BHO

Charles II: August 1676

Pages 257-306

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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August 1676

Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
William Blathwayt to the Officers of the Mint. Sending them the original answers to the questions proposed to the undertakers of the coinage of tin farthings, as the copying clerks are out, and there is not a moment to lose. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 68.] Enclosed,
Answer by the farmers of tin to the questions proposed to them by Mr. Slingsby. 1 August. [Ibid. No. 68 i.]
Reply of the farmers of tin to Mr. Slingsby, accusing him of needless delay, of seeking to blast the reputation of the tin farthing, though the farmers' great design is the good of King and kingdom, showing that unless the tin coinage be raised to 16d. the pound, they will be unable to bear the expense, and how the Mint officers are influenced by "their passionate zeal for their beloved and profitable copper farthings," and declaring they are willing to refrain from marking with grainings the edges of the farthings, though Mr. Slingsby's pretended secret therein is known to everybody. 1 August. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 68 ii.]
Proposals by Sir Richard Ford and others, the then farmers of the pre-emption, for the coining of tin farthings, received by the King at Oxford in 1665, but rejected. [Ibid. No. 68 iii.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Request by the Duke of Monmouth to Secretary Williamson to procure a pass for Herbert Throckmorton, lieutenant to Captain Richard Tufton in Col. Russell's regiment of Foot Guards, to be absent in foreign parts for six weeks. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Aug. 1.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Pleasant good harvest weather. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Aug. 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. An easterly wind brought one of our packet-boats in a few hours from the Brill last Sunday afternoon, with few passengers and little news. They could tell us none from Maestricht, though several deserters came over. Among the passengers was an envoy from Russia, who came not ashore here, but that interpreter, that was with Andreas Vimini, was ashore. I believe to save charges they went by water yester-morning to London. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Aug. 1.
The Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. This evening came in four East Indiamen and near 20 fly-boats and other vessels from France with salt, most bound over sea. The East Indiamen have lost 10 or 12 men each. The Samuel and Henry have lost the commander, suspected to be poisoned, whereof the chirurgeon is under confinement. This evening came in the Spragge also. With the names of the East India ships and their commanders. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Aug. 1.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The two packets for Algiers I sent to Cadiz yesterday by Thomas Scot, master of the Four Anns. He has promised his care in sending them to Algiers or to deliver them to the consul at Cadiz. Last night a messenger gave us an account by land that four East India ships were about Hastings, and to-day by boat we understand they are, two near Dover Road and two near the Ness, and are expected in the Downs next evening. A fresh gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Aug. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E., dry weather. Sunday came in here the Bristol, Sir John Berry, commander, from the Straits. She is to be refitted out again, as it is said for Virginia. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Aug. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 75.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 75 i.]
Aug. 1. Warrant to John Bradley, messenger to apprehend Bernard Perry, innkeeper in Mitcham, and bring him before the King in Council. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 161.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Recommending Knyvett Hastings for a company void by the death of Col. Widdrington. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 54.]
Aug. 1. Caveat that no grant pass of the Archdeaconry of Exeter till the Bishop of London be acquainted with it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 25.]
Aug. 2. Representation of the officers of the Mint to the Committee for Trade, arguing against Sir William Smyth's proposals for coinage of tin farthings and also reply to the answers sent by Mr. Palmer to the several questions proposed to him by Mr. Slingsby. [This paper prepared by Mr. Slingsby alone was withdrawn the next day and exchanged for that calendared post, p. 261. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 76.]
Aug. 2. Reply of John Cooke and others to the answer of Sir John Godolphin, to prove that Jackson is an Englishman, though free of Calais, that he did not act under a French commission, and that Sir John Godolphin has acted improperly in refusing to obey the orders of the Admiralty and in acting as Jackson's advocate, and proposing that either Jackson or they take the ship and goods, giving security to the other party to answer claims thereto, or that the ship be sent back to the French port whence it came to try any title he pretends thereto by reason of any commission from thence. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Aug. 2. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. The month for visiting the windmill being come, and some bucks being reserved, lest, if we should rely on the old place we may come off as formerly, I hope it will be no unreasonable request to ask about what time we shall have your company. The ladies will not take a dance till you come or hear any music till the man you promised to send be arrived. We are almost drowned, everyone drinking every morning more water than their bellies will well hold, but my grass walks keep green by the means, for what the heavens deny the ladies supply. We hear of great havoc at Maestricht. Sir John Newton is your humble servant. We drink your health both in wine and water. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Aug. 2.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. We had full resolution at our last sessions of trying the persons through whose hands that infamous libel I formerly sent you had passed, but the person lately tried for the same crime at the Old Bailey escaping punishment put us to the more careful examination of the evidence we had, before we brought them to public trial. Upon strict scrutiny we find that the libel that was brought here from Hereford was, burnt by the person to whom it was sent, and the copy taken of it was sent to you by me, so that we cannot now prove either the paper itself or any copy taken immediately of it, without proving which we doubt our prosecution of the offenders will be ineffectual, and, unless we have more than probable grounds of doing it thoroughly, we think it will not be conducible to his Majesty's service to make the business more public than it is. Therefore, by the desire of the Mayor and the rest of the Justices as also by the advice of the Recorder, I crave your direction whether we shall upon the evidence we have proceed to try the persons accused at our next sessions, to which they are bound over, and, if his Majesty shall judge it fit to be done, to send us down that copy you had from me, that so we may put the person who wrote it to his oath whether it be a true copy or not, for, unless that be proved, it is, I humbly conceive, much to be doubted whether the parties will be by law made liable to the punishment they deserve. According to your commands I sent you as short a relation as I could of how Mr. Rogers discovered that most infamous paper, and I am now earnestly desired by him to write a word or two in his behalf that you would procure him of the Lord Treasurer the reward promised. He has sustained much loss in his employment for performing his duty in this, and therefore I hope I have not been too troublesome to insert this his petition to you, and the rather because he has no other way of applying himself to you. I desire that, as soon as your more weighty affairs will permit, you will honour me with a line or two in answer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 79.]
Aug. 2. Sir Gilbert Talbot to Williamson. At my return from the Bath Sir John Talbot showed me his letter from you, which shows that you have not learned one part of a courtier, which is to forget your absent friends. Since Mr. Trevor is dead, the Bishop can no more pretend a pre-engagement, nor can he in my judgement grant a reversion of himself without a power from his Majesty. If therefore you will remind his Majesty of his promise to me of a reversionary grant to my nephew's son of that hospital in the vacancy of the bishopric, and that Dr. Trevor carried it from us by an after grant, he may be inclined to recommend us to the Bishop for his promise of the thing when it shall fall, the present possessor being a very aged man and of a disorderly diet. That you may not have the sole burden of this affair, I have written to my friend, Mr. Grenville, to move the King in it, whenever you will be at leisure to second it. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Aug. 2. Anna Knevitt to Francis Mence at his house in Fareham. I had a great desire to know whether you had been at my house or not, and, not knowing how the business might fall out, I thought it good to write. Pray tell her I expect her to pay all my rents that I have been charged, since she has kept me out of my own house, and say to her whatever else you and your attorney think good, and pray send me word as soon as you can how things stand that I may send down a writ. My address is at Isaac Clarke's, silk dyer, in Gravel Lane, near the Swan, Southwark. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Aug. 2.
The Assurance, in the Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. The enclosed is the declaration against the chief mate and chirurgeon of the Samuel and Henry. The purser now commands her. To-day I sent in Aaron Johnson's vessel to Dover, and hope to-night to hear the Lords' pleasure touching Capt. Jacobs and his vessel.
I have sent by several vessels, of two sloops I hear lay lurking off Fairlight and the Ness, that, if possible, they may meet with them. The frigates are still at sea, and I almost daily send them what news I hear of any privateers. [Ibid. No. 82.] Enclosed,
Charge against William Low, master, of plotting along with Hugh Davies, the chirurgeon, the death of Capt. Simon Cumberland, the late commander of the Samuel and Henry, who died at sea; of endeavouring to raise a mutiny and run away with the ship both before and after the captain's death; of trying to run the ship ashore on the Scilly Isles &c. He defended the chirurgeon and released him from confinement and gave him his former privileges contrary to the orders of the East India Company's governors &c. asserting that the captain was non compos when he charged himself and the chirurgeon with contriring his death. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 82 i.]
Similar charges against Hugh Daries, the chirurgeon, of poisoning the said Commander. In each paper the names of witnesses to each charge are given in the margin. [Ibid. No. 82 ii.]
Aug. 2. Warrant to John Bradley, messenger, to apprehend Mr. Bury and bring him before the King in Council. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 162.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Lamplugh for a gift of the remainder of 336l. 7s. 10d. remaining on his account as late Receiver General of the 18 months' assessment in Cumberland and Westmorland. [S.P.Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 125.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Howell, messenger, to search for and take into custody — Rogers, now or late of Lincolnshire, and to bring him before Williamson, to answer what shall be objected against him concerning the making, publishing, or causing to be printed an unlicensed book or pamphlet entitled "A Letter from a Gent in Loudon to his friend in the Country," relating to M. de Luzancy. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 189.]
Aug. 3. Reasons and exceptions against allowing Mr. Palmer to mark the edges of his tin coins with letters and grainings. [Substituted for the paper of the day before in Mr. Slingsby's name only. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 83.]
Aug. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E., fair weather. An order is come to refit the Bristol for sea again, and accordingly she is preparing. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Aug. 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 85.]
[Aug. 3.] Note by Roger Lloyd that by an order of Council of 2 Aug. he had received 3 Aug. from Mr. Blathwayt the four petitions thereinmentioned for passes for ships. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Order in Council for a warrant for making Cornelius Tetar a denizen, notwithstanding that he is a mariner and master of a billander. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Aug. 4. Certificate by Sir George Waterman that Cornelius Tetar took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Aug. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 89.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 89 i.]
Aug. 4.
The Council Chamber, Whitehall.
Warrant from the Lords of the Council to John Wickham, messenger, to take into custody Monsr. Marevile, secretary to the Queen's Lord Chamberlain, and to deliver him safe prisoner to the Keeper of the Gatehouse for contriving and preparing a warrant for printing the Mass Book in English. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 90.]
Aug. 4.
The Council Chamber. Whitehall.
Warrant from the same to the Keeper of the Gatehouse to keep in safe custody the said Marevile. [Copy. Ibid. No. 91.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the same to George Gillyat, messenger, to take into custody James Thompson, a milliner in Eagle Court, and to bring him before his Majesty in Council next Wednesday, to answer what shall be objected against him touching his endeavours to suborn Anthony Lawrence, bookseller, to take upon him the sole printing and publishing of a Popish book entitled The Great Sacrifice of the New Law. [Copy. Ibid. No. 92.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the same to John Wickham, messenger, to take into custody — Dimock a Popish priest, who now or lately belonged to the Portugal Ambassador, and is author of the book entitled The Great Sacrifice of the New Law, and to bring him before the Council. [Copy. Ibid. No. 93.]
Aug. 4.
[Received.]
List of ships cleared out for Greenland since 1 March, 1675-6, giving the names of those cleared between 22 March and 17 April. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Aug. 4. Affidavit by Henry Hill of Wapping, master of the Friendship of London, that he has been master of her since 15 Nov. last, when he bought her, and that she was then new and had never been at sea, and that he never had any pass for her in pursuance of the treaty with Denmark. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Aug. 4. Licence to Herbert Throckmorton, lieutenant to Capt. Richard Tufton in the King's regiment of Foot Guards, to be absent for 6 weeks. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 34.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Congés d'élire and letters missives to the Deans and Chapters of Norwich and Exeter respectively for the election of Anthony Sparrow, D.D., Bishop of Exeter, to the bishopric of Norwich, void by the death of Mr. Reynolds, and for the election of Robert Cary, D.D. to the bishopric of Exeter, void by Dr. Sparrow's translation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 32.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Pass for Capt. Thomas Noden with three servants to pass and remain beyond the seas and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 189.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent for 14 years to William Sherwin for his invention of a speedy way for printing broad calico and Scotch cloth with a double-necked rolling press, which, being the only true way of the East India printing and staining such kind of goods, was never done by any here till now. [Ibid. p. 190.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to Arthur Barclay of 100l. sterling, being the arrears of his pension. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 64.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection for two years respectively to Sir John Sinclair of Hermiestoun and Alexander Menzies, writer in Edinburgh. [Ibid. p. 65.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to John Osborne of the office of one of the serjeants at law in Ireland with a clause granting him the office of Prime Serjeant there in reversion after Sir William Davys, the present Prime Serjeant. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 44.]
[Between August 4 and 9.] Allowance by Williamson of the bill of extraordinaries, dated 2 April, of Sir Edward Wood, envoy extraordinary to the King of Sweden, from 29 Sept., 1674, to 25 March, 1676, amounting to 557l. 3s. Among them is, "Paid in clothes and entertainments at Upsala on the coronation and to poor scholars and to scholars for orations and to professors for presenting me with some of their works, to music, drums, trumpets, pipers and for fitting my stables at Upsala, 200l." [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 191.]
[Between August 4 and 9.] Allowance by Williamson of the account of extraordinaries laid out by Thomas Chudleigh, secretary to the extraordinary embassy of mediation at Nimeguen, from 30 Dec., 1675, to 30 June, 1676, amounting to 54l., with memorandum that all letters sent beyond Cologne, Liege, Brussels and the Hague pay postage at Nimeguen, and that all letters received at Nimeguen pay the whole post there. [Ibid. p. 192.]
Aug. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived here about 5 in the evening. The passengers report that the Prince of Orange has lost many thousands of his soldiers before Maestricht, and that the besieged made lately a great sally upon his quarters, but, they retreating and being pursued to the gates of the town, 18 great guns were laid, which the French discharging upon them made an incredible slaughter amongst them, but what truth is in it I know not. The wind has been easterly these three days and pretty high, the weather fair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 96.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Gylby. I have yours with the complaint against the Brandenburger caper, which I immediately communicated to the minister here from that Prince, but having no particulars of the offender, the time, the place, persons injured, &c., I could have but a general answer, that he would be sure to serve them what he could. I must therefore desire that the complaint be drawn up in form and put into any friends' hands here in town to solicit, on which I shall be sure to give them my best help. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 106.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Fowler. I have yours of the 2nd, and shall take my first time to know the King's pleasure as to the prosecution of the dispersers of the late abominable libel. As to Mr. Rogers' reward, I have already by the King's command lodged it with the Lord Treasurer to be paid according to the proclamation, and there needs only some common friend here to follow it a little by my direction at the Lord Treasurer's without loss of time or expense. Pray let Mr. Rogers send some one to me on his part, and I will be sure to give him what help is necessary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 106.]
Aug. 5. Grant to Joseph Barker, M.A., to be Dean of Exeter in place of Dr. Cary, late Dean of the same. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 31.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Joseph Atkins of the offices of chirurgeon general to the standing army in Ireland with a stipend of 6s. sterling per diem and of chirurgeon to the hospital in Dublin with a stipend of 4s. sterling per diem in reversion after James Fountaine, the present holder of the above offices. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 43.]
Aug. 6.
The Assurance, in the Downs
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. Since my last of the 2nd with the accusations against the chief mate and chirurgeon of the Samuel and Henry of London from the Indies there is little news. Yesterday our frigates came in from cruising, their days being out, and brought in with them a small sloop of Calais. The captains tell me he ran ashore as soon as they chased him, though the King's colours were out. The men all leaped ashore, so the Drake got off the vessel, and the Rose put her boat ashore and overtook the captain, lieutenant, and master, who are on board us, the rest got away. The vessel they plundered the day before is under the Ness, and will be here to give information against them the first opportunity. Her master reports that off the Start he met two small privateers, off Portland two more, one off the Wight and several off Beachy and thereabouts. Those to the westward he complains not of, though I am apt to believe, as they are privateers, so one is as bad as the other.
Even now I sent for the mate to Mr. Bant, who lies so sorely wounded on shore, to know if he knew any of these men, but he did not, but carrying him to the sloop he confidently affirms it to be one of them that much wronged them lately. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 97.]
Aug. 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday Capt. Stepney of the Drake and another of the frigates cruising in the Channel, who are very pliant, hemmed in a sloop, which not far from Hastings ran ashore, and none stayed in her but the captain, lieutenant and master. The rest escaped in the country, but the country people were alarmed at them and suddenly rose. The French gave the Sussex people good words and at last got to Dover, and yesterday Capt. Stepney brought in the sloop. 'Tis said this is one of the sloops that so desperately wounded Mr. Bant. He, who is here yet very weak, is not able to go to see her, but some of his men say 'tis one of the said sloops. These five days past nothing but very high winds at N.E. It blows very fresh at N.E. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Aug. 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather, no news. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Aug. 6. Caveat that no pardon pass for the surgeon of an East India merchantman called the Samuel and Henry for poisoning his captain, Henry Cumberland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 25.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer of England, of the petition of Viscount Ranelagh and partners reciting their former petition and the reference thereon, calendared in the last volume, p. 501, and noticing the following report of the Lord Lieutenant, and praying, as they find their credit lessened every day by the noise of their being under more covenants and obligations unperformed than they really are, a reference of their former petition and of the said report to the Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer, and also of the annexed report which was:—On examining the petitioners' accounts several defalcations appear due to them by reason of allowances made to the farmers of the revenue for losses in the late Dutch war, and also on account of quit-rents remitted, which the Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer were of opinion ought to be discounted to the undertakers by virtue of covenants in their grant, besides other payments whereof they crave an allowance as made according to his Majesty's command, though not comprehended in their contract, which payments are not yet fully adjusted, on which pretensions they ground their petition to be discharged of the sums therein recited.
On a motion lately made by the Lord Chancellor in Council a letter has been prepared for giving the petitioners a year longer for payment of the remaining part of the 12 months' arrear yet unsatisfied and the 10 months' arrear due to the army and the remaining part of the old arrears due on the Civil List, which there is good reason to believe will amount to above 80,000l. The petitioners likewise have not yet paid any part of the 6,076l. due for arms and ammunition, which ought to have been paid by them before 25 December last. They are also by a determination of the Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer to discharge so much of the Duke of Ormonde's 5,000l. per annum during the time of their undertaking as was computed to amount to about 1,250l.
These moneys remaining still due, I conceive they will near balance, if not overbalance, the payments and other allowances mentioned in the petition whereof they now desire to be discharged, so, in regard so great a part of their contract yet remains to be performed, my opinion is that your Majesty should respite giving any orders for the discharge of the said 80,000l. and 10,000l., till your Majesty be fully satisfied how they have acquitted themselves of the other parts of their undertaking, and, when a report of the whole shall be received, it will then be reasonable to grant the petitioners such releases and discharges as the petition desires, especially considering that they are by their contract in the first place obliged to pay your Majesty's charges and debts and afterwards to give your Majesty the said 80,000l. in two years from 25 Dec., 1675, so it might seem preposterous to discharge those future payments, which are not yet due, before those already incurred be satisfied. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 125.]
[Aug. ?] Lieut.-Col. Arthur Young to the King. Petition for some employment or subsistence, the petitioner having left his command in Holland, in obedience to the proclamation, and having been given a company in Lord Widdrington's regiment. This having been disbanded after the peace, the petitioner was granted a pass to return to Holland, but, in regard he so left their service, he found himself slighted, and has been out of employment ever since. At the side,
Aug. 7.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Earl of Arlington, that he well remembers the petitioner's coming over, and his being made a captain as he says, but not that to his knowledge it ever fell in his Majesty's way to do anything else for him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 100.]
Aug. 7.
Bexley.
Lord O'Brien to Williamson. I hope Mr. Williamson will make the best use of your restored kindness to him. If he does not, I shall be much troubled, and the rather, because I cannot but conclude that my son's security must be sued. His eyes continue so bad that he prays your excuse for not writing, but returns you all real thanks for granting his petition.
I am heartily sorry you have been so ill. You ought to consider your health in the midst of business. I am sure your brother Coventry is more indulgent to himself. I should be glad you would take a little refreshment with us a hawking. We have a couple of kites that threaten great destruction, provided we could but keep off the blades from destroying the game, but here are so many destroyers, that I should be very glad the King would give me the command of the game in this county, at least on this side the Medway. I would come up to ask for it, but consider that, if any of my brethren should find me soliciting for it, it might prevent my future services, but I believe that, if it was but moved, his Majesty would allow of it. Therefore I shall order Tilson to attend you to-night or to-morrow morning with that authority that was formerly granted to the Duke of Richmond, but in regard the blunderbuss (Winchilsea) had one formerly for the whole county, I should suppose a non obstante would be requisite. I pray God continue your health and our poor master's, for, I am afraid, the hawks must otherwise be cast off. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Aug. 7.
Ednall (Edenhall).
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. Last Saturday I came here and found my father indifferently as to health. He will acknowledge the honour of your letter. Lord Carlisle has sent a commission for Col. Lamplugh to be deputy lieutenant. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Aug. 7.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Thursday our Lord Lieutenant set out for London, and Capt. Huntington to-day, and last Saturday Mr. Bailiff Thaxter received a letter from the Lord Lieutenant, when he sent for his partner, Sir George England, Mr. John Woodroff and the Town Clerk, and, after spending some time in consultation, the bailiffs sent for several people that used my house, and examined them, what they had heard me at any time speak relating to the government or the settling of the militia, or what else. Not meeting with anything that I can learn to serve their purpose, they sent for me, and showed me the copy of a letter of 12 June which, they said, I had sent to you, wherein Bailiff Thaxter told me he was abused, and asked if I would own the copy. I told him I could not remember the words I had writ, and misplacing the words might alter the sense, but, if he would procure the original, I would own it, on which they bade me get sureties for my good behaviour or I should go to gaol, whither they sent me, but after some stay I was bailed out, and to-day I was punished for my wife, who with her coffee sells mum and cider. She, judging there was no necessity for a licence for mum or cider, and having none, they sent the constables and took a distress for 20s., which I redeemed by laying down the money. After this the constables were sent again to forewarn me for selling cider. They give out that they have not done with me. I doubt not, if the Nonconformists durst meet, they would have a day of thanksgiving. If I have writ to you anything I cannot make good, let me suffer, but, if it be a crime to give you intelligence of what passes here, I am in an error. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 103.]
Aug. 7.
The Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. To-day the three frigates return to their appointed station, one between Beachy and Fairlee (Fairlight), one between Fairlee and the Ness, and one between the Ness and this, and so ply off and on as they shall have intelligence.
I understand a squadron of frigates is shortly to be sent to the southward, and I have been promised fair. You know what service I have done, how many squadrons I have commanded, in all advanced his Majesty's honour and little to myself. May I say none have commanded so long and so many particular commands by myself and in all successful. Pray remember my Gottenberg voyage and the squadron I destroyed and my voyage (?) to the westward in '65 and several others, and for all these but as a private captain. I pray you, as yourself have assured me your favour many times, to move his Majesty therein. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Aug. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.E., very close weather inclining to rain. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Aug. 7.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news as in the next letter. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Aug. 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 5th came in here a States man-of-war of 60 guns called the Golouffe or Belief. She came from Plymouth to convoy a ship that had lain here some time for want of a pass called the John and Thomas of London, laden with powder and other ammunition that they took in at Amsterdam on the States' account, being bound, as they pretend, for Leghorn. They both sailed the same day, though the wind was N.E., for their admiral, called the Arms of Utrecht, stayed at Plymouth to repair his mast with some more merchantmen under his convoy. They had particular order from the Lords of the Admiralty to take care of this ship. They report that the rest of the men-of-war fitting out for the Mediterranean are making ready with all speed possible. Wind now N.E. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Aug. 7.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Robert Humes to be lieutenant to the King's own company and to William Bridges to be ensign to Capt. Thomas Stradling in Col. Russell's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 35.]
Aug. 8.
Yarmouth
Edmund Thaxter and Thomas Bradford, bailiffs, to Williamson. Having a few months since received a letter or two from you and therein your kind resentment of our ready compliance with what you desired, as likewise expressions of your readiness to befriend our corporation or any member thereof, we are emboldened to acquaint you, that we are informed of a scandalous letter, a libel we may call it, written to you by Bowers, a coffee seller here, much reflecting on the credit and loyalty of persons concerned in the civil and military government of this place, and that he very much buoys up himself in his scandalous representations by a great interest he boasts to have in your Honour, and pretends to be warranted therein as your intelligencer, which we neither can nor will believe, being more than assured of your great respect to government and the persons concerned therein than to listen or at least to credit the libellous information of every inferior person. We shall not trouble you with any of the contents of what he wrote, but become your humble suitors for the original letter that we may be in a better capacity to understand our charge and his offence, not only for the vindication of ourselves, but the encouragement of our successors, which we hope you will not deny us, if duly considered how great a dependence his Majesty's service in this corporation has thereon, for, if such unheard of insolence be not made exemplary, officers here, whether civil or military, will have small encouragement to act, for you cannot but judge it to be very unacceptable to be awed by so inconsiderable a fellow, and that his passing unpunished will give heart to others to scandalize government and authority unless squared to their own uneasy and peevish humours. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 108.]
Aug. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday about noon arrived one of our packet-boats in a few hours from the Brill. We met with no passengers in her that had been lately at Maestricht. There were several Dutch merchants, who made nothing of the siege of it, but slightingly said it will be taken in 3 or 4 days.
Soldiers, his Majesty's subjects, in considerable numbers desert foreign services at this time, and, because I have received no commands lately from you to the contrary, I have continued the registering their passages, as I have formerly done.
The passengers speak of a city belonging to the King of Denmark that was consumed by lightning, but I do not remember the name.
This morning the wind is got westerly and the weather is fair. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Aug. 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.S.E., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Aug. 8.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. To-day sailed the Dutch men-of-war and merchantmen bound to their fleet in the Mediterranean, who stayed here so long by reason of their admiral losing his foremast and bowsprit. I am told they are returned by contrary winds. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 111.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Fowler. I have acquainted his Majesty with your prudent foresight as to prosecuting the dispersers of that infamous libel in your parts. He has directed the thing should be thought of and in a post or two you shall know his pleasure. In the meantime please let me know the precise time you should need the copy of that libel, in regard there will be need also of it here for prosecuting Mr. Freeke. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 107.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Caveat by Williamson that no grant pass of the rectory of Charleton upon Otmore in the county and diocese of Oxford without notice to him, his Majesty having at his instance disposed of the same. [Subsequently cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 25.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Congé d' élire and letter missive to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, for the election of Thomas Lamplugh, D.D., chaplain to the King, to the bishopric of Exeter. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 32.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing Sir Thomas Newcomen to be of the Privy Council in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 45.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on a memorial of Heer van Beuningen, ambassador extraordinary from the States General, complaining that the Governor of Gravesend has sent soldiers of his garrison on board two men-of-war belonging to the States, which arrived there as convoy to some merchantmen, to oblige some English and Scotch mariners to leave the said ships and service, though they are inhabitants of the United Provinces, and to force the captains to pay them their wages, without which the Governor will not suffer the ships to depart, and praying that the said English and Scotch, who are inhabitants of the said Provinces, may be set at liberty and the captains with their ships permitted to depart without being obliged to the said payment; that Secretary Williamson signify to the Governor his Majesty's pleasure that he forthwith discharge the said ships and permit them quietly to prosecute their intended voyage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 112.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that, information having been given that there are divers Popish and unlicensed books belonging to Moor, Turner and Dod lodged in three warehouses over the stables in Somerset House, Secretary Williamson do acquaint her Majesty therewith and desire that her Vice-Chamberlain or some other of her officers may be directed to accompany the Clerk of the Council who is to take with him one of the messengers, and cause the said books to be seized and delivered to the Bishop of London to be disposed of, as the law directs. At the foot,
Memorandum by Williamson that he attended her Majesty in her bedchamber on the matter of this order, Friday, 11 Aug., his Majesty being present when he first addressed the Queen in it, who returned answer, that she would give order in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 113.]
Another copy of the above order. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Aug. 9. Order in Council that it be referred to the Committee for Trade to examine the matter in difference between the Trinity House and Sir John Clayton touching a lighthouse designed to be erected by the Trinity House on the cliff near Lowestoft, and to report their opinion. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Order for the release on bail from the Gatehouse of Anthony de Marevile, secretary to the Queen's Lord Chamberlain, committed for contriving a warrant for printing the Mass book in English, he having acknowledged his error in so doing and prayed for his liberty on bail. [Ibid. No. 116.]
[Aug. 9 ?] Memorandum of careats for a prebend at Worcester, dated 19 Jan., 5 March, 5 and 28 April, and 5 Dec., 1675, all calendared in the last two volumes, and of one of that date. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Wednesday,
Aug. 9.
Sir Denis Gauden to Williamson. Requesting his letter to each of the ships loaden with provisions for Tangier, the Supply and the Industry, requiring them to set sail without delay on any pretext. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Governor of Gravesend. (The purport of this letter sufficiently appears from the order directing it to be written calendared ante, p. 269.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 107.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Caveat by Williamson on behalf of Henry Savile that no grant or letter pass for granting the remainders on estates tail in Ireland or for granting the lands of Holywood or Tartane, co. Dublin, his Majesty having formerly granted the same to the Duchess of Cleveland, without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 25.]
[Aug. 9 ?] Note of the part of the above caveat relating to the lands of Holywood or Tartane. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 50.]
Aug. 9. Memorandum that the next Prebendary's place in Worcester is for Mr. Glanville absolutely, so declared by the King at the Bishop of Worcester's desire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of St. Asaph. Recommending Dr. Fabricius, late Professor of Divinity at Heidelburg, for the next donative or sinecure that shall be at his disposal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 32.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to Captain William Ricketts, Master of the Supply. As contrary to his charter party with Sir D. Gauden, Victualler of the Navy, he delays to proceed on his intended voyage to Tangier with the provisions on board for the supply of that garrison, commanding him, wind and weather permitting, to set sail without any further delay. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 193.]
Aug. 9. The King to Phineas Hide, Master of the Industry. To the same effect as the last. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 193.]
[Aug. 9?] Allowance by Williamson of Sir W. Temple's bill of extraordinaries for the year ending 26 May, 1676, amounting to 946l. [Ibid.]
Aug. 9. Warrant for a grant of the office of chirographer of the Court of Common Pleas to Thomas Harrison, of Gray's Inn, for his life in reversion after grants to William Longueville for his life and to Edmund Poley during pleasure. A similar entry on f. 157 has been cancelled. [Precedents 1, f. 160.]
Aug. 9.
Ham.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Wemyss. A petition earnestly recommended by Prince Rupert having been presented to his Majesty by Sir James McGill for a remission of the slaughter committed by him on Sir Robert Balfour of Denmill, his Majesty has chosen you as the fittest person to give him the most impartial account, and it is his pleasure that you send for the nearest relatives of both parties, and having heard what they have to say and received the truest information you can from any other impartial hands, you may send his Majesty as full and clear an account as you can. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 65.]
Aug. 9. Order in Council. His Majesty has referred it to the Committee of Trade to write to the Lord Lieutenant and point out to him the method practised in the English out ports for obtaining passes and especially those necessary for the Mediterranean, which must be signed by the Lords of the Admiralty and those for Sweden and Denmark by his Majesty. The others relating to Spain and Holland may be signed by the magistrates of the ports from whence the ships set sail. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 51.]
Aug. 10.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
The Committee for Trade to the town of Yarmouth. Wishing them to deliver carefully and without partiality their opinions about a lighthouse at Corton, which Sir John Clayton alleges would be very detrimental, and the Master and Wardens of the Trinity House very advantageous to navigation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 119.]
Aug. 10.
[Read.]
Francis Boynton and others to the King and the Committee for Trade. Petition stating that the petitioners have bought several foreign-built ships, expecting to have the usual warrants for making them free, but now find that a stop is put to the granting of such warrants; and praying that their ships, which they have purchased for valuable consideration, may have freedoms. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Aug. 10.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. There is a continuance of pleasant and good harvest weather. Several vessels here are loading for Holland and are taking in great quantities of wheat and other corn. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Aug. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat arriving since my last we have not received the least news from Holland. Though the weather be fair, the wind blows fresh at N.W. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Aug. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Two Virginia ships arrived today say the natives are not so troublesome as the English planters are, who raise mutinies and deny sending in such soldiers as are required by the Governor, which gives the enemy more advantage than otherwise he would have. 'Tis reported strongly from Flanders and Holland that the French army under the Duke of Luxembourg is routed with a very great slaughter and that Philipsburg is taken, but yet it bears no credit with us, especially the latter. Not a topsail gale at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 123.]
Aug. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master-General of the Ordnance, after reciting that the building of several works and fortifications had been ordered at Portsmouth and Plymouth and at the forts at Tilbury, Sheerness, Cockham Wood, Gillingham and Holy Island according to drafts approved by the King, parts of which had been begun, for appointing commissioners to contract with all persons requisite for providing materials and carrying on the said works and fortifications with as much speed as possible. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, f. 198.]
Aug. 10. Sir Nicholas Armorer and Sir Gabriel Sylvius to the Committee for Trade. Petition stating that, the petitioners having appeared before the Committee on the petition of the clothiers, and the Committee thinking it convenient that their grant of registering wool bonds in Ireland should be surrendered, they are willing to do so for the compensation formerly intended them, which was 200l. per annum to each for their respective lives, and therefore praying them to move his Majesty that the said compensation be placed on the Irish-establishment. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 52.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Lewis Griffith, son of Major John Griffith, late Serjeant Major of the city of Dublin, deceased, which represented that his father, being commissary of the artillery in 1641, brought with him into the said service 15 draught horses and 8 drivers, for the maintenance whereof till the cessation in 1643 he expended 964l. 2s. 8d. sterling, whereby he contracted several debts, for some of which he had been forced to pay above 50l., and that now the other creditors were like to fall on the petitioner to his utter ruin, and that he has received towards satisfaction of the said arrear only 65l. 4s. 3d. out of the bonds assigned to the king by the '49 trustees, which at great expense he brought into the Exchequer, but is now hindered by the said trustees from receiving any more satisfaction thereout without the King's special order, which he therefore prays for; very particularly recommending to him to deal with the said trustees that out of the common stock set apart for their security the petitioner be admitted to receive proportionable satisfaction for the said arrears. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 47.] Annexed,
Copy of the said petition. [Ibid.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, approving the order of the Committee for Trade of the 10th instant, that copies of the reports of the Master, &c., of the Trinity House, Deptford, and of the Trinity Houses of Newcastle, Hull and Dover, on Sir John Clayton's proposals about erecting lighthouses on Fern Island, Flamborough Head and St. Nicholas Gatt be delivered to him, that he may answer them, that he give in a copy of his printed map or paper in pursuance of his late proposals about his lighthouse at St. Nicholas Gatt for directing the course of steerage relating thereto as also of the certificate signed by 500 masters and mariners in favour of his lighthouses, and that the magistrates of Yarmouth impartially give their opinion thereon and how far they and the masters and mariners of that place consent to pay for the erecting and maintenance thereof, and further ordering that Sir J. Clayton have copies of all the letters and reports of the several Trinity Houses relating to the business of the lighthouses last delivered by Mr. Pepys to the Committee of Trade. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 125.]
Aug. 11. Reference by the Committee for Trade of the whole matter touching the coinage of tin farthings to the Lord Treasurer. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Aug. 11. Report touching the method of obtaining passes from the Lords of the Admiralty in relation to the treaties with the Turks for ships in the out ports, pursuant to the rules of 10 March, 1675-6. By the rules no such pass is to be granted. 1. To a ship that is not either English-built or, if foreign-built, made free. 2. Where the master is not his Majesty's natural born subject, and two thirds of the mariners English. 3. Where the ship is not in some English port at the time of demanding such pass.
The method of granting a pass is:—1. On any application the Secretary of the Admiralty informs the Commissioners of the Customs that the pass is demanded for such or such a ship. 2. The Commissioners, by letters to their chief officer in the port where she lies, direct her to be surveyed and the oath and bond of the master and one surety to be taken in the forms appointed. 3. Which survey and oath with a certificate of the bond being sent up to the Commissioners is transmitted by them to the Lords of the Admiralty, who proceed to issue their pass.
The same method with the necessary alterations proposed to be applied to Ireland. The terms of limitation may run to denying passes in the following cases:—1. To a ship that is not English or Irish built, or, if foreign-built, made free. 2. Where the master and two-thirds of the mariners are not his Majesty natural born subjects. 3. Where the ship is not in some port of Ireland at the time of demanding such pass.
The method of granting passes to ships capable thereof may be thus:—The Lord Lieutenant may appoint some person to whom the persons demanding passes may apply for like letters to the Farmers or Commissioners of the Customs in Ireland, who are to be directed to require from their officers the same survey, oath and bond, which survey and oath with a certificate of the bond may be transmitted by the said Farmers or Commissioners to the Lord Lieutenant, from whom the same may be sent to the Lords of the Admiralty in England as a ground for their granting the passes.
Memorandum, that a fitting number of the printed rules about passes may be sent to the Lord Lieutenant to be disposed of by him to the officers of the Customs and others for their fuller information. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Aug. 11.
Kensington.
The Earl of Anglesey to Williamson. I desire your dispatch of his Majesty's letter for the Hamburg Company as I left the draft with you, and particularly please let the last clause stand, being framed to maintain peace in the Company and being suitable to the form of the charter. Pray let the bearer have a copy of the letter when signed. I shall obey your commands to Oxford on Tuesday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 128.]
Aug. 11. Certificate by the Mayor, Aldermen and capital burgesses of Derby of their election of John Bagnold to be town clerk, coroner and steward of the court leet of the said borough, and praying his Majesty's approbation thereof. Signed by Edward Walker, Mayor, and 19 others. With note by William, Earl of Devonshire, that he hears very well of Mr. Bagnold from several gentlemen of the county, and is very well satisfied with the choice. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F., No. 79.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry, Lord O'Brien, to preserve the game within 10 miles of Bexley, Kent. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 194.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Arlington as Chief Keeper of the Palace of Greenwich, to cause immediately all the horses and other cattle now in Greenwich Park to be removed, and all the doors and passages into the said park to be walled up, and to receive into the said park such speckled or other deer as shall be delivered him by William Chiffinch, and to keep the same for the King's use. [Ibid.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Wickham and John Bradley, messengers, to search all houses and shops where they shall know or suspect any books or papers to be printed or bound, especially printing-houses and booksellers' and bookbinders' shops, and to view there what is printing or binding, and to examine whether the same be licensed and to demand a sight of such licence, and, if not licensed, to seize them with the several offenders, and bring them before Sir J. Williamson or some justice, to be proceeded against according to law. With memorandum that another warrant was granted of the same tenor and directed in the same manner. [Ibid. p. 195.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 384, No. 129.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a commission to John Trelawney to be captain of a troop of horse in Ireland on the surrender of his brother, Lieut.-Col. Edward Trelawney, who had received a commission for the troop vacant by the death of Lord Kingston. [S.P. Dom., signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 45.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the appointment of Sir James Cuffe to be deputy in Ireland to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, and for swearing him to be one of the Privy Council there. [Ibid. p. 46.]
Aug. 11. Notes by Williamson as to whether the duties on wines and brandies had to be demanded while the goods were in Jersey or Guernsey, and whether between France and Sweden it be free ships. free goods. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 38.]
Aug. 12.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. The dispersers of that abominable libel are bound over to answer at our next sessions, which will be next Michaelmas, so that I suppose Mr. Freke's prosecution will be over before we shall need that copy I formerly sent you, but, if otherwise, we can adjourn at our pleasure, till we may with your best convenience receive it, and, when you send it, I hope you will let us know his Majesty's pleasure.
Mr. Rogers presents his most hearty thanks for your very great kindness to him, and has desired me to write to a friend of mine in London, who will wait on you to take your direction how to attend on the Lord Treasurer in order to receive his Majesty's bounty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 130.]
Aug. 12.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Yesterday came into this road a Dutch ship as prize, taken and sent hither by a French man-ofwar, loaden with logwood, and, as it is thought, with other rich commodities. They pretended only at first they wanted victuals, but having liberty to buy them, provided they bought them in a short time, they now desire to break bulk, but that I have denied them. If they fall down below in the river and there sell their goods, the people of this place and the countries adjacent will quickly buy them all, which you told me was against the treaty with the Dutch. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Aug. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind having for several days been westerly has retarded the arrival of our packet-boats, so we have no news. Wind to-day W.S.W. and fresh, weather cloudy. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Recommendation to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Hingeston, keeper of his Majesty's organs and harpsichords, praying an order for payment of 100l. agreed by him to be paid to Barnard Smith for taking half a note lower the organ in the chapel, that he may give order for payment thereof, his Majesty calling to mind that the said work was done by his own particular command. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 130.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Goddard for a grant of a remainder of 1,400l. remaining in his hands as late receiver of the hearth money in Suffolk. [Ibid. p. 128.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Further reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward Progers referred ante, p. 148, and of the Lord Lieutenant's report thereon, which was as follows:—By letters of 27 Aug., 1663, the petitioner was granted 5,000l., payable out of the half-year's value given by adventurers and soldiers, whereof the petitioner alleges he received only 1,000l.; the said fund of the half-year's value was by the Act of Explanation converted to complete 300,000l. to the King, 100,000l. whereof was to be disposed of to such meriting persons as he should think fit, which sum is also exhausted; Col. Lane's daughters have been granted the annual pension of 480l. by way of interest, till 6,000l. be paid them out of the revenue of Ireland; letters patent have been passed to Sir James Cuffe and William Carr for 300l. per annum each, and also a letter has been granted to Col. Cary Dillon for 500l. per annum to him during life, all to be paid out of the first pensions on the establishment, whereof the said pension of Col. Lane's daughters is one, shall determine; if therefore his Majesty be pleased to grant the petitioner the said pension of 480l., this may take effect out of any pensions that shall determine so soon as the said grants to Sir James Cuffe, William Carr and Col. Dillon be satisfied. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 129.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Anne Sarsfield, praying a grant of so much of her ancestors' estate as is in his Majesty's dispose, and of the arrears due thereon and that Sir Theophilus Jones may deliver possession of the manor of Lucan and so much more of the estate as he is reprized for, by reason it was upon that account he got the grant of it. [Ibid. p. 131.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Further reference to the Lord Treasurer of Lord Granard's petition and of the report and letter of the Lord Lieutenant upon the reference thereof to him, calendared ante, p. 129, viz., that John Holywood mentioned in the said petition was by a decree of the Commissioners of the Court of Claims declared an innocent Papist, and was restored to the lands of Tartaine and other lands in the said decree mentioned, to hold the same in tail male, and that he conceives the remainder thereof is vested in his Majesty to the uses of the Act of Settlement, that by an Order of Council of 1 Oct. last the distribution of any lands in Ireland for making good deficiencies was forbidden till the common stock of debt and credit, viz., the claims made and the lands to satisfy the same, were cast up, that by several letters the Duke of York, Lord Kingston, and Sir Theophilus Jones have been exempted out of the said order with clauses of preference that they should in the first place be reprized before all others for the deficiencies due to them, and, therefore, if his Majesty think fit to dispense in the petitioner's behalf with the said order in Council, the said lands not being claimed by any of the said three pretensions, he conceives his Majesty may grant him such an estate in the said lands as is desired by the petition, and, in regard the estate so granted will be in reversion and not in possession, the deficiencies he is to place thereon may be proportioned accordingly. And
The Lord Lieutenant to Williamson. Having last week signed a report on a reference on Lord Granard's petition, I have since found a clause in the Act of Explanation, that the lands of Tartaine be granted and confirmed to Sir Nicholas Armorer according to the tenor of the letters patent of 19 Nov., 1663. The Registrar of the Court of Claims has certified that Sir Nicholas has taken out a certificate of these lands. Had I known those two particulars they should have been inserted in my report. I therefore desire you will add these circumstances when that matter shall be considered. July 15. Dublin Castle. [2¼ pages. Ibid. p. 142.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Grant of a prebend in Worcester cathedral void by the promotion of Dr. Lamplugh to be Bishop of Exeter to William Hoare, one of the chaplains in ordinary. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 33.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for admitting and receiving into the Privy Council John Campbell of Glenurchie. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 66.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to John Campbell of Glenurchie and the heirs male of his body or in his option to any of his younger sons whom he shall nominate and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the said John Campbell's nearest heirs male whatsoever, with remainder to his heirs and assigns whatsoever, they always assuming, using and wearing the surname of Sinclair and the arms of the house of Caithness, of all the lands, baronies and rents of the Earldom of Caithness, proceeding on the resignation of George, Earl of Caithness, deceased, the said John Campbell and others, with a novodamus and an erection of the premises into the Earldom of Caithness and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 67.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Congé d'clire to the Dean and Chapter o. the cathedral church of Orkney. [Latin. Ibid. p. 68.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Letter missive to the same recommending Murdoch, Bishop of Moray, to be chosen Bishop of Orkney. [Ibid. p. 69.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Congé d'clire to the Dean and Chapter of the cathedral church of the Isles. [Latin. Ibid.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Letter missive to the same recommending Mr. Wood, minister at Dunbar, to be chosen Bishop of the Isles. [Ibid. p. 70.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Robert Sinclaire, one of his Majesty's sewers in ordinary, of the ward and non-entry of the lands and barony of Westfield, which pertained to umquhile—Dunbar of Westfield, together with the marriage of —Dunbar now of Westfield. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 71.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Being reminded of my promise to Col. Widdrington, who was lately killed in the service of the Prince of Orange at Maestricht, that he should have the disposal of his company in the army in Ireland towards the expenses of his equipage and other extraordinaries on his going over, and intending his relations to have the benefit of my promise, I would have you not dispose of the said company but to some one who shall be willing to receive it on such terms as he and the said colonel's brother can agree upon, and, in case a commission for the same is already granted, I would, have you take care that Mr. Widdrington have the disposal of the next provided it be to a person that either you or I shall approve. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 336, p. 4.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Lieutenant. Forwarding the above letter and also the one of the previous day about Major John Trelawny, who is an ancient servant of his Majesty's and all along attended his person in the worst of fortunes. [Ibid.]
Aug. 12.
St. Hilary in Jersey.
Philip Le Geyt, lieutenant bailly, and 8 jurats to the King. Acknowledging the letters on behalf of John Fautrart containing a relief from a decree passed on the estate of Aaron le Tubelin, and showing the many and vast consequences which would follow the reversing of decrees and with how little truth Fautrart pretends to have been damnified by that decree and narrating the proceedings on the receipt of the said letters and how Fautrart had refused to allow the tenants to give reasons why they should not obey the said letters, insisting to be impossessed without any cognizance of cause with the whole purport of the said letters, with arguments to show that they have reason to suspect his peremptory carriage proceeds from his consciousness that he has falsely informed and deceived his Majesty in the very suggestions which were probably the motives for granting his petition. [3 pages. S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 39.]
Aug. 13. Sir Thomas Chicheley to Williamson. Signifying the King's pleasure that the Lord Treasurer should have a warrant for 500l. to be paid for arms for Capt. Makenney. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 134.]
Aug. 13.
Southampton.
Dr. Thomas Butler to Williamson. The promotion of Dr. Lamplugh is everywhere known. I beg neither what is big or high. If amongst his preferments the least is not disposed of, I should account myself very happy, if you would think on me. Some business calls me this week into Hertfordshire, and I shall make bold in my way to present my duty to you. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Aug. 13. T[homas] B[arnes] to—. I wrote to you about your concern 23 June and 23 July last. I was several times at the place you know to expect your answer, but could not have an opportunity as yet. The person I sent you 30 July tells me you had a desire to speak with me, and had something ready for me, and accordingly I came and saw you, but you had not time to speak with me as you then said. The person I sent you on the 6th could not be admitted to speak with you or deliver a letter, wherefore I have once more sent to know your mind. I endeavour to serve you in some considerable thing in your business and am in hopes I may. Nothing shall be wanting to the utmost of my capacity to do it; and what tokens of your kindness you have for me, as I hope you have some, you may send by this bearer, or else a few lines, when I may have it or what other directions you have.
There is but little news here, but what you have heard, I suppose, as that Philipsburg is taken. There is much discourse amongst friends about the printers and printing of the discourse at Guildhail. The papers are about, as you may perceive. I am told of a friend of the Preslytery that has many of them, but as yet have not his name. I am promised some of them at second hand, which if I have, I may pleasure you and some other friends.
It may not be convenient for mee to appear often at the place you know for several reasons, but chiefly that hee may be made incapable to do that service in the premises as hee desires, wherefore he desires you to send directions about it, how hee may send to you, if there be cause. (The words in italics are in a sort of cypher.) [Ibid. No. 136.]
Aug. 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., blowing fresh. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Aug. 14.
Rose Castle.
Edward, Bishop of Carlisle, to Williamson. Being at Carlisle on duty yesterday, I met with your letter of 11 July, and remembered my obligation to serve you in the particular desired, having also, before I left London last year acquainted the Duke of Monmouth with the circumstances, who left me to my liberty. I shall attend the coming of Archdeacon Musgrave or Mr. Ardrey with his instrument of resignation and perform my part. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 138.]
Aug. 14.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday anchored in this bay 20 light colliers, wind W., blowing hard. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Aug. 14.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The St. Malo Merchant of this place came last night from St. Malo, and reports several Dutch ships, manned by and pretended to be English, to the number of 7 or 8, condemned for want of the new passes, and that a Dover ship that had a new pass is served the like. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Aug. 14.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.W., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Aug. 14.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind proving all last week W. and S.W., very few ships came into this port. Shipping news. Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Aug. 14.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Saturday Viscount Lanesborough and his lady arrived from London, and yesterday the Countess of Essex and her train for Ireland. The dogger waits here to transport them for Dublin. Lord Fitz-Hardinge arrived here Saturday last out of Ireland, and is to-day gone towards London. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Aug. 15.
Southampton.
Francis Cartwright to Williamson. I should not have been so rude as to come out of town without giving you my humble thanks for all your civilities, but, as my occasions called me away for Jersey, so yours would not permit me to see you in three mornings' attendance, so I hope I have your pardon in that, as also for proposing an impracticable way for the King's bounty towards my relief in my old age. I here venture to give you a particular where I served the Crown.
I humbly desire you will give your assistance to my friend, Mr. Mortimer, who is fallen by losses and unfaithful debtors under the lash of his creditors by way of protection from his Majesty, till he may both by that means look after his own just debts and satisfy his creditors. In this and your minding me for something from his Majesty towards the relief of my wife and child, when I shall be called away, my whole estate being spent in his service and this employment affording only a bare subsistence, you will for ever oblige me. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Aug. 15.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news except the continuance of very good harvest weather. Wind now southerly. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Aug. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind being so long westerly has hindered the return of our packet-boats, so that we believe some of them have landed their mails at other ports. This morning it is uncertain, but the weather fair though cloudy.
Postscript.—At noon the wind got to the South and before sealing this one of our packet-boats arrived. It had been coming ever since Thursday last, so what they bring cannot be of the freshest news. They report that the Prince of Orange is got within the outer moats of Maestricht and that Philipsburg is taken. I saw a printed Dutch list of the officers killed and wounded before Maestricht. Some of the English and Scots I here present you out of it. Of the Prince's foot-guards Capt. Flood wounded, Lieut. Stuart in the Rhinegrave's regiment wounded, of the Prince of Friezland's regiment, Capt. Willemson slain, Col. Widdrington dead, Col. Fenwick wounded, Major Frier dead, Major Archer and Major Downing wounded, Captains Floyd, Barnwell, Fryet, Saum dead, Lullingston wounded, Lee dead, Macellegot, Stone, Savage, Hales wounded, Fayles, Crayn and Midton dead, Sullivan, Widdrington, wounded, Clinton dead. Three lieutenants dead and two wounded, seven ensigns dead and three wounded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 146.]
Aug. 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Aug. 15.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 148.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 148 i.]
Aug. 15. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. Dispensing with the residence of Dr. Thomas Plomer (Blomer), canon residentiary there, who is appointed chaplain to attend Ralph Montague, master of the great wardrobe, sent ambassador extraordinary to France, and desiring him to have during such absence the full profits of the canonry. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 87.]
Aug. 15.
Custom House, London.
List of what foreign-built ships have been made free by virtue of his Majesty's several orders which are not in the several lists of ships sent to Sir John Shaw by the principal Secretaries of State, showing the name and tonnage of each ship, the date of the warrant, and the money paid for custom, and by whom and when it was paid in each case, arranged according to the date of such payments. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 149, 150.]
A duplicate of the last list, but arranged in the alphabetical order of the names of the ships. [Ibid. No. 151.]
[Aug.?] Sir John Shaw's list of ships made free since the late peace with Holland. [Ibid. No. 152.]
[Aug. ?] List of foreign-built ships entered in Sir John Shaw's office which are not in the lists of the Secretaries of State. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Aug. 15.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Shipping news. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 53.]
Aug. 16. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I know secretaries of state never want excuses for not writing, therefore I will not reproach you, but the ladies say, whatever you may do to court ladies, they thought country ladies were not to be disappointed. They are all at present your humble servants, but, if a post or two brings not an account what will be the certain day, no one knows how long they may continue so. Nay, there is some fear the patient Privy Councillor may be provoked, who was not so much as moved at the news of Sir Henry Heron's refusing his health at Boston or Sir Richard Mason's doing the like where you hunted the buck when last in Lincolnshire. I keep some bucks and visits till you come, but neither will keep long. If drinking your health would have brought you, Sir John Newton and I had fetched you long before this.
Let me beg your assistance on behalf of my nephew Adrian, to whom you have all along been so kind. His and our request to the King is, that he will bestow a fellowship in All Souls upon him. His grandfather's great sufferings for his loyalty and his father's I hope may plead for him. He is left without any provision. I have written to the Lord Chamberlain and Secretary Coventry for their favours. My sister and Sir Carr will wait on you. Granting this will not only be an act of grace from the King to us, but of charity to the young man. Queen's College men are the men for bishoprics now; therefore, that there may never want of that foundation to succeed, transplant some of your young trees. Should they grow too thick, it may spoil all. I hear three fellowships are now void. Pray, when you shall think it a proper time, put up my request to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 154.]
Aug. 16.
Appleby Assizes.
Sir J. Lowther to Williamson. The differences of this county, for which you expressed so great a concern, are at last happily composed to the no small satisfaction of the Judges, justices and the whole country, and I doubt not you will share in it as the fruits of the care you have shown for the public in that affair. The enclosed is a copy of the agreement itself, wherein if I have been any way instrumental, I owe it to your counsels.
I have something concerning our other affair of St. Bees, particularly about some stock we have, 250l., which is in our management, but, till the return of Col. Lamplugh, one of our chief governors, I delay that account, lest it be imperfect. As to your other charitable design of providing for some poor youths to be sent you from St. Bees, as you have already from Bridekirk, it is infinitely to be praised, but will not reach the end you propose, to establish either industry or skill in these parts, since I have not known any return hither, who have ever taken well to an employment about London, but, if you please to have one sent, knowing what kind of youth you desire, I am ready to serve a design so national.
Thanking him for the offer of the News, which he receives with much acknowledgement. [Ibid. No. 155.] Enclosed,
The said Agreement. Every year at Midsummer a General Sessions is to be held for the whole county without adjournment at Appleby and Kendal in alternate years. All other quarter sessions are to be held at Appleby for the parts of the Bottom upon Monday in the session week, and at Kendal for the parts of the Barony on Friday in the same week. All assessments and public charges of bridges, gaols, &c., having always hitherto been distinct, are to remain so, and the Barony is not to contribute to the charges arising in the Bottom and vice versa. Subscribed by Sir Francis North and Vere Bertic, Justices of Assize, and also by Sir P. and Sir C. Musgrave, Sir J. Lowther, Christopher Phillipson, Sir G. Fletcher, Daniel Fleming and Edward Wilson. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 155 i.]
Aug. 16.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. In these two days arrived here the Elizabeth, Goodwill and one more from Croisic and the Amity from Morlaix. Those from Croisic met some French men-of-war, that cruise about Concord (?Conquet) and examine all ships going and coming through the Trade, and send to Brest those that have not passes. The pass of one Yarmouth ship not being in the true master's name, they judged they had destroyed the old, and kept master and ship. Salt at Croisic this year is made in great abundance beyond what ever has been known in any one year, so is very cheap and very good. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Aug. 16. Warrant to the Mayor and Recorder of Chichester to suspend the execution of any sentence that may be passed on Thomas Parker and John Exton, if found guilty of the murder of Devereux Gwillim, as it happened when they were all overcome with drink and there was no precedent malice between them, and, if the said Parker and Exton be convicted of manslaughter only, for their release on bail. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 162.]
Aug. 16. Caveat, on behalf of Mr. Grenville, that no grant pass of the fine or forfeiture of William Moore, of Chesterfield, the King having granted the same to Col. Culpeper. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
Aug. 16. Caveat, on behalf of Mr. Grenville, that no grant pass of the fine or forfeiture of Mr. Edward Goddard, his Majesty having granted the same to Sir Gilbert Talbot. [Ibid.]
Other copies of the last two caveats. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 157.]
Aug. 16. Caveat, that no pardon pass to John Martin, searcher of Plymouth, for inisdemeanours in that office without notice to Thomas Wyndham, of the Bedchamber. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
Aug. 16. The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of John, Bishop of Ossory, which set forth that several of the records and evidences concerning the lands, &c., belonging to the bishopric of Ossory had been lost and embezzled through the late unhappy troubles, whereby several of such lands, &c., were in great danger of being taken and separated from that see, and therefore prayed letters for passing a new patent to the petitioner and his successors of all such lands, &c., as shall appear to belong to the said bishopric, a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report of 13 Feb. last that he did not apprehend there would be any inconvenience in passing such letters patent as were desired, with which report the Lord Treasurer agreed: directing him to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to the present Bishop of Ossory and his successors of such lordships, manors, lands and tenements as he shall make appear by any other former letters patent or by any record or inquisition to belong to the said bishopric, and now in possession of the said bishop and also of such of the liberties, privileges and franchises mentioned in the said petition, as he shall think reasonable. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 94.]
Aug. 17. Report by Sir William Smyth and others to the Lord Treasurer, stating fully the particulars of the accounts delivered in by Mr. Hoare, relative to farthings, by which it appears that out of the stock of 5,500l. advanced by his Majesty for buying copper, only about 1,500l. remain. The first agreement with the Swede who furnished the copper was, that he should have 14½d. the pound, which being coined into 17d. would leave 2½d. with a halfpenny remedy making in all 3d. per lb. for expenses of coinage; that by a later agreement, the copper blanks were delivered to the mint all ready and they allowed 1d. per pound weight for coinage, and that there appears to be due to his Majesty 5,910l. 10s. 9d., but that, if this mystery of the Mint were fully laid open, the salaries paid would appear to be not so large as stated, the copper bought at a cheaper rate and more farthings coined than are brought into account, for the coins made are about 22d. in the pound weight instead of 19¾d. as made out by Mr. Hoare. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 158.]
Aug. 17.
London.
M. Courtin, the French ambassador extraordinary, to the King. Memorial stating that Captain Jackson is retained prisoner by the tricks of his enemies, as well about his commission which is in proper form, as about the execution of the former decree in his favour from his Majesty and the Council, and requesting his liberation on bail. Endorsed, "Read 6 Sept. and not approved." [French. Copy. Ibid. No. 159.]
Aug. 17. Deposition of Stephen Holder, master of the Success of London, taken before the Committee for Trade. Inquiring the end of May last for a freedom of a ship he was informed by Towns, a coffeeman and a broker, that Mr. Aires had the best warrants for freeing ships. He found Mr. Aires on the Exchange, and having bargained with him that, if Mr. Townson, Sir John Shaw's deputy, would accept the warrant he showed him, he would buy it, he paid him next day for it 60l., Mr. Belisha, one of the owners, being present, but Mr. Aires would give him no receipt for it. Mr. Hester, part owner of the Success, was once in his company when he spoke with Mr. Aires about this warrant. Mr. Aires, as he remembers, told him he had this warrant from a lady at this end of the town, and that he made no advantage by them. The deponent saw one more warrant in Mr. Aires' hands, who declared he could help him to one or two more. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 160.]
Aug. 17.
Ludgate.
Col. William Middleton to Williamson. I have not been well these two days, and therefore humbly beg you will help me with a small quantity of money for the present. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Aug. 17.
Queen's College.
Thomas Crostwhait to Williamson. Thanking him for having taken notice of the writer's scholar so far as to send him 5l. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Aug. 17.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. I have deferred acknowledging yours sent by my son, Christopher, till I could give you account of some passages at Appleby and Carlisle assizes. The gout hindered the Earl of Carlisle from being at them, where Mr. Simson brought a trial against a servant of mine for 800l. for rescuing a drove of Scotch cattle, that Simson pretended to have seized, but the information was found false, my servant not guilty, and the malice of Sir G [eorge] F[letcher], whose hand was in all this, was evident to all.
At Appleby the Judges had great patience in hearing a warm dispute about the Sessions as to the place and manner of holding them. Sir G. F. and Mr. Fleming argued the point of law with the Judges, but the Judges appeared the better lawyers, and after a full hearing the Judges propounded an accommodation, which was readily assented to by me, and at last by the Barony justices, the adjournment of the sessions as was stood upon by my fellows and myself found to be according to law and a general sessions once a year necessary. On the whole matter it is a great ease to my mind that the Judges have a clear sight how matters are carried on in these counties and how impossible it is for me to act the part I have hitherto done in the King's service without my son's assistance, which his Majesty once thought necessary and promised it to me, and, if he had but come into Carlisle in the condition he was formerly, a captain of a company, I should not have been discouraged, but with all submission have patiently attended the knowledge of his pleasure in the matter of Carlisle for the future, which I have considered in relation to his service only and not on account of my own family. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 163.]
Aug. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Towards last Tuesday evening another of our packet-boats arrived. I could not obtain any news from any of her passengers, but the common mode of slighting Maestricht with a Dutch puff. The wind these two days has been uncertain between S. and W., the weather fair. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Aug. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Aug. 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W.S.W., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Aug. 17.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. A ship from the Barbados come in here the 15th reports that sugars are very scarce and that many ships will come home dead freighted. She put to sea again yesterday for London. The 15th came in several small vessels from Croisic loaden with salt. They have made much of that commodity this year, and they have had a very good harvest also. The pilchards not falling in this year as formerly, salt is very cheap, so that it is now worth not above 2s. 6d. per bushel of 26 gallons. Wind still S.W. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Anthony Gylby. I have yours of the 12th and you do very well to deny the French privateer liberty to break bulk of her Dutch prize in any degree. It is expressly against our treaties with Holland and must not be suffered. Therefore pray continue to watch them in it. Indeed the Frenchman is not so much as to victual or take in provisions save barely so much as may carry him to the next port belonging to the French King, which is Dunkirk for example.
The King is told a certain lieutenant or ensign in one of Lord Mulgrave's companies in that garrison, having unfortunately killed a man some months or years since, stands suspended from his duty and pay, and yet cannot obtain of the town justice to be brought to trial in near two years. The King thinks this strange and commands it be enquired into. Pray let me know how the case is as soon as you can. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 108.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
Certificate by Sir J. Williamson that Robert Stephens, printer, discovered to Samuel Mearne, warden of the Stationers' Company, a libel entitled "An Account of the Proceedings at Guildhall relating to the City's petitioning his Majesty for a new Parliament" which was printing in the house of Henry Bruges by John Marlow, by which discovery the libel was seized and Marlow apprehended, and thereby the first hander of the libel to the press was discovered and imprisoned in Newgate. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 196.]
Aug. 18. Richard Bower to Williamson. Apologizing for taking up his time with his concerns.—I have in a great measure informed you of them by letters from Yarmouth. My troubles have arisen from your showing my letter of 12 June last, and I am now fallen into the hands of my adversaries, who, if not prevented, will be my accusers, judge and jury. I have now served you 14 years with such intelligence as our parts have afforded, and hope now you will stand by me to defend my innocency. My only desire is that I may be dealt with as my cause shall merit. How this may be effected I leave to you, whether to be tried at Yarmouth or here. If at Yarmouth, I have enclosed the names of 22 of our Aldermen and Common Council, besides Mr. Christopher Spendlove, our curate, out of whom you may choose such and so many as shall seem fit, only I desire that Sir Thomas Meadows and Mr. Spendlove may be two of them, lest the others should be overawed by my adversaries. Our sessions are the beginning of next month, where I am bound to appear, and I doubt not but, if I have an order for a hearing before, my adversaries will seek to me for a compliance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 168.] Enclosed,
The said list of Aldermen, &c. [Ibid. No. 168 i.]
Aug. 18.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These last four days it has blown very hard at W. sometimes veering towards N.W. and sometimes S.W.; so that we now expect some ships in, but this and about 30 days more is the dead time of the year for the coming in of ships. There are at least 60 outward-bound ships in the Downs, bound to almost all ports. They only want a fair wind.
There is now raging a new distemper as they call it, which is taken with a high fever, looseness and vomiting. It kills not many, but in three or four days makes a strong man feeble. Here is the greatest drought that ever this age knew, scarce any water in soles or bonds, so that the country people drive their cattle from parish to parish for water. Not a topsail gale at S. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Aug. 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Yesterday came in the John of London, from Oporto, bound for Rochelle. She was taken by a Spanish man-of-war and carried into St. Sebastian, where the master and men were kept prisoners 14 days. The Spaniards beat and stripped all the men and kept all their goods to the value of 6,000l. He also says there is a Newcastle ship laden with East India goods to the value of 22,000l. with about 14 other ships there. Last Wednesday came in about 12 Dutch ships, whereof two are States men-of-war, bound for Portugal and the Straits. Here is also a vessel lately come from St. Malo, who brings news that Philipsburg was surrendered, and that they gave up Maestricht for lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 170.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 170 I.]
[Aug.?] Capt. Cotter to [Williamson.] Albert took up some moneys at York for his charges hither which I must pay, and he must be supplied with a suit of clothes and other necessaries. I may light on somebody in Paris fit to carry with me.
At Lyons I must find people that I can trust and reward well, else I may lose my business and myself. If I cannot compass my business this way, I shall be forced to buy good horses and go into Savoy and come back through that country. Therefore I think the least that can be given me is 100l. and a bill for 200l. more at Lyons. Should I want there, it would be the loss of what I go about and of money too. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Aug. 18. Commission for John Hetley to be ensign to Capt. Downing in the King's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book44, p. 35.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord High Treasurer to issue orders for payment of 500l. to George Wharton, Treasurer of the Ordnance, for defraying the charges of the 400 guns to be provided as part of Capt. Makenye's ransom (See ante, p. 278). [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 35.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Denny Ashburnham for a discharge of an arrear of 249l. 10s. 1d. as one of the former Commissioners of the Excise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 131.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Hall for a concurrent lease for 60 years certain of the manor and bailiwick of Westminster and the manor and farm of Neate's Court, whereof he has a lease already for 31 years after the Queen's interest, paying during her life the several rents of 110l. and 70l. 1s. 6d., and after the determination of her interest 10l. per annum only for the remaining term. [Ibid. p. 132.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Rider, praying that, being possessed by assignment from Mr. Duart of about 94 acres of barren land in the forest of Bradon, Wiltshire, for about 20 years to come under the rent of 66l. per annum, his Majesty would direct the Queen's trustees to grant him a term in the premises for 90 years concurrent with the Queen's interest under the present rent during her life and one of 20l. per annum during the residue of the term for a reasonable fine. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46,p. 132.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Pass for Abraham Gallatin, native of Geneva, with his servants, &c. to pass to Sweden on his private affairs. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 196.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Pass for James Cotter with his servants, &c. to pass beyond the seas and to return. [Ibid.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Order for a warrant for payment during pleasure to Dame Isabella Wyche, dresser in ordinary to the Queen, of 300l. a year by equal quarterly payments, the first to commence from Michaelmas last. [Ibid. p. 197.]
Aug. 18. Warrant for a grant of the place of one of the King's Falconers to William Russell for his life in the room of James Roper, deceased, fee 38l. 5d. per annum. With memorandum, that this was signed by Secretary Williamson, because Secretary Coventry was not well. [Precedents1,f. 158.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a commission to Maurice, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, to be captain of the troop of Guards in place of John, Earl of Gowran, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 46.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the Duke of Monmouth to Thomas Newcomb, printer to his Majesty, that he forthwith give order for printing 1,500 copies of An Abridgement of the English Military Discipline, and that he deliver the original and the copies, some bound, the rest stitched, to the Duke's order, the charge whereof is to be placed to the King's account. On the back,
Receipt by James Vernon for the said 1,500 copies. 26 Sept., Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384,No. 172.]
Two copies of the above warrant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41,pp. 57, 68.]
Aug. 19. Copy of the paper delivered to the Lord Treasurer by Lord Roscommon on behalf of the Band of Pensioners, offering to his Majesty the half-year's pay due to the Band from Christmas, 1675, to Midsummer, 1676, till he be pleased to reimburse to the servants of his Household the moneys stopped from them by the present suspension, and desiring that his Majesty would let them enjoy their full pay of 6,000l. per annum for the future according to the allowances in the warrant of 18 March, 1670[-1]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 173.] Annexed,
Exemption by his Majesty of the Band from the present suspension, and order for payment to them of their full allowance of 6,000l. as formerly. [Draft. Ibid. No. 173I.]
Aug. 20.
Blechington.
The Earl of Anglesey to Williamson. I was last Tuesday at the Founder's feast at Queen's College, where I spent most of the day with your friend and mine, the Bishop, Mr. Speaker being there also, where in an eloquent speech by Mr. Tully right was done to you and the rest of the benefactors of that college, and the present flourishing condition thereof by the great supplies both Church and State have received thence so well deciphered, as might well damp our great entertainment to me and some other Magdalen College men, but that we hope you, who have done so much honour and good to Queen's, will assist me that the able men of Magdalen may not be always shut up as in a hive, but share always in the encouragements their predecessors have done, and as Christ Church and Queen's do. The Bishop is preparing to remove his library to Bugden and himself to follow and make place for Dr. Halton, who on your account favoured me with a visit here.
Mr. Gache will present you this, who has been long promised by his Majesty a prebend or living, and commanded me to caveat for him. He understands one is lately fallen, and I hope you will join with me that he be no longer disappointed. The Bishop of Oxford has a good esteem of him, and his father's memory pleads for him. By letters of fresh date from a good hand at Paris I understand they are more alarmed at our report and his Majesty's demand thereon against the French privateers, than if Philipsburg and Maestricht were both taken, and, if we insist as we have begun, we shall have thorough justice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 174.]
Aug. 20. T. Machell to Dr. Timothy Halton, at the Vicarage House, St. Martin's in the Fields. Mr. Secretary, when I was last at London, took notice of my brother, and intimated his intentions of procuring a commission for him in Ireland, which extraordinary kindness gives me confidence to desire of you that he may be acquainted with his present condition and the ill fortune he has had since he came thence.
About Easter twelvemonth I went up to London, and understanding that Sir Richard Gr[aham] to whom my father has had opportunity to do some good services, had by his brother I know not what interest in the Duke of Monmouth, I begged his favour to procure a removal of my brother out of Ireland into the Guards for several reasons which I have not time to relate. He granted my request, and the next time I waited on him in October following, told me expressly that the business was done, and made me write for him with this assurance that he should be admitted the very first muster. But, when I came to London with him we met with nothing but disappointments. Sir Richard was not able to get him in there nor in any other troop. Then Mr. Wyndham, to whom I can never be sufficiently thankful, took the business in hand of his own accord, got a man turned out for him and procured him an order to ride in Lord Oxford's troop, 23 May, in which he has served till now, but has received no pay, notwithstanding his service and his charge in providing himself with suitable equipage, and his case is the harder, because 'tis probable he might ere this have got a vacancy in the Duke's troop or purchased a place elsewhere at a cheaper rate than what it has cost him for himself and horse, since he came to England, but he had still hopes of being as freely listed in the Guards, as he gave up his place when he came out of Ireland.
Now, because Mr. Secretary has designed him a kindness, I hope he will not take it amiss to be informed thus much of his condition, and therefore I desire you to do so. He told me, he could have wished him of some other profession, and, though he has been bred a soldier, he is not incapable of other employments, for he writes a good hand, and is no bad accountant, and, if either Mr. Secretary would entertain him in any quality, or my Lord of Exeter would employ him in his service, I believe he would willingly lay down his arms and I should take it as a very high favour. I commit all to your discretion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 175.]
Aug. 20.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Aug. 21. Richard Lowther to Williamson. Importuning his notice of the bearer, his neighbour and friend Capt. Hanley, and of his concern, which will questionless establish him in the employment he has for so many years dexterously and faithfully discharged. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Aug. 21.
Ludgate.
William Middleton to Williamson. Requesting him to send him some relief, as at present he lives on bread and water and is in great want. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Aug. 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday John Knott of this parish, yeoman, brought his son to Deal Church and in time of Common Prayer stood by, whilst he was christened according to the Church of England. The child was about 6 or 7 years old. The father has been observed to be an Anabaptist of very long continuance. 'Tis said about nine months since he had another child christened. Pray God convert them all. Little wind at S. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Aug. 21.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Yesterday morning came into Portland road three French men-of-war with two other ships and went thence in the evening without coming ashore, so we know not what they are or whence they come, only they went to the westward. Two of them may have about 40 guns each. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Aug. 21.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 19th arrived here the Samuel of this place in four days from Croisic, who the day before met off the Start a fleet of Dutch of about 20 sail, two convoys of 40 and 50 guns, bound to the westward, but they would not say for what parts. The Amity, that arrived here a few days before, met with two Ostenders, who lie off Morlaix under the rocks, which had the day before been on board one of our vessels going in, which, having a horse on board, they made the merchant give them some money to save its life, else they said they would knock him on the head. They made a little further bold with them for some other little things, though they had a new pass. Wind S.W.
Postscript.—Now towards evening the wind is more west and inclining to N.W. A fleet in sight now making to the westward keeps the shore. About 12 sail are at present in sight. No letter from the office this post as usual, which you may please to order constant. Next Monday is the great meeting for election of our Mayor. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Aug. 21.
Pendennis Castle
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind proving at W. and S.W. few ships came in. The 18th the Petition of London laden with sugar, cotton and ginger from Barbados sailed out of this port. Other shipping news. Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Aug. 21.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. There came in here the Margaret of London in 5 weeks from Maryland. They came out with one more of this harbour, which was separated from them by foul weather 200 leagues to the westward of Scilly. They say the Indians are quiet there but at Virginia they are still in wars. Tobacco is very scarce. This ship wants much of her loading. She stays here for orders to enter for Ireland or Holland. The 18th came in the James of Penryn from St. Malo. They say it was certainly reported there that Philipsburg was taken. Wind now S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 183.]
Aug. 21.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Aug. 21.
[Postmark.]
Patrick Ker to William Smith, messenger. I was informed, before I left London, you had seized my goods in William Maffet's house. If you did it by order, I am glad, for God will call you and him, at whose command you did it, to account. The time may come when I may say in your face: I am as honest and loyal a subject as yourself, and have freedom to inquire for these things, which were not all my own. It was heathenish like, to leave me no clothes at all, not these I used at sea. If the reprobate be condemned to everlasting fire for not giving clothes to the poor, what shall become of them that take both their food and raiment from them? However, He that careth for the ravens and clotheth the lilies, I hope, will provide for me, and arraign you before the Bench from which there is no fleeing. I did not bid you farewell at Charing Cross, because one, in whose pocket Mr. William Welsh's letter was, began to forge lies upon me, when you went out, and discouraged me by telling me it would go very hard with me, for, said he, the King will turn you over to the law, and ordain his Attorney-General to pursue you, and I have let several noblemen and intelligent persons see this copy, who say it will draw very deep, another adding that it will go hard with me for want of friends, as justice depended on friendship. My innocence before gave me courage and confidence, but, when I heard that I was like to have law without justice, I was glad to embrace my liberty on any account. I know the worst that could have been done was but to have deprived me of my poor being, yet my life is not so contemptible that I should throw it away, nor so pleasant that I should crack my brains for a contrivance to save it. Therefore I will live as long as the Lord pleases, notwithstanding, if it were not to cast myself as a stumbling block before others to make them guilty of my blood, I could freely present myself before my pursuers, and endure all the malice they can invent. Had not your hue and cry after me at London been so great, you might very easily have found me out, but the echo thereof gave me warning to fly. He that gave you power to apprehend me could not give you policy to find me, and power without policy is like a ship without a helm. I was vexed at first that, by my abrupt departing, I had brought you to any trouble, and was dubious whether to return and liberate you, but you resolved my doubt with an impossibility to perform, since you left me neither coat nor neckcloth wherewith to appear in public. What I had on was old, being chosen to keep me unknown, that none but a beggar could wear them. The next day, after I came from Westminster, I wrote to Sir J. Williamson, by whose command you say you took me prisoner, but could not find how to deliver it. If I knew how to title him and where to direct my letter, I should write to him with as ample a declaration of what I know in reference to that sheet, which was the beginning of all this trouble, as if I were in his presence. Mr. Hall, the printer, was in suspense whether he would print more than the first section of it, which included no reflection, as he can show you. My design in printing it was to gain a farthing on the sheet, which I can prove by the printer, who was not only to print this but three other pamphlet sheets of his own choosing as one of palmistry, and another called the Maid's complaint with its answer. If I had been to print that sheet and no more, there might have been ground to jealous my design, but, since I had agreed with him for 16 more, if the cloud of mistakes be removed, there can remain no reason of jealousy, especially of me, who was never so powerful as to meddle with Church or State nor remarkable in anything but poesy, which I used oft times as a buckler to repel the invectives of satirists against the nobility of Scotland, as witness that I wrote in vindication of Duke Lauderdale at his last session of Parliament in Scotland, which I called "The Commissioner's Reply," and defy both to the satires and satirists, whereof, if I knew it would not prove tedious, I should send you a copy. The time may come, wherein the rod of God's wrath may be cast into the fire. You had no power of me, till it was given you, and God that gave it can take it back and let some worse thing trouble you, because you have no pity. Jehu was commanded to slay Jezebel and destroy the house of Ahab, yet God visited the blood of Jezebel on the house of Jehu, so it may fare with my persecutors. I know by this you will be apt to term me a preacher as you did before. I shall not resolve you whether or not, but it is to you as you think. He that said "Touch not mine anointed," said likewise "Do my prophets no harm." Excuse me, if my poor condition to which you have reduced me, force me to write more plain than pleasant language. I entreat you send me a suit of my clothes, if you can, to the Brill (from whence I intend to go very shortly I know not where), to a Scotchman's house at the sign of the King's Arms. He does not know me, but I shall cause another to convey them where I am. Judge whether it be reason or treason to give a man back his clothes. If you send me a line, cause it to be left at the post house of the Brill, till I send for it.—On a blank page.—On that anagram made by Charles I the night before he died Carolus rex, Cras ero lux
Ut CeCIDIt CaroLUs CasU præsCIsUs atroCI, Cras LUX In CæLo CLarlor, InqUIt, ero; the capitals forming DCCCCCCCCCLLLLXVVVVVVIIIIIIII=1648 (See ante, p. 245). [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 185.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Adam Pelletier, gardener to the Earl of St. Albans, to pass into France and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 197.]
Aug. 21
and 24.
Account of the proceedings before the Lieutenant Bailly and the jurats against Jan Broiuke, captain of the St. Francis Xavier, an Ostend privateer, who with a Flushing privateer had plundered the Industry of Bristol of soap and canvas, embarked at St. Malo on account of Richard March of Bristol, though the captain of the Industry had showed them his pass and the order he had from his master to load the goods, which proceedings ended by the Court remitting the whole matter to his Majesty in Council. [4pages. French. S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 40.] Enclosed,
Copy of the commission of the said Broiuke. [Ibid. No. 40i.]
Aug. 22. Detailed reply of James Hoare, senior, Comptroller of the Mint, to the objections made by Sir William Smyth, &c., against the accounts of the coinage of copper farthings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 186.]
Aug. 22.
Pembroke Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. I formerly represented to you the hard and pressing circumstances of our concerns here, which continue still the same, having not as yet gained the least prospect of a better fortune. However we have good reason to believe that you, who have done so many and eminent favours for one sister, will not be unmindful of the other. As to my own concern, I have been very unsuccessful in not finding out a way to make it better, being a perfect stranger to that method of soliciting for preferments before they be vacant, and, if that be the way, I am afraid I may wait a long time, before I shall meet with a fair opportunity. I most earnestly entreat you to bear with this uncourtly impatient humour, which proceeds from no other cause than a too narrow and contracted fortune of a fellowship. Any little piece of preferment at present would be mighty acceptable to me. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Aug. 22.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. High blowing winds have been southerly these three and four days. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Aug. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since my last no packet-boat has returned, and so no news. Wind westerly, weather fair. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Aug. 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Aug. 22.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 191.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 191 I.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Peter Wilson and Anthony Phillpeh, who have served in the Duke of Monmouth's regiment in France, and have 20 months' arrear due to them in Ireland, desiring that they may be entertained in the army there and that their arrears may be paid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 133.]
Aug. 22. Like reference of the petition of George Rowland and Edward Toull to the same effect. [Ibid.]
Aug. 22.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the King. Some days before I received your letter of 12 Aug., I had granted a commission for Col. Widdrington's company to Lieut. Courtney, Sir William's brother, whom your Majesty, when I was in England, commanded me to provide for here, which I presume Lord Bath has before this acquainted you with, wherefore I shall, when the next company falls, gives notice to the late colonel's brother, that he may propose some fit person to recommend to the same. Having from time to time through Secretary Coventry acquainted you with the state of affairs here, I shall not trouble you with a repetition of it. The army in this country have all generally received their March pay and those in the town will have theirs by the beginning of next week. Their needs were such as it was judged necessary, not only by myself but by the Privy Council here, that it should be speedily issued, which made me hasten it all I could, and indeed the present farmers are much to be commended for their compliance in making payment of a large proportion of this sum before their days of grace were expired. This money being now stirring again, I see no cause to apprehend other than that all will be quiet. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 54.]
Aug. 22. Michael, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [Williamson]. I have desired this gentleman, Mr. Adams, to wait on you to procure a warrant for a new purse, that which I now have being near 3 years old and beginning to look somewhat ancient. I should not have troubled you with such an affair but that it is customary. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Aug. 22.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Wednesday,
Aug. 23.
The Lord Chancellor to Williamson. The enclosed petition having observed all the due circumstances required by his Majesty, I think the matter fit for an order on it requiring the Constable of the Tower to bring the prisoner before Lord Chief Justice Raynsford and him to take bail of him, and I recommend the matter to your care. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 192.] Enclosed,
Sir Philip Monckton to the King. Petition for his liberty, as the many imprisonments he had by the King's enemies for his service has rendered an imprisoned condition very unsupportable to him, being very sorry for his Majesty's displeasure, whom he had never any intent to diserve. [Ibid. No. 192i.]
Copies of the above letter and petition. [Ibid. Nos. 193, 193i.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Constable or Lieutenant of the Tower to cause Sir Philip Monckton, now prisoner in the Tower, to be forthwith carried before Sir Richard Raynsford, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, in order to his being released on bail. [Ibid. No. 194; and Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 199.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Chief Justice Raynsford. By his Majesty's commands directing that Sir Philip Monckton, now a prisoner in the Tower, be released, on his giving sufficient bail. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 195; and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 109.]
Aug. 23. Lord Chief Justice Raynsford to the Constable or Lieutenant of the Tower. Warrant for letting Sir Philip Monckton have his liberty, he having given sufficient security for his appearance in the Court of King's Bench next term to answer what shall be objected against him on his Majesty's behalf. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, Nos. 196, 197.]
Aug. 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I formerly acquainted you that about 60 merchant ships, outward-bound, were riding in the Downs. About 4 this morning the wind came up to N.N.W. and this forenoon they all sailed. A topsail gale at N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Aug. 23. Caveat that no grant pass of Mr. Fielding's estate without notice to Mr. Wroth, Page of Honour. [Subsequently cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Pass for Nicola Christophorus and Theodore Joanini, merchants of Candia, who were taken and made slaves and lost all they had. Nicola being obliged for his redemption to leave his son, and Theodore his brother, in captivity, and who have besought letters of safe conduct in their passing from place to place in order to their redemption. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 199.]
Aug. 24. John Cooke, William Welche and others to the Committee for Trade. Petition recapitulating their former petition calendared ante, p. 226, showing that their reply to Sir John Godolphin's answer thereto has lain before Council unread for a month, and entreating that, as the goods on board the vessel are perishing, they may have relief at once. Noted as received, 31 Aug. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 199.]
Aug. 24.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. (Calendared in the Twelfth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Appendix, Part VIII. p. 128.) [Ibid. No. 200.]
Aug. 24.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The master of a vessel of this town which came from Rotterdam last week tells us, when he was there, many wounded men were daily brought down from Maestricht, most English and Scotch. The master of another come into this bay from Haarlem reports that several doggers and busses were come in from fishing. Most of them had been taken by the French capers, who had taken the masters away with them for ransom. They were all badly fished, none of them having above a barrel of herrings apiece. The master also tells me that yesterday morning he passed through above 200 Holland doggers with two or three men-of-war, their convoy, about a league off Flamborough Head, and this afternoon we see close by the Head about 40 fishing doggers with a man-of-war with them. They stood to the southward about a league and then stood off to sea. We have an account from Scarborough that last Tuesday there was in that road a French man-of-war of about 40 guns and two prizes with him, one of them a Dutch West India ship of between 30 and 40 guns, laden with indigo, sugar, &c., the other a raft-laden ship from Norway. Yesterday came here some fishing-boats that came by Scarborough, which give an account that the man-of-war and prizes were gone. We judge they are gone to the southward. The wind now much westerly, and there has been a great deal of rain last night. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Aug. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Tuesday, towards evening, one of our packet-boats arrived, which brought us several accounts of the unfortunate condition the Prince's army was in before Maestricht. They talk much of great damage by scythes used by the defenders. They speak as if 14,000 had been lost before it, and that the tenth man in Amsterdam is to be drawn out to that siege. They hint as if there had been an over resolute attempt of scaling the works there, and report the French are on their march to relieve it, but they say Philipsburg is taken, all which needs confirmation.
Yesterday the wind was so much northerly and blew so fresh that it brought several ships that had got as far as Yarmouth back to this port. To-day it is westerly, the weather dark and cloudy, threatening rain, which we extremely want. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 202.]
Aug. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., rainy dark weather. This morning the Bristol went to Spithead, where she's to be paid part of the seamen's wages and then proceed to Virginia, when orders come for them. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Aug. 24.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W. and by N., rainy weather. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Aug. 24.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 22nd came in the George and Susan of London, laden with wood and sugars from Jamaica bound home. They met with much contrary winds and bad weather, so they have been 13 weeks since they came out. They have been 14 or 15 days without bread. They say there are no privateers on that coast, so they now fall upon making sugar. All begin to labour and put their hands to work, so that the island thrives very well. The 23rd put to sea the Pearl of Looe with corn for St. Sebastian and three or four other small vessels for France.
This morning came in the Hopewell of Falmouth in 14 days from Rouen. They say the tax on tin continues and that there was news that Philipsburg was taken and Maestricht was like to be lost also. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Aug. 24.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Mayor of York. I have received a letter from you of the 19th instant, informing me that you had taken security for the appearance at the next assizes of one suspected to be a Popish priest, till you should receive my advice in it, by which it seems you have first taken security and then desire my opinion whether you should do it or no, whereas the question ought to have been asked before the thing was done. But, since that it is too late, I can return no other answer but that the preceeding go on according to the conditions of the security. [Precedents 1, f. 158.]
Aug. 25. James Hickes to Williamson. As yet come not to hand any letters to your orders to Col. Whitley. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 206.]
Aug. 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind southerly with the continuance of drought. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Aug. 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 208.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 208 I.]
Aug. 25. Pass for Henry, Earl of Clarendon, and his son and attendants to go to France. [Precedents. 1, f. 159.]
Aug. 25.
Tredagh (Drogheda).
James, Archbishop of Armagh, to Viscount Conway. I was at Dundalk when I met with your letter of 1 July, so I could not be so instrumental in the service you commanded me touching the contribution for the re-edification of Northampton, as I would have been, if it had found me in Dublin. But all care and diligence has been used by the Lord Lieutenant and Council in that matter, and, if I can give any further advantage to it, I shall be very ready both at your instance and out of charity to do it, and to observe your commands in any other thing, for I must acknowledge myself obliged to you in your readiness to appear for me in a Chancery suit I lately had in England, though I understand my agent neglected to address himself to you therein, by which I apprehend myself something to suffer, yet most thankfully acknowledge your kindness represented to me by Dr. Murphy. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 57.]
Aug. 26. The information of John Marloe taken before Sir J. Williamson. One Berry, a solicitor, who has a ground chamber in Cony Court in Gray's Inn, in the country discovered to a friend of the informant's, after having drunk pretty high together, that he kept a printing press, on the informant's friend asking him how he maintained himself so well above what he could gain by his practice. He further asking Berry how he got the press, he answered that he caused the spindle to be made at one place, the ribs and cramp irons at another, and the woodwork in different places. He further asking how he got his work done, Berry answered that he could work himself at press and case as well as most workmen, and further answered that he had it in so private a place, that the devil himself could not find it out, or words to that effect, adding that, if he had some small thing to print, be it what it would, he would undertake it for him.
The informant calls to mind that about a twelvemonth since a smith's man told him, pointing to a spindle in the press, that he had made such a thing for a gentleman, but could not imagine what it was for, till he now saw it in the press, and the informant has great reason to believe that Berry has his press in his chamber in Gray's Inn, being informed that he keeps very much at home and has very little practice, and besides the above-mentioned smith lives not far from Gray's Inn. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 1.]
Aug. 26.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. The Lord Treasurer has commanded me to signify to you his Majesty's pleasure, that Mr. Dickens shall proceed in his intended grant of the woodwardship of the New Forest, in order that the caveat entered in your office by Mr. Pratt may no further obstruct that grant, his Majesty designing Mr. Pratt a compensation some other way. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Aug. 26.
Magdalene College, Cambridge.
Walter Leightonhouse to Williamson. Giving him his hearty thanks and humble acknowledgements for his great care for his further promotion in the world, having in confidence of his promise once more settled himself in Magdalene College, where at present he has nothing but the bearer's kindness to rely on, he having at the writer's departure from London supplied him with 40s. for his settlement, till he could receive a further supply. His tutor is very urgent for caution money, which he promised he should receive in 10 days, which if he do, the writer doubts not he may have a long continuance there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 3.]
Aug. 26.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Being necessitated to be absent some few days, I found last Thursday yours of the 17th here. The prize is yet in our river, but we have still kept her out, and have set the best watch we can to prevent her breaking bulk, but in dark nights, she lying at a distance from us, boats may go on board and carry what they please away, unless the Customs officers look well to her. We can only prevent that no boats come from her into the harbour. They now pretend they want men to sail her, some of her men, they say, having run, but I think it is only a pretence. I beseech you to inform me what further I shall do to get quit of her. I fear she has emptied some of her lading, but am confident it is not come into the harbour.
The lieutenant you write of is suspended from his duty, not pay. I informed myself above a year since, that the way for his trial must be by a commission of oyer and terminer to the Mayor, Recorder and Aldermen of Hull and others, if they please, or else to stay till there be an assizes here, which is very uncertain, and that that will not cost above 5l., with which I acquainted both the lieutenant and the captain, but as yet I do not perceive the lieutenant concerns himself about it, he just now having told me, that he neither has nor knows how to get any to solicit it. This account I have formerly given to the Duke of Monmouth. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Lord Frescheville, Commander-in-Chief of York Castle. Richard Sligh, a soldier, in Captain Honywood's company at Portsmouth, has been accused of crimes alleged to have been committed by him when quartered at York. He has been examined and security has been taken from him by Mr. Noel, Sir Thomas Badd, and Mr. Norton, Justices of the Peace for Hampshire, to surrender himself to the Commander-in-Chief of York Castle. I understand that he has done so, and therefore send his examinations, that they may be delivered with the prisoner to the Justices of the Peace in order to his being proceeded against. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 162.] Annexed,
Memorandum that the enclosures named in the above letter were first, a letter from Mr. Fitzjames to Justice Gee, York, Aug. 18, 1676; second, a letter from Mr. Noel, Sir Thomas Badd and Mr. Norton to Colonel Legg, Feb. 26, 1676; third, the examination of Richard Sligh taken before the three last named gentlemen, Feb. 26, 1676; fourth, the examination of Edward Keld of Bishop Burton, East Riding of Yorkshire, before William Gee, senior, Justice of the Peace, 19 Aug., 1675. [Ibid. f. 163.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Sir John Hotham, Justice of the Peace, enclosed to the Postmaster of York. I have forwarded to Lord Frescheville the examinations relative to the above Richard Sligh, who has rendered himself at York Castle. The absence of the Governor of Portsmouth from his garrison is the reason you have not had this account sooner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 163.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a Privy Seal for payment to Herbert Price, junior, of 1,095l., the creation money of Sir Richard Head, as a free gift, with a non obstante of the former Privy Seal for payment of 20,000l. to the Master of the Great Wardrobe out of the first creation moneys. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 198.]
Aug. 26.
Elizabeth Castle, Jersey.
Captain George Raleigh to Williamson. There lately arrived at Orguile Castle, here, where Sir Herbert Lunsford, our Deputy Governor, resides, Mr. Lydoze, an English factor of St. Malo, and Roger Drew, master of the Industry of Bristol, to complain of having been robbed of 30 packs of canvas and 24 half chests of soap with many other small things by two capers which they thought to be Ostenders, and they procured an order from Sir Herbert to me, who have at present the command of this castle, to stop all such vessels as should come into this road. Whilst I was reading it, one of two guns came in commanded by Capt. John Broucke of Ostend, on board whom were found 7 packs of the cloth. He confessed his consort was Capt. John Peale of Flushing, and that he carried away the rest of the goods. I sent him to Sir Herbert, who with the lieutenant bailly and jurats, after examination and depositions taken, sent him back to me with an order from Sir Herbert for him to be here secured a prisoner till further order, and that all his goods should be taken out of his frigate and secured in this castle, which was accordingly performed to-day. Capt. Peale, as Mr. Drew tells me, was in Guernsey Road, when he came thither in hopes to apprehend him, but, notwithstanding the firing of guns, he got away. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 41.]
Aug. 27. The information of Philip Durward taken before Secretary Williamson. On complaint to Lord O'Brien, keeper of the game for 10 miles round Bexley in Kent, that the game was very much destroyed by Henry Grey and others of and about Dartford, his Lordship by warrant empowered the informant to seize and take away from the said Grey or his accomplices all greyhounds, setting dogs, nets or other engines, by which the game had been destroyed. The informant accordingly with a constable went to the said Grey's house, and showing him the warrant demanded of him his setting bitch and his nets, to which Grey answered in a very huffing manner that he would not deliver them, for he knew not whether the warrant was good, adding that, for aught he knew, the warrant was made under a hedge. The informant taking up the bitch, Grey forcibly took it from him, and put her into the constable's hands, charging him to keep her till he had been with a Justice to know whether the warrant was good or no, for till then he would not part with her. Grey repeated several times that he did not value such warrants which were made under a hedge, and that, if they took away his bitch, he would take more by night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 5.]
Aug. 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., calm weather. The Bristol, Sir John Berry commander, is at Spithead, attending for sailing orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 6.]
Aug. 27. Warrant for the royal assent to the election of Anthony, Bishop of Exeter, to the bishopric of Norwich in the place of Dr. Edward Reynolds, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 87.]
[Aug.?] John Kendall, William Crouch, Joseph Cox and others of London, merchants, sole owners of the John and Richard, to the king. Petition, stating that the said ship, being bound from Hamburg to Cadiz and Malaga, 30 July last was seized and ransacked by five French privateers, who having taken from the master, his pass, charter party and all his other papers, put him and six of his men on board some of their vessels; that two days after the Vice-Admiral of Rotterdam retook the said ship and carried her into Rotterdam, where she is detained, and the goods are unlading and are threatened to be speedily confiscated, and that said master and men were carried to Dunkirk, where they were kept two days close prisoners, and then freed, but the papers were refused to be delivered, unless the master would release them, which he refuses to do, not knowing what damage the French have done to the ship or goods, and, forasmuch as by the annexed affidavit it appears that the ship is an English-built vessel, was wholly navigated by Englishmen, wore an English flag, was furnished with all usual and needful dispatches, and had a pass according to the late regulation, and, forasmuch as she wholly belonged to the petitioners, who are all his Majesty's natural-born subjects, praying that he would dispense his royal power for the restoring of the said papers, and also of the ship and goods in the hands of the Dutch to the petitioners with full damages for the unjust seizure and detention thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 7.] Annexed,
Aug. 28. Affidavit by the petitioners, echoing the statements of the petition. [Ibid. No. 7i.]
Aug. 28. Order by virtue of the Privy Seal of 31 July last for payment to Sir John Shaw of 6,663l. 4s. 9d. part of the 40,622l. 7s. 6d. due to him and others as late Farmers of the Customs on an account stated for one year ended 29 Sept., 1671, with interest for the same at 6 per cent. per annum, from Michaelmas, 1671, till payment. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Aug. 28.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. Signifying by the Lord Treasurer's command that his Majesty has appointed to Mr. Hebdon 600l. for his journey to Muscovy, and, in order that he should have so much clear, his Lordship allows 60l. for the charges in passing the warrants and fees at the Exchequer. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Aug. 28.
Oxford.
François de la Motte to Williamson. Thanking him effusively for the excess of his liberality to him, without which he would perhaps have been obliged to leave Oxford sooner than he ought, for, though Mr. Durel does all he can to find means for his maintenance there, he has much difficulty in finding persons to do what Williamson has done, and assuring him that he does his best to employ his alms soberly and usefully, leading there a more sober life than he had ever done in the cloister, and studying with as great assiduity as he had done in his first years of study. He has had strange difficulty in learning English, but hopes with God's help he will succeed. He has already preached some sermons which have much pleased his audience, even the most uncultured having said they had understood them quite well, and that he already pronounces English better than many other foreigners who have preached there. He will use Williamson's charities in such a manner that he shall never be discontented with his proselyte. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 10.]
Aug. 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday evening arrived an English-built ship from Jamaica. They report that the Dutch have taken Cyen (Cayenne) in West India, and that they were so civil to the prisoners, that they carried them and landed them at Surinam.
The news is very strong and from good hands, that the French King has issued his proclamation, assuring all his enemies that on their humble petition he will grant them passes to trade by sea into France, and commanding all his subjects not to molest them but to aid and assist them, which trick will gain him a vast sum and much impoverish our trading to sea and spoil our small shipping, for 'tis observed that within the last three years more small craft of between 60 and 120 tons have been built, than were in 20 years and above before.
A ship yesterday from Virginia speaks as if things there had an ill aspect, and that the natives are so bold that they come at noontime into their plantations and kill the English, and that they are fitted out with all manner of artillery from France. This last has been confidently reported a long time.
A topgallantsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Aug. 28.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. To-day a late magistrate of this place, Robert Cawly, formerly a master of a ship but a good principled man, was chosen mayor for the ensuing year.
Last week, being some northerly winds, some of our ships sailed for the vintage for France and Spain. Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Aug. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W., no news. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Aug. 28.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news like that in the next letter. Last Saturday passed before this place to the west, wind N.W., 14 or 15 great ships. About 20 ships are now standing into this harbour. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Aug. 28.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 24th came in the Lucie of Falmouth in 6 weeks from Virginia. About 100 leagues after they came out, they met with a gust of wind, which carried in a quarter of an hour their foremast and maintopmast by the board, so that with much difficulty they got safe home. They say that in Maryland they have peace with the Indians, but in Virginia wars. The Indians lying in the woods and behind trees fall on the English when they are at work in their plantations, and so destroy and take many of them which they use very barbarously, but they dare not appear to fight them openly in a body, but they are now more ware of them, so that they do not half so much mischief as they did at first. Tobacco is very scarce. Most of the ships are come home.
The 25th came in the Cabinet of Falmouth from St. Malo. The master reports that a little before he came away there was news that a small Bristol vessel, that had taken in there 60 ballots of canvas and 50 or 60 half chests of soap, was taken by two Ostend capers, as she was going for Morlaix, and having no pass or bills of lading the Admiral took from her all the canvas and soap except 7 ballots which the Vice-Admiral had taken. After they had taken away the goods, the master said he must go along with them, so then the Admiral commanded the other to stay by him, before he had escaped, and then the other left him in the night and put in for Jersey, but the merchant at St. Malo having notice of their being on board, immediately got a shallop and went for Jersey, where he met with the Vice-Admiral, who had 7 ballots of the canvas with his mark on board, and stopped her there. The Bristol man made for Guernsey, and, just as she was coming in, the captain of the Admiral, being there and ashore, made her out in his glass, and made haste to go on board, pretending to bring in his ship to wash, and so went to sea, but the Bristol man was so near as to make sign to the castle to stop her, which they endeavoured to do by shooting several guns at her, but to no purpose, for she got away.
Yesterday came in the Adventure of London to load pilchards and corn for the Canaries. The George and Susan from Jamaica put to sea to-day for London, the wind at W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 15.]
Aug. 28.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind W., no news. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Herbert Price to be captain in Capt. Cook's room and to Ralph Egerton and John Clark to be lieutenant and ensign respectively to Capt. John Clarke, all in the Earl of Craven's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 36.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a Privy Seal for payment to John Hebdon, appointed to go as envoy to the Czar of Muscovy, of 660l. for his entertainment and allowance and the expenses of his journey. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 199.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
Pass for David van Schel, whom Peter Joye, merchant of London, intends to send as his procurator to Colberg for the recovery of his ship, the Recovery of Yarmouth, lately taken and carried in there. [Ibid. p. 200.]
Aug. 29. Secretary Coventry to Williamson. Asking him to send him the project of articles which Sir George Downing took out of the treaty marine with the States General, which he says is in Williamson's hands, because by his Majesty's order Sir George is to be with him to-morrow to consult about it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 17.]
Aug. 29.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind northerly for these two days, blowing fresh with showers. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Aug. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats arrived this morning we hear that Philipsburg is not yet delivered, and that the armies lie near one another, but have not attempted anything against each other, since the raising of the siege of Maestricht. Last night we had some rain with thunder, to-day the wind blows very fresh at N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 19.]
Aug. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E., fair weather. The Bristol continues at Spithead, where their provisions will be sent them for their Virginia voyage. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Aug. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. There is a very great lamentation here for the misfortune of the Prince of Orange in missing the taking of Maestricht. These parts afford many good prayers for him. [Ibid. No. 21.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 21 i.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
The King [to the Dean and Chapter of Durham]. Dispensing with the residence of Dr. Denis Grénville, archdeacon and prebendary of Durham, and rector of Sedgefield, for two years, and requiring that he enjoy his full emoluments, as he is by the King's command repairing beyond the seas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 88.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Recommendations to the Vice-Chancellor [of the University of Cambridge] of Sir John Osborne for leave to erect the Royal Oak Lottery at Sturbridge Fair for the benefit of indigent officers and soldiers and of Mr. Perin, master of his Grace's company of actors, to have leave to play during the fair. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 54.]
Aug. 29.
Dublin.
Sir Edward Sutton to Williamson. I am directed by Sir Gilbert [Talbot] to give you the trouble of the enclosed. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 58.]
Aug. 29.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Aug. 30.
Letter Office.
James Hickes to Williamson. As yet nothing comes to hand for Fareham or Southwark, as you gave order to the Colonel to look after. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 22.]
Aug. 30.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. This week a ship arrived here from Iceland, which says that country is in great want of provisions in two respects, first, that they have not this year had the supply of corn and meal as in former years from Denmark, secondly, that the fish have not come within their shore as usual.
Yesterday Thomas Thetsford is elected mayor of this town for the next year, to begin next Michaelmas.
These parts are in a very healthful condition according to the season of the year. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Aug. 30.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.W., no news. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Aug. 30. Acknowledgement by John Roche that he is indebted 10l. to Francis Royley. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Aug. 31.
Council Chamber.
[W. Blathwayt] to S. Pepys. The Committee of Trade, having to-day examined the enclosed reports from the Commissioners of the Customs touching the Prosperous of Lymington, the Mary of Bristol and the Sarah of Plymouth gone for Newfoundland, with the annexed papers, command me to transmit them to you, that the Lords of the Admiralty may grant such passes to the respective ships as has been practised in like cases, where bonds are to be given that such passes be not applied to any other ship but returned at the determination of them. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 26.]
Aug. 31.
Council Chamber.
Memorandum in the Committee for Trade, on the petition of John Cook and others, and Sir John Godolphin's answer (calendared ante, pp. 226, 232) that Secretary Williamson be desired to obtain the King's directions to Sir John Godolphin to obey the orders of the Court of Admiralty, whereby the ship and goods are to be appraised. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Draft of the above memorandum. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Aug. 31. Sir Nathaniel Herne to Williamson. As you commanded, I wrote for a certificate of the burning of the Expedition, which I enclose, and, if you will have it made before the magistrate, on your command I will give such order. A few days since I presented you with a jar of Mango acharr.
Saturday being fast day we do not meet at Hampstead. [Ibid. No. 29.] Enclosed,
Attestation by Ezekiel Marsh of Boston in New England, master of the Trial of Boston riding in Catwater, that about midnight 22 July last, the Expedition of Plymouth, then likewise at anchor in Catwater, having only ballast on board, being suddenly on fire, the attestant left his ship and went on board a great Dutch ship lying there near him laden with ammunition, which with several other outward-bound ships then rode at anchor in Catwater, and that, about a quarter of an hour after he was on board the said Dutch ship, the fire very much increased, running into an extraordinary flame, in which the attestant observed some noise of musket or small shot, which he judged to be by their report in the Expedition, and soon after observed two remarkable ascents, as fireworks or fireballs, which went up out of the said ship a very great height, and continued 5 or 6 minutes, one extinguishing before the other; and this was so observed and specially noted by the attestant, in regard that the said ship so on fire was driven unto and came very near the said ammunition ship, the attestant and others not being able to board or come near the said ship so on fire, and so he remained on board the said ammunition ship for her preservation she being in great danger, and, had the fire taken on board her, she would in all probability have been the means of destroying all or most of the ships there in that harbour, being upwards of 30 sail to the best of the attestant's remembrance. Aug. 24, Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 29 i.]
Aug. 31. Sir R. Francklin to Williamson. Your most welcome letter I received when in a great crowd of my friends and acquaintance, who had invited themselves to dine with me; on which we applied ourselves with as much devotion as might be to drinking your good health, for which I hope you have been much the better ever since. No one wishes the continuance of it with all happiness more than myself. Did I not, you might justly conclude me a most ungrateful beast, having been obliged by so many favours to me and mine. Though your master cannot spare so necessary a servant for so long, as Dr. Busby has his young lads, yet methinks on so important a business as a visit to one, than whom no one loves or honours you more, you might get a little to spend with him. To encourage you, we have the young rich widow with us, and are as merry as we can be without you, but wish nothing more than your good company. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 30.]
Aug. 31.
Sussex.
John Hammond to Williamson. This morning I received a letter from my Lord of Exeter expressing his readiness to procure for me the presentation of Goudhurst, Kent, now vacant. I formerly made my address to him for that place, if void in his time, and received a most kind answer. But, as I perceive that he, having been sorely pressed by the solicitation of competitors, very powerful and urgent on both sides, has devolved the right of presentation to the new Dean, and has reserved to himself only the privilege of advice and direction, my humble petition is that you would use your interest in my behalf to the present Dean. I can use no other topic but your own innate goodness, which, as it is beneficial to the nation, and to Queen's College, enlarged and beautified by your munificence, so it cannot be contracted by diffusing itself to particular persons. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Aug. 31.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Fourteen sail are now at anchor in this bay, 3 from Norway belonging to this town loaden with raft, the rest light colliers for the northward. The wind is now W. blowing a hard gale. To-day we see several loaden ships pass to the southward. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Aug. 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind is for the most part W. sometimes N.W., and the weather cloudy without rain. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Aug. 31.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon went hence for France in one of his Majesty's yachts the Earl of Clarendon, Lord Cornbury, Col. Villiers and Mr. Henry Savile. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Aug. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W., windy weather. The Bristol remains at Spithead, where she takes her provisions for the voyage, which the victuallers are in hand with. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Aug. 31.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 28th came in here in the afternoon about 33 ships for Malaga, Tangier and further up in the Straits. Those that stop at Tangier have on board several soldiers for the garrison and some gaol birds to row in the galleys there. There also came in five for the Canaries, one for Jamaica and one for Virginia. They all put to sea Tuesday morning, wind N.N.W. They came out of the Downs about 200 sail. The rest, it is supposed are got too far to the westward to put back. The wind yesterday and to-day came about to W.S.W. with fair weather, so it is believed the fleet will keep at sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 36.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the Deanery of Bristol, void by the death of Dr. Toogood, to Dr. Ironside, chaplain in ordinary. With note, that it was not used, Dr. Toogood not being dead. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 88.]
Aug. Monsr. Terieso and others to Williamson. As the King's letter granted last September on their behalf to the Senate of Hamburg (the purport of which appears from the Order in Council of 22 Sept., 1675, calendared in the last volume, p. 305) is not yet complied with, requesting him to recommend the business to Sir William Swan, the Resident at Hamburg, that he may press the Senate to give some answer to the letter, and that the whole matter may be remitted hither, where the witnesses are, and where only the writers are able to make their proof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 385, No. 37.]
Aug.
The Fleet.
Payne Fisher to Williamson. I have once more presumed to trouble you in sending you this little book, it being your due as a most worthy member of the Privy Council. The proem is in honour of the Crown and mitre, written in heroics, the other part being a concatenation of several funeral elogiums in prosometric, which I formerly or more lately wrote, all here embodied in this octavo.
I had designed a re-impression of your own poem with the correction of some few peccadilloes. I have made a little enlargement in praise of your country, where I have eaten more bread than in my own, though there born to very great estate, but am necessitated to defer the reprinting, till I can obtain my liberty, the greatest matter I now lie for being only 8l., towards which would you be so kind as to make me your debtor for the other 5l., to be sent by Mr. Newcombe or any of your own servants. The bearer humbly desires to be admitted to your presence, whose father had the honour to be known to you at Oxford, who is by profession a printer. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Aug. Joseph Fisher to Williamson. Rendering him his thanks because he would have given him the exhibition, had it been vacant, and regretted that it was not, and because he had sent him an unexpected gift of 5l. [Latin. Ibid. No. 39.]
[Aug.] The Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge, to Williamson. Regretting deeply that they are unable to elect John Covell to the Proctorship, as recommended by the King, but before his letters arrived, another was elected. His absence at the time of presentation, no proxy being allowed, would render it impossible according to statute to present him. If the person chosen and presented be not continued, it would deprive the college of their right to the Proctorship for this time. The college too is not obliged by any statute to choose the Senior Fellow qualified, whether present or absent. [Ibid. No. 40.]
[Aug. ?] Account of money received of M. de Ruvigny for recruiting his Grace's regiment of foot in France in 1676, amounting to 3,531l. 17s. 4d., with account of the disbursements thereof to the several officers named, amounting to 3,492l. 4s. 10d., the date of the latest payment being 20 June, with note that Capt. Home received 50l. more not charged here on his Grace's letter to M. de Ruvigny. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 55.]
Aug.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge (with two exceptions) to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 385. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
41 Aug. 1 2 2 4 N.E.
42 " 2 2 1 2 N.E.
43 " 3 1 1 0 N.E.
44 " 4 1 2 0 N.E.
45 " 5 1 2 0 N.E.
46 " 6 4 3 0 N.E.
47 " 7 4 1 0 N.E.
48 " 8 1 1 2 N.W.
49 " 9 1 2 2 N.E.
50 " 10 1 2 4 N.E.
51 " 11 4 2 0 S.W.
52 " 12 2 8 1 S.W.
53 " 13 2 8 1 S.W.
54 " 15 2 18 0 S.W.
55 " 16 2 19 0 S.W.
56 " 17 3 24 0 S.W.
57 " 18 3 28 0 S.W.
58 " 19 3 33 1 S.W.
59 " 20 2 36 2 S.W.
60 " 21 2 5 The same ships outward bound as yesterday and 5 others.
61 " [22] 2 46 3 S.W. Misdated 21.
62 " 23 2 1 0 N.W. The fleet sailed this morning.
63 " 24 3 2 2 N.W.
64 " 25 3 0 1 N.
65 " 26 2 1 0 N.W.
66 " 26 2 1 0 N.W. Addressed to Mr. Pepy's.
67 " 27 3 0 0
68 " 28 3 8 1 S.W.
69 " 29 3 8 0 N.W.
70 " 30 3 9 0
71 " 30 3 9 0 Addressed to Secretary Coventry.
72 " 31 2 13 0 S.W.