made men shy of me by seizing and keeping the books they brought me, in regard those mercenary men would then endeavour particularly to spread them much further than, methinks, they can do when they bring them to the licenser. But, if your prudence judges otherwise, I shall conform to your judgment, and immediately, when I meet with any such thing, attend you with it, and inquire carefully after the names of persons concerned and other circumstances requisite for better information, and so demonstrate to you more caution than I have done in this. I have spoken with the bookseller again, who assures me that Bremont is so confident of the harmlessness of his book, that he said, he would, as soon as he got any more, present one to the King himself, and that he intended to speak with me to know the reason of my refusal to license it, which if he had done, I should have dealt very roundly with him. I wonder also Lord St. Albans has not quarrelled with the author, who is a person, as now I hear, known at the Court, and whose lodgings the bookseller, Bentley, can direct to. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 193.]
April 18.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind these three days E. and N.E. [Ibid. No. 194.]
April 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday towards evening Sir Gabriel Silvius from Holland arrived here in one of our packetboats and after very small stay went for Ipswich. It is said the Prince of Orange is marched with great resolution to raise the siege of Condé. The wind all Sunday and Monday has blown very hard at E. To-day it is a little calmer and mostly northerly. [Ibid. No. 195.]
April 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 196.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 1961.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Grant to John Grove of the office of master plaisterer of the King's buildings in England during his life, fee 12d. per diem. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 162.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Privy seal for payment to Robert Knapp of 1,095l., payable by Sir William Barker of Bocking, Essex, on being made a baronet. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 162.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a privy seal, remitting to William Denny, rector of East Harling, Norfolk, 40l., being the King's moiety of the 80l., which he was condemned in for non-residence, the parsonage house being very unhealthy, and he having obtained a dispensation for non-residence from the Bishop of the diocese, and having resided within a mile and a half of the parish and performed the duties thereof. [Ibid. p. 163.]
April 18. The King to the Lord Mayor, Justices and Aldermen of London. Granting to John Price of Wansted, High Constable of the Hundred of Becontree, Essex, exemption from any parish office or other public duty or employment in the City of London, as long as he continues such High Constable. [Precedents 1, f. 141.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Holcroft Blood for his life of the offices of Clerk of the Peace and Clerk of the Crown in Clare, and, in case the same be not void, for a similar grant thereof to him in reversion. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 22.]
April 19.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. In a few days arrived here the Unity, Amity, John and Mayflower from Morlaix, the Windsor, Elizabeth and Adventure from St. Malo and the Samuel from Croisic. They advised that the French continue to raise what forces they can, the drums beating at all markets, and also a considerable number from Ireland are lately imported at Brest, it's said 5,000 men. Notwithstanding, the people are very full of murmuring for the continuance of the war, and wholly left off their humour of boasting of their great force and success, and are not without fears occasion may be given for a breach with England also, for they stop several of our ships, as now lately one of Bristol and one of Southampton on account of their late duty on tobacco, when they are merely designs made by their officers to trepan. A new duty is lately put on their brewers, whose vent is most for English shipping. The Newfoundland men from St. Malo were ready to sail, about 100 ships. The wind is now N., which brings several ships sailing near our shore; one we discover to be an Ostender of about 12 guns. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 197.]
April 19.
Milford.
John Powell to Williamson. Shipping news. The wind has been much inclinable to S. and E., and the season very good and forward to the husbandman. I desire to know the name of the gentleman that writes me the news, that I may return him my thanks. [Ibid. No. 198.]
April 19. The King to the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge and the other electors of the Lady Margaret's foundation. Because Dr. Thomas Stephens, who by abilities and learning is well qualified for the place of Lady Margaret's preacher, possesses a small benefice, dispensing with the statute, which requires the said preacher to have no other benefice, and with the obligation requiring him yearly to preach twelve sermons in twelve several places of the kingdom, and empowering them to choose him if they think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 194.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Sir J. Robinson. As the wife of Major Cobbet, prisoner in the Tower, complains that the allowance usually made to State prisoners is refused to her husband, asking the true state of the matter, both in general concerning allowances to State prisoners and particularly as regards Major Cobbet, that he may be able to give his wife a reasonable answer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 152.]
April 19. The King to the Governor, Deputy Governor and Assistants of the Eastland Company. Requiring them forthwith to admit William Linch, merchant, into the fellowship of the said company, he paying the 40s. required by the Act of 25 Car. II. for his admission, or otherwise to inform the King of their reasons for not doing the same. [Precedents 1, f. 142.]
April 19. Affidavit by Richard Prowd of Basinghall Street, merchant, that the Golden Phœnix of London is an English-built ship and is the same ship expressed in the certificate of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, dated the 11 April, and is now at sea on her voyage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 1.]
Similar affidavits by the following persons concerning the following ships, the only difference being that the ship is sometimes a foreign built ship made free. In case of a foreign built ship there is a certificate annexed of her having been made free.
Date. Name of Person. Name of Ship.
April 25 John Fuller Hopewell of Yarmouth.
" 25 Richard Boone Providence of Yarmouth.
" 25 Francis Kempe William and Elinor of York.
" 27 William Spilman Crown Lion of Yarmouth.
" 29 Mark Proudfoot White Fox of London.
" 29 Sir Thomas Gould Zebulon of London.
" 29 John Fuller Agreement of Yarmouth.
May 1 Francis Hunt Providence of Ramsgate.
" 3 James Thierry James of London.
" 3 Thomas Grimble Success of London.
" 3 Christopher Lyne Lilly of Yarmouth.
" 3 William Clarke Thomas of Yarmouth.
" 3 James Thierry Peter of London.
" 3 James Thierry Ewe and Lamb.
" 5 Martin Walker Mary of Whitby.
" 5 Thomas Nash Unity of Margate.
" 6 Thomas Clements John and Elizabeth of Rochester.
" 6 Sir William Warren Abraham of London.
" 8 Hugh Surrey Friends' Adventure of London.
" 9 William Fry Hopewell of London.
" 9 Arnold Browne Red Lion of London.
" 9 William Smith Anne of London.
May 10 John Slaney Friends' Adventure of London (different from the other ship of the same name.)
" 10 Thomas Elmhirst Pearl of Boston.
" 10 Francis Jaggard Industry of London.
" 25 Chamberleyn Donne Margaret of London.
" 26 George Turfrey Hope of London.
" 27 Stephen Bearcroft Hannah of Topsham.
" 29 Anthony Harispe James of London.
" 30 Richard Cotten Frog of London.
" 30 James Elson Endeavour of Boston.
June 2 Samuel Sowton Great St. George of London.
" 20 Martin James Hopeful Margaret of London.
" 24 William Fry Speedwell of London.
" 26 William Newnham Mayflower of London.
" 27 Peter Watson Hamburgh Merchant.
" 30 Edward Nelthorp Constant Friendship of London.
July 1 William Strode Peter of London.
" 1 Cary Ward Providence of London.
" 10 John Groenwaldt Great George of London.
Aug. 2 George Redshaw Owners' Goodwill of London.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 2-42.]
April 20. Detailed account [by Secretary Williamson] of the King's repeatedly sending for him, April 16, about the election of the governor and sub-governor of the East India Company, and declining to employ Secretary Coventry therein; of the king's also sending for the governor and a committee of the company, who blamed some of themselves for contriving all this for revenge; that some of the votes having been given in before the King's letter arrived, they knew not how to proceed, till the second letter was sent; with copies of the letters of April 17 and 21, calendared ante, p. 75, and post, p. 81. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 199.]
Draft by Williamson of parts of the above. [Ibid. No. 200.]
April 20.
Doctors' Commons.
Thomas Bedford to Williamson. On search in the Admiralty I find the Judge in respect to the Swedish pass found on board the Dolphin, the chief ship claimed the last war by the Swedes, which was taken July or August, 1672, going from Amsterdam for Stockholm, decreed she should be discharged on bail, but afterwards finding exceptions against the pass put the claimants to prove their property, and on failure condemned some of the goods, and the claimants, fearing he would condemn the ship, brought the whole matter before the Lords of Appeals and there insisted on the pass, and the Lords restored the ship, and his Majesty afterwards sent his order to them about the rest of the lading then remaining undetermined. I enclose copies of these orders and also of the pass that you may use them, by showing them to the Swedish ministers or sending them over thither to let them see how tender his Majesty was in proceeding to condemnation of ship or goods when a Swedish pass, though dated almost a year before capture, was found on board.
Very few Danish ships were taken the last war. The chief was the Thomas of Copenhagen, which presently after capture was restored by his Majesty's order of Feb., 1673[-4]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 201.]
April 20.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This noon arrived in the Downs a ship from Virginia in 30 days. They report that the natives there have risen and destroyed several English families and plantations and that they continue in a body, and, 'tis to be feared, will do much mischief.
Post time, 4 p.m. The wind varies divers times in a day, but is now scarce a topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 202.]
April 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 15th. Wind N. and cloudy weather. [Ibid. No. 203.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Hatton. I have yours of the 15th from Easton and shall make a fit use of what you write about the Guernsey complaints, as occasion shall arise. Something, I perceive, has been already done in a Guernsey cause, that looks a little like the thing in question, when I came into the Council Chamber yesterday. I have appointed an extract of the notes taken on that matter to be enclosed for your information, that you may give me your further commands in it, if there be cause. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 92.]
April 20. Caveat at the request of Lord Chief Justice North that no pardon pass to John Rawlyns, late of Westbury, Wiltshire, convicted before him for barratry, conspiracy and subornation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 23.]
April 21. — to Williamson, recommended to Mr. Benson's care. To-day, passing by Bentley's shop he told me he could now help me to one of the Hattiges, which I find to be a new edition and printed here. I immediately bought six, and enclose you a copy. I beg that no notice be taken that I give you this intimation that it is printed at London, but I am certain it is, both by the letter and correction. [Signature torn off. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 206.]
April 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 207.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 207 I.]
[April.] Notes in Williamson's hand about Hattige or Les Amours du Roy Tamerlain. Bremont is the author, dedicates it to Lord St. Albans. Printed in Holland. Bremont gave 16 to Bradley, a bookbinder in Covent Garden; of which he carried one to Oldenburg to have it licensed. Last Saturday Bentley went to Oldenburg to have his book again, which he refused, but told him that it would not be licensed. [Ibid. No. 208.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley to prepare an estimate of the charges of repairing the bridges in Hull garrison, that it may be presented to the Lord Treasurer for his allowance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 153.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Nathaniel Herne. His Majesty, having understood that my letter of the 17th (calendared ante, p. 75) came too late, the votes having been already delivered, and that nevertheless the Company have endeavoured, as much as in them lay, to pay all obedience to his intimation, but that they find themselves in great difficulties by reason of that incident, in his tender care for the privileges of the Company, which his meaning was not in the least to infringe, and which he will preserve and protect, has commanded me to signify that you proceed in the election now depending in your usual form according to your charter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 93.]
Copy and rough draft in Williamson's hand of the above letter dated 20 April, with note to the former that this letter was sent early next morning to the East India House by a messenger and delivered to Sir N. Herne, and to the latter that this is the very draft worded by the Lord Chancellor in the presence of the King and the Foreign Committee held on purpose for this business at Secretary Coventry's. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, Nos. 204-205.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the justices of assize for the Norfolk Circuit to cause Alice Phillips to be inserted in the next general pardon without any condition of transportation. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 163.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Roger L'Estrange, surveyor of the press, or his deputies or any of the messengers to search for an unlicensed book called Hettige, or Les Amours du Roy de Tanamar nouvelle and for the author, printer or publishers of the same, and to bring them before Secretary Williamson or a justice. Minute. [Ibid. p. 164.]
April 21. Pass to Anthony Greene to go to Holland with two servants. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 143.]
April 21— Sept. 25. Thirty-seven certificates by Robert Bertie between the dates in the margin that the ships respectively therein named had certificates from the Commissioners of the Customs in pursuance of the treaties with Spain and the United Provinces. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 43-79.]
April 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Apologizing for not having written on Thursday. Yester-morning arrived one of our packet-boats and brought no news but the confirmation of the Prince's march. Wind these two or three days and still much northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 380, No. 209.]
April 22.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. To-day a Dunkirk man-of-war of 10 guns, 12 petureros, as they call them, and 90 men was suddenly surprised as he anchored in our bay by 3 Dutch men-of-war, who coming about Dungeness fell all three on him, before he had time to get up his anchor. The men are all set on shore here. [Ibid. No. 210.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir John Godolphin, Vice-Admiral of Cornwall. Whereas we are informed that the Arms of Waterford, lately taken by a French privateer and brought up to St. Ives, is now in the possession of some of your officers, and that there is a suit depending in the Admiralty concerning the propriety of her and her lading, and that the said lading is daily embezzled and sold, you are immediately to send strict orders to the persons in whose custody the ship and goods are that they not only take all possible care to prevent such selling or embezzlement but preserve the same safe till the propriety thereof shall be determined. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 27.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Col. Francis Willoughby, and Elizabeth, his wife, for an assignment of their pension of 300l. per annum on the 40,000l. reserved to his Majesty over and above the ordinary establishment of Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 102.]
April 22.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for the delivery to Andrew Holmes, appointed one of the Falconers in ordinary in place of John Howard, deceased, of the following parcels for his livery, viz., 3 yards of broad cloth at 15s. a yard, 3¼ yards of fustian for a doublet at 3s. 4d. a yard, ½lb. of silk lace at 3l. 4s. the lb., 2oz. of sewing silk at 3s. the oz., 3 dozen of buttons at 6d. the dozen, one pair of silk garters price 10s., one hat with a band price 13s. 4d. and one pair of worsted stockings price 10s., and for the delivery every year at the feast of All Saints of the like parcels of stuff for his livery. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 31.]
April 22– Sept. 25. Thirty-eight certificates by William Jackson of the Custom House, London, between the dates in the margin, that the persons therein named had given security for delivering up their passes within one year of the respective dates thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 80-117.]
April 23. The examination of Richard Bentley. Sebastian Bremont about a month since brought 6 of the Hattigé to the examinate to be bound, two in Turkey leather for presents to Lord St. Albans, as he pretended, and the others in marble, acknowledging himself the author. Some three days after, coming to fetch them away when bound, he brought 24 more in quires and rated them at 14d. a piece, desiring the examinate to sell them for him. He, finding the sale quick, innocently intended to have it translated, but being informed there were ill things in it, he went to Bremont and told him he heard it was a dangerous book. Bremont replied, they very much mistook his book, there was no harm in it, and he had a second part, which he intended to print in England and have it licensed, and asked if he thought him such a fool as to put his name to it and dedicate it to a person of quality, if he could not justify it. He likewise told the examinate, that he had a hundred more coming over, and the examinate 14 days ago saw him writing on the second part, which he said, would be ready in a week. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 1.]
April 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The gunner of a loorendroger, which had procured his Majesty's pass, an Englishman but gunner in the late war with the Dutch in one of their flagships, his commander and he falling out at sea, in revenge, when he had lain some days in the Downs, came ashore and reported to the Deputy of Deal that the said commander had spoken at sea very treasonable words against his Majesty, whereon the Deputy sent yesterday or Friday night both master and gunner to the Mayor of Sandwich, who, 'tis reported, keeps both in prison, and last night I was informed that he had given a fuller account than I can to one of the Secretaries of State. But by report of all who know the gunner he is a greater enemy than a Dutchman, and he reports, if a war present, he will serve the Dutch against the English, and he is a very debauched drunkard and a great swearer.
No other ship is come from Virginia since my last to confirm the insurrection of the natives there, but news from other places confirms what I lately wrote.
The winds continue contrary, so that no news can come from sea. It blows very fresh at N.N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 2.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Richard Stratford setting forth that by the Act of Explanation he was to be satisfied 3,000l., a debt due to him, out of 30,000l. thereby due to his Majesty, which was to have been paid in 1666, but has been omitted, and, as the levying of the said 30,000l. has been directed, praying letters to the Lord Lieutenant for the levying and paying to him of his said 3,000l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 102.]
April 24.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last week came into this bay 10 light colliers, the wind at N. and N.N.E. being contrary for their loading ports. Last night they loosed, the wind being S., and this morning it is S.W., with some rain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 3.]
April 24.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here a ship of this town from Crokery (Kragero) in Norway which came thence last Wednesday, who can give small account of the affairs of that country, only they were drawing up their forces for land service at Christiania, and that they were fitting out a man-of-war for the Crown service at Long Sound and another at Christiansand. He could give no account of the Dutch fleet bound for that country or the Baltic, which was expected the first good wind. That coast, according to expectation, was not infested either by Swedes or French privateers, scuits coming in daily laden with corn from Jutland to Norway as in times of peace. They very much dreaded that country should want corn, insomuch that the King of Denmark had wholly taken off the custom from all grain coming into Norway.
As to affairs in these parts, all are very healthful. Under the new Lord Lieutenant as yet no alteration in the militia near this. Winds to-day and yesterday N.N.E., some days before E. and E.S.E. [Ibid. No. 4.]
April 24.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. In a letter from one Conley of London to Joseph Goose of this town he writes that the Duke of York, being troubled in conscience for concealing his judgement, had now declared he was a Roman Catholic and would live and die in that judgement. Our town chose several to wait on Lord Paston to congratulate him on his new honour of Lord Lieutenant of this county, who were nobly entertained by him. [Ibid. No. 5.]
April 24.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Dragon of London from Jamaica. They tell us all things are in a very good condition there, and the place flourishes. Last Thursday appeared off the Manacles a fleet of about 60 or 70 sail and continued in sight of this place, sometimes very near, till Saturday noon, moving only with the tide, it being very calm, and the wind that was all at East. At last we understood they were the grand party with three men-of-war. Wind N.W. Other shipping news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 6.]
April 24.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last Thursday and Friday was seen off this harbour a great fleet of about 50 or 60 sail, the wind blowing very mild at N.E., so they were seen off Plymouth by a vessel, that came in to-day from London, yesterday morning. They came through them, yet did not speak with any of them, but most of them were flyboats, and they judge them the Dutch fleet from St. Tubus.
The 22nd came in here the Eleanor of Dover from Rochelle with corn for Rotterdam. They have been 15 days at sea, so wanted both beer and water. They were at Morian (? Marennes), when order came from the King that no corn should be loaden before the three great ships there were loaden, so that all small vessels were pressed to carry corn on board them, so that this vessel was forced to come to St. Martin's to take in the rest of her lading and several other vessels there must do the like or stay till they are loaden. The report was that they were bound for Toulon and Marseilles. (Concerning the Dragon as in the last letter.) [Ibid. No. 7.]
April 24.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. No news. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 8.]
April 24. Licence to William Legge, Groom of the Bedchamber, and cornet in the Earl of Oxford's troop of horse in his own regiment, to travel to France and remain there for 8 months, with two servants, their pay being continued to them during their absence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 156.]
[April ?] Sir William Petty and Robert Marshall to the King. Petition stating that the petitioners acquiesce in several orders and warrants lately made concerning the moderating of quit-rents on coarse and insolvent lands in Ireland, but beg his Majesty either to settle in England or to empower the Lord Lieutenant to settle in Ireland the following particulars:—1. That misnomers, double charges and other mistakes in their patents or certificates may be examined and amended according to truth. 2. That a valuation be made of the said lands according to such rules and orders as the Lord Lieutenant and Council or Commissioners thereunto appointed shall think reasonable and that an account be made up of what the petitioners have really enjoyed, as also of what has been disposed of by his Majesty by seizures, custodiums or otherwise. 3. That his Majesty would settle the measure of the said lands to be either according to the reduced column or extreme column of the survey, the same being of great importance in sundry matters, but of far the greatest to his Majesty. 4. That the petitioners may have allowance and reprizal, 1, for lands twice reckoned, 2, for mortgages and chieferyes saved on their certificates, 3, for lands inserted in their certificates by mistake which belong to others, 4, for lands which they themselves forbore to accept and which are yet undisposed of by reason they were not worth the acreages lying upon them. 5. That the seizures may be forthwith taken off, the petitioners promising to answer anything which appears due on the intended settlement of this affair and the balance of all accounts relating to it. On the other side,
April 24.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report that it may be for his Majesty's service that some speedy course be taken to have the said matters jully examined and settled in Ireland according to justice and equity. 24 April. Northumberland House, and
Reference of the above report to the Lord Treasurer. 26 April, Whitehall, and
His report agreeing with the Lord Lieutenant's report. 27 April, Wallingford House. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 29.]
Other copies of the above petition, references and report of the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, pp. 103-105.]
April 24. Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the reference to him of Col. Willoughby's petition, calendared ante, p. 82, certifying the grant of a pension of 300l. per annum to the petitioner and his wife and the survivor of them, with a clause for inserting the same on the present or future establishment for Ireland, and that the new establishment for Ireland is now closed and that no provision is made for the petitioners therein, and conceiving that, if his Majesty is pleased to make good the said pension to the petitioner, the establishment being now signed, the most effectual way to secure it will be for his Majesty to grant him the same, which his Majesty may do, out of the surplusage of the growing rents which the new farmers of the revenue in Ireland are to pay over and above the charge of the present establishment. On the back,
Reference thereof to the Lord Treasurer. 26 April. Whitehall, and
His report agreeing with the above report, in case his Majesty shall make any further addition to the present establishment, and, as an inducement thereto, informing his Majesty that, besides the letters patent passed with the clause of being inserted on the present and future establishments, his Majesty commanded him to assure the said colonel's wife that payment should be made accordingly and commanded him to write his Majesty's pleasure therein to the Lord Lieutenant about 12 months ago. 2 May, Wallingford House. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 30.]
Other copies of the above report of the Lord Lieutenant and of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, pp. 105, 106.]
[April ?] The Principals and Masters of Arts of the Halls in the University of Oxford. Petition stating that the late king to avoid inconveniences and disturbances in the election of Proctors caused a cycle to be made, that the colleges in their turns should choose a proctor, and provided statutes for regulating such elections, one of which was that no person should be admitted proctor who had not completed 4 years after his standing in the Act or should exceed 10, that never was any person chosen and admitted proctor who was not so qualified till after the late rebellion, and that the admission of the few since elected under four years standing has always been protested against by the principals and masters in those societies as unstatutable, that they might preserve their right, and praying his Majesty's decision as to the true meaning of the said statute. On the back,
April 25.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Ormonde, the Bishops of London, Durham, and Rochester, and the Secretaries of State, whose meetings are to be attended by the King's Advocate. With note at foot, appointing Thursday in Whitsun week to hear the matter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 9.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 104.]
[April ?] Statement by the Principals of the Halls of their reasons for conceiving that no M.A. is capable of being proctor who is not of 4 years' standing, adding that the Statute concerning the standing of M.A.'s eligible to be proctors (not to be less than 4 or more than 10 years) was made about 1573, from which till 1648, when the Parliament's Commissioners interposed to make proctors, there was no proctor who was not at the time of his being chosen and admitted of such standing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 10.]
April 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. About the changes of the wind and the departure of three vessels of that place. [Ibid. No. 11.]
April 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived last Sunday, but brought no news. This morning we see the Kingfisher under sail for Sheerness, with the wind W.N.W., the weather with small rain inclining to gusts yesterday and to-day. [Ibid. No. 12.]
April 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Those from St. Tubies (Ubes) laden with salt came from St. Tubies here without convoy, where they are resolved to wait till they have got convoy. Two of them sank, the men being all preserved. [Ibid. No. 13.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 13 i.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Robert Bloome, merchant, in behalf of himself and the rest of the owners of the Bachelor's Adventure of Hull, which stated that on her voyage homewards from the Baltic she was forced by stress of weather into Malstrand, a Swedish port, near which his Majesty's army then lay, where she was stopped by his Majesty's order, his army wanting corn wherewith she was partly laden, that the master inquiring the cause of her detention was told that the King of Sweden needed the corn and would buy it, and that he was forced to deliver at an agreed price, viz., 13,800 rix dollars to be paid on delivery, but that no part of that money has been received, and the ship is still constrained to lie in the same port for want of it, and prayed his Majesty's mediation therein; that Secretary Williamson do effectually recommend the petitioner's case to the Resident of Sweden here and to his Majesty's Resident at Stockholm, that full satisfaction may be made for the corn and for the damages caused by the stay of the ship. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, Nos. 14-15.]
April 26
[Received and read].
Replication of Sir John Shorter and others, owners concerned in the 4 ships taken and destroyed by the Dutch in the Elbe, to the answer of Sir William Holcroft, Thomas Tyte, Thomas Farrington and Edward Deering. They believe Sir W. Holcroft, Sir Philip Lloyd and Mr. Thomson have acted only as commissioners and not as proprietors, and it is likewise confessed that Tyte, Dering, Farrington and Bancks were interested in the said loss and Bancks is a petitioner with Sir J. Shorter. But the repliants deny that the four respondents have signed all just warrants, and say that, instead of reserving the sums allotted to the just claimants, they have assumed a power to give large sums as particular gratuities, viz., 500l. to the said Tyte and 250l. to Samuel Missenden, and they deny that they say in their petition that the Judge of the Admiralty had allowed 1,340l. 9s. 4d., whereas they do apply that sum to the order and instructions of his Majesty in Council, ordering that as to the freight provision should be made for the satisfaction thereof in such moderate proportion as may all come within the said sum. As to the error pretended in the account, though the repliants have no reason to apprehend there was one, they take themselves not to be concerned therein, being only owners of the ships, and their sum of 1,340l. 9s. 4d. being particularly mentioned to be distributed for the freights with equality to each owner. As to their pretending no interest or satisfaction for loss of market is considered to them, the repliants would think it very happy for their loss to receive but one-third of their principal freight, whereas all other interessants have received their full satisfaction, which had the repliants received, they had received a great deal more than the sums allotted them. Whereas they pretend the ships never performed their voyage, and therefore would debar them of their freight, the repliants cannot imagine they should be so unreasonable as to let the repliants be losers of that little freight allowed, they having received all their demands in full.
The repliants therefore again beg his Majesty to reinforce his instructions for their relief in the payment of the said 1,340l. 9s. 4d. so due to them for freight, and that a day may be appointed for them to be heard and relieved. [Ibid. No. 16.]
April 26.
Thetford.
Thomas Gooch, Mayor, to Williamson. When you vouchsafed us the honour and advantage to choose you as our representative, it was far beyond our hopes that we had made ourselves happy in the choice of a patron also. Your liberality has supported us, and assures us by a letter from your own hand of being made able to conquer our present necessities, which are now very urgent upon us by the decay of two of our chief bridges. We desire and hope to be as sensible of this and all other your favours as gratitude obliges us, but are able at present to return only our humble and hearty thanks. I have desired my friend, Mr. Owen Croft, a woollen draper, to wait on you to receive your beneficence and to give a receipt for it to the use of the corporation of Thetford. My father [-in-law], Mr. Martyn, presents his humble thanks for the favour of your last, and hopes shortly to do it himself, for he is in a fine way of recovery. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 17.]
April 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day the John of London arrived from Maryland. They report that the natives have done very much mischief and destroyed many plantations. The ship stayed not, so I have not particulars. She is sailed for the Thames. Little wind at S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 18.]
[April 26.]. Martha, wife of Edmund Clerke of Winton, to the King and the Privy Council. Petition. Having brought her husband a portion of 1,000l., and had 300l. a year settled on her as jointure, he now beats her, denies her necessaries and threatens to kill her, as she conceives at the instigation of some persons who have got his whole estate made over to them, from whom he has obtained a very fair estate for himself, but she is left without any place of abode or subsistence. The common law being defective in her case, and the spiritual courts not extending to the estate, but only to the person, she begs his Majesty and the Privy Council for relief. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. 12, p. 199.) [Ibid. No. 19.]
April 26. Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley for the delivery of 50 barrels of powder for Jamaica. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America &c. 1675-6, p. 382.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 153.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Philip and Sir Edward Carteret, gamekeepers in Jersey. Whereas the game in Jersey is much destroyed by persons with greyhounds, mongrels, setting dogs, guns, nets and other engines in breeding time and other unfit seasons, they are to suffer no persons whatsoever to shoot or destroy the said game from the beginning of February to the latter end of October for three years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 28.]
Note of the above letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 20.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley for the delivery as a free gift to Thomas Wyndham, Groom of the Bedchamber, of 6 iron threepounders formerly taken in Dutch prizes, to be put on board a merchant ship, now going to the Straits, belonging to him and other subjects, to preserve her from the Sallee pirates. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 27.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Instalment of the first fruits of the Bishopric of Oxford amounting to 343l. 7s. 11d. to John Fell, D.D., elected and confirmed bishop of the see, to be paid in 4 years by 4 equal portions, the first payment to be made on Lady Day, 1677. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 47, p. 27.]
[April ?] Note that the Bishopric of Oxford is worth 381l. 11s. 0d., and subtracting therefrom a tenth, 38l. 3s. 1d., 343l. 7s. 11d. remains and that for this sum the last two bishops compounded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 21.]
April 26. Notes by Williamson concerning the case of Jackson, the alleged pirate, giving reasons why his commission was not good, and that it was proposed that the claimers be put in possession of the ship and goods upon security to Jackson, and Jackson to give security to answer the embezzlements, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 133.]
April 27. Giles Ivy to [Williamson]. Returning his most hearty thanks for his letter in his behalf to Sir W. Petty, which not taking the good effect his Honour desired, by reason of his deserting his interest in the farm of the Irish revenue, he humbly prays his Honour to write to the same effect to Sir James Shaen, one of the farmers of the Irish revenue, to be communicated to the rest of them, to find out an employment fit for the writer under them in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 22.]
April 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boats setting out from the Brill most commonly in the afternoon very rarely get in here by noon next day, so we seldom have anything to write by Thursday's post. Yesterday and to-day the wind has been southerly with summerly weather. [Ibid. No. 23.]
April 27.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 22nd. Wind S.S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 24.]
April 27.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Monday came in the Merlin yacht, bound for Minehead to transport Lord Burlington for Ireland, and turned out again next day. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 25.]
April 27– July 13. Eighteen original bonds given by various persons between the dates in the margin for the delivery up within a year of the respective dates thereof of passes granted to various ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 118-135.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Mayor of Sandwich. The King has considered the letter from him and the Jurats and the charge brought by Edward Phillips, gunner, against Frederic Sweers, captain of the Duke of York, of speaking scandalous and opprobrious words against the King, and commends their prudence, but as there is only one witness, and he not much to be relied on, and the words are so gross, false and insolent that a man fit to be trusted with the command of a ship could scarcely be thought impudent enough to utter them, Captain Sweers is to be released and allowed to proceed on his voyage and Phillips to be dismissed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 152.]
April 27. Grant to Mr. Montgomery to be a poor knight of Windsor. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 142.]
April 28. Order in Council that a copy of the replication of Sir John Shorter and others concerned in the four ships taken and destroyed by the Dutch in the Elbe to the answer of Sir William Holcroft, Thomas Tyte, Thomas Farrington and Edward Deering, read at the Board that day, be sent to the said Sir W. Holcroft and the rest, and that all parties attend the Board 3 May, when his Majesty has appointed to hear that business. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 26.]
April 28. Statement of the voting at the election to the Fellowship on the old foundation at Peterhouse, vacant by the death of Mr. Sammes, the candidates being Charles Otway and John Wogan, the former receiving four votes of the Fellows including that of Mr. Witty, the Dean, and the latter five, with declaration by the Master that he voted for Otway and that, as Mr. Witty, one of the Deans, agrees with him, Otway is elected for a year of probation. [Latin. Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 27, 28.]
April 28.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind these last three days southerly with some showers, now S.W. and by W. [Ibid. No. 29.]
April 28.
Harwich.
William Smith to Williamson. I arrived here about noon, but, the wind being a little contrary, could not get out of the harbour till about 9 at night. Capt. Taylor hired me a vessel. [Ibid. No. 30.]
April 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived Capt. Grantom of London and two more ships from Virginia. They all report that Maryland has been much disturbed by the natives, divers plantations being by them destroyed and people murdered. They have ventured to Rappahannack in Virginia and there done mischief also, but it is reported they are beat again into the woods. Letters to that purpose came from the Governor's family in Virginia to some of their near relations living near Deal.
Not a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 31.]
April 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 32.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 32 I.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower, to release Col. Henry Danvers, whose health is much impaired, on his giving 1,000l. security to surrender himself when required and to remain in the meantime confined to his own house, and to behave according to the laws. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 153.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
On the petition of the daughters of Col. Thomas Neville, deceased, praying his Majesty to recommend to the Lord Mayor and the Court of Aldermen the stating of their father's accounts and the payment of what shall appear to be due to him as collector of the duty of 12d. in the pound on coals, recommendation of them to the favour and kind treatment of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 107.]
April 28. Account of moneys due to Bevil Skelton for extraordinary disbursements from 28 Dec., 1675, to 28 March, 1676, allowed that day by Secretary Williamson.
£ s. d.
Mourning for myself to wait on the Prince of Orange, whose Court was then in mourning for his grandmother 15 0 0
Convoys in the journey from Arnheim to Ratisbon being a trumpeter and 4 troopers 40 0 0
Mourning for myself and secretary for the Electress of Bavaria 25 0 0
Intelligence and other extraordinaries 50 0 0
Putting my family into mourning for the Empress, viz., a valet de chambre, a page, 6 footmen, a coachman and coach about 100 0 0
230 0 0
[Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 164.]
April 28. Grant to Sir John Ernley of the offices of Chancellor and UnderTreasurer of the Exchequer during pleasure, with revocation of the grants of the same to Sir John Duncombe. Minute. [Ibid. p. 165.]
April 28. Grant of the clerkship of the Pipe to Edward Villiers for the lives of his brothers Charles and George and the survivor of them in reversion after Sir Robert Crook in possession and after a grant to Hugh Clifford in reversion. Minute. [Ibid.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Pass to William Legge, Groom of the Bedchamber, for transporting 7 geldings and one stone horse into France. [Precedents 1, f. 143.]
April 28. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the case of Whitchot and Holt. Whitchot asks that Holt may be put out of the King's palace that he may take him. Holt insists he ought not, because, if he were out, Whitchot could not take him, that is, Whitchot's remedy lies not against Holt. N.B.—A deputy makes his principal answerable, but an assignee is answerable in himself. A gaoler consenting to an escape of his prisoner cannot retake the same prisoner, but the creditor may, for the knavery of the gaoler cannot discharge the creditor's debt. Holt never was in Whitchot's custody, but was in Duckinfield's. Duckinfield is fled, who made the agreement with Holt. Whitchot now disallows the agreement and presses to take Holt. Duckinfield had a freehold in the office, and all is good that he did. Holt gave 1,000l. to Duckinfield and had his discharge, and paid 500l. to Plummer, the creditor, and but 300l. remains. Whitchot having made an ill bargain with Duckinfield rakes up all these titles as in Duckinfield's right. Mr. Attorney for Whitchot.—He has been the King's servant 12 years, and has been a bankrupt. Whitchot is by law like to be made liable for 100,000l. of escapes in Duckinfield's time. Query: All Duckinfield's title is his also? Query: Duckinfield's release to a prisoner could not take a prisoner out of Whitchot's hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 141.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting the petition of Sir W. Petty and Robert Marshall and the Lord Lieutenant's report thereon, calendared ante, p. 84, and that the Lord Treasurer agrees with the said report, authorizing and directing him to cause the matters therein mentioned to be fully examined and settled according to justice and equity. Sign-manual. Counter-signed " J. Williamson." [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 31.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 10.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting the petition of Capt. Charles Ashburnham, which stated that he bought himself a foot company in Ireland, and, being fixed there about 3 years in the old establishment, he and his company were commanded into England and thence into France to serve under the Duke of Monmouth, where he has since continued, and that in his absence his place in the old establishment was filled up by a new man and he and his company left out and prayed that he might have the first company falling in Ireland, and till one shall so fall he may be set down there to receive his captain's pay, a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report of 17 March last that Lord Ranelagh and his partners have cleared with the petititioner and his company to 12 January, 1672–3, and no further, and that nothing is since due to him out of the last Irish establishment, so, if captain's pay is allowed to him from that date to the beginning of December last, being about the date of his new commission for a foot company, it will amount to about 390l., which may be ordered to be paid either out of the advance money payable on the farm of the revenue or out of the surplusage of the growing rents there, and that the Lord Treasurer on a subsequent reference to him agreed with this report, in case the King thinks fit to dispose either of the advance money or growing rents to any other uses than those already designed; in regard the moneys mentioned in the report are already appropriated to other uses, recommending him particularly to endeavour to find out something in Ireland that may answer the sum specified in the report, and, having done so, to give effectual orders for the same to be paid to the said captain. [Ibid. p. 21.]
April 29.
Pall Mall.
H. Oldenburg to Williamson. Returning the deputation received from him some time ago for giving licences for books of a political nature, because persons have been busy to impress on Williamson's mind disquieting suspicions concerning his affection to the Government, and also because of the tenderness of the employment and the vast expense of time it requires. He has said so much already on other occasions as to that one unhappy amorous romance, that he need not add more. He is still ready to serve him in Englishing such papers as he has hitherto done, and in Latinising such letters as he may have occasion to dispatch abroad. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 33.]
April 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday evening arrived one of our packet-boats. The master informs me that the taking of Condé by the French has struck amazement in the Hollanders, who say the first have set the greatest part of Flanders under contribution. (Concerning his difficulties in procuring a vessel for Mr. Smith, and his finally hiring one from Capt. Langley for 16l.) The master received orders to land Mr. Smith, if possible, at Scheveling, which is but about half an hour from the Hague, and that he himself should attend him thither, that, in case the Ambassador should dispatch Mr. Smith back again, the same vessel without stop or stay may return with him. Capt. Langley intends shortly to direct the receiving the money for this vessel according to your appointment.
The wind was yesterday and still continues southerly. I hope Mr. Smith will reach the Hague this afternoon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 34.]
April 29.
Harwich.
Capt. Thomas Langley to Williamson. Informing him of the hire of his vessel, &c., as in the last, and requesting him to cause one of his servants to advise him where he is to call for his money. [Ibid. No. 35.]
April 29.
Deal.
George Lodge for his master, Mr. Lodge, to Williamson. This morning here are two Virginia men come home, and several other ships bound to the East country. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 36.]
April 29.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 27th arrived here the Samaritan of Bridgwater in three days from Rotterdam, who met between Dungeness and Fairlee (Fairlight) three Dutch men-of-war, which took a French privateer of 22 guns and ran two shallops off Beachy ashore, but fetched them off afterwards and carried them all away. Wind at W. and N.W. [Ibid. No. 37.]
April 29. Notes by Williamson of proposals for the settlement of volunteers in the Navy. First and second rates, the King says nothing. Third rates, 4, Fourth rates, 3, Fifth rates, 2, Sixth rates, 1. Not above 16 to be volunteers in future unless they have been already in service. Captains Courtney and Foulis would never have been seamen. On a vacancy in the number of volunteers, those that have served formerly as such to be preferably received. Besides an ordinary ship's man's allowance an addition to make it 24l. per annum. The commanders may victual the volunteers at their table and have their allowance, or leave them to themselves. No volunteer a servant at the King's charge. Whoever has served as captain or lieutenant and not charged with failure in duty, shall be capable to be a midshipman and a servant allowed on the King's pay. No cabins to be built for volunteers or midshipmen besides the cabins established by the rules, 1673. No officer to be dispossessed of his cabin in favour of any of these volunteers or midshipmen. One formerly a volunteer or midshipman, if he pretends to be received in a succeeding voyage in that quality, shall produce certificates of his sobriety and proficiency (?). They and servants to be reputed as supernumeraries in the ships they serve in.
Corderius was tutor or Latin Master to Calvin. Calvin made on Rablesius, Rabie Læsus, Rablesius on Calvin, Jan Cul. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 145.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of the Duke of Monmouth and the Lord Lieutenant's report thereon, calendared in the last volume, pp. 497, 498, and that the Lord Treasurer agrees with the said report, transmitting a list of the leases mentioned in the schedule to the said petition, and directing him to examine which of the lands contained therein or in a former schedule mentioned in the petition remain undisposed of by letters patent, and requiring and authorizing him, of such as remain in the King's hands to cause grants to be passed by letters patent to the said Duke and his heirs to be held under such rents as the same during the continuance of the leases thereof are or were liable, to commence from the determination of any of the said leases. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 13.] Annexed,
The said schedule containing particulars of numerous leases in several counties, the yearly rents of which amounted to 185l. 1s. 3d. [3½ pages. Ibid. p. 15.]
Draft of the above warrant, dated 28 April. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 32.]
April 30.
Hart Hall [Oxford].
Dr. John Lamphire to Williamson. These lines are to salute you and to thank you for my timely dismission. When his Majesty determines the business of the Halls in relation to the Proctorship in controversy, please signify it to Dr. Lamplugh.
I shall desire you to accept of a small present, two Thames silvergrig pies. They are rarities with us, and only at this time of the year they run. Robin Harper is the artist. I would have had them baked on Dr. Gregorie's sermon stiled [Grigoreite], if I could have met with it. It is fit for nothing else. If you can meet with it, it is stuffed with all the words of Gregorius magnus, only he has left out the Thames grig. They are sent up by Barkley's wagon and will be in London, Tuesday. His inn is at Oxford Arms, Warwick Lane. Our sauce is a good stomach and vinegar. The lamprey pie is inferior. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 381, No. 38.]
April 30.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon at Sandwich a boy beating or burning straw in an oast as we call it, under a great deal of malt, by boyish carelessness set the straw, oast and malthouse at a sudden on fire, and burnt most of the malt-house and part of the dwelling-house and two stacks of deal boards and some other harm. We judge the damage to be about 300l. In putting out this fire five or six men were desperately wounded with the fall of a wall, timbers, &c. This loss happened to Edward Fellows, a good churchman. About the same time in the parish of Ripple, about three miles from Deal towards the south-west, another fire happened at the outhouse of John Fox, a blacksmith, by the carelessness of his wife keeping also a straw fire. The straw caught alight of a sudden and burnt down the dwelling-house, shop, outhouse and barn to the ruin of the smith, and yet the whole value not above 40l., beside the housing which was demised by a poor man and was all his livelihood.
The whole country till near the seaside has had great showers, but we scarce a drop. The smallpox has been and yet is almost in every house; many have died of them. These two days past at times the guns have been heard very plain. We suppose the French king has besieged some other place. Little wind at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 39.]
April 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Fair weather. At Spithead ride the Phœnix and Norwich, the first attending a fair wind for their voyage to the West Indies, the latter is to be refitted out from hence. [Ibid. No. 40.]
April.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 381./No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
41 April 1 1 2 0 N.E.
42 " 2 1 0 0 N.E.
43 " 4 1 1 1 W.
44 " 5 1 0 1 N.E.
45 " 6 1 1 0 N.E.
46 " 7 1 1 0 S.W.
47 " 8 1 3 5 S.W.
48 " 9 1 1 0 N.E.
59 " 10 1 1 5 S.W.
50 " 12 1 2 0 S.S.E.
51 " 13 1 1 0 S.E.
52 " 14 1 0 0 N.W.
53 " 15 2 1 0 N.
54 " 16 2 0 0 N.E.
55 " 17 2 0 0 N.E.
56 " 18 2 0 0
57 " 19 2 4 2 E.
58 " 20 2 0 6 N.
59 " 21 2 1 1 N.E.
60 " 22 2 1 0 N. Phœnix, king's ship, gone through the Downs.
61 " 23 2 1 0 N.E.
62 " 24 2 0 2 N.W.
63 " 25 3 2 1 N.W.
64 " 26 3 2 3 S.W.
65 " 27 3 2 6 S.W.
66 " 29 3 5 3 S.
67 " 30 3 6 2 S.