BHO

Charles II: May 1676

Pages 95-139

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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May 1676

[Before May 1.] Establishment for the pay of a chaplain to the garrison of Guernsey of 2s. per diem to commence from 1 May, 1676, on the representation of the Bishop of Winchester and Lord Hatton that such a chaplain was needed. Sign-manual. Counter-signed, "Danby, J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 68.]
May 1.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. To-day passed by about 60 laden colliers to the southwards, the wind being W. Last night we had a little shower. There is a great drought in these parts, and the springs are so dead that most wells are dry. The like has not been known for many years. [Ibid. No. 69.]
May 1.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Thursday came in a vessel of this harbour from Bayonne laden with wine and brandy for Holland. On board were 7 or 8 passengers, Spaniards, going to the army in Flanders. Other shipping news. Wind N.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 70.]
May 1.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Saturday the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland arrived here. He was met on the road by a considerable number of eminent gentlemen and persons of quality of this country, who accompanied him here, where he was received by the citizens with all expressions of joy and satisfaction and a guard made him by the Militia Company. This morning he is gone towards Holyhead, where the Monmouth yacht is ready for his transportation to Dublin. The Earl of Mount Alexander, Sir Charles Meredith, Col. Edward Vernon and divers other gentlemen accompany him in his voyage. [Ibid. No. 71.]
May 1. Commission for Nicholas Mesurier to be chaplain to the garrison of Guernsey. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 160.]
May 2. Commissions to Sir George Hewytt to be lieutenant and major of the Queen's troop of Guards, whereof Sir Philip Howard is captain and colonel, and to Col. John Fenwick to be cornet and captain and to Capt. Charles Orby to be guidon of the same troop. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 28.]
[May 1?] Request by Sir Philip Howard that the above commissions be drawn that evening, if possible, that they may be ready to be signed as soon as the King comes home, with blank commissions for cornet and guidon, till it be determined by the Duke of Monmouth, the commissions to be drawn as those of the King's troop are. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 72.]
May 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Saturday, Sunday and most of yesterday very much shooting of great guns at some distance has been heard, the wind being then southerly. We question whether we could hear them from Bouchain or any places thereabouts lying so much inland, but whence, if not from thence, we cannot conjecture.
Yesterday arrived one of our packet-boats bringing few passengers and no news. Capt. Langley went this morning for London and will wait on you. Wind pretty fresh W. and N.W. [Ibid. No. 73.]
May 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. The Guinea and Norwich continue at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 74.]
May 2.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 75.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 75 i.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Sir John Robinson, Deputy to the Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower. The King wishes the daughter of Major Cobbett to be allowed to visit and speak to her father in the hearing and presence of his keeper, any order to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 153.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Referring to the Committee for Plantations, &c., the business of Sir John Shorter and Sir W. Holcroft. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 76.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition of Casper Braem, a Dutchman, setting forth that he has long employed himself in inlaying and making curious cabinets, that he came to England the year after the restoration, and married an English woman, that he is a Protestant, that he was made a free denizen about 8 years since, that he has had all his workmen Englishmen, that he had taken a house in Fleet Street, it being moved to him that he might be made a freeman, but attending the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen he found it could not be done by a late order of that Court and the Common Council unless he were naturalized or commended by his Majesty and Council: that Secretary Williamson effectually recommend the petitioner to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to be made a freeman as desired. [Ibid. No. 77.]
May 3. Paper containing two sets of satirical verses on the King and Government. The first, entitled "The Chronicle," begins:—
"Great pious prudent Charles the Second,
The miracle of thy restoration
May like to that of quails be reckoned
Rained on the Israel's nation.
The wisht for blessing which Heaven sent
Became their curse and banishment."
28 similar stanzas attacking the king for his incontinence, his granting the indulgence, his promoting his father's foes and neglecting his friends, his corrupting the Parliament, his mismanagement of the Dutch wars, his shutting up the Exchequer, &c., among them:—
"His very dogs at Council Board
Sits grave and wise as any lord."
and:— "Blood, that wears treason in his face,
Villain complete in parson's gown,
How much is he at Court in grace
For stealing Ormonde and the crown!
Since loyalty does no man good,
Let's seize the King and outdo Blood."
The second, entitled "The Busse or the Royal Kiss or Prorogation, 22 November, 1675," begins:—
"As in the days of yore odds
Between the giants and the gods,
So now is full as fearful braw!
Between the Parliament and Whitehall."
68 lines describing that, when Parliament refused to raise further taxes, objected to a standing force, defended religion, law and property against will and popery, framed the bill of Habeas Corpus, objected to impressment, and made it treason to raise a penny without Parliament, &c.,
"Then Carwell, that infestious punk,
Made our most sacred gracious drunk,
And drunk she let him give that busse
Which all the kingdoms bound to curse,
And so, red-hot with wine and whore,
He turned the Parliament out of door."
Endorsed, "3 May, 1676, this seditious and traitorous libel was with sundry depositions presented to the Board by Mr. Secretary Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 78.]
May 3. Warrant to the Constable of the Tower or his deputy to release Major Robert Cobbett on his giving security in 1,000l. that he shall surrender himself on summons, behave as a good subject, and do nothing to the prejudice of the government or the public peace; his health being much impaired, he is to be permitted to have the use of his own house. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 154.]
May 3. Commission to William Roche to be Lieutenant to Sir Robert Holmes' company of foot in the Isle of Wight. Minute, with note that on 31 July Roche had a new seal to his commission, the old one being broken. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 154.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to William, Earl of Derby, to be Lieutenant of Cheshire and Lancashire and of the city of Chester. [Ibid. p. 155.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Anglesey, Lord Privy Seal. After reciting letters of — June, 1673, for a pension of 400l. per annum each to Sir Thomas Strickland and Robert Milward during pleasure (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673, p. 357), and that the payment to Milward had determined by his death, directing him to discontinue any further payment in pursuance of the said letters to the said Strickland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 29.]
May 3— June 23.
Yarmouth
Seven certificates by John Dawson, collector, that the persons therein named had given security for delivering up passes for their ships within one year of the respective dates thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 135–141.]
May 3. Notes by Williamson on the Law of Nations. A man is presumed to be of that country of which he is native, till the contrary appear. There must be mutatio domicilii per decennium. He must have all the things fovere familiam in territorio alieno, i.e. pay scot and lot. So a Dutchman being master of a ship taken at sea in a Dutch built ship confirms the suspicion that the ship is Dutch property notwithstanding some appearances of passes, &c. He is presumed in law to be still of the country of his original, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 157.]
May 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon Mr. Smith arrived in the vessel that was hired for him, but tells us not any news from the armies, nor have we any here by any other means. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 79.]
May 4.
Deal.
George Lodge for Mr. Lodge to Williamson. The wind is come N.E. and several great ships are gone out for the Straits and other parts. The Merlin yacht is gone through the Downs for the River. Several ships are arrived from Bilbao, Jamaica and elsewhere. [Ibid. No. 80.]
May 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. Last Tuesday sailed the Phœnix for their West Indian voyage. The Norwich continues at Spithead. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 81.]
May 4.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter of the 29th. Wind E.S.E., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 82.]
May 4.
Falmouth
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the John Bonaventure of and for London from Zante and the Samaritan of Yarmouth from the same place for Hamburg. Seven or eight more came out of the Straits with them, but, being peaceable times everywhere, everyone made the best of his way. It is about 30 days since they came away and then Sir John Narbrough lay before Tripoli to receive his moneys and slaves. The peace he has made is very much commended by all nations in the Straits to be very honourable for the English nation in matter of trade. They also say that Sir John has redeemed many Malta slaves, because that island has showed much kindness to our fleet, since they have been reducing of Tripoli. A small vessel of Topsham from Cadiz is also come in but brings no news. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 83.]
[After May 4.] Extract of Capt. Faseby's journal in the Charles yacht. Thursday, 4 May, 1676, about 11 or 12 noon off Dungeness, we met an Ostender of 36 guns with French colours. We fired shots twice at him to strike, and then he struck his French and put up his Ostend colours. Then we made a third shot at him, and then he ran his guns out and made one shot at us, and then we fired two more at him and commanded him to strike, and he told us he was a King's ship as well as we, and that, if we fired again, he would sink us; whereupon we made sail to bring our guns to bear on him, and told him I would not part with him till he had struck, and after some dispute he struck, and likewise his Admiral, which came towards us, while we were disputing, with two or three menof-war more, but, if three French men-of-war had not been in sight, I cannot tell whether we should have parted so or not. [Ibid. No. 84.]
May 4. The King to the Wardens of New College and Winchester College and the rest of the Electors for Winchester College. Recommending John Stone, son of the late John Stone, master mason at Windsor, who was very loyal during the late troubles, for admission to a scholar's place at Winchester at the next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 194.]
May 4. Warrant for a grant of the office of Clerk of the Faculties in the Court of Chancery to Benjamin Harrison for his life, in reversion after John Spencer, the present clerk. [Precedents 1, f. 143.]
May 4.
Jersey.
Sir Herbert Lunsford to [Williamson]. Recommending the bearer, Commissary Cartwright. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 34.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. On the petition of Sir Benjamin Ayloff and William Scrimshire of London, merchants, setting forth that the Constant Friendship of London with her lading wholly belonging to the petitioners and company in her voyage from Elsinore to London last January ran on the sands of Leesen (Læsö) Island under the dominion of the King of Denmark, where the inhabitants in great numbers forcibly boarded her and carried away her lading on shore with what they could of her tackle and apparel, and that by their correspondents they have complained and demanded satisfaction at the Court of Denmark, but cannot yet obtain reparation, and praying his Majesty's favour therein; that Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for his Majesty's signature to Sir John Paul, the Resident in Denmark, to demand and obtain satisfaction for the loss sustained by the petitioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 85.]
May 5.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The winds these last three or four days have been N.E., and this morning came to S.W. with the continuance of an exceeding drought. [Ibid. No. 86.]
May 5.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 87.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 87 I.]
May 5. Notes by Williamson. The captains give not up their commissions. Additional memorial of Denmark for the proclamation. The Confederates like better to have the proclamation particular.
N.B. Query who was the man that used to copy things for Mr. Bolton?—One William Radford's father, as Radford informs on oath.
A ship is not a wreck while her rudder is on, and she be in a condition capable to be saved.
By Sir W. Temple's letter of Tuesday last, arrived this morning, it is said that letters to private hands at the Hague from Mons, &c. say that the King of France, hearing the Prince of Orange was designing to come in upon his back at Quevrain, thought fit with the greatest part of his army to retire to the rest of his forces before Bouchain, leaving the Marshal d' Humieres with 8,000 men to make good that pass at Quevrain, that the Marshal soon after had likewise quitted the post fearing to be cut off by the Prince, and that last Sunday the Prince arrived with his army at Valenciennes, &c. but nothing of this was assured. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 366, p. 149.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pension of 200l. sterling per annum to Sir Archibald Primerose, Justice General, to begin at Martinmas next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 444.]
May 5.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Giving accounts of the arrivals of a ship from Virginia and of three ships from Cadiz. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 33.]
May 6.
Bristol.
Certificate by Sir Robert Cann, mayor, that John Harris of Cork, and Robert Pennington of Bristol, mariners, and Nehemiah Webb. William Brinkworth and Thomas Duddlestone of Bristol had deposed before him that they at the various dates therein mentioned transported from Bristol to various quantities of tobacco, on which duty had been paid at Bristol, to various ports in Ireland, where they were respectively forced to pay at the Custom House 2½d. a lb. for the said tobacco, and that they had never before had to pay more than 1½d. a lb. for tobacco brought from England as aforesaid. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 88.]
May 6.
Easton.
Lord Hatton to [Williamson]. I deferred acknowledging yours of 20 April, till I might see by the Order of Council, which I was to expect from Secretary Coventry, and which I received not till last post, whether that would occasion my importuning you further with this matter, but I do not find there is anything yet to inform you of more than that I have sent for the lieutenant, of whom chiefly the complaint is made, to come over and himself give an account of his actions, which I doubt not he will do to the shame of his accusers. When he comes, which, I am confident, will be very suddenly, I shall send him to wait on you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 89.]
May 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday afternoon one of our packet-boats arrived, which left the Brill the day before. The passengers affirmed it was the general belief in Holland that the Prince of Orange had engaged the French and that they were even then in fight when they came away. But this belief, as far as I could inform myself, was only planted on the noise of guns heard at some distance. Since my last, the wind has been in all the points of the compass, at present it is southerly, weather clear and dry. [Ibid. No. 90.]
May 6.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland arrived at Holyhead last Tuesday, and next morning went abroad the Monmouth yacht with the wind N.E., so that in all probability he arrived that night at Dublin. [Ibid. No. 91.]
May 6. Certificate by Robert Townson that 14 June, 1674, a certificate was granted by Sir John Shaw for the freedom of the Black Cock of London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 142.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pension of 200l. sterling per annum to John, Lord Elphingstoun, to begin at Whitsunday next. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 445.]
May 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Some gentlemen arriving from Calais yesterday report as if the Prince of Orange had raised the siege or at least had a battle with the French. Some report of a great slaughter of men on both sides with equal loss, but others say that the French army is very much routed. They, being strangers, cannot credit what is reported, but certainly the two armies have fought.
Notwithstanding the great rains between Deal and Dover and 8 or 10 miles up the country we have not had so much rain as to lay the dust which causes the fear of the loss of our barley. The smallpox has very much raged and increases, and has been mortal, many dying. It blows very fresh at W. and by N. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 92.]
May 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W., fair weather. The Norwich is come into the harbour to be refitted to go to her former station on the coast of Ireland. [Ibid. No. 93.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Samuel Norris, M.A., to the rectory of Tilehurst, Berkshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 83.]
May 7. Warrant for a pardon to John Baker charged with an assault on the person of Richard Downton in the vestry and churchyard of the parish church of Isleworth, Middlesex, and of all excommunications and forfeitures incurred thereby. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 154.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Killigrew praying a forfeiture of a 500l. bond forfeited to the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46,p. 107.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter ratifying and confirming all gifts, grants and patents in favour of the four ordinary maisers before the Lords of Council and Session, and anew granting to the four present maisers and their successors full right to attend and convey the crown sword and sceptre at all Parliaments in Scotland and at all other times when the same or any of them shall requisite to be borne or used for dignifying and conferring honours on any subjects of the said kingdom by the accustomed solemnity, for which services his Majesty grants to them and their successors the following fees, to be paid them by the persons dignified, viz., by every Duke 120l., by every Marquis 100l., by every Archbishop and Earl 80l., by every Viscount 100 merks, by every Bishop and Lord 80 merks, by every Baronet 40 merks, and by every Knight Bachelor 20 merks, all Scots money, and he also grants to each of them in place of the former yearly fee of 10l. Scots, the yearly fee of 10l. sterling. [3½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 445.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Pass to Capt. Thomas Binning, who is going beyond the sea. [Latin. Ibid. p. 449.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to James Boswell of Glencorse for two years. [Ibid. p. 450.]
May 8. Statement by George Pearce that he was ordered by Secretary Williamson to bring before him Capt. Crow, to which he answered he would not come, but would appear before the King and Council. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 94.]
May 8.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twelve light ships are at anchor in the bay, the wind being W.N.W. with some showers. [Ibid. No. 95.]
May 8.
Deal.
George Lodge in his master's absence to Williamson. This morning came home the Smyrna Merchant from the Straits and several other merchant ships from other parts, and also four French men-of-war, three of them great ships of 40 or 50 guns apiece, the other of about 20 or 30 guns. [Ibid. No. 96.]
May 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 97.]
May 8.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news partly the same as that in Holden's letter of the 4th, calendared ante, p. 99. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 98.]
May 8.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. Our ships come in daily from Virginia, the West Indies and elsewhere, so that in these 16 days above 30 merchant ships are arrived and more are daily expected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 99.]
May 8.
8 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Weather yesterday and to-day very windy, the wind now N.W. There has been some rain which the ground wanted badly and may dispense with much more. [Ibid. No. 100.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. Enclosing a copy of an order in Council about the case of a poor foreign artificer settled here ever since the restoration, who excels very much in inlaying cabinet work, &c., and by his Majesty's command recommending him to him and the Court of Aldermen that they would signify it in the Common Council or where else according to the custom of the City his freedom is to be obtained, as a thing his Majesty would be glad were done. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 94.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Passes in English and in Latin for the Earl of Winchilsea, with his family, servants, &c., to go and remain beyond the seas for three years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, pp. 166, 167.]
May 9.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Since last Sunday there have been many pleasant showers and it is rainlike at present, wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 101.]
May 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Rain, which we have long sorely wanted, we received with gladness this morning with a westerly wind almost in a petty storm. The packet-boat which should have come out of the Brill last Saturday is not yet arrived. [Ibid. No. 102.]
May 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon four French men-of-war came into the Downs. This morning the commanders came on shore and would have hired several of our pilots per mensem and gave them advance money, but they said they were at his Majesty of England's command and would serve no foreign prince. These pilots were to be hired for the northern and Holland coasts.
Little wind and that westerly. At noon to-day the Lord sent us a comfortable shower, so long looked for and so much wanted. [Ibid. No. 103.]
May 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 104.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 104I.]
May 9. The King to [the University of Cambridge]. Requiring them to admit William Durham, B.D., chaplain to their Chancellor, James, Duke of Monmouth, to the degree of D.D., having received a good account of his abilities in the study of divinity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 195.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Treasurer of St. Bartholomew's. I have had some time in my hands by the King's command Capt. Rawson's petition for his letter to the House in favour of his pretension to the place of porter there. His loyalty and worth is such that his Majesty is willing to gratify him, but I am desirous, if possible, to avoid the sending of any such letter for the consequence of such precedents hereafter. All the service I can pay the House is to waylay all I can commands or interpositions of the King. Only the poor man ought not to suffer by this tenderness of mine, and therefore I must beg you to see if there is not a way to secure him the place by the voluntary goodwills of the Governors rather than this letter should come. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 95.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
On the petition of John Wroth, calendared in the last volume, p. 368, and the report thereon of the Solicitor-General dated 4 Dec. that the advowson of Whitchurch was granted by King Edward VI. to Sir Thomas Wroth and his heirs, to whom the petitioner is right heir, and that no regrant thereof to the Crown appears, but that his Majesty's predecessors had usually presented to the said church, which wholly disables the petitioner at law to recover the same from his Majesty, but his ancestors having an ancient right by the said grant may be some ground for his Majesty extending his favour to him, further reference of the above petition and report to the Lord Chancellor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 108.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Arundell Bull, a page of the Bedchamber, praying a grant of 65l. collected by Samuel Pretty, collector at Ludlow of the law duty, and not answered, and an order for discharging the said Pretty from the same. [Ibid. p. 109.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain to swear and admit Wentworth, Earl of Roscommon, as captain of the Band of Pensioners in the room of Thomas, Viscount Fauconberg. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 165.]
May 9. Certificate by Isaac Cooke, surveyor of the customs at Ipswich, that the Barbabella of Harwich is an English built ship manned by English subjects, and has received a pass for which bond has been given. With certificate at foot that John Westbrowne, the master, has deposed that the above particulars are true.[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 143.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Sir John Kennedy, now of Girvanmaines, and Dame Margaret, his spouse, and to the survivor of them, and the heirs of their bodies with remainder to the other heirs of Gilbert Kennedy, of Girvanmaines, deceased, father of the said Dame Margaret, with remainder to the said Sir John, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the ten pound land of Girvanmaines in the parochine of Kirk Oswald, Earldom of Carrick and shirefdome of Ayr, which are provided to the said Dame Margaret in life rent, and also of the lands of Dalquharrane and other lands in the shirefdome of Wigtoun proceeding on the resignation of Fergus McCubbine of Knockdolaine and John Inglis, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, with a novodamus and an erection of the premises into the barony of Girvanmaines, and with a change of the holding from simple want to taxt ward. [Over two pages. Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 450.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Sir Godfrey McCulloch of Myretoun and the heirs male of his body with remainders over of the lands and barony of Myretoun and of the lands and barony of Cardmess proceeding on the resignation of umquhile Sir Alexander McCulloch, his father, with a novodamus and an erection of the premises into the baronies of Myretoun and Cardmess and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 453.]
May 10.
London.
John Buckworth to Sir John Nicholas. Sending the answer of the Committee of the late company of Royal Adventurers trading to Africa to the petition of Thomas Pearson, according to an order in Council of 28 March, 1676. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 105.] Enclosed,
Answer of the above Committee to the aforesaid petition in detail, denying the expenditure of money by Pearson in their behalf, asserting that on the balancing of accounts he would probably be found their debtor, and that the matter is still pending, because the Royal African Company refuse arbitration, though the Committee are willing to accept it. [Ibid. No. 105 i.]
May 10.
[Received.]
Reply of the Royal African Company to the petition of Thomas Pearson that the business in no way concerns them, the transactions having taken place before their incorporation and they having paid over 34,000l. to the former company, out of which they were to discharge all their debts, &c. [Ibid. No. 106.] Enclosed,
Article IV. in the preamble of the charter of the new Company, by which they pay 34,000l. in consideration of all debts, lease of the African House, plantations, forts, privileges, &c., belonging to the former Adventurers, &c. [Ibid. No. 106 i.]
May 10. Sir R. Franklin to Williamson. I sometime since gave you an account that Mr. Rosewell, the schoolmaster of Eton, was not so kind to me or mine as I thought I might expect, especially since you had so kindly concerned yourself with him and the Provost of Eton, whose creature he is, on our behalf. On what score it is, I know not, unless he took it ill that according to your commands I employed Mr. Martin, the then usher, to take pains with my son at spare hours, which he did. Sir Thomas Page, my kinsman, the Provost of King's, I find not so well inclined as formerly, and can attribute it to nothing but Mr. Rosewell's unkind proceedings, who, I perceive, is resolved to make his interest for some other that is more his favourite. I cannot rely on either, indeed my hopes wholly depend on you, who, I am confident, will do what you may to get him removed to King's at the next election. My brother [-inlaw] Musgrave is your servant. [Ibid. No. 107.]
May 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The ketch, formerly his Majesty's Hawk ketch, was bought by a merchant of Calais, and is a private man-of-war of 8 guns, an Englishman captain. Yesterday about Dungeness she met a pretended English flyboat of about 300 tons from France bound to Holland ('tis said he had a new pass sent from London to France about a fortnight ago). The ketch took out her master and about 8 men more and brought them on board herself and sent as many on board the flyboat. But this was espied by a Flushinger, who made after the ketch and prize, and at last came up to them and fought the ketch at least two hours, but the Flushinger over-gunned him and was too big for him, so retook the prize and brought her last night into the Downs, and this morning the ketch came in also; the captain is much wounded.
Yesterday with the French men-of-war came in many Englishmen who serve with them. The Dutch say that 6 or 8 of their men-ofwar lie to watch the motion of the four French ships in the Downs.
We have had two brave showers long much wanted with us and near 8 or 10 miles distance. Though others have had much we none till yesterday. The wind is very varying, but is now N.N.W., but coming northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 108.]
May 10.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving an account of the French and Dutch privateers as in the last letter. The wind is come up by N. and several ships, outward-bound, are preparing to go away. [Ibid. No. 109.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir James Shaen. Recommending to him Mr. Wood, his countryman and neighbour, who is a suitor for some employment under Sir James and his partners in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 96.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Lionel Walden praying the remittal of a debt due to his Majesty from him as receiver-general of the royal and additional aids, the poll money, and the one month's and eleven months' assessments for Huntingdonshire, or so much thereof as his Majesty shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 109.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Powney for a lease in reversion of a small farm in the parish of Eton, Bucks, called Martions, now in lease to Gwyn and Lovell for about 12 years to come. [Ibid. p. 110.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to Hugh May of the petition of John Rose, his Majesty's gardener, and the annexed proposal for paying all the workmen, labourers and weeders (except his own board wages and wages) for 320l. per annum. [Ibid.]
May. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of the petition of Sir Thomas Slingsbie, that the Chancellor of the Duchy may be ordered to suspend all proceedings in order to the passing of a grant to Mr. Morrice of 6,000 acres in the Honour and Forest of Knaresborough, parcel of the Duchy, till Michaelmas Term next. [Ibid. p. 111.]
May 10. Notes by Williamson. Montgomery sessions &c. Three justices held a sessions at — in the same time the Custos Rotulorum holds one by precept at Montgomery. N.B. The Custos Rotulorum is but the first justice in the commission, and, though he has a respect from them all, yet he is but one of the justices.
Ponder for printing Marvell's book.—Owned to have had those papers from Mr. Marvell with directions from him to print them. That he, Ponder, gave them out to be printed, that he had no licence for the book. Ordered to be committed. Lord Privy Seal opposed it, because the cause (?) is bailable by statute. Lord Chancellor. That for contempt of the order of the Board late made against printing without licence, for the seditiousness of the matter of it &c. he may be committed for it.
In prizes, &c., where there is just cause of seizure, there no security de damnis et expensis is to be demanded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 161.]
[May ?] J. Buchanan to Williamson. Requesting him to recommend William Wood, merchant, whose sufferings and losses, he having been under the Inquisition, have been very great, to some place in the Custom house of Dublin, or as a collector, surveyor, &c., in any other port of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 34.]
May 11.
Canterbury.
Certificate by John Lott, Mayor, Viscount Strangford, and others that the Walloon congregation in and about Canterbury, consisting of about 1,500 persons in the enjoyment of the rites, ceremonies, customs and discipline of the foreign Protestant churches from whence they first came, live very peaceably and orderly and are very laborious and industrious in the art of weaving and other manufactures, whereby they not only maintain all their own poor without permitting any of them to beg or be burdensome to others, but also set many hundreds of the English poor on work, and are likewise a great benefit and help to the said city in bearing a great proportion of the public taxes and in finding arms and soldiers in the trained bands and otherwise, without which the city being of itself poor could not well have borne such large proportions as have been charged on it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 110.]
May 11.
London.
Thomas Hartopp to Williamson. I employed Tuesday afternoon and yesterday morning only to pay you my duty with all imaginable thanks for the many honours now received, but, my ship being fallen down, I am so unhappy as not to receive your commands before my departure, so I make my excuse and beg your continued favour to our Company of Merchant Adventurers. [Ibid. No. 111.]
May 11.
Musgrave.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. The business wherein Mr. Eglanbie (Aglionby) was made the instrument to strike at my reputation was by the king's great goodness brought to a period with as much honour to me as the matter could bear, and yet it was my grief that he should be put upon so much trouble in my concern. I am in the like case at present considering his Majesty and his Royal Highness have been put to descend to the thoughts of my affairs. The same persons that then covertly plotted all they could to bring me low in esteem with my king and country now openly pursue the same course, and my son Christopher must bear a part of the blow aimed at me. He must be rendered a person factious and hot-headed and a powerful persuader of me, the better to gain a belief that I discover either a weak understanding or ill nature by being imposed on by one so ill-tempered, so regardless of filial duty, which, I hope, you do not believe, and will own what you think of him to the King and Duke, for I am ready to make out that what his enemies call factious proceeding in him was the discharge of a duty to the King, not relating in the least to any particular of his or mine. He may live to serve his master; I am old, it matters not much how things go with me. I hear Lord Carlisle will now at last be pleased that the gentlemen I procured to be put into the commission of the peace in Cumberland shall so continue, if Mr. Eglanbie may be likewise put in. When I heard a year ago that this was endeavoured by my lord, I thought it my duty by my son to make known to the Lord Chancellor how he came to be put out of the commission, but I have long ago forgiven the injury he did me, and whatever his Majesty and his Royal Highness think fit to have done in it will be very agreeable to me. Indeed it signifies very little to myself who is in the commission, for I am not in a condition to do his Majesty any considerable service in Cumberland, as matters now stand, unless he think fit, as he seemed once resolved, to send my son Christopher to Carlisle in a condition to assist me, and I humbly request to know what his pleasure is in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 112.]
May 11
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats coming in yester morning early brought very little news. They say, they have not heard of any battle between the French and the Prince of Orange, but only of skirmishes, wherein one side has lost 1,000 men and the other 700, but they could not apply either of those numbers to any one party. The wind yesterday afternoon veered from W. and round the compass and before dark got into the west again, a little southerly, where with fair weather it is this noon.
In this packet-boat came over a young English drummer, the only deserter I have met with since 17 Feb. I desire to know whether I should continue to keep this account of the deserters. [Ibid. No. 113.]
May 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 114.]
May 11.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 5th. Wind S.S.W., weather showery. [Ibid. No. 115.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to Lord Elphingstoune. I have seen your last letter to my brother and have fully communicated the contents to his Majesty, who has commanded me to return his hearty thanks for your great care in all matters relating to his service, and to signify his express pleasure to you not to part with those arms seized by you till you receive further orders. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 454.]
May 12.
Hart Hall.
Dr. John Lamphire to Williamson. I have shown your letter to the Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Bathurst, and many heads of colleges at their meeting to-day, and read it as follows:—"Your case is set down by the Lord Chancellor and the Duke of Ormonde for Thursday in Whitsun week, when you of the Halls will please to employ some friend to attend here, and so must the Colleges on their part." On reading it the Vice-Chancellor and the said heads waived sending anyone to attend, because neither the letter nor any other summons was directed to him or the heads, but the Principals of Halls and Masters there are much obliged to you, and have sent up William Edwards, M.A., of St. Edmund's Hall, to wait on you and receive your further directions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 116.]
May 12.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The Flushinger that retook the flyboat was falsly reported to have 16 guns; she had but 8 and two small murderers or such like The captain of the ketch was a Scotchman and had 8 guns. He has done much mischief to his Majesty's subjects at several times. To-day Andrew Johnson, the master of the flyboat, by virtue of a warrant out of the Admiralty of the Cinque Ports, arrested the said ketch, and she weighed and anchored under the stern of the Greyhound, commander in chief in the Downs. The captain was also arrested but is very dangerous of his wounds, and cannot come out of his ship. The pass the flyboat had was under his Majesty's own hand and seal both under the writing, which we never saw before, and underneath at the very bottom was Mr. Secretary's hand, which some feared was counterfeited. The master of the flyboat is a Dutchman and most of his men, and his flyboat is bound for the Baltic. 'Tis certainly reported that Englishmen get passes and then send Dutch ships and masters to sea by which means our ships cannot get freight. Here are now 7 or 8 Dutchmen with English passes in the Downs.
Not a topsail gale at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 117.]
May 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Last Wednesday evening an unfortunate accident happened here between Col. Hugh Piper, deputy governor of this garrison, and Lieut. Morris, also of this garrison. It is supposed he had an old grudge to the deputy governor. This dispute happened in a room. The deputy governor, being unwilling to show any cause of difference, took leave and left the room. The lieutenant followed him below stairs where he suddenly drew on him and ran him through before he had opportunity to draw, by which thrust he fell. After recovering on his legs again the lieutenant would have run him through the second time, had he not been prevented. It is much doubted that this wound is more than ordinary dangerous. [Ibid. No. 118.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 118i.]
May 12. The King to the Wardens of Winchester and New College, Oxford, and the rest of the Electors of Winchester school. Requiring them to place John South, a child in Winchester College, son of John South, late vicar of Writtle, Essex, who suffered much for his loyalty during the late troubles, on the roll for his removal to New College. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 195.]
May 12. Warrant to the Bailiff and Jurats of the Island of Jersey requiring them to suffer Abraham Besnard to return and reside there, he having been sentenced to perpetual banishment, under pain of death should he return, for stealing two sheep. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 155.]
May 12. Warrant to the Recorder and High Sheriffs of London and Middlesex to reprieve Charles Murrell, committed to Worcester gaol for having two wives, and thence brought to Newgate, and sentenced to be transported, but, it being reported by one of his prosecutors in court that he owed great debts, he was called back, and received instead the sentence of death, and to insert him in the next pardon for the convicts of Newgate under the penalty of transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 155.]
May 12. Warrant for a pardon to Richard Downton for an assault on John Baker in the vestry and churchyard of the parish church of Isleworth, Middlesex, and of all excommunications and forfeitures incurred thereby. [Ibid. f. 156.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Mayor and Jurats of Sandwich to deliver several prisoners committed to their gaol for stealing a barge belonging to Prince Rupert to the custody of the Marshal of the Admiralty, in order to their trial before that court. [Ibid. f. 158.]
May 12. Notes by Williamson of proceedings at the Council. Tobacco pays 1d. per lb. custom and 1d. additional duty. When exported from England the additional duty is repaid and half the custom, i.e. 1½d. In Ireland all such tobacco must pay in subsidy only so much as is repaid in England, i.e. 1½d. Another Act of Excise in Ireland says for every lb. of tobacco must be paid 1d. The Act of subsidy was first made. It is insisted that what is imposed by the Act of Excise is not to be understood as included in the 1½d. imposed by the Customs. N.B. In usage the Farmers have usually taken neither 1d. nor 1½d. but 2d. If the Act of Excise was since the Act of Subsidy, it seems as if the 1d. Excise were a distinct addition to the 1½d. Customs. N.B. Subsidy in the laws of Ireland imports all duties created by Act of Parliament. This interpretation if carried in favour of the merchants will cost 12,000l. per annum to the King's Customs in England. Pemberton. —It is allowed by the adverse party that 1½d. by the Custom Act is subsidy only. Only is referred to subsidy not to the payment, not as if that were all that paid any way in all, but only in the way of subsidy and 1d. still to be paid by way of Excise as the following Act imposed. King.—The Act of Subsidy does not repeal that of Excise. The subsidy is to be paid by the importer, the Excise by the retailer. Sawyer.—No, the Excise is payable by the importer or first buyer. Lord Keeper.—Left to law in Ireland, &c.
Mearne v. Newcombe about the printing the Injunctions of King James, 1604. Newcombe confesses it and offers to waive his privileges as the King's printer and will appear at law. Objection. Let them stay the printing in the interim as the law printing was. Answer. The law printing claimed by virtue of the King's patent and so the Board ordered a stay, but Mearne claims by an entry in the Book of Stationers, i.e. a title at law.
Lord Herbert and the Welsh Justices about removing the Sessions. It was agreed the next Sessions should be at Montgomery. Lord Herbert as Custos Rotulorum issues the warrant. Afterwards Mr. Vaughan and others appointed a Sessions at another place. Unless there were some good cause, it is irregular and of ill example. Sir L. King.—The Sessions have formerly been kept, sometimes at Montgomery, sometimes at Llangellin. The justices had prayed Lord Herbert to hold them elsewhere sometimes, he had promised it, but did it not, so two justices sign a warrant for holding them at Llangellin, not hearing anything of the Sessions appointed by Lord Herbert at Montgomery, nay before he issued his warrant. Solicitor-General.—They knew Lord Herbert had appointed a Sessions. They chose a clerk of the peace, which is contrary to law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 165.]
May 12. Notes by Williamson of the case from Jersey of John Briard v. Mary Dore and others. He notes that a cause comes by way of either appeal against a sentence, or doleance against the Court for refusing to admit of an appeal, where the Court is made a party. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 35.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth of his consent that John Chamberlaine obtain letters mandatory to the University of Cambridge for making him M.D. with the condition of performing the requisite exercises or cautioning for the same. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 119.]
May 13. The Earl of Pembroke to Williamson. As the single month's assessment after the rate of 70,000l. per mensem was raised in Wiltshire, which was received by the High Sheriff of that county for 1663, and by others for the next two years, who have never made any satisfactory account thereof, notwithstanding that several trained bands of that county were drawn out to the Isle of Wight during the late war against the Dutch, who are yet unpaid, and, since the said receivers have been by myself and deputy lieutenants required to render a true account of the said moneys, they give out they will avoid it by gaining his Majesty's discharge, therefore, being informed that at your intercession the King promised not to dispose the said moneys from the militia of that county, I desire you will obtain his warrant, whereby I may be enabled to call the said receivers to an account and recover what shall appear to be due from them to the use of the militia of the said county. [Ibid. No. 120.]
May 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat which should have come from the Brill last Wednesday has not yet reached this. Weather fair, wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 121.]
May 13.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A New England ship come last Thursday into our road and a small vessel of our town come now from St. Malo bring no news. Wind S.W., fresh. [Ibid. No. 122.]
May 13—Aug. 1.
Hull.
Four certificates by Thomas Meriton, collector, that the persons therein named had given security for delivering up their passes within one year of the respective dates thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 144–147.]
May 14.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Here are several ships come in from the westward and a great many privateers of all ports, one waiting for the other. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 123.]
May 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. The Norwich is refitting, being to be employed in her former station on the coast of Ireland. [Ibid. No. 124.]
May 15.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W.N.W., a fresh gale. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 125.]
May 15.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 126.]
May 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 12th came in here the Jacob, of Bideford, from Miller River in Maryland, laden with tobacco to enter here for Holland. They report that the Indians have done much mischief to several families, about 32 cut off before they came away, and that their emperor or king sent a messenger to the Governor to speak with him, to which he was inclinable, but he was persuaded to the contrary by his Council, and so answered that he would meet him in any indifferent and convenient place, on which he sent the Governor word that he would speedily meet him with 16,000 men. The country are putting themselves in the best posture of defence they can and guarding their houses, especially those furthest up the country. They also say they have had but an indifferent crop this year. Wind now W., and has been so these three or four days. [Ibid. No. 127.]
May 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Almost identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 128.]
May 15.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. No news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 129.]
May 15. Warrant to Sir John Howell, Recorder of London, to insert George Earle, of St. Mary's parish, Islington, labourer, and Thomas Sadler, of St. Pancras parish, labourer, convicted of burglary and sentenced to transportation, in the next pardon but without the clause for transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 156.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Lowe. TheJames of Yarmouth being hired for a voyage into the Baltic for the King of Poland's service, and being much pressed in point of time, desiring him, notwithstanding the holidays, to give them all dispatch imaginable in the survey to be made of her in order to her pass from the Custom House. She lies in the river, is English built, and wholly belongs to the King's subjects. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 96.]
May 15. Licence to Edward Villiers, major and lieutenant of the King's troop of guards commanded by the Duke of Monmouth, with his three servants, to be absent for six months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 29.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Grant to Leonard Gurle, senior, of the office of keeper and gardener of the garden in St. James' Park, with the garden house and greenhouse therein, and also of all the orange trees and other trees and greens therein, in reversion after John Rose, for his life, with the wages of 40l. a year and the usual further allowances. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 166.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Chancellor of the petition of Sarah, relict of Basset Cole, showing that he having by a nuncupative will left her a very considerable estate, she undertook the charge of his funeral and other expenses, amounting to above 500l., and then Robert Mordant, the son of the deceased's former wife by a former husband, contested in the Prerogative Court the said nuncupative will and set up a will made before the deceased's marriage with the petitioner, and that the cause being removed before the Delegates, they, though not unanimously, decided against the petitioner and the nuncupative will and desiring a commission of review. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 111.]
May 16.
Horseheath.
Lord Alington to Williamson. Since I waited on you at London, I had another letter from Count d'Alby entreating me to remind you of an answer to the letter I gave you from him, so I desire you would be pleased to send it to my house in Southampton Square and I shall take care to have it sent him.
We discourse here of nothing but the deadness of trade, that our wool is a drug, our butter and cheese and generally all sorts of grain are fallen within these few months from a reasonable good price to so low a one that tenants call on us for abatement of rents, which I wonder at, considering the waste the armies now make in Flanders, and that Holland and those parts cannot be so well provided as formerly out of Germany, Poland and Denmark, they having the miseries of war amongst them as well as Flanders, and so must need what escapes their devouring armies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 130.]
May 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One packet-boat arrived last Saturday afternoon, but we could not attain to any news by them of the two encamped armies. This morning another arrived, but brought as little as the former. Many passengers came over in it, who either would not, or could not, tell us anything certain. Wind is most westerly, and the weather with some small showers full of gusts. [Ibid. No. 131.]
May 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. Windy weather. [Ibid. No. 132.]
May 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. I sent you an account of how Col. Piper was wounded. It was supposed he would not have lived till this time. There is yet much doubt of his recovery. [Ibid. No. 133.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 133 I.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that, a draft proclamation prohibiting his Majesty's subjects to take out commissions, set out ships or serve at sea against any foreign prince or state in amity with his Majesty being read and approved, it be sent to a Secretary of State that it may be printed and published. [Ibid. No. 134.]
May 17.
[Read.]
Thomas Peirson to the King and Council. Petition for a day of hearing, the Royal African Company and the Committee of the late Company of Royal Adventurers having put in their answers to his petition. [Ibid. No. 135.]
May 17. Order in Council, for the hearing of the above cause on Wednesday next, the 24th. [Ibid. No. 136.]
[May 17.] James Nayler to the King. Petition for speedy payment of 1,066l. 11s. 10d. with interest thereon, due for black cloth delivered in 1666 to the Great Wardrobe for the funeral of the Queen Mother of Portugal, for 600l. of which tallies were taken on the customs of 1667, which are still unsatisfied. The petition of his late partner, George Townsend, was referred to Lord Treasurer, Viscount Latimer, above 2 years ago, but the debt is still unpaid. His Majesty's care therein would unlock the hearts of all his subjects on any exigency. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. XII., p. 232.) [Ibid. No. 137.]
May 17. The King to Prince Rupert. After reciting that by orders for regulating the established forces in 1660, and several times afterwards penalties were assigned to be inflicted on any officers that should be drunk, signifying his pleasure that the said orders be duly executed as to non-commissioned officers so offending by sentence of the courts martial of the regiment, troop or garrison to which they belong, and in case of any commissioned officer by sentence of a general court martial; but, if any commissioned officer be found drunk on the guard or any other public place, such officer be cashiered by sentence of a general court martial; and he is to cause this order to be published to the garrison of Windsor Castle under his command, and, if any commissioned officer there under his command be found drunk upon the guard or in any other public place, he is to take order that the same be represented to the King that he may appoint a general court martial to judge thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 29.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Pass for Robert, Lord Lexington, to go and remain beyond the seas for three years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 167.]
May 17. Licence to the High Sheriff of Salop to repair to Westminster or elsewhere in England, out his county. [Precedents 1, f. 144.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Proclamation forbidding all his Majesty's subjects to take any commission at sea from any foreign prince or state against any other foreign prince or state now in amity with his Majesty or by virtue of any such commission to set out any vessel of war or to serve on board any ship which shall be employed against any such prince or state during the present war. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 349.]
May 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The continuance of the westerly wind, though the weather be very fair, puts a bar to our expectations of seeing the packet-boat, which yesterday was to come from the Brill, before this day's ordinary leaves this, but of late that part of Holland seems to be in a profound slumber of unconcernedness, for, as there is but little news stirring there, so are they not very inquisitive after any. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 138.]
May 18.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived in the Downs a ship from Virginia but anchored not. The master reported that country had endured much hardship by reason of the natives rising, who had done them much mischief. After a very great drought, God has sent us two showers and to-day one great shower to the great refreshing of the corn, especially barley. Wind S.W., sometimes S.E. variable. 4 p.m. It is now come N.E. [Ibid. No. 139.]
May 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 140.]
May 18. Muster of the militia of Essex at Oxeye Green, near Chelmsford on that day.
Lord Oxford's regiment: Files.
His Lordship's Company 36
Lieut.-Col. Luther's " 20 Files 183.
Major Turner's " 25 Soldiers 1098
Capt. Milburne's " 25
Capt. Rush's " 19
Capt. Taverner's " 19
Capt. Nutt's " 21
Capt. Sherburne's " 18
The Duke of Albemarle's regiment:
The Duke's Company 21 Files 148.
Lieut.-Col. Sir Edward Smith's Company 17 Soldiers 888.
Major Pert's Company 27
Capt. Bateman's " 16
Capt. Walton's " 13
Capt. Higham's " 21
Capt. Reeves' " 21
Capt. Vernon's " 18
Col. Sir William Wiseman's regiment:
The Colonel's Company 26 Files 166.
Lieut.-Col. Honeywood's Company 24
Major Bowes' Company 21 Soldiers 996.
Capt. Nicholson's " 23 " 18.
Capt. Creifeild's " 17
Capt. Wheler's " 16
Capt. Guyon's " 19
Capt. Lambe's " 20
The odd men at 3 files 3
Foot Soldiers 3,000
Horse:
Sir Anthony Browne's troop 68 269
Capt. Staines' " 68
Capt. Reynolds' " 72
Sir Francis Marsham's " 61
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 129.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a commission of 10 Dec. last appointing Sir Charles Meredith, Chancellor of the Exchequer in Ireland, and 10 others commissioners for managing the Irish revenue, and an indenture of 8 April last granting and demising to Sir James Shaen and 10 others all the revenues of Ireland payable from 26 Dec., 1675, to 25 Dec., 1682 (new aids or increase of the revenue by Acts of Parliament hereafter passed only excepted) with full power to collect and manage the same at and under the rents and covenants therein mentioned, and that the said commissioners were required to take effectual care that the moneys received out of the said revenue and paid to their chief treasurer should, except what should be necessary to defray the charges of management, within 10 days after the same come into their hands be paid over into the receipt of the Exchequer in Ireland for the better securing of the rents to be paid by the said then intended farmers, and that the said grant is now passed and the 60,000l. advance money therein mentioned is fully paid and satisfied; authorizing and requiring him to give immediate order that an Exchequer acquittance may be given to the said farmers for 30,000l, the residue of the advance money, as if the same were actually paid into the Exchequer in Ireland in the same manner as the former acquittances were given for the first 30,000l., and that the said clause for payment into the Exchequer every 10 days be no further observed, but that such payments do henceforth cease, and also to give effectual order for superseding the said commission, which is in reality superseded on the perfecting of the patent mentioned in the said commission, nevertheless requiring the said commissioners and all persons employed under them to be accountable only to the said farmers for their respective receipts and actings under the said commission, and further, for preventing any inconveniency to the said revenue from the revoking of the said commission, he is by proclamation to command all the said commissioners and others employed by them to continue to act in their respective employments, while they shall be continued or till they shall be removed by the said farmers, and in the meantime they are to observe such orders and instructions as they shall receive from them, and all the officers in the said kingdom shall aid and assist the said farmers in the execution of the trust committed to them by the said demise, and further that such commissions and powers be from time to time given to the said farmers as they shall desire for better enabling them to discharge the trust reposed in them, and also to do all such other things for better enabling them to perform their contract and agreements as he shall find just or reasonable. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 23.]
May [19]. The London Company for Mineral and Battery Works to the King. Petition against the importation of foreign wire, which prevails notwithstanding former Acts prohibiting it, and requesting that the seizure thereof may be entrusted to them, and that all the wire so seized may be destroyed, and that a proclamation may be issued for prohibiting the importation thereof. [Original and copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, Nos. 141, 142.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring the above petition to the Committee for Trade. [Ibid. No. 143.] Annexed,
Act of Parliament (14 Car. II. c. 14) forbidding the importation of foreign wool-cards, card-wire or iron wire for making woolcards, and also the using of the wire of old wool-cards in making new ones, as being very detrimental to the carding of cloth. Printed. [Ibid. No. 143 I.]
The Commissioners of Suits to the Farmers of the Customs. Requesting their opinion on a petition relative to the bringing in of foreign wool-cards, which concerns the customs as well as several trades. 8 July, 1618. [Ibid. No. 143 II.]
May 19.
[Received.]
The wire makers of Tinton and Whitbrook to the Company of the Mineral and Battery Works. Petition stating that the petitioners are informed that Mr. Foley, the Company's farmer of the said works, is minded to desist from making wire, because he cannot sell it by reason of the vast quantities of outlandish wire continually imported, and praying their help to procure a restraint on foreign wire. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 144.]
[May?] Paper setting forth the desirability of encouraging the manufacture of iron wire in England, many families depending on it for their livelihood, and, when in the late wars the works were hindered from making wire, the outlandish wire having been raised to a very high rate. [Ibid. No. 145.]
May 19. Henry Slingesby to [Sir Robert Southwell]. It is impossible in my present condition to depute any other person to make objections against Mr. Palmer's propositions about tin farthings, or the answering those made by him to the copper ones. I have studied the ways of counterfeiting all projectors' farthings 16 years, and will much regret that I shall not be an instrument in preventing the mischief that must ensue, if tin farthings are established. I beg you to communicate the enclosed papers to their lordships. [Ibid. No. 146.] Enclosed,
Henry Slingesby to the Lord Treasurer. Finding Mr. Palmer's proposal about the tin farthings defective and sending questions which the officers of the Mint request Mr. Palmer to answer—as to the place, length of time, quantities, mode, allowances, &c., proposed by him in reference to the said coinage. 27 March, 1676.
The same to Mr. Palmer. Performance on his part of the Lord Treasurer's orders about the tin farthings will be ready when Palmer observes them himself, which he seems unwilling to do. Mr. Bertie will give him further instructions by the Lord Treasurer's order. 25 April, 1676.
The same to Mr. Bertie. I do not blame Palmer for avoiding a trial of his making and the Mint counterfeiting his tin farthings, as it would show the impossibility of his performing his offers, and the easiness of counterfeiting his farthings. I wish he would reply to the queries proposed to him, and I will soon be ready to fulfil my own part. 28 April, 1676. [Ibid. No. 146 i.]
May 19.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Two vessels of this place arrived from Norway the other day. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 147.]
May 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The two Smyrna ships are worth, as the commanders say, 200,000l. [Ibid. No. 148.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 148 I.]
May 19. Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of William Hill of Hillsborough, co. Down, for payment of the arrears of a fee of 3s. 4d. granted to his father, Arthur Hill, as constable of a fort built by himself in Hillsborough and of 6d. a day for 20 warders to each, discontinued about 5 years since. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 113.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Grant to John Nicolls of the office of writing to the Great Seal all presentations to advowsons and other spiritual promotions, except archbishoprics and bishoprics, for the lives of himself and his brother-in-law, John Baker, and of the survivor of them, in reversion after Robert Eddowes, the present holder. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 166.]
May 19 and June 1.
Newcastle.
Four certificates by Anthony Isaacson that passes had been granted for the Love and Friendship and the Success of Newcastle according to the treaty with Holland and that security had been given for the delivery up thereof within a year of the respective dates thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 148-151.]
May 20.
Spring Garden.
Sir Robert Southwell to Henry Slingesby. I laid your letter of yesterday before the Lord Treasurer in the Council Chamber, who said that you neither promise to comply with what the Lords of the Committee desire in seeing your counterfeits of Mr. Palmer's metal nor do you say that this metal is useless, which if you declared with your reasons, their Lordships might have a new point to go upon. I wish you a happy recovery. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 381, No. 149.]
May 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A gentleman that landed here yesterday from one of our packet-boats produced, it is said, a letter or a copy of one from Naples giving, for the most part, the same account as we that evening found in the Gazette of the fight in the Mediterranean betwixt the French and Dutch, which I transcribed to send you, had I not been prevented by the print. It particularized the three hurts received by De Ruyter, &c. But it was also reported, how certain I know not, that the Spanish Admiral, visiting De Ruyter next day, on his return out of the cabin, was affronted by the seamen, first with reproachful words, and then endeavouring to have thrown him overboard, had they not been hindered by the officers.
At the Brill they are suddenly awakened, being of late very apprehensive of the French potency, fearing that the French intend to attempt from sea a descent on that island, and report that in order to it a squadron of them are, or were very lately, in the Downs. Wind E., fresh, weather dry. [Ibid. No. 150.]
May 20.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The Jamaica Merchant of Bristol, and the Three Friends of this port, arrived here two days since, the former in seven weeks from Barbados, the latter from Maryland. Neither brings any news. Wind easterly and fresh. [Ibid. No. 151.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire. Warrant after reciting that, pursuant to the Act for ordering the forces of the several counties, the single month's assessment after the rate of 70,000l. per mensem was raised in Wiltshire and received for 1663 by the then high sheriff and by others for the two succeeding years, who have never made any satisfactory account thereof, notwithstanding that the companies of the trained bands of that county sent into the Isle of Wight during the late Dutch war remain still unpaid, and that the receivers of the said moneys avoid to come to an account thereof thereof, though they have been required thereto; authorizing and requiring him to call the said receivers and accountants to a speedy account and to endeavour to recover what shall appear to be due from them of the said moneys, which shall be applied to the use of the militia of the said county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 30.]
May 20.
Whitehall
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Capt. Gregory Alford praying a discharge from a debt of 1,400l. owing by him to Nicholas Warren, for which he gave him a judgment, which Warren has assigned to his Majesty in lieu of a debt due to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 112.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Pass for Capt. Therence Byrne, who is going to seek military service abroad. [Latin. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 167.]
May 20. Similar pass for Thomas Marshall. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 20. Warrant for a grant of the office of Attorney-General of the Marches to Lewis Meyrick of Gray's Inn during pleasure, in place of Owen Wynne, lately made a justice for the counties of Glamorgan, Brecon, and Radnor. [Precedents 1, f. 144.]
[After May 20.] Capt. Therence Byrne and Capt. Thomas Marshall to Secretary Williamson. Petition for some supply, having received their pass, but being unable to depart in a condition answerable to what they are. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 152.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth of his consent that William Seaman may obtain letters mandatory to the University of Cambridge for creating him M.D., he performing the requisite exercises or cautioning for the same. [Ibid. No. 153.]
May 22. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. That I may write with a witness, I have taken this time, Sir John Newton being present. We have drunk in honour of your health. We break no necks in this country, so have no news, and being invention and intelligence, as somebody told somebody, has left the Secretary's office, I am afraid it would be in vain to expect any news unless a man held correspondence with that party. Pardon the trouble of the enclosed. [Ibid. No. 154.]
May 22.
St. Peter's College, Cambridge.
Certificate by six Fellows that Charles Otway's election into Mr. Sammes' fellowship was good and valid, both by reason of the statutable devolution of the election to the Master and Deans on a parity of votes and also in regard of the nullity of the contrary suffrages for Mr. Wogan, he being not a B.A. and so utterly unqualified. [Ibid. No. 155.]
May 22.
Loddington.
Dr. J. Bentham to Williamson. I must ever acknowledge your favour to my son at Peterhouse, for thereby and the Duke of Monmouth's letters to the Master a strict examination of all candidates being declared, my son's competitors sat down, and he, having passed the test before all the Fellows, was elected Fellow by a unanimous vote. Last Saturday I was assured that two of the prebendaries of Peterborough were very near their deaths, without any hope. I presume the Bishop resolves his own chaplain shall succeed one, and, if by your letters to the Bishop I might succeed the other, it would much better please me than if I could procure it by other hands. On Tuesday sennight he visits our deanery and I desire your letters may be with him about the 27th that I may know his pleasure the 30th, when he visits us. The preferment is not great, yet being near me, and in a place where, if you knew what chapter there is, I might be of some use, I shall gladly accept it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 156.]
May 22.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W.N.W., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 157.]
May 22.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. A vessel of this place, which came from Croisic last Friday, reports of two Sallee men-of-war heard of about Ushant, and that they had taken an English vessel very lately. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 158.] (fn. 1)
May 22.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. A small vessel from Rochelle come in here gives account that there was a report there that the Dutch and French fleets before Messina engaged, and that the Dutch lost six ships taken and two burnt and the rest all shattered. Other shipping news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 159.]
May 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 18th came in here the Dublin Merchant from Dublin with corn from France for Holland or the Eastland. They are to stop at Dover or the Downs to receive orders. To-day they put to sea again, wind W.N.W.
Yesterday came in the Peace of Bristol from Holland for Bordeaux. They came out of the Texel five days past, where they left above 100 ships and three men-of-war for convoy bound for the Straits. It is supposed they all put to sea that day or the day after, the wind being fair. There was a close report that the French and the Prince of Orange had engaged and that the Prince's army had the worst of it, and he himself either hurt or killed, and that De Ruyter had fought in the Straits and was hurt in the leg. [Ibid. No. 160.]
May 22.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Last Wednesday about four miles to the westward of this a fish 18 feet long was cast ashore, which by some was judged to be a young whale, and others say it was a grampus. Her proportion in all parts was suitable to the length. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 161.]
May 22. The King to the Ministers, elders and deacons of the French Congregation in London. Having seen the report by the Bishop of London upon the differences between Dr. Herault and the consistory of the French Church, declaring that Dr. Herault has behaved as a true and faithful minister of the gospel, and a good and loyal subject, requiring them to make good the agreement between them and Dr. Herault, and ordering this declaration to be published in the said church next Lord's day and to be registered amongst the other acts made on this occasion. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 84.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate. Recommending John Chamberlain and William Seaman for their degrees of Doctors in Physic. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 27.]
May 22
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting his report on Col. Cary Dillon's petition, which report represented a grant dated 3 Oct., 1671, to him of the place of Master and Worker of the Mint to be reestablished in Ireland with a fee of 500l. per annum, which fee, though passed under the Great Seal of Ireland, was never placed on the establishment there, so that the petitioner has received nothing thereby, and that if, in regard of the several disappointments and charges of the petitioner in soliciting the king's favours, who has been forced to sell his estate in the prosecution thereof, he shall think fit to continue his gracious inclinations to him, it is necessary, the establishment being now closed, that the king should grant letters commanding the said pension to be placed on the present establishment there, with which report the Lord Treasurer agrees, in case the king should think fit to make any further addition to the establishment, and further reciting another report from the Lord Lieutenant, certifying that the said colonel surrendered the place of Surveyor-General of the Excise and Customs of Ireland to—Foliott and that Lord Ranelagh was employed by the Irish House of Commons to make it their suit to the king that the said colonel might have a compensation for the wardship of Talbot of Dardestown on their passing the Chimney Money Bill in lieu of the Court of Wards, both which the petitioner alleges to have been part of the above mentioned disappointments, and that the Lord Treasurer had further represented that, in regard of the said colonel's surrendering the said place and the said compensation for the wardship, his case being thereby particular and deserving favour, the king might in lieu of the 500l. per annum granted him in consideration of the same grant him 500l. per annum payable out of the temporary payments or pensions allowed on the new establishment for Ireland that shall revert by death or otherwise; directing that, as soon as any of such temporary payments or pensions shall so revert, they shall be applied to the payment of the said 500l. per annum granted to the said colonel as aforesaid during his life, and further that the said colonel be inserted on the said establishment for the said 500l. per annum in such manner as the persons into whose place he shall come were inserted in the same. [Over 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 27.]
May 23.
Guildhall.
The Commissioners of Lieutenancy of London to the King. Address for a warrant for levying one month's tax for the militia for the year ensuing, commencing Midsummer next. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 162.]
May 23.
Harwich
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Garland anchored last Saturday in Hollesley Bay, and in the afternoon set ashore here an ambassador, as his attendants, who are about 17, give out. He is secretary to the King of Sweden, and went hence for London yesterday, and, 'tis said, intends to pass from thence for France and so to Nimeguen, where he is appointed a plenipotentiary at the treaty. They highly set forth the present powerful condition of their king in his land and sea forces and well paying of them.
Last Sunday morning by a brisk easterly wind arrived in about 12 hours from the Brill one of our packet-boats. They communicated no news of the two great armies in those parts, but give us an account of the great fear at the Brill of the French designing an attempt on that island. They imprisoned two Italian gentlemen that passed hence thither last week for walking on the inside of their works in a common walk. They have also imprisoned Mr. Dale that inhabits there on some suspicions and jealousies. Some say Mr. Paine complained of him for harbouring a Capt. Plat (to which he pleads not guilty) against whom, it is said, the States have published a placart.
There is a report of a French fleet on those coasts by some vessels lately arrived here, but I guess there is no certainty in it. Wind yesterday and still S.W., weather fair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 163.]
May 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. An intimate friend of mine, come lately from Bordeaux, reports that port to be very poor and miserable, the fruits of their late rebellion, the whole town being undone, good part of the housing being pulled down, the merchants undone or removed, and those lately of small estates reduced to very little more than nothing.
Ships arrive daily all barren of news except the Virginians, who say the tyranny of the natives exceeds that of the rebellion of Ireland, if possible, roasting men and causing their neighbours to eat them, as the last ship from there reported.
Wind variable, sometimes S., sometimes W., but now a little at S.W. [Ibid. No. 164.]
May 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W., fair weather. At Spithead are two vessels from Malaga, one from the Straits and one from Bordeaux, bound for London, put in by contrary winds, and so have new passes. [Ibid. No. 165.]
May 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Smyrna and Cadiz ships with the two frigates from the Straits sailed yesterday for the Downs. [Ibid. No. 166.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 166 i.]
May 23.
London.
Samuel Packer to his mother, Anne Spinage. Congratulating her on the hopes of his cousin's recovery and wishing him many happy years. [Ibid. No. 167.]
May 23. Pass signed by the Duke of Monmouth for 5 horses to Capt. Fletcher. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 47.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the Duke of Monmouth that, whereas he formerly granted an order for the division of the profits arising out of the estat major of his regiment of foot in France, as also out of the vacancies of the same, between Col. Scott, Lieut.-col. Langley and Major Kirke, which has occasioned some dispute concerning the proportions each ought to have, for preventing the like for the future, his intention is that the division be made as it was in Sir Samuel Clarke's time, that is, that Col. Scott shall have one entire moiety of the said profits, and the other half be divided equally between the lieut.-colonel and major, saving only that Col. Scott shall receive all the pay to himself which shall grow due to the Duke himself as colonel of the said regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 53.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir James Shaen. Though his luck was so bad in his late recommendation of Mr. Wood, recommending an old Custom House officer, the bearer, Mr. Ivy, to whom he would be glad to pay an ancient arrear of kindness, that, if possible, he may be accommodated in his service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 97.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring to the Committee for Trade the table of rates appointed by the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to be paid for tolls on the several goods and merchandizes therein mentioned, which shall be brought into or pass out of the channel from the Thames to Holborn Bridge, for which they desire his Majesty's approbation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 168.] Annexed,
Reference by the said committee of the said table to the Lord Treasurer. 2 June, the Council Chamber. [Ibid. No. 168 i.]
Report of the Lord Treasurer that he does not see that the rates in the said table will be prejudicial to his Majesty in his customs, so that provision be made that neither this channel nor any part thereof be deemed a lawful quay for shipping or landing any merchandizes. 15 June, Wallingford House. [Ibid. No. 168 ii.]
May 24. Henry Slingesby to [Sir Robert Southwell]. I doubt not, when better, to produce such counterfeits of Mr. Palmer's farthings that he cannot, with all his pretended art, nay with his wooden tool and scale, distinguish them. I am too ill to declare reasons and objections, but send some presented to the Lord Treasurer several months ago and very imperfectly answered by Mr. Palmer, who has not done his part in preparing for the trial, which was the cause I did not proceed further therein. [Ibid. No. 169.] Enclosed,
Objections against tin farthings, grounded on the softness of the metal and the easiness of working it, which would encourage counterfeits, and they might be debased 30 or 40 per cent. by a mixture of lead; the necessary bulk of the pieces, if of intrinsic value, unless the price of tin were raised, the King having the preemption, and that would be ruinous to the tin trade, as the Hollanders, etc. would seek it elsewhere; also the kingdom being supplied with 30,000l. worth of copper farthings, they would be decried, if tin ones were introduced to the great loss of his Majesty, the people, or the undertakers. [Ibid. No. 169 I.]
May 24. William Burford to James Hickes. Requesting him to take care in the delivery of the enclosed with all speed. [Ibid. No. 170.]
May 24.
Portsmouth
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., rainy weather. Many French privateers are on this coast, chasing every ship and examining their passes. Where they find defects or suspicion, away they carry them for France. Several they let go, but plunder them as they please. Merchants and owners complain that we have not some small frigates to guard our coast. [Ibid. No. 171.]
May 24.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A small vessel of this town came from Cherburg last Sunday and into this port this morning. One that came in her tells us that last week was brought in there by a privateer of that place a ship of Dover that came from some islands. He forgot the name, but I suppose it is the Western Islands. The Frenchmen there torture by live matches and otherwise to make the men confess to whom the goods belong, and will not suffer others to come near them till they have got such confession to make them prize. The informer would not have his name mentioned nor the vessel's for fear, when they go next for Cherburg, they might be abused by the French there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 172.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Margaret, Lady Herbert, praying a reversion of certain lands now in jointure to the Queen in Surrey, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire and Oxfordshire for 99 years, to commence after the leases that shall be in being at the Queen's death. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 113.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox, after reciting a grant of a pension of 60l. a year to Madame le Grand for good services to the King during his abode at Cologne during the late times of rebellion, and his intention to grant to each of her three daughters, Maria Elizabeth le Grand, Aldegonde Olney and Elizabeth Constance le Grand an additional pension of 30l. per annum for their respective lives and that the said pension to Madame le Grand should continue after her decease to be paid to her said three daughters, for the punctual payment to the said daughters of the said pensions to begin from Christmas last. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 168.]
May 24. Notes by Williamson of the arguments of counsel before the Privy Council in the case of Pearson against the Royal Adventurers and the Royal African Company. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 175.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pension of 400l. sterling per annum to Alexander, Earl of Moray, who has freely resigned the office of Justice General of Scotland, to commence at Martinmas next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 455.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Chancellor, and Sir James Dalrymple, President of the College of Justice, and the remanent Senators thereof. We require you by all means to prevent and suppress all mutinous courses, which you have prudently adverted to and obviated by your Act of Sederunt of 5 Jan. last, and we leave the advocates and others of the College of Justice to be ordered and ruled by you in all things relating to their employments, and further require you to prevent and punish all combinations and unwarrantable correspondences amongst advocates whereby they may refuse to consult, plead or concur with any of the rest, especially with those who adhered to our service and continued in, or early returned to their station, and we ordain that the three Clerks of Session be nominated by the Senators of the College of Justice in all time coming and be subject to their censure, and further that in future there be only three Clerks of Session besides the Clerk of the Bills, and that you choose three out of the present number and modify such satisfaction to be paid by those that remain to those that go out as you shall find just and reasonable. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 456.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Chancellor, and Sir James Dalrymple, President of the College of Justice and the remanent Senators thereof. Requiring them to admit Sir David Falconer to be one of their number, to fill the vacancy caused by the appointment of Sir Archibald Primerose to the office of Justice General. [Ibid. p. 458.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Requiring them to employ Sir George McKenzie, of Rosehaugh, as assistant to his Majesty's Advocate, and to pay him the yearly salary of 100l. sterling, beginning at Martinmas next. [Ibid. p. 459.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for charters to the following persons for the following lands:—
Charles, Earl of Mar, and his heirs male, with remainder to his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Raploch and Over Raploch, lying beside the Castle of Stirling and within the shirefdom and parochine thereof, proceeding on the Earl's own resignation, and also the right of patronage of the Kirk of Stirling and emoluments to the same pertaining, which patronage pertained to his Majesty.
Alexander, Viscount Kenmore, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Gordonstoun, Over and Nether Blackmark and other lands, which pertained to Robert or John, Viscounts Kenmore, deceased, and which are now at his Majesty's disposition by reason of recognition.
[Docquets. Ibid. pp. 460, 461.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Charles Maitland of Haltoun, Treasurer Deput of Scotland, of the lands and barony of Dundee, together with the heritable office of Constable in the burgh of Dundee, the office of bearing his Majesty's banner and standards of war, the customs and colt silver of the first fair of Dundee together with the burgh of barony of Rattenraw, proceeding on the resignation of the said Charles Maitland, David, Earl of Northesk, John Wedderburn of Blackness and others, and ratifying and confirming to the said Charles Maitland a charter granted by John, King of Scotland, dated at Striveling, 10 July, in the ninth year of his reign, to Alexander Scrymgeour, then Constable of Dundee, containing a grant to him of the said office of constabulary with the privileges and jurisdictions therein expressed, all which are granted after inquisition made thereanent and are declared to have belonged to the said office in the time of King Alexander III., and also another charter from the same king to the said Scrymgeour ratifying the former charter, as also a charter from King Robert to Nicholl Scrymgeour of certain lands about Dundee and of the said office of constabulary, and further ratifying a decreet by the Privy Council of Scotland of February last, which found that the said constables of Dundee have been in possession of a civil and criminal jurisdiction and that the said Charles Maitland ought to be continued therein, with a new gift to the said Charles Maitland of the said lands, barony, &c., with the patronage of the kirk of Innerkeithing and Rossyth annexed thereto, which patronage formerly belonged to his Majesty, with the heritable office of constabulary over and in the said town of Dundee and specially the jurisdiction and privileges granted by Alexander III. and confirmed by King John and King Robert, and his Majesty further declares the said Charles Maitland and his successors, Constables of Dundee, to be the first magistrate of the said burgh and to enjoy all privileges as such, and with power to hold their courts, civil and criminal, as formerly, and finally erecting the village of Rattenraw in a burgh of barony, and erecting all the foresaid lands, baronies, burgh of barony, milnes, woods, fishings, kirks, teinds, patronages, chaplaincies, heritable office of constabulary, and bearing of his Majesty's banners, &c., in a haill and free barony to be called the barony of Dundee. (The ratification of this charter is printed in the Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. 8, p. 339.) [Docquet. Two pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 462.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The King to Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput. Warrant after reciting that Alexander Swinton and Laurence Charters, sheriffs deput of Edinburghshire, by his appointment secured the moveables of a deceased bastard of Portsburgh near Edinburgh, for the king's use, amongst which were 2,000 merks in cash which were delivered by them to him, which was then no more a part of the said hereditas jacens, and could not fall under any gift of bastardy given of the said moveable estate, empowering him to pay the said sum to the said sheriffs deput equally between them as a reward for their pains in that and other affairs. [Ibid. p. 464.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Robert Raitt of Snadoun, Provost of Montrose, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Sands, part of the barony of Dun, proceeding on the resignation of David Erskine of Dun, reserving to the said Erskine and his heirs so much of the said lands without the dyke to be bigged by the said Raitt betwixt it and the river of Southesk as shall be necessary for their fishing on the said river and for no other use whatsoever, and further granting to the said Raitt all that piece of the lands of Sands lying on the east and south east of the burn of Teik, both which lands are overflowed each tide with the sea and water of Southesk, with the teinds, parsonage and vicarage of both the said lands, with power to the said Raitt to drain both the said lands, and with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Alexander Brown of Thornydykes, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands and barony of Thornydykes lying within the shirefdoms of Berwick and Edinburgh and the constabulary of Haddington respectively, proceeding on the resignation of William Borthwick of Cruikstoun, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 466.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift in favour of James Cunningham, merchant of Edinburgh, of the escheat and life rent of William Wood, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, deceased, now pertaining to his Majesty by reason of escheat through the said Wood having been denounced his Majesty's rebel and put to the horn at the instances of Alexander Daes and others and through his contemptuous remaining at the horn attour the space of year and day, with a declaration that, when the sums contained in the hornings are paid and also the said Cunningham's expenses and any debts due to him from the deceased, he is to make just compt and payment of the surplus of what he shall receive to the other creditors of the deceased, or to his relict, bairns and executors. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 467.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Katherine, widow of Sir James Maclier, deceased, and the report of the Attorney-General thereon (both calendared in the last volume pp. 591, 592), transmitting to him the whole matter with the Attorney-General's opinion, and requiring him, if he finds it according to law and otherwise fitting, to give order for producing the said Entry Books or authentic copies thereof concerning the said claim and judgment of innocency that they may be brought for the petitioner as evidence at any trial as in the report is mentioned, or else to report the state of the matter with his opinion thereon. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 29.]
May 25.
Council Chamber.
[Sir Robert Southwell] to Mr. Hoare, Comptroller of the Mint. Informing him that the Committee of Trade would have him attend them to-morrow at 3, touching some questions relating to the business of farthings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 173.]
Tuesday,
May 25.
Sir Francis North to Williamson. I must acknowledge it as a great favour that you communicated the papers concerning Mr. Fifeild, whereby I perceive he has used me very ill, for, when he showed me the petition he intended to prefer, it concluded only in general terms to desire a bounty in regard of his past services and present poverty. It seems now his aim is to be restored to his place, which if he had acquainted me with, I should have declared my thoughts to him, which I now beg to trouble you with.
When I was made Chief Justice, I had no obligation to receive him, he being no sworn officer, but a clerk under me to dispatch business concerning writs of error, and to receive my profits arising thereby. I was not then without information that he had been very displeasing to all former Chief Justices, that he had neglected to attend as he ought, and of the great indigence he had brought himself into by projects. But, because of his loyalty and his dependence on that employment, I, who removed no other officer that had any such place, believed an admonition might reform him, and told him my doubts concerning him, and that he must not expect to stay one week longer than he behaved himself. I kept him as long as I could, till a whole term's absence occasioned daily complaints to me and frequent motions in Court, so I was forced to put another into his place, on whom I imposed by contract to give 20l. a year to Mr. Fifeild, with which I thought he had reason to be content, when he became incapable of performing the office. The office he seeks to be restored to concerns not only the receipt of my profit but is of great importance to the dispatch of justice, and I am in law answerable for all his faults, whether of negligence or corruption; and I think him in many other respects, besides his necessitous condition, unfit for the employment.
If, after you have considered this matter, you think fit to move the King to write that letter, I must beg leave of him to appear before him and represent my condition to him, hoping he will not command me to take a servant in whom I can have no confidence, and yet must trust with the receipt of my money, and stand chargeable with all his faults. I promise myself your assistance, that I may receive no disquiet by this affair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 174.]
May 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Though the wind has these two days been easterly, where it continues fresh, the packet-boat, which was to have come from the Brill yesterday, is not arrived. Yesterday and to-day very much shooting of great guns from sea has been heard. [Ibid. No. 175.]
May 25.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 20th. Wind S.W., a little rain. [Ibid. No. 176.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Sheeres. I am extreme sorry we were forced to part so abruptly, having several points to discourse with you at large upon, particularly some queries as to the state of the inland country of Barbary, besides our mechanics, which I wish I could have had more time to entertain myself in with you.
I am commanded by the king to call to you for certain mathematical instruments which Marke made new lately, and which are sent down to you to the Downs. If you have them, the king desires they may be sent back to his Majesty through one of our correspondents at Deal, either Lodge or Watts, whom I have ordered to hand this to you. I wish you a happy passage and a good success in your undertaking. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 97.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Morgan Lodge or Richard Watts. Recommending the above letter to his care to watch when Mr. Sheeres, who is bound for Tangier in a vessel of his own, passes through the Downs, where he is expected in a day or two, and praying them to take care of what he gives to be sent to Williamson. [Ibid. p. 98.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Kenrick Edisbury of Hammersmith for a patent for a sort of plaister observed by him in France and not yet used in England called Glassis, which may be used instead of freestone for paving. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 113.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of John Dunbar, praying for a small proportion of land called Dromcroe and other lands in Fermanagh, whereof he is now in possession, which had been granted by King James to his grandfather, Sir John Dunbar, with the proviso that, if they were aliened or demised to any mere Irishman or others not having taken the oath of supremacy, the grant should be void. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 114.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Viscount Granard for a grant of the remainder of lands in co. Dublin and elsewhere possessed by John Holywood, the remainder whereof, if he die without heirs male of his body, is in the Crown, to hold the same for 1,000 years under the present rents and services. [Ibid.]
May 25. Warrant, after reciting a reference of the Earl of Orrery's petition to the Lord Lieutenant and his report dated the 1st instant that the petitioner surrendered all his patents of President of Munster, that in consideration thereof he was granted by letters patent of 19 Feb., 1673[-4], a pension of 838l. 14s. to be continued till 8,000l. be fully paid him at one entire payment, that he now prays an order that the said 8,000l. be paid him out of the 20,000l. monthly, which will be due from the new Farmers of the Revenue in Ireland the last year of their farm from 31 Dec., 1681, to 31 Dec., 1682, and that letters patent may be passed to him for the same accordingly, that the king by letters of 23 March, 1675–6, ordered that, after the temporary payment of 5,000l. per annum to the Duke of Ormonde out of the particular quit-rents assigned for his satisfaction till he shall have received what remains due to him under a contract with the king shall cease, the several sums due to the several persons thereafter mentioned, first to Col. Lane's daughters, 6,000l., secondly to Laurence Hyde, 8,888l., thirdly to Sir Timothy Tyrrell, 3,000l., and lastly to the petitioner, 8,000l., be successively paid out of the said quit-rents without the interfering of any other payments whatever on that fund, that in regard the petitioner's payment is last to be paid, so that, if any failure should happen by reason that the Duke may possibly be entitled to receive this money longer than two years, which cannot certainly be known, the sum yet due to him not being yet fully adjusted, the king may therefore, in consideration of the petitioner's many faithful services and the better to enable him to provide for his family, order the remainder of the said 8,000l., if any shall be unpaid out of this fund, to be paid to the petitioner or his assigns, either the whole, if but a little sum, out of the last monthly 20,000l. payable by the said new Farmers as aforesaid, or, if a great sum, out of the said last three monthly payments, and a further reference of the said petition and report to the Lord Treasurer, who by his report the 22nd instant certified that he agreed with the said report, and in order that the king's grace may be effectual thinks it necessary to make these additions, that the payment to be granted be inserted in the present and future establishments of Ireland, till the sum granted be fully paid, and that the acquittances of the petitioner or his assigns shall be a sufficient discharge to the Farmers of the Revenue for their payments and that the said Farmers may defalk the same out of their said last three monthly payments: for a grant to the said Earl, his heirs and assigns, that, in case of any failure in payment of the said 8,000l. as directed by the said letters of 23 March, 1675–6, any part remaining unpaid out of that fund be satisfied out of the last said three monthly payments in the last year of the said farm as aforesaid by equal portions, with clauses therein as proposed by the said report of the Lord Treasurer. [Over 6 pages. Precedents 1, p. 146.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Order in Council approving of a draft proclamation for the security of navigation and commerce, and ordering that it be sent to a Secretary of State to be prepared for his Majesty's signature, that it may be forthwith printed and published. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 177.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, the Committee for Trade having that day reported that, having read several papers from Mr. Slingesby, touching the making of farthings with tin as proposed by Mr. Palmer, they are of opinion that a stop be put to the further coining of copper farthings; that the officers be required to forbear coining any more farthings or halfpence of copper till further order. [Copy. Ibid. No. 178.] Annexed,
Minute of the said report of the Committee for Trade. [Ibid. No. 178 i.]
May 26.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. There are many pleasant showers, the wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 179.]
May 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The President, an East India ship outward-bound, has been two days in the Downs. The Dutch pretended English ships not getting his Majesty's pass are at a stand and dare not go out of the Downs without convoy. His Majesty's subjects in smaller vessels now much hope for a trade, which these Lorendrogers, as they call them, stole away, being great ships and flyboats, which sailed a third per ton cheaper than the English could do. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 180.]
May 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 181.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 181 i.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Pass for Nicholas Oudart to go to Holland and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 169.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Blank pass for importing and landing at any port 6 stone horses for the king's service. [Ibid.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for permitting the bearer to import and land the said horses. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for appointing 16 persons therein named commissioners for licensing hackney coaches. [Ibid.]
May 26. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to John Brookes of the City of York and the heirs male of his body, with a discharge to him from all services that ought to be performed in consideration thereof or sums that ought to be paid in respect of those services, with a particular non-obstante of the Privy Seal directing the application of the 20,000l. that shall first accrue by the creation of baronets to the use of the Great Wardrobe. [Precedents 1, f. 145.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Proclamation, similar to that of 8 Feb., 1668, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1667–1668, p. 222, providing for the observance of rules in English harbours, during the time of hostility between neighbouring nations. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 350.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 182.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of Lieutenancy for the City of London. Ordering them to levy so much money as shall be needful for defraying the necessary charges of the militia of the City not exceeding the proportion of the one month's tax paid by the City towards the tax of 70,000l. per mensem, to commence from Midsummer next, in accordance with the Act, 14 Car. II., c. 3. Sign manual. Countersigned, "J. Williamson." [Ibid. No. 183.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 29.]
May 27.
Pembroke Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. The reason Mr. Ardrey's degree was so long deferred was because no man appeared by way of proxy. I happened to be in the North, so knew nothing of that affair till Mr. Benson wrote to me. Last Thursday I was admitted for Mr. Ardrey, so his degree was completed. At the same time Bancks was admitted B.A. He returns his most humble thanks for your generous charity towards him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 184.]
May 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Thursday towards evening one of our packet-boats arrived. The Master told us that it was generally reported in Holland that De Ruyter was dead, and that on their apprehensions that the French have a design on them by sea they have got several of their men-of-war out, who were then, he guessed, not far off Goree, where the shooting is said to have been, of which I wrote in my last, and he believes they were only the salutes of the ships on their coming into their fleet. I hear Mr. Dale is discharged from his imprisonment.
Wind S.W., weather variable with showers. [Ibid. No. 185.]
May 27.
Deal.
J. Sheeres to Williamson. Missing the Soudades, whose captain I prayed might have orders to sail without me, in case the wind came fair, that neither he nor myself might suffer her Majesty's further displeasure, I arrived here yesterday in a ship I have freighted with materials for the mole, whose dispatch being of much importance has proved one great cause of my detention. Coming ashore I found your commands, to which I reply that the instruments intended for his Majesty were by mistake sent after me, which I immediately put into the hands of a trusty friend to give to Mr. Chiffinch, who ere this I trust may have received them. The king's and your commands for my instant departure will, I hope, absolve me from not attending your last instructions. I was so alarmed on all sides that I scarce remember how I left Whitehall. I therefore humbly pray your forgiveness, and that your orders and the instructions of the Royal Society may be deposited in Mr. Pepys' hands, whom I have prayed to be careful in their dispatch.
My last prayer is for the continuance of your favour and protection. I am a humble shrub that begs leave to creep up under your shelter. [Ibid. No. 186.]
May 27.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Your packet for Mr. Sheeres was received last post, but the ship is not yet come into the Downs. The Rose and Drake, King's ships, and several merchant ships from the Straits and several others from St. Ubes are arrived with a great many others, the wind being S.W., very fresh. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 187.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Major Kirke. Warrant for payment of what shall be found due to Capt. Thomas Pye on account of his half pay or otherwise from the Duke's regiment now in France to his sister and executrix, Hester Hoare. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 47.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Thomas Walker. His Majesty having received an account from Sir James Smith, your fellow member, on his arrival here of the great care of the magistrates and justices of Exeter for effectually putting in execution the laws against Nonconformists, and that there had been spread abroad a malicious report, as if such their proceedings were disliked by him, at least that they were not altogether according to his mind in that matter, I am commanded by him to assure you of the contrary, and that he takes very kindly from them their care and diligence in that particular, and desires they will not only continue it, but that they do by all means endeavour to find out who they are that spread those false and malicious reports of his mind in this point, that they may be proceeded against with fitting severity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 99.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Albemarle. Informing him of the above letter and desiring to second to those gentlemen what he has written for their encouragement. [Ibid. p. 100.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Mary Kirke, showing that on her marriage with George Kirke, deceased, his late Majesty settled upon her a jointure of 500l. per annum in consideration of 2,500l. paid to his Majesty, to be paid out of the Honour of Grafton, which Honour being since settled on her Majesty, her officers refuse to pay it, and therefore praying an order for payment thereof out of the said manor, granting her Majesty a reprizal for the same on some other branch of the revenue. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 115.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of the Bishop of London, praying his Majesty to empower him and his successors and their Vicar Generals to visit and exercise ecclesiastical jurisdiction in the Minories, that the abuse of clandestine marriages and others that shall be found to be there committed may be restrained. [Ibid.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to Hugh May, surveyor of Windsor Castle, of the petition of the Dean and Canons of Windsor praying that the Castle wall, on which are situated their prebendal houses, may be repaired. [Ibid. p. 116.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for paying to Laurence Hyde, Master of the Robes, appointed ambassador to the King of Poland, to represent the king at the christening of his daughter, 10l. per diem for his entertainment and 1,500l. for his equipage and such further sums for intelligence and other extraordinary expenses as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 170.]
May 27. Warrant for a grant to the Mayor, Jurats and City of the town of Maidstone and their successors for ever for holding a market from 6 to 23 Sept. yearly for the sale of cattle and hops only, it having been found by inquisition that such a market will not be to the damage of the Crown or any others, or of any neighbouring markets. [Precedents 1, f. 145.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for admitting John Keating, Attorney-General to the Duke of York in Ireland, to be one of the King's Counsel in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 31.]
May 28.
Council Chamber.
Sir Robert Southwell to Henry Slingesby. The Committee for Trade having met about the business of tin farthings, Mr. Palmer showed that on 10 April he delivered in a pound of blank pence, half-pence and farthings, and was to have received the same quantity of unstamped counterfeits from the Mint so as to examine the metal, but your illness has prevented it. If it continue, you are to depute another officer of the Mint to attend to the matter. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 188.]
May 28.
Cainewood.
Diana Bill to Williamson. Apologizing for troubling him, and, as the poor woman who keeps this poor youth lost all her livelihood in the last great fire in Blackfriars, and lives only by the charity of good people, hoping he will not give any stop to his charitable intentions to the boy. [Ibid. No. 189.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Constable of the Tower to keep John Freake, committed by warrant from the Council for high treason, close prisoner, and to allow no person to come to or have conference with him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 157.]
[May ?] William Sherwin to the King. Petition for a patent for his invention of a most excellent and speedy way for printing of broad calicoes and Scotch cloth with a double-necked rolling press, which is the only true way of the East India printing and staining such goods. On the back,
May 29.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General, and Report by Sir Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, in favour of granting the petitioner a patent for 14 years. 22 July. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 190.]
May 29. Oliver Gregory to Williamson. There is due to me by an assignment from Mr. Smith, clerk of the cheque, the assignee of Sir Edward Griffin, on an order registered on the Hearth-money for the use of the Yeomen of the Guard, which was very near in course to be paid before the stop, 2,000l., on an order registered on the Customs 250l., on an order registered on the Wine Act 300l., and on several orders at large 1,401l. I have sustained loss by the fire in Southwark 2,300l. I have nine children to provide for, and am in debt, which I am not able to pay, and so must be forced to quit my employment to my ruin. Knowing your great kindness to myself and my brother whilst living, I desire you to stand by me with all the assistance you can. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 191.] Annexed,
Oliver Gregory to the King. Petition stating his condition as in the above letter, and praying an order for the payment of the moneys due to him. [Ibid. No. 191 I.]
May 29.
Knighton, Isle of Wight.
Sir Robert Dillington to Williamson. It has been the misfortune of this poor isle to be severely, censured, though unjustly, for defrauding the customs, so that, when lately there were complaints against the patent officers about the exorbitancy of fees and delays, the inhabitants could obtain but little redress, which with other inconveniencies will so discourage them, that the isle, which is a frontier and necessarily to be full of people for its defence, is already greatly lessened in its inhabitants, and will in a few years be much depopulated. But I am given to understand that the officers themselves, who should detect the frauds, are the greatest criminals, and that Mr. Horton, a customer of Cowes, by his diligence has newly discovered several false certificates given out by the patent officers or their deputies, and that the business is or will be before you in Council or the Treasury Chamber. I could heartily wish such practices might be severely punished, for through these abuses a scandal reflects on the country, and presume that on a fair occasion this isle might not dispair of your patronage. [Ibid. No. 192.]
May 29.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Yesterday came in two Scotch vessels bound for France. Yesterday between 60 and 70 were in sight of this place, which these Scotch inform us to be Dutchmen bound for St. Tubus, convoyed by four or five men-of-war. Other shipping news. Wind these four or six days S. and S.W., now S.W. [Ibid. No. 193.]
May 29.
London.
J. Belman (? Sir J. Williamson) to Monsr. [?de Vic]. I am very sorry to hear by yours of 2 June of your indisposition. I hope the first post will bring us news of your recovery. I have received yours of 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, 25, 29 May and 2 June.
I shall take care after the departure of Don Pedro Ronquillo "de bien faire tenir tout ce que vous escrivez à vos amis en Irelande." [French. Copy in the hands of one of Williamson's clerks. Ibid. No. 194.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Instalment of the first fruits of the Bishopric of London, amounting to 1,019l. 8s. 4d., to Henry Compton, D.D., elected and confirmed bishop of that see, to be paid in 4 years by 4 equal portions, the first to be paid at Lady Day next. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 27.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Enclosing commissions for 26 persons to be officers of the militia, to whom they are to give notice that they may receive their commissions, and, as the Marquis of Montrose and Lord Livingstoune are at present beyond the seas, authorizing them to deliver the commission of the latter to his father, the Earl of Linlithgow, who is to command his troop in his absence, and that of the former to the present lieut.-colonel of his regiment, who is to command the same during the absence of the Marquis. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 468.] Enclosed,
Commissions of the same date to James, Marquis of Montrose, to be colonel of the Perthshire militia regiment of foot in place of the deceased Earl of Perth, to Lord Murray and Sir John Stirling of Keer to be captains of the two militia troops of horse in Perthshire in place of the Earl of Tullibardin, deceased, and Lieut.-General William Drummond, whose commission is declared void, to Charles, Earl of Mar, and Seaton of Touch to be colonel and lieut.-colonel of the Stirlingshire and Clackmannanshire militia regiment of foot in place of the Earl of Calendar, and — Buchanan of that ilk, whose commissions are declared void, to James, Lord Burntisland, to be lieut.-colonel of the Fife and Kinross-shire militia regiment of foot in place of Sir James Lumsden, deceased, to the Earl of Kinghorn to be colonel, and to — Graham of Monorgan to be lieut.-colonel of the Forfarshire militia regiment of foot in place of the Earl of Southesk, and — Carnaigie of Bonnymoone, whose commissions are declared void, to George, Earl Marischal, to be colonel of the militia regiment of foot in Kincardineshire and the Marischal's part of Aberdeenshire, to Charles, Earl of Aboyne, to be captain in place of Viscount Arbuthnot, whose commission is declared void, of the militia troop of horse in Kincardineshire and the Marischal's part of Aberdeenshire, to John, Earl of Erroll, to be colonel, and to — Ogilry of Boyne (in place of Sir John Keath) to be lieut.-colonel of the militia regiment of foot in Aberdeenshire, excluding the Marischal's part thereof, to Sir John Keath of Keath Hall, Knight Marischal, to be captain of the militia troop of horse in Aberdeenshire, excluding the Marischal's part thereof, in place of the Master of Saltoun, whose commission is declared void, to Sir William Murray of Stenhope to be lieut. colonel of the militia regiment of foot in Linlithgowshire and Peebles-shire in place of — Murray of Blackbarony, whose commission is declared void, to Lord Livingstoune to be captain of the militia troop of horse in Linlithgowshire and Peebles-shire in place of Lord Torpichen, whose commission is declared void, to William Murray of Spott to be lieut.-colonel of the militia regiment of foot in the shire of East Lothian, and constabulary of Haddington, in place of Sir James Hay of Linplum, whose commission is declared void, to Sir Archibald Cockburn of Langtoun, to be colonel in place of the Earl of Home, deceased, and to Sir James Cockburn of that ilk to be lieut.-colonel of the militia regiment of foot in Berwickshire, to Sir John Home of Prenderguest to be captain of the militia troop of horse in Berwickshire, in place of Sir Patrick Home, of Polwart, whose commission is declared void, to James Murray, of Philiphaugh, to be lieut.-colonel of the militia regiment of foot in Roxburghshire, in place of — McDougall of Mackerstoun, whose commission is declared void, to Lord Elibank to be captain of the militia troop of horse in Roxburghshire in place of Lord Newbottle, now Earl of Lothian, whose commission is declared void, to George Hopringle of Torsonce to be lieut.-colonel of the militia regiment of foot, whereof the Duke of Monmouth is colonel, in place of Sir Francis Scott of Thirlestane, whose commission is declared void, to the Earl of Glencairne, John, Lord Rosse, and — Blair of that ilk to be captains of the three militia troops of horse in the shires of Ayr and Renfrew, in place of — Earle of Colinton, the Earl of Cassilis and Lord Cochrane, whose commissions are declared void, and to Alexander, Viscount Kenmore, to be captain of the militia troop of horse in Wigtonshire and the Stewardry of Kirkcudbright, in place of the Earl of Galloway or Lord Gairles, whose commission is declared void. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, pp. 469–494.]
May 30.
Rushton.
Viscount Cullen to Williamson. I can never sufficiently acknowledge your extraordinary kindness, but, if you stand not my friend, after all I am like to lose 245l. of the money, for Lord Exeter long since deposited the money in Sir Lewis Palmer's hands, and now I can get not one penny of him. For particulars I refer you to Mr. Portlock. I wrote to Lord Peterborough two weeks since and Lord O'Brien delivered th letter, but I have no answer. I beseech you to know from Lord O'Brien what his Lordship's answer is, for, if you judge fit, I desire to have an immediate order from his Majesty to Sir Roger Cave and John Westly, his trustee, to pay me either the whole sum or what part of it you think fit, for from Sir Lewis I despair of getting a farthing, and, if you procure me not this order immediately, I shall be quite defeated, for I am certain Lord Peterborough is getting the whole sum into his own hands, and then what will become of me ? I have sent my servant with a pad gelding, which I most humbly beg you to accept of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 195.]
May 30.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind easterly with much rain this morning. [Ibid. No. 196.]
May 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. We have had good store of rain of late. Mr. Oudart sailed hence for Holland last Saturday with a fair wind which has continued S.W. ever since. [Ibid. No. 197.]
May 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 198.]
May 30.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 27th came in the Trompeuse, a French man-of-war, with two merchantmen under his convoy bound for the West Indies, which he is to see safe several leagues out of the Channel and so return, for they fear none but the Spanish capers, having passports from Holland to free them from any Holland man-of-war or caper. They report that last Wednesday night they fell in with a Dutch fleet of between 30 and 40 sail, and say absolutely it was De Ruyter's fleet from the Straits, and that there were three flagships, but since by some English vessels from France, &c., which came very near the same fleet, which lay off the Lizard, we are told that they are the Dutch St. Tubus or Lisbon fleet, being great ships and but two convoys. They stand up the Channel, wind S.W. The Frenchmen report De Ruyter is dead, and that the Prince of Orange is prisoner in France. They also saw another Dutch fleet outward-bound, about 60 sail, off the Lizard, plying eastward, wind S.W., and it is supposed they are cruising to sea yet, for on Saturday above 20 sail were seen off this harbour, which made as if they would come in, but stood off to sea again to save port charges, wind S.W.
Several vessels bound for Newfoundland are come in that have lost both the rest of their fleet and two men-of-war. their convoy.
The Orange-Tree of Hull being at St. Anthone loaden with sugar and fruit, the master and four of his men ran away with the ship and goods about 15 days past. This comes by a passenger of this town that comes from Rochelle and spoke with the master. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 199.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott. Order, after reciting that he had given Capt. Parker towards completing his company six men carried into France by Mr. Hatton and three carried there by Mr. Young, that the said nine men be allowed to muster in the said captain's company and to pass as his soldiers for the future. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 48.]
May 30. Pass for horses to Major Kirke. [Ibid.]
[Before May 31.] Sir John Shorter's case. The Committee for Trade reported, 24 May, that 1,340l. 9s. 4d. not only appeared due for the freight of the 4 ships lost, but it was by his Majesty's order to be paid, and that not only in this point but in others the instructions to the Commissioners have been broken by them, so that they have been ordered on 31 May to show cause why they have not satisfied the said freight, and by what authority they have varied from their instructions.
Account of the 35,000l. received from the Hamburgers by Sir T. Player:—
Paid out by him by virtue of several warrants from the Commissioners 31,658l. 10s. 9d., so that 3,341l. 9s. 3d. remains in cash, out of which the Commissioners pretend that warrants are signed for 2,419l. 4s. 6d. including 500l. to Mr. Sandford, treasurer to the Hamburg Company, said to be bequest moneys borrowed of the Company to carry on the suit, and the Commissioners say that but 922l. 4s. 9d. will remain, which can be for freight against the 1,340l. 9s. 4d. ordered to be paid.
But it is to be observed that Thomas Tyte, one of the Commissioners, had 500l. gratification, and Samuel Missenden 250l. more, though they cannot show they have deserved aught, which they ought to refund thereby to satisfy the 1,340l. 9s. 4d. justly due for freight. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 200.] Probably annexed,
Account of the payment of the 35,000l. received from the City of Hamburg, showing the disposal thereof. [Ibid. No. 200 i.]
Copy of Mr. Tyte's account of the 35,000l., being a duplicate of the above, except it shows only how 32,120l. 4s. 8d. was disposed of. [Ibid. No. 200 ii.]
May 31.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here a ship of Bridlington, a member of this port, from Dam in Norway. At sea she met a Danish man-of-war, on which, though it be not their usual custom, he lowered his topsail and came under his lee. The man-of-war made a shot at him through his shrouds, but did him little hurt. He was so near that the wad of the gun fell on his deck. He gave them very ill language, calling them several times English dogs, and demanded 4 rix dollars, which he refusing, he sent his boat aboard with command to bring off goods to that value, on which the poor man was forced to give him a guinea. I have had other complaints of the same kind, and beseech that some course may be taken for the better encouragement of our trade. [Ibid. No. 201.]
May 31.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. By reason of my absence from home I have not writ for some time. All in these parts is in a very well settled condition, especially the militia. Scarce any officers but renew their commissions under the new Lord Lieutenant.
The 29th was performed with great solemnity. The Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council went from the Town Hall to church in their formalities. After service and sermon, they were all feasted by the Mayor. The day concluded with ringing of bells, bonfires and shooting off great guns.
The last three days several ships are arrived from Norway. They heard nothing there of the taking of Gothland. The Norwegians are full of courage and resolution, the armies of that country drawing towards Christiania, some whereof are shipped off for Denmark. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 202.]
May 31. Warrant from Secretary Coventry to John Bradley and Thomas Dixon, messengers, to search the house of—Turner, bookseller, near the Turnstile, Holborn, for Popish books sold by him contrary to law, and to seize the said books, and bring Turner before him to answer concerning the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 157.] Annexed,
List of the titles of 9 works on the Romish religion alluded to above. [Ibid.]
May 31. Pass for the James of Yarmouth laden with goods for the King of Poland from France to the Baltic. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 170.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Pass for Maria Elizabeth and Elizabeth Constance le Grand to go to Cologne. [Ibid.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to John Jarvis, Mayor, and the jurats of Sandwich. I have communicated your letter of the 28th with your examinations of several persons apprehended for misdemeanours and thefts committed at sea to his Majesty, and have his command to thank you for your care and diligence and to require you to continue the said offenders in safe custody till further orders. I must likewise desire you to make all the enquiry you can about other delicts or crimes that the said persons may have committed at sea upon mackerel boats or the like, and give me a speedy account of what you shall find. [Precedents 1, f. 146.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Elizabeth Mowat, relict of William Douglas, tailor, who was killed in his Majesty's service near Tangier, of the escheat of the said Douglas now pertaining to his Majesty through the said Douglas being a bastard and deceased intestate and without any heir of his body. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 495.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Instructions for the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland.
1. That no part of the 12 months' supply yet remaining be disposed of by them, nor no precept be drawn thereon, without the king's special warrant docquetted by the secretary, except such as are already drawn by the king, or such as he has approved before the date thereof.
2. That all fines imposed by the Privy Council or Justice Court be called in and brought into the Treasury, and no part thereof be given away or disposed of without the king's special warrant.
3. That no gifts of ward or marriage or gifts of non-entry or relief that has fallen since 1 Aug., 16—, or hereafter be revised by them or presented or passed in Exchequer of any vassal or tenant of the king's whose yearly rent exceeds 14 chalders victual or 2,000 merks, unless such gifts and signatures be first superscribed by the king and docquetted by the secretary.
4. That no signature of lands, &c., containing de Novo damus be presented or passed in Exchequer, unless superscribed and docquetted as before.
5. That no signature of ward lands containing change of holding from ward simple to taxt ward or taxt marriage be presented or passed in Exchequer, but such as are superscribed and docquetted as before. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 496.]
May. Edward Benlowes to Williamson. Latin couplet, thanking him for sending him 5l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 203.]
May.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.:—
Vol. 381. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
204 May 1 1 0 0 S.W.
205 " 2 1 5 0 S.E.
206 " 3 1 4 3 E.
207 " 4 1 1 0 N.E.
208 " 5 1 4 0 N.
209 " 6 1 2 0 S.E.
210 " 7 1 2 2 S.W.
211 " 8 1 6 1 N.W.
212, 213 " 9 1 6 6 N. Two copies, one addressed to the Navy Commissioners.
214 " 10 1 6 2 N.
215 " 11 1 0 1 S.W.
216 " 12 1 5 0 S.W.
217 " 13 1 8 2 S.W.
218 " 14 1 8 0 W.
219 " 17 2 9 1 S.W.
220 " 18 5 10 1 S.W.
221, 222 " 19 3 0 0 N.E. Two copies.
223 " 20 2 2 0 N.E.
224 " 21 2 0 0 N.E.
225 " 22 1 0 2 S.W.
226 " 23 2 1 0 S.E.
227 " 24 3 2 0 E.
228 " 25 3 0 0 E.
229 " 26 3 1 0 S.W.
230 " 27 5 1 13 S.W.
231 " 28 5 7 5 S.W.
232 " 29 5 8 8 S.W.
233 " 30 5 9 0 S.W.

Footnotes

  • 1. This and the last letter are both plainly dated 22 May, 1676, but apparently there must be some mistake in the date of one of them.