BHO

Charles II: September 1676

Pages 306-346

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

September 1676

Sept. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 73.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 73 I.]
[Sept. 1.] Memorandum that Mr. Montagu took leave of the King on that day in order to his journey to France as Ambassador Extraordinary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 211.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Windsor. Ferdinando Ivy, grandson of Sir George Ivy, deceased, has represented that he was admitted to the poor knight's place of Windsor, void by the death of — Beck, and held it six months, but on Captain Draper's restoration to his place, Thomas Wright and Thomas Trapps, whose patents were precedent to his (Ivy's), were admitted into the two places last vacant, and he dispossessed. Prince Rupert and the Earl of Arlington two of the referees of the case, reported, 30 Aug., that Capt. Draper having been restored, into whose place Wright was placed, caused a dispute which of the three should be put out and that in their opinion Wright and Trapps should stand, and that Ivy should have the next vacant place, and that, as to lodgings, the senior poor knight should choose his chamber first, and so all according to their seniority, as is practised among the prebendaries. We approve of the said report and direct accordingly, and you and the Chancellor of the Order of the Garter are to see the same effectually executed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 89.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Major Darrell. The envoy of Sweden having made suit to his Majesty for the use of such magazines or store-houses as his Majesty does not immediately use himself, for laying up certain bales of goods destined for Stockholm for the use of the King, his master, as soon as an opportunity offers, his Majesty has commanded me to signify his pleasure that, in case there be any such store-houses proper for such a use, which he does not use, you should accommodate them with so much of them as they need. The bearer is sent particularly to inform you what they need, and to bring an account of how far you can serve them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 109.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bishop of Oxford. I must not let the bearer part without my compliments to you. I have lived all the summer in hopes of bringing them myself but the good nature of my old acquaintance at Queen's would not allow me that satisfaction. I return you and our colleagues of the Press my humble thanks for all your favours to me, and beg I may not be the only one of our partnership that am to remain so wholly useless to that excellent undertaking. [Ibid. p. 110.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Robert Mower for a pardon for himself, George Mower, Samuel Lowe, John Revell, and Elizabeth Vincent for the unlawful taking away of Hester Taylor, then a maid under 16. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 133.]
Sept. 1. Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Lieut.-Col. Laurence Dempsey for a pension of 200l. per annum, lately enjoyed by Col. Trelawny out of the arrears of the Queen's portion, his Majesty in consideration of his good and faithful services being pleased to gratify him. [Ibid. p. 134.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Treasurer, on the application of the officers and gentlemen of the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, exempting them from the suspension of the pay of the servants of the Household of 28 Jan. last, and for payment to them in future of their full allowance of 6,000l. per annum according to the warrant of 18 March, 1670[-1], to commence from Midsummer last. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 201.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Pass for Charles, Earl of Shrewsbury, and John Talbot, his brother, to pass to the parts beyond the seas and to remain there 7 years with their servants, carriages and baggage and 50l. in money and 12 horses. [Precedents 1, f. 159.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
The King to John, Joseph and Philip Rottiers, Chief Gravers of the Mint and Seals. Warrant for making a great seal of silver for the Queen. [Ibid. f. 160.]
Sept. 1. Grant, after reciting that, at the request of Sir John Finch, ambassador to the Grand Signior, liberty had been granted to export from Smyrna and elsewhere two ships' lading of fruit annually for the King's own use in his kitchen, to the Levant Company of the licence and liberty obtained as aforesaid to take on board at Smyrna and elsewhere in the Grand Signior's dominions, two ships' lading of fruit every year during pleasure and to import the same into England, with prohibition to all other persons to intermeddle with the said lading of fruit without the consent of the said Company. [Ibid.]
Sept. 2.
Newark.
P. Whalley to Williamson. Thomas Meynell, of Blidworth, reproving a constable for executing a warrant against Nonconformists, on the constable's reply that what he did was in order to the service of the King, his master, answered that the King, his master, was a rogue and a knave, which was proved by three witnesses on oath. I sent him to gaol for treasonable words, and am now solicited to bail him, and desire your directions in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 74.]
Sept. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind having been much westerly, and still continuing, may be the occasion that the packetboat which was to have come from the Brill last Wednesday is not yet arrived. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Sept. 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning the wind came up to N.N.E., and to-day the whole outward-bound fleet of about 50 ships sailed. Not a topsail gale at N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Sept. 2.
Bristol.
Sir Thomas Lynch to Williamson. To-day arrived here from Jamaica the Primrose that has been nine weeks absent. He brings news of the Dutch's taking Martinico, and, further that about six weeks ago, between Cape Antonio and the Havana he met with a French caper that plundered him, and next day with seven Dutch capers that had with them seven prizes, some of them English privateers with French commissions. They were going into Havana to dispose of their prizes, and hoped to be employed by the Governor. If not, they talked of going for Canada and so home. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bailiffs of Yarmouth. I must beg your excuse that I have been so long in answering yours of the 8th past. Your demand of having me transmit to you the original of a certain letter mentioned to have been written me by Mr. Bower was such, that I did not think fit of myself to make any answer, till I had acquainted his Majesty with it, which I have now had an opportunity to do, and I am to return you for answer that he intends to have the matter of that letter brought before him in Council, where the author will be put to prove what he alleges, on which hearing he will declare his further pleasure. As the Council is adjourned for some weeks to come, he has not yet appointed a day when the matter is to be heard, but on the reassembling of the Council I shall remind him of it, and take care you shall have early notice of the day. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 110.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir John Holmes and Thomas Wyndham for a lease of all such purprestures, cottages and enclosures as have been taken in from 1632 during the late rebellion on the waste and commons of the New Forest on the same terms as the tenants of Lyndhurst enjoy their leases. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 134.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe, for making a purse for the Great Seal of Ireland, to be delivered to Sir J. Williamson to be sent to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 202.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting as in the warrant of 10 April, calendared ante, p. 68, that 2,000l. per annum was still due to John, Lord Kingston, and Edward Roberts, the order in Council of 1 Oct., 1675, and the exemption therefrom of the Duke of York and Lord Kingston, and that Lord Kingston had in his lifetime informed the King that Viscount Ranelagh was on good and valuable considerations justly entitled not only to a full moiety of the 1,597l. 10s. per annum of reprizes due to him in his own account, but also to a full moiety of the 402l. 10s. per annum due to him in trust for the said Edward Roberts and therefore besought that the grant for the said reprizes might be passed to them jointly and by equal shares, the King consenting thereto, and that Lord Kingston has since died, having by his will dated 9 March, 1675-6, devised to Sir William King of Kilpecan, co. Limerick, John Blackwell of Dublin and William Sprigg, councillor at law, amongst other things all his interest in all reprizes for lands in Ireland theretofore claimed by him, whether in his own right or as the assignee of or in behalf of any other person, upon trust to sell the same or such part thereof as they with his executors should judge needful for payment of his debts and to such further uses as by the said will may more fully appear: requiring and authorizing him, the said Duke being in the first place reprized for his deficiencies, to cause grants to be passed to the said Viscount, Sir William King, John Blackwell, William Sprigg and Edward Roberts or to their nominees in fee simple of so many lands and hereditaments in Ireland vested in the Crown by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation remaining undisposed of and applicable to the said Lord Kingston's satisfaction as are now of the clear yearly value of 2,000l. over and above quit-rents and all other charges and incumbrances, in full satisfaction of the reprizals due to the said Lord Kingston and Edward Roberts, one moiety thereof, being 1,000l. per annum, to be held by the said Viscount in fee simple and the other moiety by the said Sir William King, John Blackwell, William Sprigg and Edward Roberts, under the like yearly quit-rents as are payable by Adventurers and Soldiers in the respective provinces wherein the said lands lie, or such quitrents as the Lord Lieutenant shall think fit, not exceeding the quitrents to be reserved by the said Acts of the like quantity of lands in the provinces wherein the same lie, with other clauses as in the said warrant of 10 April. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 49.]
Draft thereof noted as transmitted from the Lord Lieutenant, June, 1676, differing by having in place of the recital about Viscount Ranelagh a recital that Lord Kingston had informed the King that the said Viscount was for valuable considerations equally interested in the reprize due to him, and besought that the grant for the said reprize might be passed to them by equal moieties. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 60.]
Draft by Lord Ranelagh of the above recital as it appears in the warrant. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Draft of the above warrant, endorsed, "This draft was signed, having been altered by Lord Ranelagh, with the consent of all the parties interested, Sept. 1." [Ibid. No. 62.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting that by letters of 22 Sept. last concerning the settling the transplanted interest in Connaught it was directed that the Commissioners and their officers should receive such fees and allowances as the Lord Lieutenant and Council should appoint, not exceeding one moiety of the fees allowed to the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and their officers, and that the Lord Lieutenant has since represented that on such a scale the fees of the said officers would be too mean, appointing that the registrar, attorney, usher and crier of the Court should receive the like fees as were formerly settled by order of Council in the Court of Claims according to the annexed table transmitted by the Lord Lieutenant, and further, as sub-commissioners will be necessary, leaving it to the Lord Lieutenant and Council to appoint fees for them. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 52.] Annexed,
The said table of fees. [Ibid. p. 53.]
Sept. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 78.]
Sept. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that amongst the papers of Dr. Henry Stubbe, lately deceased, which with his estate have become forfeited to the Crown, there are several containing matters dangerous both to Church and State, which papers are in safe custody and sealed up, declaring that they shall not be unsealed but in the presence of some person appointed by the Bishop of London, who is to inspect the same and seal up such of them as he shall find to contain any dangerous matter, to be disposed of as the King shall direct. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 203.]
Sept. 4. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. Complaining that after sending so many hue and cries he has no hopes of a secretary's company, being told that being in a reprobate sense with somebody. Aswerbie is forbidden ground and Carebie no less, and threatening to go to Carebie to enter into a league offensive and defensive against Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 79.]
Sept. 4. Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. When I received yours I was five miles from Sheerness, curing myself of an ague, so I immediately sent to my Lieutenant to assure the gentlemen that they might freely use the tower and the keys to be delivered to them, or what else they required to be accommodated therewith. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Sept. 4.
Hull.
Walter Morgan to Sir Henry Pomeroy. The difference between Corporal Emerson and myself is thus. 1 Nov., 1674, I had the guard of this town and a little after one in the night went my round and found all well. I returned to the main guard, where I found all in an uproar, and all but one complained against the corporal, for, not being able to tie one neck and heels which they refusing, he broke their heads with such an oaken plant as scarce is worn by any. The two pieces of the stick the soldiers brought me to see, a third the match that tied the soldier who made the difference, a fourth and a fifth their broken pates. I told the corporal I thought him too severe, and that these men might come to be corporals in time as well as he, and that I never did such a thing in my life and prayed him to do so no more, and so left him. He said "Surely my officers knew what they did when they made me corporal, for it is twelve years since I was corporal, and I am not now to be taught my duty, but know it as well as you," at which I stepped back and, being muffled with my coat, struck him one blow with my flat hand. He turned up his eyes, biting his tobacco pipe, twisting his hands as if he had been troubled with the falling sickness and fell on my foot with some three or four drops of blood out of his ear. I got him laid on the settle. After a while he rose and went to the fire and asked me leave to go home, and I sent one with him to light him, after which I never heard of him till he was laid out for dead. Then the Governor, without any examination before a Court Martial or himself, disarmed me and delivered me over to the civil power, who forthwith sent me to prison, where I had still remained, had you not bailed me. I hope you will labour for my trial at our next Michaelmas sessions. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Sept. 4.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last night came a Dutch privateer into this haven. He reports that, being in the fishing grounds off Lowestoft with nine English doggers that came out of Harwich, last Saturday morning a French privateer fell in amongst them and took three of the English doggers, being as many as he could man, and carried them away, which scared him in hither.
Since I was at London, I am informed that the Nonconformists met here in town, but, on my giving notice I should be home last Saturday, they yesterday met in the marshes without the bounds of our town. I am threatened with thousand pounds actions to be laid upon me by Bailiff Thaxter and that my lord would ruin me. I desire no more than to have a hearing, and I shall clear my innocency to the shame of all my adversaries. I cannot hear that you have sent down what you told me you had in command, which alone would make them tremble, they very well knowing how black they would appear. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 82.]
Sept. 4.
Yarmouth.
Edmund Thaxter and Thomas Bradford, bailiffs, Sir George England and Richard Huntington to Williamson. Expressing their gladness at hearing by his letter of the 2nd (calendared ante, p. 309) that it is his Majesty's pleasure to have the matter of Bower's letter brought before him in Council, as they look on it as the best expedient for the vindication of themselves, being confident of their innocency and freedom from such scandalous imputations, and thanking him for his intended kindness of giving them such early notice of the appointed day that they shall not be surprised. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Sept. 4.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W.S.W., coming to rain. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Sept. 4.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Monday evening came in between 30 and 40 sail, which, the wind presenting, went out early next morning. Off the castle were about 30 more. Of these five or six were bound for the Canaries, the rest for several ports in the Straits. On Wednesday came in two Londoners to take in pilchards, one for Leghorn, the other for the Canaries. Thursday came in Capt. Mathews of Plymouth for fish for Leghorn, who off this harbour met a Dutch man-of-war, who had with him a French prize from the West Indies, and desired Mathews, if another prize from Port-a-port, which he had taken, were in here, to dispatch her to Plymouth. Here was the Swallow of London, bound for Tangier. Yesterday came in 12 or 14 sail outward-bound and one from Monseratt laden with tobacco, sugars and indigo. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Sept. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 2nd came in the Tiger of London, laden with sugars from Barbadoes, bound for London. They say that sugars are very scarce and that many ships will come home dead freighted, though they have their full loading. They put to sea again the same day. The 3rd came in the Friendship of London, from Holland, bound for Nantes. They report that a French man-of-war of 14 guns fell in with five or six Dutch East Indiamen homeward-bound, and boarded a flyboat with several men, but the Dutchmen behaved so well that they killed most of them, and at last carried the French man-of-war and brought her in, before they came out of Holland. There also came in the Elizabeth of Plymouth from Antego, laden with tobacco and sugars, bound for Plymouth. They said that island has made a good year of tobacco and sugar, and that the islands thereabouts belonging to his Majesty are in a very thriving condition. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Sept. 5. James Hickes to Williamson. As yet nothing is come visible to either of the parties you ordered Col. Whitley to look after and send you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 87.]
Sept. 5. T[homas] B[arnes] to —. I shall be as careful in your concern as I can, and shall give you a faithful account ont, as anything considerable shall occur.
As to news, which you desired, there is little but what I suppose you know of. There are many odd discourses about the defeat at Maestricht. Our friends differ in opinion about it. They are not pleased that the French have done it, and yet seem not to affect some of the Du[t]ch persons or proceedings, as if there were here also some of the Lores-tean party. Such is the variety of opinions amongst us. Our friends seem pleased at the release of our friend, Jenks, and there are many several discourses about it, of which I may give you an account, when I have it more exactly, and of the hopes of our friends from it. There is a murmuring report amongst us from some merchants and others about an edict or some such thing of late from the French K[ing], as if he promises protection to such ships as shall have his let-pass or to that purpose. 'Tis no question but you have heard whether it be so or not, and how comprehensive it is, but there are many fears and doubts about it. Our friends begin again to fear persecution, for many are much fined and imprisoned for meetings at and about Nottingham and divers other parts. (The words in italics are in a sort of cipher.) [Ibid. No. 88.]
Sept. 5.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Sept. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since my last, two packet-boats have arrived, by whom we have confirmed the loss of the Prince's artillery near Maestricht, they say above 50 in number. His powder also would probably have fallen into the hands of the French, but that it was thrown into the water with great quantities of provisions. We hear that yesterday Colchester elected a new Recorder, the Duke of Albemarle, who made Sir Thomas Smith his deputy. Wind northerly, weather raining, which is very welcome. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Sept. 5.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Last Saturday his Majesty's chief engineer, Sir Bernard de Gomme, came here. He has brought bills of exchange to pay off all undertakers and labourers employed in building the Royal Citadel. The news that this money is come so encouraged all labourers to come to work that Sir Bernard will dispatch very much work, though the season be much spent. [Ibid. No. 91.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 91 I.]
Sept. 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The 3rd I acquainted you of about 50 ships sailing, all outward-bound. Next day they got to about the Ness and so tided it, the wind suddenly proving contrary. Above 20 outward-bound ships are since come from the river. About 12 last night the wind veered to N.E., a very fresh gale, so this morning early this fleet weighed and sailed. The whole country have been or are almost all sick with violent fevers, &c., as I formerly acquainted you. It blows very fresh at N.E. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Sept. 6.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here the John and Thomas of Brithemson (Brighthelmstone) which came out with 20 more English for these western ports all laden with salt, that commodity being there this year very cheap and good. The Diligence of London from Nevis and St. Christopher's wanting anchors and provisions also put in here. The master says those places thrive well and the English and French agree well in the latter. He also says the Indians in New England were mostly reduced before he came thence last March, and since by a ship he met at sea, which came very lately thence, that King Philip has not with him above 2 or 300 at most. The praying Indians, as they call them, have contributed much to the subduing of them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 93.]
[Sept. ?] Statement for Williamson that Edmund Halley, student of Queen's College, Oxford, having been for some years a diligent observer of the planets and stars, has found it absolutely necessary, besides the continuance of observations here, that in some place betwixt the Tropics, where the sun, moon and planets will pass near the zenith without refraction, their motions will be much ascertained and navigation perfected, and that St. Helena will be a fit place, where the celestial globe may be finished, the stars in the southern hemisphere being very much out of their places. He humbly desires his Majesty's letters of recommendation to the East India Company, that they will cause the ship ready to go to St. Helena to transport him and his friend thither, and that there he may be received and entertained and have fitting assistance. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Sept. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir John Godolphin, Vice-Admiral of Cornwall. After reciting the letter of 22 April last (calendared ante, p. 81) which directed him to take care for preserving the furniture and lading of the Arms of Waterford, taken by a French privateer and brought into St. Ivès, till the right thereof should be determined, and that under pretence of the said letter he obstructs the execution of a commission lately issued out of the Court of Admiralty for the appraisement of the said ship and goods, signifying his dislike of his proceedings therein, and also his express will and pleasure that he forthwith order his officers to obey the said order of the said Court. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 33.]
Sept. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the East India Company. We being informed that Edmund Halley, student of Queen's College, Oxford, who for several years has been a diligent observer of the planets and stars, intends, in order to make observations for rectifying and finishing the celestial globe, to remain some time in St. Helena, which place he conceives very fit for such a design, we, being willing to give all encouragement to whatever may tend to the improvement of navigation and be beneficial to the public, hereby most particularly recommend him to you, that you will give order that he and his friend and their necessaries may be transported to the said island on the first of your ships that shall go thither, and that he be received and entertained there, and may have such assistance and countenance from your officers as he may need. [Ibid. p. 34.]
Sept. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Governors of the Charter House. After reciting that by his letters of 24 March, 1669-70, on the petition of John Webb, he had recommended his son John to be elected into the next vacant scholar's place, and that the said Webb has informed him that his said son has received no benefit by the said letters, and is now not capable, being above the age limited by the statutes, effectually recommending Thomas, another son of the said John Webb, to be elected to the next vacant scholar's place. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 33.]
Sept. 7.
Yarmouth.
Certificate by Samuel Starling, a constable of Great Yarmouth, that, he having a warrant for taking a distress on Francis Clifton for a fine of 5l., he being convicted for being at the grand conventicle there, being one of the chief constables, and also one of the deacons of the Independent Congregation, Clifton desiring to see the warrant snatched it out of his hand, and then bade him go about his business. On his complaint to the bailiffs he had a warrant to bring him before them, where, he refusing to deliver the warrant, Starling was ordered to carry him to gaol for want of sureties, when he told him that these times would not last long and that we were all upon the hill now, but he expected to see it otherwise soon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 95.]
Sept. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By the packet-boat that came in this morning with a fret of an easterly wind, we obtained no news from Holland. Deserters from foreign services come over in great plenty. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Sept. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E., blowing weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead, waiting for sailing orders. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Sept. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., a very fresh gale. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Sept. 7.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news, most of it given in the next letter. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Sept. 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Ruby of Salcombe in 6 weeks from Antego. They bring no news but omnia bene. There also put in a French caper of St. Malo, the Viva Orenga, with an orange tree in her stern. The captain has two commissions from the King and the Duc de Chaulnes, in which she is said to carry 12 guns, but she has but 6. She was a Dutch prize and came from St. Malo about six days ago. They have met with no purchase since she set out. The Mayor of this town by virtue of an order from the King and Council of 11 Aug. last has seized her and taken her sails and rudder ashore, till there be an order from his Majesty to clear her. The captain says he met with a Guernsey vessel from Bilboa and another Englishman from France bound for Topsham. To both he showed all kindness possible, so I believe him not guilty of any abuse to the English. The Success of London is come in to load pilchards for the Straits. Wind N.E. Pray remember me, if there may be an advantage in clearing this caper or any other way. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Sept. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of Monmouth. Whereas we have formerly given orders to our troops of Horse Guards and our established regiments of horse and foot to observe your orders, we hereby commit to you the cognizance and care of appointing removals of quarters, the reliefs of any of the troops or companies and the sending of all needful convoys, in pursuance whereof you shall give such orders for those respective purposes as you shall judge most expedient, and we authorize you therein to require the officers to quarter the respective troops, companies and parties on their march and at their quarters in inns, victualling houses, taverns, brandy houses and ale houses, and to require all justices and officers it may concern to be assisting therein.
And, considering that we continue to issue from ourselves some kinds of warrants and military orders which belonged to the office of the late General, we, being desirous to distinguish such warrants and orders from other affairs of the Crown passing the Signet and Sign Manual, have thought fit that all such warrants and orders as formerly issued from George, Duke of Albemarle, the late General, deceased, in regard of that office, and which we continue to issue from ourself, shall pass our Sign Manual only and shall be countersigned by the Secretary to the forces as by our command. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 36.]
Sept. 8.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 101.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 101 i.]
[After Sept. 8.] Bill of Mr. Royley from 25 July to 8 Sept. for sugar and spices amounting to 5s. 2d. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
Commission to Capt. Alexander Makennye to be captain of the troop of horse in garrison at Tangier. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 36.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of William Thomas, clerk of the cheque to the Band of Pensioners, showing that Lord Roscommon, captain of that Band, on some representations to his Majesty against the petitioner got an order to have another sworn in his place and desiring to be heard before some of the officers of the Household, to the Duke of Monmouth, Master of the Horse, the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, or any two of them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 135.]
Sept. 8.
Jersey.
Philip Le Geyt to Sir Edward Carteret, gentleman usher of the Black Rod, Bailiff of Jersey. Enclosing copies which will show him their proceedings in the matter of an Ostend privateer, accused of having plundered an English bark.
The decision of such an affair must depend on some treaties or declarations, of which we have no knowledge, wherefore we felt ourselves obliged only to take the evidence and on the proposal of the Lieut.-Governor to remit the suit to one of the Secretaries of State. Nothing else extraordinary has happened since my last letter, except the confirmation (interinement) of a pardon signed indeed by the King's own hand but without the Great Seal, of which I know no example but one or two since the restoration. Divers considerations induced us to obedience, but yet you know the tenderness always felt for ancient customs. Letters of grace being among the most august marks of the royal power, it was formerly preferred to grant them in forma pauperum rather than to dispatch them in the most majestic of all the forms. It is also alleged that easiness in granting such letters may at last detract from the awe caused by punishments. However, I write this only to submit it to your wisdom and not to omit informing you of anything of importance. I thank you for your very obliging letter which I have received by M. de St. Ouen. [French. S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 42.]
Sept. 9.
Bristol.
Charles, Earl of Nottingham, to Williamson. I am reduced to a condition little better than miserable, being old, lame and wanting what should supply me with food and raiment and those necessary helps of physic my age and infirmities need. This, I hope, will procure me your favour and assistance in presenting my petition to his Majesty and procuring for me such an effectual command to the Lord Treasurer as may obtain me all arrears of my pensions, both those due before and those grown due since he had the staff. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 103.]
Sept. 9.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twenty light colliers are now at anchor in this bay, the wind having blown very hard much northerly most of this week. Several amongst them are from Holland, out of which were landed 8 or 10 English soldiers who were at the siege of Maestricht. They report that most of the English and Scots were cut off, not one regiment left of three that were there, and confirm the loss of their cannon, and that a great many men were cut off on their retreat from the siege, and that most of their boats were taken. The poor soldiers look as if they had come out of gaol, miserably poor. I believe they will scarce be persuaded to go out of their own kingdom. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Sept. 9.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. I beg I may trouble you once more about the prize ship. Since I denied her entrance here, she is fallen down four or five miles below this, and now lies in Heddon haven, for what purpose may easily be guessed. This is not unknown to the officers of the Custom House here. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Sept. 9.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 7th arrived here the Concord of this place in three days from Rotterdam. They came out with 80 English belonging to the north and western ports, the major part of them having carried corn outward-bound.
The master says that three nights before he came away the Prince of Orange was said to be there one night. He came privately in his pleasure boat and went away next morning. The people there are very sad on the raising the siege and their loss at Maestricht, and many speak after their rude fashion, judging of things according to the event. Indeed by their long war and great taxes their condition is very bad, beggars very numerous as well as maimed soldiers and not paying them able to fight. Some capers of St. Malo took lately many of their busses and one manof-war convoy, and their Greenland fleet made but bad voyages. They are also concerned at the passes given out by the King of England, while the French king's plackaet gives liberty of trade with him, to those obtaining his passports. This plackaet occasions some discourse amongst us. Wind N.E., fresh. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Sept. 9. Warrant for a privy seal for payment to John Brisbane, appointed agent at the Court of France to solicit the affairs of English merchants there, of 3l. a day for his entertainment and also of 500l. for his equipage and of an allowance for a clerk at the rate of 100l. a year. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 212.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Norwich to Dr. Anthony Sparrow, now bishop thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 90.]
Sept. 9. Warrant to John Bradley, messenger, to apprehend Banister, a bailiff, living at the sign of the Robin Hood in the Strand, and bring him before Secretary Coventry. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 163.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
Congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of the cathedral church of Moray. [Latin. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 72.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
Letter missive to the same, recommending James Atkins, rector of Winfrith, Dorsetshire, to be chosen Bishop of Moray. [Ibid.]
Sept. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These four days have produced nothing but gusts and storms with little intermission, which now are over. Yesterday a boat coming ashore overset on the watermen's heads three times, one was dead for a while but afterwards came to himself. Not any other loss or harm has happened to the men or ships in the Downs. All the storm the wind was N.E., but now a topsail gale at W. and W. and by S. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 107.]
Sept. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. Cloudy weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 108.]
[Sept. ?] Samuel Hutchinson, citizen and ironmonger of London to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for his invention of melting down lead ore and other minerals into lead and other metals with sea coals or pit coals. At the foot,
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting the petition, 21 Sept. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 136.]
Sept. 11.
Henton (Hinton).
Lord Poulett to Williamson. Informing him that the deputy lieutenants of Dorset very much desire that Mr. Francis Mohann of Flit in that county may be added to their number, whom he believes to be a very fit person. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 110.]
Sept. 11.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. Our quarter sessions will now soon come. Therefore I entreat you to be mindful of remitting the paper I formerly sent you with his Majesty's pleasure and your directions. We hear that Mr. Freke is also quitted, and, if so, I hope you will not omit anything that may give us a true steerage in the management of that affair.
Mr. Rogers presents his duty and thanks for your very great favour in writing to the Treasurer's clerk for expediting the payment of his Majesty's bounty, as I understand from my friend, Mr. Whistler, and, since his hope is wholly founded in your favour, be pleased to continue it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 111.]
Sept. 11.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Saturday Miles Walford, a custom house officer, searching a ketch of this town that came from Rotterdam found about 400 firelocks for pistols, which are now claimed by a servant of Mr. Panser of Rotterdam. They are seized and carried to the Custom House. This breeds great jealousies in the King's friends here that there may be some design in hand, considering the confidence the Nonconformists have of late taken to sing psalms, which they had left off from the time their licences were recalled till a month before they were suppressed and from Major Desbrow, Capt. Nichols and others coming to town and resorting to their meeting not only on the Sabbath day, but also on the week days. But what increases their jealousies and fears is that Francis Clifton, a deacon of the Independent Church, being sent to gaol on misdemeanour for want of sureties, told the constable that these times would not last long and that they were all on the hill now, but he expected to see it otherwise soon, and Mr. Paris, who commands the fort at the haven's mouth, told me this afternoon that they take the impudence to talk so boldly before him, that he is in some fears of the m[utiny ?] of the town, which is under his charge. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Sept. 11.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. There is a report there that the Prince of Orange's army is broken all to pieces. This came by the master of the Elizabeth of Foy, which came in thither last Friday night from Rotterdam, where he heard the news. Wind N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Sept. 11.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Thursday several ships sailed hence for France and that day came in a Dutch caper of 7 guns, the Flying Dragon of Flushing, which went out last Saturday. Some other small vessels are in the harbour bound some for Ireland, some for Wales. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Sept. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Shipping news as in the last letter. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Sept. 11.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Last Tuesday there met two companies of the militia in this town and the deputy lieutenants of these parts, who appeared in very good order. The rest are to appear this week in other parts of the county, the whole being commanded by Sir Edward Mansell, a person of great worth and integrity both to his Majesty and the country, who takes all imaginable care for the good appearance of the militia. Wind a stiff gale at N.W. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Sept. 11/21.
Lisbon.
Memorial by John Ashlin, formerly supercargo of the Catherine, an English built ship, and John Andrews her captain of several transactions during their detention on board several Portuguese menof-war. The ship left London in December, 1675, with a passport from the Admiralty of England, for Athens, Smyrna, &c. She left Athens in June, 1676, with a cargo of oils, soap, silk, cordevants, &c., and took in further cargo at Cephalonia. Off Cap de Palos they met six Algerines who put several Moors on board and ordered them to Algiers on the ground that their passport was not in the form of that now issued by the King of England, saying they had positive orders to send in all English ships that had not such passports, but they questioned not the English Consul there would immediately clear both ship and goods. On their passage to Algiers they were seized by Portuguese men-of-war and carried eventually into Lisbon, with details of all that took place and of the ill-treatment they received from the Portuguese. [9 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 117.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Commissioners of the Customs. A French privateer has brought into the Humber a Dutch prize and has been permitted to remain there now some weeks contrary to the treaties with the States General and the late proclamation, wherefore I desire you will enquire into the thing and give orders to your officers at Hull to see the said proclamation executed in causing the said privateer forthwith to depart with his prize without breaking bulk in the least. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 111.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Lieut.-Col. Fitzpatrick, Major Adam Roach, Captains Edmund Fitzgerald, Thomas Bates, Henry McCartane, Philip Barry, Edward Sarsfield, Timothy Odulaine, Bryan Lenan, Oyne Beulane, Leonard Blansfield, Walter Tressey, Cornelius Mulreane, Charles Ferrell, Terence Fonner, Pierce Nagle, Richard Dulahide, Richard Dyure (? Dwyer), and James Sinnard, Lieut. John Kavanagh and William Dullard of all plate and other lotteries, including the Royal Oak lottery, to be held in any place in Ireland for 13 years, to commence after the expiration of the term granted to several loyal officers by letters patent of 3 July, 1669, with a prohibition to all others to hold any kind of lottery during the said 13 years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 344.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Col. Strode, Governor of Dover Castle. A petition having been presented by James Thierry and Gomez Rodriguez of London, merchants, against Arent Jansen, a Dunkirk privateer lately brought into Dover, and praying his detention, till they can obtain justice in France in the case of a ship belonging to them, taken by the said privateer, signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he respite the discharge of the said privateer and his company, till he shall give satisfactory answer to the reasons offered in the said petition against their being presently discharged, whereof he is to return an account. [Precedents 1, f. 161.] Annexed,
The said petition to the Committee for Trade. Showing that Arent Jansen of the Peter Lewis, a French privateer of Dunkirk, 9 June last took about 5 miles off Dorer the Welcome of London, coming to anchor in Dover Road from Santa Cruz in Barbary, and carried her up and detained her at Dunkirk, and that the said Thierry had been a great sufferer for the ship and the said Rodriguez for her lading, as was proved before their Lordships, on whose report his Majesty granted a letter of 27 July last to his ambassador at Paris to demand restitution and satisfaction, and that on the petitioner's complaint to the Lords of the Admiralty the said privateer was brought into the Downs, and that his Majesty ordered that Jansen, his men and the privateer, should be delivered over to the law whereby the petitioners might recover damages, and that accordingly Jansen and his men were sent to Dover Castle, and the vessel detained in Dover Pier, and that, notwithstanding the King's letter and all the proofs of the propriety, the French, without due examination of witnesses and proofs, 4 Aug. last condemned the ship and goods, and that the said caper and vessel pretend to be released by virtue of such unlawful condemnation, and praying that Jansen, his men and vessel may be detained here, till the petitioners can obtain justice here. [Precedents 1, f. 161.]
Tuesday,
Sept. 12.
Edward Glynne to William Bridgeman. Mr. Secretary told Capt. Aston that Mr. Jolley's warrant should pass in any friend's name, and desired that a name might be sent and it should be dispatched. Mr. Jolley desires that my name may be made use of for him, and that you would endeavour to get it done before the King goes to Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 118.]
Sept. 12.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. The wind has been northerly these six days. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Sept. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Having no news by reason of the not arrival of our packet-boats, I once more give you an account of what I have done in obedience to your commands. I have kept a register of the names of the soldiers who had deserted foreign services and were set on shore here out of the packet-boats from 17 Feb., 1674 [-5], till now, and constant notes of the arrival and sailing of the packet-boats from 23 Dec., 1674, till now. It would make these my endeavours more pleasant to me, did I receive so much encouragement as to understand you take notice of my obedience to your commands and approve of my continuing them. Wind W.N.W., weather dark and cloudy. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Sept. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W., a dark day. The Bristol continues at Spithead attending for sailing orders. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Sept. 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. All people in these parts are very much concerned for the disappointments of the Prince of Orange. [Ibid. No. 122.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 122 i.]
Sept. 12. Caveat that no grant pass of the estate of Richard Withers of St. Audres, Somerset, a felo de se, without notice to Sir Edmund Wyndham. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of Sir John Otway, stating the circumstances of the election to a fellowship at St. Peter's College at which his son, Charles, and Mr. Binks were candidates (which sufficiently appear from several papers hereinbefore calendared), when the Bishop of Ely commanded the Master to admit Mr. Binks, and praying a reference of the dispute to some of the Privy Council, and that, till his Majesty shall determine it, the profits of the fellowship may be suspended, to the Lord Chancellor, the Dukes of Monmouth and Ormonde, Chancellors of the two Universities, Lord Arlington, the Bishop of London, and Secretaries Coventry and Williamson or to any three of them, whereof the Lord Chancellor and the Duke of Monmouth to be two. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 136.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Castillian, son of Col. John Morris, deceased, for a day to be appointed near the end of Michaelmas term for hearing the encroaching foresters and others that have obstructed his grant of the waste of Knaresborough Forest and of the cottages and encroachments there, declaration that his Majesty will hear the pretensions of all concerned towards the end of next term. [Ibid. p. 136 A.]
Sept. 12.
Dublin.
Phelim O'Neill to Viscount Conway. I received yours of the 1st, with your cousin Gwynn's letter and also his letter of attorney for me to receive his salary here. I will do what I can to get it, and will remit it according to his direction. Exchange is offered here now at 3 per cent, and I hope ere long it may be had at par. If I find it so, I will without further advice remit you the 500l.
Yesterday I received the sad news of Mr. John Rawdon's death. His father had it by letter from Mr. Edward before I had it. I know not how he got the letter. He writes to me of it and the enclosed to you is about it. I am afraid it will quicken his end, for he takes it very much upon him. God send him grace to bear it patiently. I have writ to him as you desired me, and yesterday sent him your last packet by the grooms who landed here last Friday and stayed here with the mares and horse to rest them. All is well with them. They had of me 4l. 15s., for they spent all the money they had of you. I hope Mr. Tottnall will proceed well, notwithstanding the opposition he meets with.
John Lillburne paid me 12l. on your account, and I added 12l. more to make up 24l. towards Mr. Magenis' bond and have paid it.
If you think it convenient, I pray you to recommend me to Sir Robert Booth or Sir Charles Meredith or both. They are commissioners for the transplanted interests, and I have a claim before them for some lands set out to my wife's father. The claim is in the name of John O'Neill, his son, but the interest is mine in right of my wife for some time to come. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 63.]
Sept. 13.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Mr. Tregonwell, of Anderson in this county, came here last night with Mistress Davis, that his wife had by a former husband, and Mistress Masters, his wife's sister. They all went in a small vessel of this town for Cherbourg, and intend, as I hear, to stay six months in France. This Mistress Davis is like to be a good fortune, and worth, after the death of her mother, between 3,000l. and 4,000l. per annum. It was said a match was intended betwixt Lord Berkeley's son and her. They have had a good wind and fair weather, and in probability may be in Cherbourg ere this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 123.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he forbear prosecuting Anthony Lawrence, bookbinder, till further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 164.]
Sept. 13. Warrant to the Attorney-General to forbear prosecuting Anthony Lawrence, bookbinder, as ordered, he having expressed his sorrow for the offence, and given evidence thereof by being very useful in discovering Popish and other unlicensed books and the authors of them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 164.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Treasurer. The Queen's little vessel, the Soudades, being now daily expected from Lisbon, his Majesty is pleased at her desire that she be allowed to enter as she has used to do, without being searched or paying any custom, that her goods and lading of whatever kind be delivered out, as Emmanuel Deas, who is particularly appointed by her Majesty, shall direct, and that you will give order to this effect to the Commissioners and officers of the Customs with what convenient speed you may, in regard the vessel is expected in with the first westerly winds, which is the reason I dispatch this by express. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 111.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
Approbation of Francis Mohann, of Flit, Dorset, to be a deputy lieutenant of the said county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 37.]
[Sept. ?] John Cary and Richard Marsh, of Bristol, merchants, to the Committee of Trade. Petition, stating that the Industry of Bristol, being loaden at St. Malo with 50 balletts of linen cloth and 24 half chests of soap, of which ship and goods the petitioners were the owners, and sailing thence about 15-25 Aug. last to Morlaix, met with two capers, commanded by John Brooke and John Pyles, both of Ostend, who stopped her and carried her into the Bay of St. Brieux, took the master out of her, and bound him hand and foot and carried away all the petitioner's said goods, and that Brooke is now a prisoner in Jersey Castle, being seized there with his said ship on the complaint of the said master, and that there are remaining in her 7 balletts of the said goods, and praying an order that the said 7 balletts may be returned to the petitioners, and that also Brooke's ship, a small one carrying but two guns, may be delivered to them towards satisfaction of their great loss. At the foot,
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
The Committee of Trade are of opinion that Brooke, his vessel and lading be continued under custody in Jersey till the petitioners hare time to proceed judicially in the Court of Admiralty against the said caper, and therefore recommend this case to one of the Secretaries of State for obtaining his Majesty's orders to the magistrates of Jersey. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, Nos. 124, 125.]
Sept. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The westerly wind, which has continued these 4 or 5 days and last night blew a storm, has, we suppose, hindered the arrival of any of our packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Sept. 14.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. We have very violent winds, but last night about 2 happened a violent storm with gusts hurricane like, which continued about 6 hours, in which time several boats brake from their ships' sterns and many ships' anchors came home and they drove, but no other prejudice was done. The wind in the storm was variable from S.W. to S.E. Not a topsail gale now at N. The Virginia ships and great Straits men are yet in the Downs, the others are sailed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 127.]
Sept. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E., rainy. The Bristol continues at Spithead, expecting sailing orders. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Sept. 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Sir John Narbrough for want of victuals put into this port, which he is supplied with, and resolved to sail to-day for the Downs, but that the wind is N.E., so he must wait for a fair wind. He yesterday sent an express to Secretary Coventry. [Ibid. No. 129.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to P. Whalley. I have received yours of the 2nd concerning the words spoken by Meynell, and the Lord Chancellor is of opinion, that, considering the time is long to the assizes, you may take bail for him, provided it be very good. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 112.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Poulett. Enclosing his Majesty's approbation of Mr. Mohann to be a deputy lieutenant of Dorsetshire. [Ibid.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Sir William Boreman for a patent to set up a public horse and cart or coach ferry for the accommodation of Walton-on-Thames and adjacent places. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 136.]
Sept. 14. Pass for the Sieurs Desbordes, being three French gentlemen, with their servants for Dantzig. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 204.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Memorandum that the grant to Lieut.-Col. Fitzpatrick and others of all lotteries in Ireland, calendared ante, p. 252, was afterwards renewed to the same persons and in the same terms with this alteration only that the clause excepting the Royal Oak Lottery was left out. [Ibid.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a Privy Seal for payment to Sir Edward Griffin or the Treasurer of the Chamber for the time being of 60l. per annum by equal quarterly payments to commence from Midsummer last, during pleasure, to be paid by him to Edward Glynne, and received by him without account. [Ibid.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Lord Advocate. You may remember that the last time but one I was in Scotland a gift of recognition of the estate of Towie was desired from his Majesty by Lord Berkeley of Stratton in behalf of William, his younger son, which he not being then willing to pass in regard of a former gift granted to Lady Towie, it was referred to you, and you returned your opinion that it ought not to pass, whereupon his Majesty thought fit to lay it aside. But within these few days a new petition was presented to him for passing a new copy of the old draft with a pretended letter from one John Fraser, who assumes the boldness to give his positive advice in point of law, though I cannot learn there is an advocate of that name. I am now commanded to transmit you the said copy, petition and letter, signifying his Majesty's pleasure that you send your opinion of that draft of the signature and of the thing itself desired by Lord Berkeley, and I think it fit you call before you the said Fraser to see if he will own that letter, which is somewhat too positive and in my opinion most false in saying that nothing is more ordinary than to procure a second gift of recognition under his Majesty's hand, when indeed I think it is in his own power to grant a first or second gift or to refuse either to any one, as he shall think fit. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 73.]
Sept. 15.
Letter Office, London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I received yours this morning past 1, and sent yours to Major Beckford and Mr. Page, which were delivered betwixt 5 and 6 this morning. The box to the Queen was sent forward and the postmaster in Thetford required to give it speedy and safe delivery.
I last night wrote and commanded your kind respects to Col. Whitley in your own words. Nothing more is yet come to hand for Mr. Moure or Mr. Kneyvatt.
I am sorry I had not opportunity to know your commands at Merchant Taylors' Hall. The noise of the drums is scarce yet out of my thin skull. [Ibid. No. 130.]
[Sept. 15 ?] Allowance by Sir J. Williamson of the charges of Richard Gammon, messenger, when sent by him with an express to the Lord Treasurer, being then at Rycote at Lord Norreys', amounting to 3l. 11s. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 205.]
Sunday,
Sept. 16.
Sir D. Gauden to Williamson. As his indisposition prevents him from waiting on him, in return to his Majesty's commands received two days since in reference to his Majesty's present inclinations of his laying down his gown as Alderman, lest, while his present condition will not admit of his taking on him the Mayoralty, any ill use might be made by his remaining in a capacity of election thereto, resigning himself to his Royal disposal in that and any other matter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 131.]
Sept. 16. Sir Nathaniel Herne to Williamson. Requesting him to recommend John Ceely, one of the prebendaries of Exeter, to Dr. Lamplugh, the present bishop, there being like to be a vacancy in the living of Faringdon, within 5 miles of Exeter, the present incumbent being sick, or at least not likely to live long, being near or full 100 years old, that he may bestow that on him, if it fall not, before he has the disposal of it, or, if it do and it is in his Majesty's disposition, that he would procure a grant of it for him. Note on the back that the Minister of Faringdon died, Saturday, 9 Sept., and that the living is under value, being 8l. 8s., and is disposed of by the Lord Chancellor. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Sept. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday evening one of our packet-boats arrived, and in it many passengers, among them several deserters from foreign services. By it I received this account from my friend at the Brill in a letter of 19 Sept. (n.s.) The Prince of Orange was the day before at the Hague, and after a few hours' consultation departed for a country house of his near Utrecht, and from thence this day to his leaguer, as he calls it, in Brabant, whence he is to march to join, as we say here, 15,000 Imperialists that were at the taking of Philipsburg and with them to make a fresh assault on Maestricht. The merchants, passengers, could inform us nothing of it.
Yesterday and last night we had a great deal of rain with wind N.E., but to-day is very fair, wind N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 133.]
[Sept.?] The Dean and Canons of Windsor to the King. Petition praying that, as they are informed it is his pleasure and intention, in consideration of their collegiate walk now taken in to enlarge the terrace, to give them free use of that their own terrace with full liberty to enter with their own keys and there to walk at all times, he would render it more effectual by granting them an express declaration thereof. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bayliff and Jurats of Jersey. After reciting the petition of John Cary and Richard Marsh of Bristol, calendared ante, p. 323, ordering them to detain safe under custody John Brooke, mentioned in the said petition, with his said vessel and lading till the petitioners have time to proceed judicially against the said caper in order to their relief. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 35.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
Commission to Benjamin Barnett to be chaplain to the Queen's troop of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 38.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
Licence by the King to Henry Bold, B.D., chanter and canon of Exeter and Fellow of Eton, to remain three years beyond the seas for the recovery of his health, and direction that during his absence he shall enjoy all the profits, advantages and emoluments to the said chantership, canonry and fellowship respectively belonging, with dispensation of any law, ordinance or custom to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 34.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the King that, as for enlarging the terrace walk of Windsor Castle he had taken in the collegiate walk belonging to the Dean and Canons, in consideration thereof they should have the free use of the said terrace walk with liberty to enter in there with their own keys and there to walk at all times. [Ibid. p. 35.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant by letters patent dated about 24 June, 1644, of a baronetcy to Sir John Ackland, late of Cullum John, Devonshire, which letters patent through the distraction of the late times and the minority of Sir John's successors have been lost, whereby his heirs would be deprived of the said honour, though the said Sir John during his life, Sir Francis, his eldest son, Sir John, his second son, Sir Arthur, his grandson by his second son Sir John, and Sir Hugh, his third son, now living, have ever since assumed and enjoyed the title and precedency of the said dignity; for a grant of a baronetcy of England with the precedency of the former letters patent to the said Sir Hugh Ackland in tail male, with a discharge of the services to be performed or payments to be made in consideration of those services. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 206.]
Draft thereof dated June. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 385, No. 135.]
Sept. 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About noon yesterday the storm ceased, since which there has been pleasant weather. There has been no considerable damage to any of the ships in the Downs. Not a topsail gale at E. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Sept. 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. This evening came in here the Valiant, a privateer of St. Malo, which came from St. Malo yesterday morning. Col. Piper with the Mayor and the Collector of Customs, finding the captain of the privateer ashore, secured him and sent to the Sound to stop the privateer from going away. This is sent to Sir John Narbrough, who remains here wind-bound, the wind being at N.E. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Sept. 18.
London.
Sir John Berry to Williamson. Again interceding for his friend and kinsman, Josias Calmady, to keep him off from being sheriff of Devon, as he is hydropsical and scorbutical and labours under various other distempers, and suggesting for the office William Basterd, lately turned out of the commission of the peace for Devon for being a great fanatic and an indulger of conventicles, who has a plentiful estate and is an active strong man fit for that employ. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Sept. 18.
Bath.
Jos. Glanvill to Williamson. Returning his thanks for, as he understands by the Marquis of Worcester, favouring and assisting a late endeavour on his behalf for a prebend of Worcester, and begging his acceptance of a small trifle of his. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Sept. 18.
Ednal (Eden Hall)
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. I have yours of the 12th with the enclosed paper. I wish it had come sooner, for my observations might have been more to effect whilst that person had been upon the place, than my inquiry can be after his return southward, but I will use my endeavours, and to that end only I am to-day going into Westmorland to discourse with a person I dare trust in a matter of weight and secrecy. I shall also carefully observe the commands in the matter of Scotland, and, as speedily as I can, you shall receive an account. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Sept. 18.
Ednall (Eden Hall).
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. Thanking him for his great condescension in honouring his son with his name.—I have waited on the Bishop, and, to give you his own language, he dares not disobey your commands. My brother Tom has not been in this country since I came, but this week will be here and then will attend the Bishop to perform his duty to you. I have twice waited on Lord Carlisle, and have had free discourses, though not so warm as heretofore. I will not trouble you with the narrative till I have the honour to kiss your hands. I am glad the sessions in Westmorland are settled and wish Sir George [Fletcher] and others would not persist in their malicious and ungenerous practices, which are so contrary to my father's temper, that he is almost discouraged from acting publicly in Cumberland, disputes of this nature requiring more activeness than suits his body, for there is scarce a day that he is not indisposed. It is whispered that our Dean is about marrying a prebend's widow at Durham. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Sept. 18.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news, all of which appears by the next letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 142.]
Sept. 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 15th came in here the Jacob and Mary of London, in 30 days from Nevis. They report that the Dutch have there a squadron of 9 men-of-war, the least carrying 36 guns, and that they have taken three islands from the French, St. Martin, Mariegalante and Kian (Cayenne), and that they also intended to fall on Guadeloupe, but just before they came before it two French men-of-war, one of 70 the other of 50 guns, arrived, which made the Dutch draw off again. There are also 8 or 9 Dutch capers, most of which were at Montserrat when this ship came away, having taken one prize as had the States fleet. This ship has been very leaky ever since she came out, and so was forced to put in here, the other ship in her company keeping her course to the eastward. To-day and yesterday put to sea the Adventure of London and the Friend of Plymouth, both laden with pilchards for the Straits. The 16th came in here the William and John of London to load pilchards for the Straits, with several other vessels for France. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Sept. 18.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. No news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Sept. 18.
Whitehall.
Four several warrants to John Wickham and John Bradley, messengers, for searching the houses of Thomas Milborne, John Redmaine, and — Bennet, printers, and Richard Moore, bookseller, for Popish and unlicensed books and for bringing the same to London House, Aldersgate Street, to the Bishop of London's chaplain or secretary, and for bringing the said persons before Mr. Secretary Coventry. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 164.]
Sept. 18.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. According to what I discoursed to you last night, I am this morning giving an account to Sir D. Gauden of his Majesty continuing in the same mind I had order some days since to declare to him as to his laying down the gown of Alderman, and his Majesty would be glad you would speak with him as soon as may be, to have the thing done, for preventing the ill use that may be made of the uncertainty of Sir Denis' mind as to this point of laying down his gown. Methinks in your return from Croydon you might call in at Clapham. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 113.]
Sept. 18.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Denis Gauden. I immediately communicated yours of the 16th to his Majesty, who, I find, continues in the same mind I had by his order some days before declared to you he was of, as to your keeping or laying down your gown of Alderman, and so he commanded me to signify to you, and at the same time to pray the Lord Mayor to say as much to you, as from his Majesty. My Lord has promised to do it this evening, his Majesty thinking it of consequence that the thing may be finished as soon as may be, to prevent the ill use that might be otherwise made by some of the uncertainty that matter yet stands in. [Ibid.]
Sept. 18. Warrant, after reciting the charter of 3 April, 1661, to the East India Company, which granted to them the exclusive right of trading to and from the East Indies, and the charter of 27 March, 1668, which granted them the island of Bombay, and that since the granting of the said charters transactions had happened wherein it might be questioned how far the Company's proceedings might be warranted by the strict letter thereof, and the charters themselves might be in danger of being impeached, and doubts may be conceived whether the Company may not be accountable to the Crown for the moiety of what they receive in the nature of mulets and penalties, though by virtue of particular covenants and agreements, and also for the moiety of divers seizures and forfeitures; for a confirmation of the said charters notwithstanding any former abuser, mis-user or non-user of the same, wherein is to be inserted a clause enabling the Company to have the full benefit of all covenants and agreements made with any of their factors, agents or servants or any commanders or owners of ships, whereby any special damage is agreed to be paid in case of breach of such covenants, without any account of the moiety thereof or other matter to be therefore rendered to the Crown, and another clause enabling the Company within the island of Bombay and the territories thereto belonging to coin money to be current within the limits of their charters, to be known by the names of rupees, pices, and budgerookes or such other names as they shall think fit, so that it be not by the name of any coin current in England or any of the King's dominions except the East Indies, and another clause containing a full pardon to the Company for all offences and transactions committed by them before 16 Sept., 1676, and also to the members, agents, factors and servants of the said Company for all crimes and offences committed by them within the places limited by the said charters before the said day by colour of any commission or order of the said Company, and a further pardon and release to the said Company of all accounts, debts and demands which the Crown might have against the said Company by reason of any fines, mulets, penalties or forfeitures by them received, or by reason of any stated damages paid them in pursuance of any covenants, or by reason of any seizures or compositions made by them before the said day, but with a saving of all debts, duties and demands by reason of any customs or subsidies before that time due or unpaid, and another clause requiring the AttorneyGeneral to forbear all prosecution of the said Company for anything therein pardoned or intended to be pardoned, and to cause any suit that may be therefor depending to cease. [2 pages. Precedents 1, f. 162.]
Sept. 18
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Dunbarton. The last letters from Brussels particularly informing that you are to receive money and come over hither to make recruits, I am commanded by the King to tell you in his name that your coming on such an account will be very unseasonable and of no use to you, for as mediator, when so many ambassadors are come to Nimèguen and the rest expected, he neither can nor will permit or connive at any recruits for either party now in war, nor can he think your old regiment needs recruits, as he is informed that, out of it or the recruits to it, a new regiment is drawn without his consent or application. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 74.]
Sept. 19.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. Our sessions will be next week. Therefore I humbly ask you to remit that paper and send your letter whereby we may be directed what his Majesty's pleasure is concerning the proceeding against those bound over for dispersing that abominable libel. We shall not enter on it till we hear from you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 145.]
Sept. 19.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twenty light colliers are still at anchor in this bay waiting a fair wind. Last Wednesday they loosed and got as far northwards as Robin Hood's Bay, but the wind took them short and brought them in here again. Last Saturday night we had a very violent storm, but being much landerly at N.W., with much rain, it did no harm nor caused any great sea here. Yesterday it blew hard, but now it's very good weather, wind N. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Sept. 19.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind has been northerly these many days, this morning it came W. and S.W. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Sept. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., windy weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead attending for orders to proceed on their voyage for Virginia. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Sept. 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Sir John Narbrough is still here wind-bound. [Ibid. No. 149.] Enclosed,
The said list. The Elizabeth of Boston in New England from New England for Dover reports that about nine weeks since the Indians burnt six country towns there of the English, but the Governor having made peace with the Eastern Indians so that between these Eastern Indians and the Christian Indians with the English he fell upon them and killed 1,600 of them, which intelligence the master had from the relation of a Sackamore that was taken prisoner and condemned to die, and accordingly was shot to death by a boy of 10 years old, the son of Oliver Mason, a baker there, but King Philip escapes still, the English not losing above a dozen men, whereupon the Governor sent out a proclamation that those of the Indians that would come in should be welcome, so that the master saw in one day about 300 men, women and children that came in, so that the English think themselves to be conquerors over the Indians. [Ibid. No. 149 i.]
Sept. 19. Memorandum that Mr. Brisbane that day kissed the King's hand in order to his journey to France as agent marine. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 213.]
Sept. 19. The King to Nathaniel, Bishop of Durham. As Dr. Isaac Basire, chaplain in ordinary, is so ill that his recovery is despaired of, and, besides his 16 years' banishment for his loyalty, he has spent large sums in building and repairing the ruined houses and chancels of his ecclesiastical benefices, and paying debts contracted during his banishment, and has therefore been unable to provide for his children, therefore recommending his son, Charles Basire, to succeed him in the [rectory] of Eglescliffe, the least of all his preferments. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 90.]
Sept. 19.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for payment to John Blow, appointed master of the children of the Chapel Royal in place of Pelham Humphries, deceased, for teaching and keeping two boys to be educated in the King's private music, 80l. for the allowance for two years to Midsummer last, and at Michaelmas next 10l. for the like allowance for one quarter and thereafter 40l. a year during pleasure, to be paid quarterly at the four usual feasts. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 55.]
[Before Sept. 20.] Peter Monamy, prisoner in the Gatehouse, to the King. Petition for release on bail, having been committed, 28 July last, on suspicion of complicity in counterfeiting the Sign Manual and the handwriting of the Earl of Arlington to warrants for freeing foreign-built ships, being innocent and so ill that he can only last a short time. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. XII, p. 347.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 150.]
Sept. 20. Sir Joseph Sheldon to Williamson. In my return from Croydon I called at Clapham, where I found Sir D. Gauden not well, but very ready to resign himself to the King's pleasure. I delivered his letter to the Court, who very unwillingly parted with him. Next Tuesday another will be chosen in his place. It now plainly appears he would have been chosen in spite of all opposition. I am truly sorry for his sufferings, but it cannot be helped. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Sept. 20.
Euston Hall.
The Earl of Arlington to Williamson. Enclosed is the letter to Lord Ossory, which you sent me for him by the express I had Tuesday at noon. The Queen seems to be pleased with her entertainment here, so she will not remove till next Monday. What contributes much to her satisfaction is the very fair weather. If a time be fixed for the King's remove to Newmarket, I should be beholden if you would send me word of it or of any other important news. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Sept. 20.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. I was called this sessions to appear, where my original letter was produced in open Court, which was thronged with people, some from Norwich and others out of Suffolk as well as Norfolk, to hear what should become of me, it being reported I should be banished 10 miles out of town. My letter was showed me to know if I owned it, but unexpectedly I saw my name torn off, so I told them there were so many so cunning at counterfeiting men's hands, that it was no easy matter to know their own. Then they showed it to some in the Court, who believed it to be my hand. Then Capt. Huntington stood up and told the Court that he received the letter from the Lord Lieutenant, which he received from Sir J. Williamson, who told my lord that, when he delivered out a letter of those that gave him intelligence, he used to tear out their names. I then desired to have it read, they having rendered it a hundred times worse than it was, upon which the town clerk read it out.
I then told the Court I owned it and was ready to make it good, but the Recorder then stood up and said that, being the King had ordered the hearing of it, he would leave it as he found it, and therefore would have me enter into recognizances and stand bound over to the next sessions. My counsel pressed the unreasonableness of it, being then ready to answer my charge and being not convicted of any crime, but I was at last forced to comply. This was all that passed there, but the daily threats of my ruin continue put on by my lord. Mr. Bayly Bradford, as I passed his door, invited me in and told me he never had any prejudice against me, and that they were pressed to what had been done by my lord, which otherwise had not been done, and therefore he hoped he should not have the trouble of going up to London, since which he has told Bayly Thaxter that he will not be concerned further in the difference. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 153.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
Licence to Christopher Bateson, vicar of Brightlingsea, Essex, to pass beyond the seas as chaplain to John Hebden, envoy to the Emperor of Russia, and direction that during his absence he shall receive all the profits &c. of his vicarage. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 35.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for discharging the feu and blench duties of the lands of Colin, Earl of Balcarres, for the crop and year 1675. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 75.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to Capt. William Carstaires of 3,000 merks Scots out of the fine of 500l. sterling lately imposed by the Privy Council on Robert Baily of Jerveswood. [Ibid. p. 76.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
Pass to Alexander Hume for going to and returning from the United Netherlands. [Ibid. p. 77.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to Robert Ker, glover in Stirling, of the crime of treason, whereof he was found guilty in saying that his Majesty was a fool in making bishops and that he would hang them all for sixpence apiece, in consideration of the said Ker being known to be subject sometime to drunkenness and distraction and that he has continued in prison for the said expressions since April, 1671, and the Commissioners of Justiciary having recommended him to his Majesty's favour. [Ibid.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protections to William Hamilton of Olivestobbs, and to Robert Preston, brother to John Preston of that ilk, for two years respectively. [Ibid. p. 78.]
Sept. 20.
Lisburn.
Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. In the last three weeks, I and every officer of the troops and companies of the army, except those of the Northern Brigade, have had letters from the Secretary to return an account of what they have received of the three months' pay ended 31 Dec., which were the contents of the two first letters, for that pay is only made yet to those of that Brigade. I send you a copy of the third letter and my answer, but know not what is to be said yet for your troop, though I have considered with Capt. Thelwall, whom I would persuade to go to Dublin himself and consult with Mr. Bodurda about the answer, and see if your money can be put in a better way of assurance. I doubt your trust to him will be both to the loss of that paid to the troop and your own personal pay. I suppose the agent that wrote to me that he had taken out your licence of absence, and that his Excellency denied to give any to your lieutenant has informed you of it, and it becomes me to inform you of all I hear that may concern you, which is, that much notice is taken at Dublin of your favour to one that has not governed his tongue with discretion but slighted and reproached his general in his common discourse. Whether this be true you will best know, and I desire you to consider of it, and make your own use thereof, not as receiving it from me.
I have been at Portmore and seen the horse and two mares come over. (About them and other mares and colts there.) Here is the greatest plenty of grass this year that any man alive ever saw, and the grooms say it is far otherwise in England.
I wrote to you on our late sad affliction, and am loth to dwell on it more than my thankful acknowledgement of your concern about it, and my regret for yours and my thankfulness to Dr. More for his consolatory letter. It is my endeavour to learn resignation more and more to the will of God, which I am minded of both by reports and letters daily, the whole country lamenting his loss and speaking of his hopefulness and magnifying his gallantry both in these parts and in Dublin, where they had notice of it and at Belfast and Derry before it came to me. John Tottnall has not written since he left the seaside, which makes his wife very melancholy. I acquainted her with the occasion of his stay to remove the obstruction on his estate, which she much desires better news of.
This dry summer has made the air unwholesome on the side of the town where the tuckmill dam is, and the water corrupt, so the dwellers on that side of the market place have propounded to fill up the dam at their own charges, and to pay the tuckmill rent for the enlargement of their gardens, and others propound to have water brought in pipes to this house and the town and to have a conduit for their use and to contribute to its charge, which I doubt will not be considerable, but for a diversion I have myself with some of them tried the project with water levels, and Colson, the carpenter, who pretends skill, has estimated the charge about 100l. It must come in ditches along above ground half way from Mr. Harrison's to the hill behind Jackson's 360 perches, and in wooden pipes thence to the house 70. There are alders very fit to bore in the islands, where I went to see them, and the addition to the park and the water is from limestone springs, fit for all uses. If you approve, next spring will be the fittest season for the work. That would make the laver in the dwarf orchard spout up a great height.
Your cornet has delayed his answer to the Secretary's letter, till he has advice from Dublin about it, and writes now for it. Mr. Neill and Mr. Bodurda are to advise him therein, which is thought better than for himself to go. Jealousies are fomented both of your troop and mine. We mustered last week and showed the best troops in the army, as the muster-master acknowledged. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II.337, No. 64.]
Sept. 21.
Wytham.
The Earl of Danby to Lord [Conway?]. Thanking him for his letter.—I assure you that nothing in this progress, which I have designed for pleasure, would have given me so much as if I could have had your company, and I would have requested that favour of you, but that Lord Norreys, with whom I have been the whole time, has been so stocked with company that it would have been with too much inconvenience to you both. I go to-night to Rycote and thence on Monday to London, whence, for anything I yet know, I shall attend his Majesty to Newmarket, 2 Oct. I hope the diversion of that place may invite you thither and with the assurance of saying it with no more ceremony than I believe you do in anything you profess, I am, &c. [Conway papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 154.]
Sept. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Tuesday afternoon one of our packet-boats arrived, which brought over Colonels Fenwick and Salsbury, but they brought no news. There also came over a good honest philosopher whom some of the passengers call Count or Baron van Helmont. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Sept. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Rainy weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead expecting commands to proceed on their voyage to Virginia. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Sept. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.W., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to S. Pepys. Recommending the bearer, Mr. Clench, who is the person he named to him for the small employment to be filled in the commission of Tangier, and begging him to hand him to the Navy Commissioners for their approbation, that so he may come as named by them at the next meeting of Tangier. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 114.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Recommending the bearer, the poor old cavalier he mentioned to him the day before, in the pretension he has before him. [Ibid.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Fowler. As to prosecuting or not the person that published that infamous libel at Gloucester, his Majesty, according to his natural clemency, is rather inclined to overlook the thing, in hopes men will take warning and be more circumspect in their carriage and discourses in future, and therefore you may, if you please, let the thing fall, only methinks it were but reasonable a man fallen under such a crime should be continued for some time under the good behaviour. [Ibid. p. 115.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward, Lord Montagu of Boughton, for a grant of the deer, herbage, lodges, ridings and plains in Goddington Woods in the bailiwick of Brigstock, in the Forest of Rockingham, and that the same, with the woods and coppices, may be turned into a free chace and granted to him and his heirs discharged from all forest laws. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 137.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Grant to John Baggelley of the office of master glazier of all the King's buildings in England during pleasure with the fee of 12d. per diem, to begin from Midsummer last. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 207.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Col. John Strode. I have no other answer to return to yours of the 18th than what I wrote in my last of the 16th, acquainting you what his Majesty's resolution was as well concerning the party petitioned against as the petitioner, that you were to weigh the cause thoroughly, and act according to what should appear to be just. It belongs not to me to judge the cause, therefore I return the papers you enclosed, and desire you will proceed according to the directions of my first letter. Noted, that the papers returned were a petition of Arent Jansen, the privateer, and a copy of the sentence of condemnation of the ship reclaimed. [Precedents 1, f. 163.]
Sept. 22.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Sir John Narbrough with two fireships and a sittee sailed to-day for Portsmouth. The Portsmouth frigate is still here to take in victuals, she coming in not having one day's victuals left. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 158.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 158I.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the [Bishop of Ely]. His Majesty having referred the case of Sir John Otway's son to be heard by me and some others of the Privy Council, supposing you will think yourself obliged to defend Mr. Binks in the possession of the Fellowship you put him into, I send you a copy of the petition with the reference, desiring you would let me know when the affairs of your diocese will permit you to be in London, and I will send to the rest of the Lords to order their meeting accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 56.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Justice Rycroft. This fellow Morris, against whom the information comes, should be proceeded with according to law, and, if the thing be bailable, he should find good bail to answer it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 115.]
Sept. 23 and Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
Two caveats that no grant pass of the office of clerkship of the Exchange and Mint vulgarly called the clerkship of the Irons in the Tower, and of the office vulgarly called the surveyorship of the melting houses of the Exchange Coinage and Mint in the Tower, void by the death of Thomas Swallow, without notice to James Hoare. [Subsequently cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, pp. 27, 28.]
Sept. 23.
Dablin.
Viscount Blessington to Williamson. Making all the acknowledgements gratitude could pay to him, who has been beyond expression obliging, and regretting that he is not in a capacity to return the favours he has received from him. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 65.]
Sept. [23?] Michael, Archbishop of Dublin, to Williamson. You have so many ways of obliging your servants, that it is impossible for our acknowledgements to keep pace with them. We must deal with you as small retailers do with wholesale merchants, take up many things on trust and pay for all together. But I doubt our payments will not be found sterling, but such as this country affords, low and debased coin. Your acceptance and only that can make it current. My son, Blessington, tells me he is obliged to you beyond all the men in the world. A few such persons as you would propitiate for the sin and hypocrisy of a whole Court and make friendship and reality be esteemed and valuable, though you are single in that fashion. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337,No. 66.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing Sir Cyril Wyche, his Chief Secretary, to be of the Privy Council in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 56.]
Sept. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. Friday came to St. Helen's Road Sir Roger Strickland in the Dragon from the Straits. We daily expect Sir John Narbrough from Plymouth. The Harwich is ordered to lie up here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 159.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
Consent by the Duke of Monmouth that Moses Holwey of St. Catherine Hall may sue for letters mandatory for creating him M.A. with particulars about him as in the letter of the 26th, calendared post, p. 340. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Sept. 25.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. When I was last at London, some of our town sent me the original of the enclosed certificate, only Mr. Meen's hand was wanting, but at my return he readily subscribed it, who not keeping to himself what was done, they were all discovered that had subscribed it. My adversaries forthwith acquainted Lord Paston with what had been done and by whom. The post following the Bayliffs, as is reported, receive an answer from him, which Capt. Huntington shows up and down the town, wherein he writes, as they say, that he would make me fly the corporation, and that he heard I was sick, but he would make me vomit before I had done, and that, whereas I had put a thorn in their foot, he would take it out and stick it in my sides, and that he heard some of the subscribers recanted and that he would make the rest do so, and that Capt. Huntington tells the people further that the King said I was a rogue and a rascal, and so were my abettors. What I have writ I will prove by those that heard Capt. Huntington read the letter and declare it was Lord Yarmouth's, and they further say that my lord has writ to them to put me by selling coffee, which is my wife's trade. All this has befallen me, by discovering my letter of 12 June wherein there is nothing but truth, but, as they would have you have no intelligence from hence, so they would not have the truth to be known of that you have received, and to this end would scare me and all others from giving any evidence, otherwise what needs these threats, when his Majesty has appointed the whole matter to be heard by him? [Ibid. No. 161.] Enclosed,
Testimonial by four who have been Bayliffs and are now Aldermen, two chamberlains, two ministers, two churchwardens and another in favour of Bower, 25 Aug. [Copy. Ibid. No. 161 i.]
Sept. 25.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Last night arrived the Adventure of this place in three days from St. Malo, where several English merchantmen were brought in by men-of-war of that place, some of which were discharged, but some yet detained for want of passes and some other pretences they have against them. The 23rd arrived the Prosperous from Morlaix, and off the Start met the Dragon and astern of him Sir J. Narbrough. This as well as the other ship met with some Ostenders, but they offered them no injury, and 'tis said the French privateers &c. are more offensive to our navigation than all others.
The French are fitting out a fleet from Brest and Rochefort, given out for the West Indies. It's said from Morlaix &c. that the duty imposed on tobacco from England is also required on their own subjects on their own navigation from St. Christopher's &c., which causes some dispute amongst them. Wind S.E., a moderate gale. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 162.]
Sept. 25.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind E.N.E., close weather. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Sept. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the St. Francis formerly of Bayonne, but taken 50 days past near Canada loaden with fish with four more, and ten more loaden with tobacco and other West Indian commodities, all taken by six States men-of-war, the Admiral called Herman Baily. They were all in company 30 days past, homeward-bound, but separated in foul weather. There also came in the Sampson and the Ann of London from Virginia. They report that the Indians are still in arms and do much mischief to the English living up the country, so that they are forced to leave their plantations. They also speak of a difference betwixt the English themselves, for the Governor, Berkeley, and the Council are dispersed, and the said Governor fled from his house for safety. It is said the cause was for laying great taxes on the common people, so that they have chosen Esquire Bacon to be their commander-in-chief, who is at the head of 15,000 men. There was a report that the Indian King Philip was killed by the English, which may make some alterations with them as time may show, but these disturbances hinder the planting of tobacco &c., so that it is like to be scarcer next year. Wind N.E. Several vessels are come in from Yarmouth &c., bound for Bordeaux. [Ibid. No. 164.]
[Sept. ?] Ariens van Hammens to the King. Petition for a grant making him a free denizen and for a patent for making tiles and other earthenware after the manner of Holland with a prohibition of the importation of the said tiles from Holland or elsewhere, he having at the encouragement of his Majesty's ambassador at the Hague come over to settle in England to exercise his trade of making tiles, porcelain and other earthenwares after the way practised in Holland. At the foot,
Sept.26.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting the petition. 3 Oct. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 137.]
Sept. 26.
Mile End.
Josiah Ricroft to Williamson. Sending the enclosed informations against Morris, a factious, Fifth Monarchy fellow, and craving his advice what is to be done therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 166.]
Sept. 26.
Magdalene College, Cambridge.
Walter Leightonhouse to Williamson. The Lincolnshire fellowship, which Sir Thomas Meres solicited you about in my behalf, is not yet void, yet one of our Fellows, who had a fellowship of 20l. per annum is pre-elected into it, because there was no resident who had a title to it, nor is there any who has so good a propriety to it as myself, being born in the same town and educated in the same school, Alford in Lincolnshire, from which they who enjoy it ought to come, nor do I want anything but the scholarship now vacant to make my propriety entire. My humble desire therefore is that you would let me know whether there be any means of my obtaining it, and, if there be, I beseech you to give yourself the trouble of one line to Dr. Duport, our Master, who may either elect me into it or at least into that of 20l. per annum which the other Fellow has left. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Sept. 26.
The Swan, Northampton.
John Hall to Williamson. There is a small living at Hardingston near Northampton in the King's gift, which you may verso pollice procure for me. Your ingenuity, when I had the happiness to be familiar with you at Oxford, has encouraged me in this suit, and the readiness you have showed with great success in promoting your academic acquaintance. I hereby crave your favour and assistance in this, and you will be an instrument to preserve your poor old friend alive. Time will not allow me to request your acquaintance, Mr. R. Plowman's, certificate of me, and therefore I beg you to trust me in this or any other ordinary favour. I would have appeared in person with my petition, but have lately been hurt in my shoulder by the fall of a stone from the ruins here, where I sustained a very considerable loss of all that was left me since the fire of London, which consumed my estate and the plague my relations. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Sept. 26.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind easterly. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Sept. 26.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. In my last I informed you that the Lord Lieutenant had written to our Bayliffs to put me by selling coffee. They have since received another letter, wherein he presses them not to permit me to sell it. They sent for me and commanded me to forbear selling any, and to-day sent for me again to know if I had any pardon for the time I had sold it. I told them no. Then they asked me if I had anything to show to permit me to sell coffee, I told them, not anything, that I knew might satisfy, which was all that passed, and I caused my wife in obedience to their commands to leave off selling any coffee. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Sept. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday one of our packetboats arrived, but I could not attain to any news by it. The wind has blown N.E. these three days, so fresh that it seems near akin to a storm. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 171.]
Sept. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead bound for Virginia. Sir Roger Strickland in the Dragon is in St. Helen's Road attending for orders. Sir John Narbrough in the Harwich is come this morning to Spithead. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Sept. 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. We have to-day advice from Falmouth of a ship arrived there, which reports that six Flushing capers took 15 French prizes from the Bank, Canada and the Western Islands. The Duke of Albemarle arrived at Exeter last Saturday. It is supposed he may be here next week. [Ibid. No. 173.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 173 I.]
Sept. 26.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Wemyss. I have fully represented to the King your full account of what you could discover concerning the slaughter committed by Sir James McGill on the body of Sir Robert Balfour of Denmill. Though by the report of George Moncreff of Reddie, who came with these two gentlemen from Perth to Abernethie and of the sheriff deput of Perth, as also by the modest assertions of Sir James' friends, it appears to his Majesty that the quarrel on which that slaughter happened was sudden and accidental (though much is said to the contrary in that paper signed by Sir Robert's friends, whereof little or nothing appears to be proved), yet he takes notice of what is asserted by Sir Robert's friends of a shepherd who, they say, heard Sir Robert crying out, "O treacherous man, you have murdered me and my sword undrawn," which Sir James strongly denies with the greatest asseverations that there was not a shepherd nor any man within hearing, if within sight of them, and further says that, if he had killed Sir Robert, when he was tying his horse's head to his foot, he could not be wounded himself, as he says he was, nor could the mortal wound have been given by him in so fair a part of Sir Robert's body with his face to him as it seems it was. Now on the whole matter his Majesty commands me to desire you to make all the inquiry you can into the truth of that assertion concerning the shepherd, and in particular whether there was a shepherd present and if he heard Sir Robert saying the words already mentioned, and thereafter to send your report to his Majesty. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 79.]
Sept. 27.
Custom House
The Commissioners of the Customs to [the Committee for Trade]. Reporting that they believe the enclosed certificate dated 22 Sept. and signed by Gregory Dottin, Jerome Stone and Peter Bird, certifying that the Dorothy and the John and Christopher, both of Dartmouth, are English-built and are wholly manned by his Majesty's subjects and sailed thence last December and May, to be in the hands of the said persons, officers of that port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 174.]
Sept. 27.
Bath.
Lord Brooke to Viscount Conway. As he is informed of the death of Henry Rumsey, steward to Sir Francis Popham's estate requesting him to recommend to Mr. Speaker, who with Lord Poulett is entrusted in the management of that estate, as a fit person to succeed Mr. Rumsey, Andrew Innys of Bristol, who is now employed by the writer, Sir William Whitmore and others in business of that nature. [Conway papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 175.]
Sept. 27. Caveat at the request of the City of London that no grant pass for erecting a market in Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, till notice be given to Mr. Wynn, the City Solicitor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 27.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Powney, a corporal of the Yeomen of the Guard, desiring a lease in reversion for 31 years of Mustion's farm in Eton, in consideration of his willingness to quit his right to the tithes of two of the King's parks near Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 138.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Charles, Earl of Nottingham, for an order for payment of the arrears of his pension amounting to 4,916l. 13s. 4d. and for the continuance of the payment thereof as it shall become due. [Ibid.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of James and Edward Halsall and John Walter, stating a grant to them of the sea weed and sea wrack growing on rocks called tangles, &c. and that they being interrupted warrants were granted them dated 30 April, 1661, which being burnt in the late dreadful fire, they pray may be renewed. [Ibid. p. 139.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate. Recommending to them Moses Holwey of Catherine Hall for the degree of M.A., who is of upwards of 6 years standing and has made great proficiency in all parts of learning, but, being hindered from constantly residing there by his parents' aversion from the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England, he has not been able regularly to take his degree. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 36.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin for payment of 30l. to Gideon Royer, the King's writer, flourisher and embellisher, for writing, flourishing and embellishing three skins in vellum adorned with the King's arms, ornaments and badges in gold with three superscriptions and labels most part in gold, as also for writing them partly in gold, being for three letters to the Emperor of Russia, one whereof was sent by his envoy, Trefann Memthenore, the other two by the King's own envoy, John Hebdon. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 207.]
Sept. 27. Licence and pass to Arthur Fleetwood, one of the Commissioners of the wine licences, to travel into France for the recovery of his health and to remain there 6 months. [Precedents 1, f. 163.]
[Sept. 28.] Durant Jenkinson, of London, merchant, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner last June freighted the Thomas and John, of London, an English-built ship, master and mariners all English, belonging to Sir Thomas Bloodworth and Sir John Moore, that she took in her lading of rye at Auray in France on the petitioner's account, and in her voyage to Amsterdam was, 13 Aug., stopped by a Dunkirk privateer, which took out the master and two seamen with all his papers, and put five Frenchmen into her, pretending her a prize, but the wind drove her on the Holland coast, and the 15th she was met by a States man-of-war and carried to Amsterdam, where the petitioner applied that the ship and goods might be restored, which being no prize to the French could be no prize to the Dutch, and that the Lords of the Admiralty ordered one-ninth part of the value of the ship to be deposited and security given for the rest, on which condition the master should have liberty to take his ship, and that the goods should be delivered on the same terms, but would not give any determined sentence till his Majesty's pleasure should be known to their ambassador as to what will be done to their ships on the like occasion, and therefore praying that his royal pleasure therein may be made known to their ambassador, that so the money deposited may be restored, and the ship and goods cleared. Noted, as read in the Committee of Trade, 28 Sept. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 176.]
Sept. 28.
Council Chamber.
Sir R. Southwell to Sir J. Williamson. After reciting the above petition, informing him that their Lordships declared that, seeing that otherwise the petitioner could not be freed, he might assure the Dutch ambassador of equal favour when the like occasion should happen. [Ibid. No. 177.]
[Sept.] Lieut. William Morris to the Earl of Craven, President, and the rest of the members of the Court Martial. Petition stating that the petitioner, since he was 12 years old, was with his father in the late King's service, till, after Lord Goring's defeat in Cornwall, he with his father was ordered to be banished, and as his father, his brother and himself were carrying their men, who laid down their arms in Cornwall, for the service of Flanders, they were taken by Swanley, a commander of one of the Usurper's ships in the Downs, tied back to back and condemned to be thrown overboard, their funeral sermon first preached before them, but, another of the Usurper's ships arriving, which brought Swanley intelligence that complaints had been made of him for having used many men, women and children with the like cruelty intended for the petitioner and his father and uncle, they were set at liberty and pursued their voyage to Flanders, where they served his Majesty, which is well known to him, his Royal Highness and Prince Rupert, and many persons of quality; that since the Restoration the petitioner has served faithfully and honestly, and was the only instrument, under God, of saving the Drake and two ketches with pressed men from falling into the hands of the Dutch fleet during the war; and that the petitioner never had the least dispute with any officer till this, to which he was not any way accessory but in defending himself, and hoping that his imprisonment, being full three months, and the loss of his father's life in his Majesty's service will be considered, his wife and children having nothing to live on but the small employment he holds. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Sept. 28. Sentence of the Court Martial held at the officers' room in the Guard house for the Coldstream Guards in the Tilt Yard, for hearing the complaint of Col. Hugh Piper, Lieut.-Governor of the garrison at Plymouth, against Lieut. William Morris, Lieutenant of Capt. Humphrey Cornwall's company in garrison there, present the Earl of Craven, President, Lord Howard of Escrick, John Churchill and the Earl of Middleton, Lieut.-Colonels, Major Thomas Mansfield, and Captains Herbert Jefferies and John Mutlow, finding the said Lieut. Morris guilty of the breach of the 16th article of the Articles of War, which runs, "If any inferior officer or soldier shall refuse to obey his superior officer or shall quarrel with him, he shall be cashiered or suffer such punishment as a Court Martial shall think fit," and not proceeding to give any further judgment therein but leaving him to his Majesty's mercy. Signed, "Craven." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 179.]
Sept. 28.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The light ships that were at anchor in this bay are got down to Newcastle and Sunderland. The storm on Saturday night, the 16th, did no damage here, nor on the coast to the northward, but at Beverley it was so violent with thunder and lightning that it has done much damage to the minster and church there by blowing down the pinnacles &c. so that the damage is valued at 1,000l. One stable was burnt, supposed by the lightning, but it did no more hurt. The wind is now N.E. and has been in the same quarter four or five days. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Sept. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have fair weather with an easterly wind. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Sept. 28.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Yesterday, the wind being S.E., several small vessels came in and this morning most of them sailed for France, wind N.E. Yesterday the Providence of London, laden with corn for the Canaries, sailed. Yesterday came in the St. Francisco of Bayonne laden with Bank fish, taken by a Flushinger. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Sept. 28.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 25th came in the Humphrey and Elizabeth of London from Barbados laden with sugars for London. They say that all things there are in good condition only sugars are scarce. Sir Alexander Waldron, who came over in her, went to London by land the day after he came in. The 26th came in the James of London from Bayonne with brandy for London, and also two from Bordeaux, which report that wine is not so plentiful this vintage but very good, and also 40 or 50 English merchantmen bound for places in France. The wind continues E.N.E. The men belonging to the Dutch prize, the St. Francis of Bayonne, say that they have sent about Ireland four of their richest prizes with two of their men-of-war for convoy. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Sept. 28. Warrant for the presentation of Richard White, M.A., to the vicarage of Garstang, Lancashire. [S.P. Dom.. Entry Book 27, f. 91.]
Sept. 28.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Hall at Northampton. I should have been very glad to have served our old acquaintance at Oxford in the suit you proposed to make to the King, but I find Hardingston to be under value in the King's books so as to be in the gift of the Lord Chancellor and not immediately in the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 115.]
Sept. 28. Pass for the Sieur St. Julien to go with a servant to Sweden. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 208.]
Sept. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin and the Treasurer of the Chamber for the time being for payment yearly during pleasure by equal quarterly payments to commence from Midsummer, 1673, of 46l. 10s. 10d. to Thomas Purcill, one of the gentlemen of the Chapel Royal, to be disposed of to such uses as the King shall direct. [Ibid.]
Sept. 29. James Hickes to Williamson. As yet no more letters come for Mr. Moure or Mr. Knyvett. Col. Whitley will be in London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 184.]
Sept. 29.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Sept. 29.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Repeating as in his last how the Bayliffs had forbidden him to sell coffee.—Accordingly I have sold none since, yet yesterday they sent their constables to my house and took a distress, and carried away my pewter for selling coffee last February without a licence. To-day our new Bayliffs took their place, who are Capt. Huntington and Benjamin England, Sir George's son. Mr. Bayliff Thaxter has handled me pretty severely for my letter, and, now Capt. Huntington is come in his place, I doubt not he will sweep away what the other has left. I hear they are about to petition to have the business heard in the county by commission, which I think cannot be thought reasonable, my lord having such power in the county and they making their concerns his. As you prize the King's or the Church's interest, use your interest, that it come before the King, where I doubt not to make those mentioned in my letter ashamed and tremble. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Sept. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Portsmouth frigate from the Straits sailed hence to-day for the Downs. The Duke of Albemarle, we are informed, left Exeter yesterday, and it is supposed he may be here to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 187.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 187 I.]
Sept. 29.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Treasurer. I think you have heard from the King's own mouth that the charge for passing the privy seal for 1,500l. to the 3 Commissioners going to Virginia, as also the fees payable thereon, and 100l. for a writing clerk shall be paid from the dormant privy seal or some other contingent moneys, so that the Commissioners may receive the 1,500l. without abatement. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 213.]
Sept. 30. Sir Robert Southwell to Williamson. Requesting him to draw him a pass for permission to pass into Ireland on his own concerns, as he cannot find the one he had from Lord Arlington about five years ago last May. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 188.]
Sept. 30. Receipt by John Hebdon, going as envoyé to the Emperor of Russia for the papers therein mentioned. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Sept. 30.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. The enclosed libellous paper came here to-day by post to be delivered as directed, but, when Mr. Langford saw there was nothing in it but the printed paper, he returned it to the postmaster, and from him it came by Mr. Wagstaffe to me. What use may be made of it I cannot tell. However we thought it our duty to send it to you to do with it as you think fit, as also that you may be acquainted what evil spirits are still roving about the world. I very humbly thank you for writing to the Lord Treasurer on behalf of Mr. Rogers. He prays you will continue your goodness till his Majesty's reward be paid, for he has had much ill-will and loss for the performance of his duty. Our sessions being adjourned for some time, I can give no account of the libellers. [Ibid. No. 190.] Probably enclosed,
Outer sheet of a letter directed to Mr. Langford, bookseller in Gloucester, with post mark of 19 September, the rest being gone. [Ibid. No. 190 i.]
Sept. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday night one of our packet-boats arrived, but brought no news, except that of the Prince's resolution of coming over into England. The wind has been easterly of late, to-day it is more northerly, the weather dark without rain. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Sept. 30. T. Jennings to his cousin, Francis Ryley, at the Balcony house in the Great Sanctuary, next Green's Alley, Westminster. Instructing him how he should make a seizure for rent. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Sept. 30. Warrant for a pardon to John Exton and Thomas Parker, of Chichester, found guilty of the manslaughter of Devereux Gwillim, who were respited before trial during pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 165.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Caveat by Williamson on behalf of Mr. Ogilby that no grant pass of the office of the Master of the Revels in Ireland, without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 27.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Pass for Sir Robert Southwell, Clerk of the Council, to go to Ireland on his domestic occasions and to remain four months there. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 208.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Master of the Rolls, the Barons and Chamberlains of the Exchequer, and the Keeper of the Rolls in the Tower to permit Fabian Philips to peruse and take notes of all the records in their custody and to use all such indexes, calendars and repertories which may further the same, he being employed by Secretary Williamson to search the records for certain matters relating to the King's special service. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 210.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 193.]
Sept. 30. The King to the Lords of the Admiralty. Warrant for ordering an embargo on all merchant ships going to Virginia or Maryland, till the convoy designed for them be ready, on account of the disturbances lately broken out in the former colony. [Precedents 1, f. 164.]
Sept. 30. Pass to Sir Thomas Isham to travel beyond the seas. [Ibid.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for granting to Viscount Ranelagh, Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, licences of absence in the usual form from his employments in Ireland till 25 March next. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 56.]
Sept. Statement by Jonas Gabay, a Jew by birth, who was converted to the Christian faith and was baptized 28 April, 1672, of his persecutions and sufferings at the hands of the Jews. On the other side is a more detailed statement addressed to all Christian readers zealous of the Christian faith of how he was beaten by the Jews, how they attempted to poison him, and how they procured persons with whom he lodged to beat and misuse him. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 194.]
[Sept. ?] Petition to the King and Privy Council showing that some 3 months since (beginning of June, 1676, see ante, pp. 143, 144, 146) four French men-of-war, casting anchor before Tynemouth Bar, came to Tynemouth Castle to desire leave to come into the harbour to mend one of their mainmasts and to clean, which being before the proclamation prohibiting privateers from coming into the ports could not be denied, so they came in to refit and clean, to do which they were compelled to land all their men to the number of 700 or 800, which gave a great alarm to the country, who knew the weakness of the garrison, the works of the castle being much ruined, so that there is a great necessity for erecting a half moon to cover the gate and for making a half bastion before the south battery, and desiring an order for making the said works forthwith, and that the Master of the Ordnance should make an estimate thereof that a further order may issue for moneys for paying for the same. [Ibid. No. 195.]
[Sept. ?] Queries by Williamson what the sense is of the Act of convoying one another's merchantmen? How the Admiralty of Jersey and Guernsey stands? The order of the Board to Sir W. Swan to take oaths on the Lord Chancellor's opinion? Above is an equation on the problem how long two pipes will take to fill a cistern, if each takes 3 and 4 hours respectively. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 233.]
Sept.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 385. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
196 1 1 19 1 S.W.
197 2 1 N. The fleet is now under sail, wind N.E.
198 3 1 5 3 S.
199 5 1 24 2 S.W.
200 6 2 2 1 N.E.
201 7 2 1 0 N.E.
202 10 3 0 2 N.W.
203 11 2 12 0 N.W.
204 13 2 13 0 W.
205 14 1 8 0 N.W.
206 15 2 0 0 N.E.
207 16 3 0 0 S.W.
208 18 3 4 0 N.E.
209 19 3 8 0 N.W.
210 22 1 12 0 N.W.
211 23 1 2 0 N.E.
212 25 1 2 0 N.E.
213 26 2 1 0 N.E.
214 28 1 1 0 N.E.
215 30 2 3 0 E.