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Charles II: July 1676

Pages 199-257

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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July 1676

July 1.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth of his consent that Francis Harper, B.A., of Trinity College, Cambridge, may obtain the King's letters mandatory to the University for creating him M.A. forthwith, as a considerable preferment is offered him, for which he is not qualified unless he were M.A., for which degree he wants a year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 1.]
Minute thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41,p. 51.]
July 1.
The Custom
House,
London.
The Commissioners of the Customs to the King. In obedience to the order in Council of 9 June last, transmitted us by the Lord Treasurer, with his direction to us to cause blank passes to be printed and dispersed among the officers of the outports appointed by the late rules to issue passes and to report why Portsmouth is not named, or may not fitly be named among the ports authorized to grant passes, we answer that on transmitting the late rules to the collectors of the outports they were directed to apply to our Secretary for such blank passes as they should think fit, who informs us that they have all been furnished therewith by him, and that he does not know of any port that wants blank passes at present. As to the omission of Portsmouth, on observing that one great occasion of obtaining fraudulent passes was the multitude of places granting them, we offered the taking away the power of granting them from several places, and among them from Portsmouth, for the following reasons:—
1. Very few or no merchants live there, and the trade thereof is very inconsiderable.
2. By a certificate from our collector there, it appears that there are but 11 ships belonging to Portsmouth, the biggest one of 70 tons, one of 50 and the rest but of 30 and under. Southampton being so nigh, this small number might very well be supplied with passes from thence.
3. As the customs there were so little that they did not nearly pay the salaries of the officers, we lately moved the Lord Treasurer that the surveyor and other officers might be retrenched, which is since done, so we have not officers enough there fit to be entrusted with this power, considering the great number of foreign-built ships arriving daily at the Isle of Wight and thereabouts, and the cunning devices daily practised for obtaining fraudulent passes.
Southampton lies convenient enough for any ships that come to those parts to obtain passes, and has a surveyor and other necessary officers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 2.]
July 1.
Bristol.
Sir Robert Cann, Mayor, to Williamson. In reply to the letter of 27 June from a committee of the Council assuring him that he never wrote to the Lord Mayor of York nor any other about a design for burning some cities, but, had any such cause arisen, he would have given notice to a secretary or the Council. There was a report of persons taken at Marlborough, who designed to burn that place, Chippenham, and Bristol, so he told the postmaster there to send an express to know the truth thereof, whose letter and answer are enclosed. About the same time there were groundless reports that Worcester was endeavoured to be burnt by fireballs. [Ibid. No. 3.] Enclosed,
Thomas Cale to William Stephens, postmaster of Chippenham.
The Mayor and Aldermen here desire to know the truth of reports of persons apprehended there, on suspicion of designs to fire Bristol and other places. 3 June, Bristol.
Postscript. As he since understands these persons were apprehended at Marlborough, requesting him to send the letter there.
Certificate by Ralph Bayley, Town Clerk of Marlborough, that a report arose last Wednesday that some persons apprehended in Dorsetshire confessed that they were concerned in firing Blandford, and that there were 62 of them, engaged to fire other towns, whereof Sarum, the Devizes and Marlborough were some, and, though no certainty of it could be found, double watches were set and two rogues, one boy and a lewd woman, were taken, who were whipped and sent to the house of correction, where the woman yet is, but the others were sent home, but no truth of any such hellish intention appears. 3 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 3 i.]
July 1.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Since the Mayor received the Council's letter, they are here something better satisfied, and I am very glad it came, for they were endeavouring to persuade me to some things I was not very willing to satisfy them in, but now all is well, only at York, I hear, they are still in great fears. [Ibid. No. 4.]
July 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday arrived one of our packetboats. The passengers report that the Prince of Orange is set down before Maestricht, but above all the Dutch were so out of measure filled with Admiral Tromp's action against the Swedes in the Sound, that, whatever your discourse was, they would be speaking of that with the greatest encomiums. Wind westerly these two days. [Ibid. No. 5.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, to pay to the gentlemen of the Chapel Royal 20l. as the King's free gift in lieu of three deer usually granted them. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 84.]
July 2. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee all about foreign affairs except:—England. Popery. The Portugal ambassador's chapel at St. James' to be shut up. Care to be taken against the Irish officers coming into Whitehall, St. James' Park. To be sent away with some small gratification each. Lady Lichfield and Sussex. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 207.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Ratification by the King of the articles agreed on between Henry Wilkie, Resident for the affairs of Scotland in the Seventeen Provinces of the Netherlands and Conservator of the privileges of subjects of that Kingdom in the Low Countries, and the Commissioners of the Prince of Orange and the deputies of the town of Campveer (which articles are approven by the royal burrowes of Scotland) by which the Scots Staple is removed from Dort to Campveer where it had been formerly established, and established there for 21 years and so much longer as should be thereafter agreed on by the royal burrowes and the town. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 25.] Prefixed,
The said articles, forty in number, by the 6th of which the magistrates of the town are to provide a church and churchyard for the exclusive use of the Scottish nation and maintain a minister for the congregation. [24 pages. Ibid. pp. 1–24.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council in Scotland. Warrant for issuing a proclamation of his approval of the foregoing articles, and ordaining that the royal burrowes make strict acts for the punctual observance of the Staple. [Ibid. p. 26.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that tools had been made for the use of the Mint by the masterworker of the Mint in England and that the work and office houses of the Mint were not large enough for the said new engines and that therefore a new work house and other offices had been built and the whole expense of the said new tools and buildings had been advanced by Sir John Falconer, Master of the Mint in Scotland, which with fees advanced by him to the officers of the Mint and what he was super-expended in his last account will amount to a considerable sum, for taking the accounts of the said disbursements, fees and balance of his last account. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 27.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to Sir Thomas Murray of Glendoick, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, and the heirs male of his body. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 29.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Alexander Hume of Manderston for two years. [Ibid. p. 30.]
July 3.
The Custom
House,
London.
The Commissioners of the Customs to the Committee for Trade. According to Sir Philip Lloyd's letter of 29 June, by your directions we have written to all ports trading with Newfoundland to send us forthwith an account of what ships are gone there this year, with particulars of them, which we shall transmit to you as soon as we receive them.
As to the cases wherein you desire our opinion, viz., where a pass shall be demanded in pursuance of the treaties with Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli for any ship gone to Newfoundland before the date of the late rules, or where a ship was surveyed by the Customs officers and immediately proceeded on her voyage, leaving the pass to be solicited afterwards, we do not think any general rules can be made which may not open a door to many frauds and abuses, but conceive the best way would be to have a thorough examination of each ship falling under any of those circumstances for which such a pass shall be demanded, and, if the Lords of the Admiralty be in any doubt of the reality of any case coming before them under either of the above heads, if the particulars of such ships be transmitted to us, we shall do our best to discover the truth of the case. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 6.]
July 3. Certificate by James Hoare, Comptroller of the Mint, that from 20 July, 1672, to 22 Feb., 1676, 492,271lbs. 4½oz. of copper farthings and halfpence were coined, value 40,252l. 16s. 11d., of which 32,696l. 0s. 8d. worth have been distributed, and 7,561l. 16s. 3d. remain on hand (sic). [Ibid. No. 7.]
July 3.
[Received]
Certificate by 8 shopkeepers and glass-sellers in and about London that, whereas some of the crystalline or flint glasses formerly made were observed to crizell and spoil, this defect was remedied many months ago, and the glasses since made prove as durable as any other sort. [Ibid. No. 8.]
July 3.
York.
Yorke Horner, Lord Mayor of York, to Secretary Coventry. I was induced by the enclosed paper, sent hither by an Alderman of London, and reports of fires in different places, to summon the aldermen, who with myself set a watch, by whose care four fires were early extinguished. What was done was for the security of the city, the people being in great consternation. We had not time to consult your Honour. I hear that a prisoner in Newgate confesses that he was set on to burn by others, whose business is to steal in those calamities. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 9.]
July 3.
Stoke
Hammond,
Buckinghamshire.
Thomas Disney to Williamson. Explaining that the continuance of his too evident malady has withheld him from waiting on him long since, and promising never to trouble him again, so that, if remembered at any time with some dignity in the Church, he must wholly ascribe it to his goodness. [Ibid. No. 10.]
July 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The master of another ketch of this port, which came from Stockholm the same time as the ketch mentioned in my last, and arrived last Tuesday in this bay, informs me that he heard of but two ships lost by the Swedes, the Crown, the Admiral with 130 guns, which overset and blew up, and but 30 men were saved out of 1,500, and the Sword, the Vice-Admiral, which was fired by one of Tromp's fireships, and another of their admirals ran on a rock going into harbour and was sunk, and these were all he could hear of that the Swedes lost.
Many laden ships passed by to the southward last Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 11.]
July 3.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday arrived a ship from Leghorn, who met Sir John Narbrough with his fleet in the Straits. The master waited on Sir John, who said he would go to Tripoli and see those parts, and then come for England. The Henrietta is yet in the Downs, waiting for orders. Yesterday and to-day we have had brave showers, to the great refreshment both of corn and cattle. A topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 12.]
July 3.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 1st and 2nd arrived here four ships of this place. The master of the Amity from Morlaix says the people there were much troubled at the news of the King's forces being defeated by the Emperor's in a late engagement, but he gives no great particulars, saving that then it was kept private till further account of it. The Society from Teneriffe says there is great likelihood of a plentiful vintage this year. Those coasts are at present pretty free from any Turkish pirates. Corn is a good commodity with them. The Fellowship from Bordeaux two days before he came here met with three Dutch men-of-war, which had been cruising several weeks between the Seames and Belle Isle with little purchase. The day after, off the Penmarks, he met three French men-of-war, King's ships. The first had from him in small runlets about a hogshead of wine, which was all the damage he sustained from both. The Providence took in her lading of tobacco at Bush river in Maryland. The Indians there have been very troublesome, and the Susquehannas had built a fort at the head of the Potomac, and with about 200 of them kept it two months, notwithstanding 7 or 800 lay before it, and at last, when their provisions were spent, issued out, and most of them got away. These troubles hindered the planters getting in their crop, and made tobacco something scarce this year. [Ibid. No. 13.]
July 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. The wind is S.W. and full of rain, of which we have had some store of late. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 14.]
July 3.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news and news from Virginia as in the next letter. [Ibid. No. 15.]
July 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the Constant John of Hull in one month from Maryland loaden with tobacco. Off the Western Islands they met a caper, which they could not discern whether French or Dutch. They had French colours, but spoke but poor French. They took from them a hogshead of tobacco and most of their clothes.
They are like to have a very good crop of tobacco, but they stand much in fear of the Indians, so they are forced to keep a guard of 100 horse always in arms on the confines of the English plantations to give notice to the rest of the plantations, if there should be any invasion, who are all ready with their arms fixed. The Governor of Maryland, hearing that the Indians had fallen in upon Virginia, sent a boat to be advertised of the truth, who returned 21 May last and brought word that they had fallen on some of the outward plantations, and that they had raised forces against them, and that the governor had caused a tax to be levied for discharge of the army, on which there was a difference betwixt the inhabitants, for those that went to fight would not pay anything, saying they ought to pay that stayed at home and enjoyed their plantations, which dissension is like to prove worse than the enemy. [Ibid. No. 16.]
July 3. Caveat that no grant or letter pass of the impropriations belonging to Murne Abbey in the counties of Cork and Limerick without notice to Thomas Elyott of the Bedchamber. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 24.]
July 3. Caveat that no grant pass for the clothing of the army in Ireland without notice to Mr. Havers. [Ibid.]
July 3. Request by Havers, the Lord Lieutenant's agent, for entering the above caveat, as the said clothing has ever been under the ordering of the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 41.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Licence to Robert South, D.D., prebendary of Christ Church, Oxford, and also of Westminster, and rector of Llanrhaidar in Mochant in the diocese of St. Asaph, to pass beyond the seas as chaplain to Laurence Hyde, appointed ambassador to the King of Poland, with order that during his absence he shall enjoy all the profits and emoluments appertaining to the said prebends and rectory, and dispensing with any law, custom or anything else to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 29.]
July 3. Warrant to Col. John Strode, lieutenant of Dover Castle, for admitting and swearing William Edstorth, to be gentleman porter of Sandown castle in the place of Samuel Pittock, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 38.]
July 4. Certificate by Peter Bar and four others that Marcelin Jourda is a merchant, and has lived about four years in London, trading as a merchant of good repute. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 17.]
July 4.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Wind northerly with several showers. [Ibid. No. 18.]
July 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats which came in about 9 this morning we had as little news as few passengers. Among them were seven soldiers who had deserted foreign services, of whom four paid part of their passage money, so I keep no account of them or of any that pay any part of their money so as to bring the charge of their passage on his Majesty's grace.
We hear the English regiments that have lain in garrison all this summer are all drawn out and marched since Friday sennight to Maestricht.
The wind continues westerly, the weather cloudy and cool. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 19.]
July 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 20.]
July 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 21]. Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 21 i.]
July 4.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The deputy lieutenants of Glamorganshire meet to-day in order to have a meeting of the militia of the county, and other counties in Wales, I suppose, will follow their example. A fresh gale at N.W. [Ibid. No. 22.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir George Ent. Reminding him of a suit he had made through him to the College for a licence for Mr. Butler to practise physic within the liberties of the charter, which is the way he chooses his friends should take rather than by any superior interposition. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 102.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Bathurst. I must not forget your civility last year in admitting my recommendation in favour of the poor commissioned officers interested in the lotteries. They have obtained your Chancellor's for the like favour this year, and I cannot refuse them my good wishes, though I am not much a favourer of anything that may give a temptation to the youth of the University. But this case is so extraordinary that I hope the example will be of no prejudice, and therefore they cannot doubt of success in the suit they now make you. What I have to pray is, that you will make the time of their stay there as long and as favourable as you may. [Ibid. p. 103.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Caveat entered at the Signet Office at the desire of the Duke of Monmouth that no grant pass of any fair to be kept at Maidstone in Kent till notice be given to Mr. Secretary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 26.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Request by the Duke of Monmouth that the above caveat be entered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 23.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate there. Requiring them forthwith to admit to the degree of M.A. Francis Harper, B.A., of Trinity College, who has had a considerable preferment offered him, for which he is not qualified unless he were M.A., for which degree he wants a year, and dispensing with any statute, &c., to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 29.]
July 4. Notes by Williamson respecting the dispute between the Lord Great Chamberlain and the Lord Chamberlain of the Household as to their respective jurisdictions over Westminster Hall, arising from a warrant from the Lord Great Chamberlain to the officers of the works to prepare the scaffold there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 215.]
[July ?] Richard Acland and others, owners of the Scanderbeg of Barnstaple, to the King. Petition for a pass for the said ship, which sailed from Barnstaple for Newfoundland, and thence for the Straits, about 19 May last, having received a pass according to the order of 21 July last, the officers there having not then received the last orders of 10 March last, and the Lords of the Admiralty having refused a pass, because the ship is not in port to be surveyed. On the back,
July 5.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Committee for Trade. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 24.]
[July ?] Thomas Griffith, Thomas Tyte, Peter Jones and others, the owners of the Prosperous and the Turkey frigate, to the King. Similar petition for passes for the above ships, which have been abroad long before the late regulation touching passes. On the back,
July 5.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Committee for Trade. [Ibid. No. 25.]
[July ?] William Castle and Henry Ewbancke to the King. Petition for a patent for their invention of secure and commodious fire-hearths for ships, which he has seen. At one side,
July 5.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. At the other side,
Report by Sir Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, in favour of granting a patent. 8 July. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 123.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Request by the Duke of Monmouth for a pass for Theophilus Oglethorpe, one of Lord Duras' troop of Horse Guards, to be absent in foreign parts for 12 months from 25 Dec. last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 27.]
July 5.
Henton
[Hinton].
Lord Poulett to Williamson. Being desired by the deputy lieutenants of Dorsetshire to add George Savage of Bloxworth to their number, wishing to receive from him his Majesty's pleasure therein. [Ibid. No. 28.]
July 5.
Dover.
James Houseman to Lord O'Brien. Since his lordship had twice gone with him to Secretary Williamson to entreat his favour how the masters of the packet-boats might procure the money due to them for provisions for several subjects brought over by them by command from Nieuport and Calais, once more entreating his lordship to assist the bearer, who has all the papers relating to that concern, hoping that his advice and his appearance to the secretary may gain them their money. [Ibid. No. 29.]
July 5. Information of Sir Philip Monckton, given before the Secretaries of State. He is informed that Lord Widdrington's brother, a priest, is in England. Asked by whom he received this information, he desired to be excused, he could not tell by whom, he that informed him desired to be concealed. It is likely we may hear of him at Lady Crane's or at Lord Powis'. If he can be taken, he undertakes to prove he is a priest. He may be gone into Northumberland. He cannot tell of any body that has seen him or spoken with him since his coming to England. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 30.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to George Gilliat, messenger, to take into custody Sir Philip Monckton, and to deliver him safe prisoner to the Constable of the Tower. [Ibid. No. 31.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower, to take into custody Sir Philip Monckton and to keep him safe prisoner, for writing a seditious and scandalous letter to defame the Government and the Privy Council, and to raise groundless jealousies and fears among the people tending to the public disturbance. [Ibid. No. 32.]
July 5.
London.
Deposition of Aaron Noell of Jersey. He saw, 10 June last, Joshua Paine tender to Philip Messervy 10l. in order to obtain from him an acknowledgement signed by the said Paine that he had received from the said Messervy a freedom for a ship, which he thereby promised to return to Messervy on Saturday, 10 June, or else to pay him 40l., whereupon, Messervy producing the said note, Paine delivered it to the deponent to keep, which, he being unwilling to do, delivered it to Jane Johnson, of Whitechapel, that she might keep it, and, 27 June last, she delivered it to the said Paine. [Ibid. No. 33.]
July 5. The King to George Legge, Governor of Portsmouth. Richard Sligh, a soldier in Captain Charles Honywood's company now in Portsmouth garrison, was sent with a constable to York gaol, to be tried for crimes committed when the company was quartered at York, but is alleged to have been taken out of the hands of the constable by some of the said company. He is to give notice to Richard Noel, Sir Thomas Badd, Bart., and Richard Norton, justices of the peace before whom Sligh was examined, to take good security from him to surrender with all convenient speed to John, Lord Frescheville, Governor of York. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 163.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Pass for Captain Theophilus Oglethorpe to be absent in foreign parts for 12 months from December last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 51.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant declaring that, notwithstanding the disbanding of the forces raised in 1674, Sir George Monro's commission as major-general continues in force, and authorizing and requiring them to grant him warrant to inspect the militia forces and to grant him power to command the same or any part thereof when called together. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 30.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to Sir George Monro of his daily allowance as a major-general from the day of the disbanding of the forces to the date thereof, and for payment thereafter to him of the pension of 300l. granted him by a warrant of even date. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 31.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a yearly pension of 300l. to Sir George Monro during his life. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 32.]
July 6. Sir Philip Lloyd to the Commissioners of the Customs. Your letter of the 3rd has been read by the Committee for Trade, and there lying before them the case of John Davy of Bideford, relating to four ships gone to Newfoundland, they, in order to the better dispatch of the petitioner who is much pressed in time, have commanded me to enclose his original papers, desiring you would immediately return your opinions on the same and that in all such cases coming before you you would also send them your opinions with all expedition, signifying what you think fit to be done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 34.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Statement by Sir Philip Lloyd that the Committee for Trade have appointed Monday the 10th at 9 in the morning in the Council Chamber at Whitehall to hear any propositions concerning the coining of tin farthings, where the officers of the mint and Eliah Palmer are to attend. [Ibid. No. 35.]
July 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. The weather is fair, and the wind somewhat northward of west. [Ibid. No. 36.]
July 6.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here the Fellowship and Rose of this place in 3 days from Rotterdam. The masters say at their coming away there was advice from the leaguer at Maestricht of the taking of the counterscarp and great hopes of taking the town in a few days. To hasten it supplies were daily sending of men and provisions, especially gunners, of whom many have fallen.
The flying news of the mutiny at Tangier I hope is without ground. The French have laid an import duty on our tin. [Ibid. No. 37.]
July 6.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., very fair weather. [Ibid. No. 38.]
July 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 39.]
July 6. Warrant for a privy seal for payment to Ralph Montague, appointed ambassador extraordinary to France, of 1,500l. for his equipage and 100l. a month for his entertainment and such sums for extraordinaries as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 212.]
July 6. Commission to Captain John Hebdon to be captain of the company of trained bands in Bricklinsie (Brightlingsea), Essex, in the 2nd regiment of the Cinque Ports, in place of Roger Hemson deceased, obeying the orders of the lieutenant of Dover Castle. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 161.]
July 6. Commissions for James Fremantle to be a lieutenant and Samuel Shaw an ensign in the same regiment of trained bands. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 161.]
July 6. Commission to Francis Lane to be muster master of the trained bands in the Cinque Ports, requiring the lieutenant of Dover Castle and all mayors, bailiffs, &c., to admit and assist him to and in the said office. [Ibid. p. 162.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord George Berkeley. The enclosed is a translation of the Emperor of Russia's letter to his Majesty about opening a trade for Persian silks at Archangel. His Majesty orders me to transmit it to you, that it may be communicated to the Company, to make a fit use of it so far as the interests of that trade may be concerned in it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 104.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Licence to Theophilus Oglethorpe, one of the gentlemen of Lord Duras' troop of Guards, to be absent for 12 months from 25 Dec. last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 33.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to John Whitehall for holding with the rectory of Stoke Doyle, Northamptonshire, whereof he is now possessed, the rectory of Fiskerton, Lincolnshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 30.]
July 6. Pass for Marcelin Jourda, merchant of London, to pass into Holland and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 179.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for 515l. 0s. 6d. to be paid to Alexander Mackennyie, one of the captains in the garrison of Tangier, being part of what he was obliged to pay for his ransom, after he had been unhappily taken last September in an engagement against the Moors. [Ibid.]
[July] 6.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Mayor of York. Informing him that he would communicate his letter of the 3rd instant in answer to one from the Lords of the Committee for enquiring into the occasion of the late frequent fires to their lordships at their next meeting. [Dated 6 June, but see ante, p. 202. Precedents 1, f. 153.]
July 6. Appointment of Henry Peacock to be keeper of the garden plots at Hampton Court under the balcony in the Queen's lodgings during pleasure, fee 2s. a day, and also to be keeper of the bowling green there during pleasure with the same advantages as Tobias Yates, lately deceased, enjoyed. [Ibid.]
July 6.
Southampton.
Certificate by Thomas Cole, collector, that a pass had been granted for the Comfort of Bristol, formerly the Freeman of London, in pursuance of the treaties with Spain and Holland, and that security had been given for the return within 12 months of the Danish pass. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 158.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for adding the Archbishop of St. Andrews and Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Depute, to the persons sine quibus non in the last commission establishing the Privy Council. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 33.]
July 7.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. To-day arrived the Patience of this town from Pillau in Prussia, where a Brandenburg caper had brought in two Swedes prizes. The 28th he sailed by Copenhagen. One came on board from the Danish Admiral and told him the King was then coming on board to go over to Schonen. Next day he was in Elsinore roads, and saw the Danish fleet with about 700 small vessels attending, having an army on board, which about 11 in the forenoon anchored between Landskron and Malmney (Malmo), at which time his ship sailed, and in two hours was but as low as the Kooll (Kullen). He heard very great shooting, which continued all that night. At his coming from Elsinore the Queen of Denmark was come there to hear and see what passed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 40.]
[July] 7.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Sunday three strangers came out of the country and informed Bayliff Thaxter there was a meeting of the Nonconformists at their public place here and desired his warrant to our constables to assist them in dispersing them and to bring them before him, which he granted, and having 5 or 6 constables with them, they went to the meetinghouse, where the informers required them to secure as many as they could, for they, being strangers, knew none of them. The constables replied they knew them very well, and therefore need not secure them, for they would give them their names. Yet, when they had dispersed them, and returned with the informers to the Bayliff's, the constables pretended they knew none of them, but in conclusion of the whole number, which filled the house, they gave in 15 or 16, 10 of whom were given in by one constable being provoked by some blows he received from Mr. Burton's man. At this conventicle were three of our chief constables, who daily frequent it. The informers were at last put off with this answer, that they had a quarter of a year's time to bring in their information and therefore had best go about the town and see if they could see any they saw there. [Ibid. No. 41.]
July 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 42.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 42i.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of the Earl of Norwich, praying the King to authorize the Queen's trustees to lease to him the Honour of Penrith and the Forest of Inglewood under the ancient rent for 80 years, if any of his issue male shall live so long, and after her Majesty's decease during the residue of the term, paying a full third part. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 124.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of the petition of George Porter, praying the examination of the points in question between him and Mr. Tildsley about a lease in reversion of Medscough Park, Lancashire, which he petitioned for and Mr. Tildsley opposed. [Ibid.]
July 7. Warrant for the grant of the dignity of a countess of Ireland to Dame Hamilton, relict of Sir George Hamilton, for her life, by the name of Baroness Hamilton of Rosse and Countess of Bantry. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, f. 179.]
Draft thereof. Sign-manual. Counter-signed "J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 43.]
July 7. Certificates by Robert Townson that 19 Feb., 1668[-9] the Trainefatt, a prize, afterwards the Freeman of London, had been made free and by John Dudelstone, merchant, that the above ship is now called the Comfort of Bristol. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 159.]
July 7. Elizabeth, Viscountess Powerscourt, to [Williamson]. Making her most humble acknowledgments for his great civility towards her, which will be increased in a high measure by his moving the King with all the haste he conveniently can to grant the petition presented by her husband. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 42.]
July 8. Affidavit by William Stanley of Southampton, merchant, that the Diligence, Desire and Providence are all English-built vessels of Southampton navigated by Englishmen and all belong to the deponent and other subjects and that no foreigner, directly or indirectly, has any share therein, and that the said 3 ships sailed from Southampton about the beginning of March last for Newfoundland and so bound for the Straits and Portugal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 44.]
July 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I have got your last two packets for Argier. No ships being thitherward bound, I could have sent them to Tangiers or Lisbon and desired formerly an order what to do therein. It blows fresh at N.E. [Ibid. No. 45.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Chief Justice Raynsford. After reciting that John Bastard, a prisoner in the gaol for Devonshire, is charged with murder committed at sea off Newfoundland, and that for want of sufficient evidence he has long lain in prison, from which he cannot be discharged by course of law till the sessions of the Admiralty, directing him on his arrival there to peruse and consider the examinations and evidences against him, and, if he sees cause, to bail him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 33.]
[July ?] Request by John Fortescue at the desire of Lord Chief Justice North that the above letter be procured, with statement that Bastard is charged on malice prepense with having thrown his fellow boatman overboard a league at sea off Newfoundland in a dark night and in a storm, they two being then only in the boat. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 46.]
July 8. Pass to Hamburg for the Prophet Daniel carrying the servants and equipage of the Duke of Mecklenburg. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, f. 180.]
July 8. The King to the Alderman, Chief Burgesses, and Common Council of Bury St. Edmunds. Whereas on the last vacancy of the Readership for the parish of St. Mary's there by the death of one Piggot, William Stewkley, an orthodox divine, and John Bull, a young man and unqualified as not being in priest's orders and under age, being candidates, Bull for the reasons aforesaid was protested against by the Alderman and several burgesses at a Common Hall called for the election, not one of the said parish being for him, whereupon Stewkley being recommended to the Bishop by the consent of the said Alderman and chief of the society as well approved for the said place, the Bishop licensed him to serve the said cure and also gave his determination that the said Bull could not undertake the said office, being not qualified, and inhibited him from giving the said Stewkley any further trouble therein, and whereas, the said Bull notwithstanding still giving disturbance to the said Stewkley and the corporation, in regard he had one voice more than the other at the election, we sent a message to the corporation that they would acquiesce in the choice of the said Stewkley, and that notwithstanding some of the corporation still dissent from it, and seem to make some doubt of the truth of the said message, we therefore let you understand that we did send you the said message for your acquiescing in the said election and hereby reiterate and confirm the same, recommending to all parties concerned that for the peace of the parish and your corporation you do all acquiesce therein and receive the said Stewkley for a reader of the said church according to the determination and licence of the said bishop. [2 pages. Precedents 1, f. 153.] Annexed,
The said licence to Stewkley by Robert Pepper. LL.D., Vicar General in spirituals and official of the Consistory Court of Norwich, dated 15 Feb., 1675–6. [Latin. Copy. Ibid. f. 154.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for permitting such persons as shall be appointed by Lord O'Brien or Lady Catherine, his wife, Baroness Clifton, sister and heir-general of the late Duke of Lenox and Richmond, to inspect and take copies of all documents in their custody belonging to the said Duke or his family, or to his or their honours or estates. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 34.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the gift of a yearly pension of 20l. sterling to Marjory, one of the daughters of the late Thomas Forrester, minister at Melrose, he and his family having been reduced to great straits on account of their loyalty. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 35.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Andrew, Lord Rollo, and others of the lands and barony of Duncrub and other lands. (Printed in the Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. 8, p. 376.) [Docquet. Nearly 2 pages. Ibid. p. 36.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrants for charters of new infeftment to the following persons of the following lands:—
Sir William Fleeming of Ferme and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over. Lands of Nether Philiphill and other lands on his own resignation, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Sir William Bennett of Grubett, and William Bennett his eldest son, and the heirs of his body, with remainder to Sir William's heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Grubett, on his own resignation, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Robert Barclay, second son of Sir Robert Barclay of Pearstoune and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his said father and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his father's heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Pearstoune and Nether Drummuires in the bailliary of Cunninghame and shirefdome of Ayr, on the resignation of his brother Alexander, with a provision for payment of 1,000 merks Scots yearly to the said Alexander during his life after the decease of his said father with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Colin Campbell of Ormidell and his heirs male with remainder to his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Ormidell in Argyleshire with a novodamus and a charge of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
William Douglas of Dornock and Isobell Allane his spouse, and the survivor of them in conjunct fee, with remainder to the heirs male of their bodies with remainders over. Lands of Bodsbeck and other lands in the parochine of Moffett, shirefdome of Dumfries and stewardry of Annandale on the resignation of John Acheson of Bodsbeck, with consent of his creditors, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
William Thoires of Muiresk and Elizabeth Gellie, his spouse and the survivor of them, in conjunct fee, with remainder to William, their eldest son, his heirs and assigns. Lands and barony of Muiresk in the parochine of Turreff and shirefdome of Aberdeen on the resignation of John Lindsay of Muiresk, Margaret Fraser his spouse, and James Innes, writer in Edinburgh with a novodamus and with an erection of the premises into the barony of Muiresk, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
James Gordon of Newark, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Easter and Wester Newark and Hillend in the parochine of Mayboill, bailliary of Carrick and shirefdome of Ayr on the resignation of John, Lord Barganie, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
John Scott of Canterland and the heirs of his body with remainders over. Lands and barony of Canterland (reserving to Robert Graham of Morphie the fishings on the water of Northesk and other fishings), lands and barony of Morphie Meikle and other lands on the resignation of the said Scott and Graham, with a novodamus and an erection of the premises into the barony of Comestoune and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
[Docquets. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, pp. 38–49.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to William Craik, the elder, merchant burgess of Dumfries, of the lands of Duchraw. (Printed in the Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. 8, p. 393.) [Docquet. Ibid. p. 49.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to William Imbrie of Wester Cruivie, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of West Plewland of Sandfuird and Flashill in the barony of Wauchtoune and shirefdome of Fife (except as therein mentioned) and reserving two annual rents therein specified on the resignation of James McGill of Flashill and his daughters, Anna and Margaret, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 51.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Robert Melvill in Craigrothie, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Carskeirdow, in the barony of Cullairnie and shirefdome of Fife, on the resignation of William, Lord Lindsay, and Dame Mary Johnstoune, his spouse, with a novodamus. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 52.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to George Stirling of Balwill, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Drungie and other lands in the stewardry of Menteath and shirefdome of Perth now in his Majesty's hands by reason of recognition, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form for two years each to William Scott, the elder, and William Scott, the younger, both of Ardrosse,—Young of Kirktoun, John Murray, tutor of Stormont, Dr. William Clark and Francis Irving of Hilton. [Ibid. pp. 54, 55.]
July 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 47.]
July 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. It being Sunday I have no list of ships. Yesterday morning came in six Dutch men-of-war commanded by Admiral de Haines to convoy 40 Dutch merchant ships, which have been here three or four months from St. Ubes. Last evening came in two other Dutch men-of-war from the Straits, the biggest of 60 guns. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 48.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Colonel Scott. I have consented to refer the business of the bearer, Lieutenant Comins, to be examined by you, that, as you see cause, you may restore him to a lieutenancy on a vacancy, and, if in the meantime you can contrive a way for his subsistence, it will be a kindness to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 51.]
July 9. Commissions to William Wind to be lieutenant of the King's own troop and to Anthony Crofts to be cornet of the Earl of Oxford's own troop in his regiment of Horse. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 33.]
[July] 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Roger L'Estrange, Surveyor of the Press. Warrant to search for and seize a pamphlet, entitled "Jenkes his Case" or for any printed papers concerning his late speech at the Common Hall of London, his examination before the King and Council, his being taken into custody thereupon with the form of his commitment or any ways relating to the case aforesaid, and to search for and carry before himself or a justice the authors, printers or publishers of them or any of them. [Misdated, June 9. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 180.]
July 9. Patent for 14 years to William Castle and Colonel Henry Ewbanks for their invention of secure and commodious firehearths for ships. [Ibid. p. 181.]
July 10.
[Read.]
Proposals by Elia Palmer about the tin coinage, that the coins be of the full value, allowing only 2d. per lb. for coinage, made of fine block tin, and hardened by a metal of equal value, stamped with any impress the King pleases, and made current by proclamation, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 49.]
July 10.
[Read.]
The Earl of Norwich to the King. Petition showing that his late father had patents for 21 years for the sole making of farthings, but lost the benefit from them from 1641 to 1660; that on the restoration the petitioner petitioned for their renewal, to compensate for this lost time, but his Majesty wished to reserve the coinage to himself; that in 1669 he proposed the making of tin farthings, but it was refused, and he now begs that, if any such propositions are accepted, he may have the preference of a patent for the sole making of them. [Ibid. No. 50.] Annexed,
Patent of Charles I. granting to Henry, Lord Maltravers, and Sir Francis Crane the licence to coin copper farthings for the Plantations, as they already do for the other British dominions, 21 Feb., 1638–9, Westminster. [Copy. Ibid. No. 50 i.]
Abstract of the above patent. [Ibid. No. 50 ii.]
July 10. Col. John Russell to William Bridgeman. Desiring him to prepare a commission for Mr. Palmer to be ensign to Capt. Sackville Tufton's company in the King's regiment of Foot Guards. [Ibid. No. 51.]
July 10.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twenty light ships are at anchor in this bay, most of them wind-bound since last Tuesday, the wind being N., blowing very hard. The master of a ketch of Whitby which came from Elsinore on the 1st tells me that three days before he came from thence the Danes landed their men at Eslingburg (Helsingborg) in Sweden, being reported 23,000 strong, the King of Denmark at the head of them, without any opposition. Van Tromp had landed some men higher up in the land, and taken a fort or two which caused the Swedes to withdraw their whole force that way, so that the Danes landed so easily, not five men appearing at their landing.
There is a flying report all over the country of fires in several parts of the country as well as in London, and that several have been taken on suspicion and confessed they were hired by the French to fire several of the chiefest towns, but I take it is an old fanatic alarm to amuse the ignorant people and stir up rebellion, for the ordinary sort are too subject to believe such stories, and, I fear, too many that should be wiser are too credulous. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 52.]
July 10.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Just now a ship is come in, which came out of the Sound and tells me that the King of Denmark has besieged Helsingborg in Schonen, and that he both saw the fire and heard the great guns shoot very violently, and that the King of Sweden is also near at hand himself in his army. [Ibid. No. 53.]
July 10.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The three persons that dispersed our grand conventicle Sunday sennight came yesterday to town again, expecting they would have met again, but not being so foolhardy, they, hearing the Anabaptists were met to the number of 80 or 90, went and dispersed them and took five of the chief into custody, whom they convicted to-day, with five constables. The Nonconformists here are generally so dejected, as if they were past all hopes to find any moderation to be ever any more afforded them, and therefore being past hopes several of their grandees came yesterday to our church and of the common sort so many as filled it fuller than ever I saw it since 1665. [Ibid. No. 54.]
July 10.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Friday arrived the Eagle of this port, Henry Holman master, from Potopon in Maryland, whence he came 3 June last. He tells a great deal of news. They wanted rain as to the planting tobacco, on which account there was little hope of a good crop. Thomas Trueman, one of the Council there and called major-general, was at their grand assembly questioned for some misdemeanour or negligence committed by him. Mr. Bollard, a merchant of New England, came in there a little time before his going away and bought up several parcels of corn to transport it for New England, reporting that the Indians had burnt up all the corn about Salem, and taken and burnt Salem also, but our master has said to others that only part of it is burnt. How true this is I know not, for a merchant of our town had lately letters from one of our neighbours, a factor to a ship of this place now at Boston, of 5 May last, signifying no such thing as the burning of Salem. Holman also reports that a Major or Col. Bacon in Virginia, having his family destroyed by the Indians, desired the Governor there to have some force to oppose or be revenged on the Indians, and that, the Governor not consenting, he raised forces and went against the Indians, and that the Governor, having summoned him to come in and he refusing, was marching against him with some forces.
A private letter speaks of Trueman's being questioned, and a fear that it will produce some disorder or stir there, and one of our town, meeting about Bordeaux a fortnight since a New England ship come thence 7 weeks since this day, said the Indians had done much mischief there. [Ibid. No. 55.]
July 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. A ship arrived the 6th from Morlaix reports that there is like of a great harvest there this year, and that they brag very much on the victory of their ships over the Dutch and Spaniards in Palermo, and the towns their king has taken in Flanders, and doubt not they shall very speedily rout the Imperialists by land also and seem very confident in carrying on the war to their advantage. The same day stopped here the Hannibal of London for the Straits. She took in a parcel of tin and put to sea again. Wind N. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 56.]
July 10.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. No news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 57.]
July 10. Bonds for 200l. given by Capt. Joshua Paine and Philip Messervy to secure their respective attendance before the Committee for Trade on the following day and so on till the business touching a counterfeit warrant for the freedom of a ship be determined. [Ibid. Nos. 58, 59.]
July 10.
[Received.]
Counterfeit grant of freedom to the Rose and Crown dated 7 Sept., 1674, Windsor, and purporting to be under the sign-manual and to be countersigned "Arlington." [Ibid. No. 60.]
[July 10?] Order to prepare a warrant to Sir John Shaw for taking into custody the person who brought the counterfeit warrant for making the Rose and Crown free. [Ibid. No. 61.]
July 10. Commission to George Bowes to be ensign to a company of foot in the regiment of Guards under Col. John Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 163.]
July 10. Commission to Edward Picts to be captain of the company of foot (late Sir John Osborne's) in the regiment of Col. John Russell. Minute. [Ibid. p. 164.]
July 10. Commission to William Legge, groom of the Bedchamber, to be cornet to Lord Hawley's troop of Horse, in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Caveat by Sir J. Williamson on behalf of Hugh May that no grant pass of the office of Woodward of the New Forest. [Subsequently cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 25.]
July
[before the 11th].
John Haines and five others on behalf of the Clothiers of the old and new drapery to the Lord High Treasurer. Petition stating that, the woollen manufacture being much decayed by reason of the exportation of wool from Ireland and England to foreign parts, the petitioners have attended several sessions of Parliament for relief, and, being informed that his lordship has appointed a time for consideration and redress thereof, praying to be heard therein. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 43.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Sir Philip Lloyd to S. Pepys. The Committee for Trade desire him to prepare passes for Alderman Stanley's three ships, the Providenee, Desire and Diligence, of Southampton, the Commissioners of the Customs, a copy of whose report is enclosed, having given their opinion to the Committee's satisfaction. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car II. 383, No. 62.]
July 11. Statement by Robert Townson, by order of Sir John Shaw, that in 1666 several ships taken as prizes and condemned were made free, according to the Act of Parliament and the King's orders, and so the practice continued and prizes taken in the first and second wars were made free for trade, the whole number being 341 in London, and 122 in the outports: that the first foreign-built ship made free was in Sept., 1667, from which time to the present 306 in London and 22 in the outports have been made free. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 63.]
July 11.
[Read.]
Reasons by Mr. Palmer why the copper coins should not be exchanged for tin piece by piece, viz., that the copper coin is not made according to the contract with his Majesty, that most of them are made very much lighter, that quantities have been counterfeited, and that, if the exchange is made piece by piece without regard to weight, many thousand pounds' worth will be imported from Sweden or elsewhere, that by the exchange of tin for copper weight for weight there will be about 22 per cent. loss to the farmers, and that when copper farthings were put down in the beginning of the Long Parliament, though some persons had gained very much by them, no exchange was made or any satisfaction given, but they died in the people's hands.
Suggestions that the price of tin in the block be 1s. per lb.; that one lb. of tin being coined into pence, &c. shall not exceed 14d. so that there shall be advanced but 2d. in every lb. above the real value towards the charge of coinage; that pieces coined to pass for 1s. each shall weigh 14oz., but 1½d. a lb. being advanced above the worth for that coin, which is intended for the plantations, and is conceived to be highly useful and necessary; that for every 100lbs. weight of coined tin sold from the Mint 5lbs. over shall be allowed and so proportionably; that all tin coined and transported to the plantations pay no custom; that the present copper halfpence and farthings be exchanged for tin ones, weight for weight; that the impress on the tin money shall be the same as on the copper halfpence or any other his Majesty shall please, and they shall have gravings or letters on the edges as are on the gold or crown pieces; that the hardening metal mixed with the tin be of the same worth as the tin; that the tin money may by proclamation be made to pass as current coin in all his Majesty's dominions. [Ibid. No. 64.]
July 11. Notes by Williamson of complaints concerning the Dantzig trade. (The substance of these fully appears from the articles, calendared post, p. 220.) [Ibid. No. 65.]
July 11. Walter Williams to Williamson. Two years since you received a letter from me by my cousin Charles Bennet, Lord Arlington's brother, petitioning your favour either to advance me by some office, or to prevail with his Majesty to allow me a pension of 100l. a year for my life. Being honoured by no return, I apprehend your great employment will not permit you vacancy to inquire into the dispositions of the Crown. I have diligently sought to discover a way for my support, which I may proceed in. 'Tis this. I hear his Majesty resolves to alter his Excise farmers, and, if you endeavour to get South Wales for me, I paying the former rent, and putting in as good security as any, you will thereby perpetuate your obligations. Please direct to me to be left at the Unicorn, Leominster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 66.]
July 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind has blown these five days N. and N.E. [Ibid. No. 67.]
July 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats and brought several deserters, even in this time of action, but no news. The wind continues at N. and E. We have had two days of rainy blustering weather. To-day is fair. [Ibid. No. 68.]
July 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 69.]
July 11.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. In my last I wrote that Admiral de Haynes commanded the Dutch men-of-war here, which was a mistake. They are commanded by Admiral Bastiane. The fleet is still here wind-bound. [Ibid. No. 70.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 70i.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Pass for Francis Sheldon with his family and goods to transport himself beyond the seas. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 182.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Mayor of York. I thanked you last week for your letter concerning the danger of fires in several parts of the kingdom, in which letter a loose paper was enclosed said to come from Bristol but sent to some citizen or citizens of York by an Alderman of London, as you express it. I desire you will with all speed send me a more particular account of that Alderman, viz., what his name is, and where he is to be heard of. [Precedents 1, f. 155.]
July 11. Sir Nicholas Armorer and Sir Gabriel de Silvius to the Lord High Treasurer. Petition, stating that the petitioners have in pursuance of the letters patent granted them used their utmost endeavours to prevent the exportation of wool from Ireland to foreign parts, but from the greatness of the charge of the undertaking and the shortness of their authority to put the same in execution they found themselves disabled, and, being informed that his lordship has appointed a day to hear the complaints of the clothiers in reference to the great decay of the woollen manufacture, praying to be heard by their counsel at the same time, and that provision may be made for carrying on the said work. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 43.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring to the Committee for Trade the whole business of the Adventurers and Undertakers of the fishery, which was appointed to be heard that day in answer to a report of the Commissioners of the Customs, which has obstructed the passing of the charter for their incorporation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 71.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the report by the Committee for Trade of several articles presented to them by the merchants trading to Dantzig for redress of grievances with their lordships' opinion on them, that Secretary Williamson forthwith prepare instructions for Mr. Hyde, now going ambassador to Poland, to insist on the redress thereof according to the opinion of the said Committee. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 72.] Annexed,
The said articles. 1. That the burghers may pay the Excise duty on goods called Zullag (Zuschlag), as they formerly did, and ought to do, though now by practice they have imposed it on the English merchant.
2. That the abuse of the lightermen be redressed and sound lighters provided, that the English merchants lading their goods in such lighters as they can get, may not be forced, if the lighter be cast away, to pay for it, though cast away by the ignorance or heedlessness of the lightermen, or the insufficiency of the lighter which they are forced to accept and employ in course.
3. That the English merchants may not on every bare suspicion be forced by the Court to their oaths to purge themselves. (The above three articles to be insisted on for redress.)
4. If any English merchant die there, as well his own as others' estates in his charge may be put into the custody of such as he has appointed or in default into such hands as the Eastland Company shall direct, and that no part of such estate be seized or detained, as now, because he died in part of the King of Poland's or the Dantzigers' jurisdictions.—The Ambassador to inform himself of the law, and, if he finds this usage according to law, then to endeavour to have it mitigated.
5. That no English merchant be forced to bear arms against any enemy to the Government there.—Not to be insisted on, unless found easy to obtain.
6. That the English merchants be allowed to use the inland streams and highways there to convey their goods to Köningsberg or Elbing.—To endeavour to obtain this, if possible.
7. That all English merchants may have the same benefit of law against a burgher as one burgher has against another, and the officers there may not refuse or neglect to execute a judgment against a burgher.—The Ambassador to complain of this and to insist on redress.
8. That when any English merchants are suitors against burghers, the latter be not suffered to appeal into Poland, but that the matter may have a final and speedy determination at Dantzig. —The Ambassador not to be instructed concerning this.
9. Other grievances the Eastland Company will instruct their deputy at Dantzig, Francis Sanderson, to present to his Excellency on his arrival.—The Ambassador to have a general instruction to receive information from Mr. Sanderson. [Ibid. No. 72i.]
July 12.
[Received.]
Thomas Kirle, clerk, to the King. Petition stating the petitioner's long and faithful services to the late King, having the command of horse or foot from the beginning to the end of the late war, and having been his Majesty's sworn servant as his physician in ordinary these 14 years, but without salary, and that he had received a grant some years ago of the mastership of St. Katherine's Hospital near Bristol, but that the patent has not yet been sealed, and praying that the said mastership might be confirmed to him by the patent's being sealed, whereby he may be empowered to recover the lands belonging to the hospital and employ them for the maintenance of the poor, which are otherwise likely to be utterly lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 73.]
July 12.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last night the three informers that put by our meetings here were amongst several passengers in a passage boat going for Norwich. They were no sooner placed, but some of our Independents called out to the passengers that they had informing rogues amongst them, and surely they would not take such rascals with them, on which the passengers began to leave the boat, so the boatmen, to keep them, turned the informers out on the quay. When they were landed, they began to throw stones at them, but, making their escape, they came to my house, on which I went down to the quay, and there learned who some of them were, and gave the informers their names, who are since bound over to the sessions. I enclose our town's address to Richard, Protector, which came from one formerly of their Assembly, where you will find several of our new militia officers, as our colonel, Sir George England, our major, Bayliff Thaxter, and Captain Richard Huntington, besides several of the old Presbyterian gang, that are at present justices and aldermen of our town, who are marked with P. There are also the chief of our Independents marked with I. In another are the names of all the bayliffs and justices from 1661 till now, and how we came here into the condition we are in. The other papers are Capt. Clarke's with his petitions and orders of the Board thereon, which orders coming to Sir William Doyley's hands and Robert Suckling's, his son-in-law, he could get no report, though everything was plainly made appear by those who were bayliffs and justices the year that Capt. Clarke dispersed the conventicle, but the second order with the annexed narrative was never examined, there being too many of his friends therein concerned, but on the contrary they huffed so at Capt. Clarke, that he was forced to let the business fall which had put him to no small charge and trouble, and it quite discouraged the friends of the King and Church, so that hitherto they have been forced to truckle under, and their spirits are so low now that Sir Thomas Medowes has left the town, that they are afraid to be seen in my company or to open their mouths against any of the said persons, and, if Capt. Huntington stand this brunt and come off, the town's their own and the hearts of the others broke, for certainly the impudence and false reports of these people and the others continuing in command will prevail with them to believe that the Church is going down. [Ibid. No. 74.] Enclosed,
The said list of bayliffs and justices from 1662 to 1675. Noted between 1662 and1666 that all the foregoing except Justice Castle, who fell in course to be a justice, having been bayliff the foregoing year, and Justice Woodroff, who was taken in as a justice for his experience the first two years, ever stood for the King and the Church's interest in the late unhappy times, and in all the foregoing years the laws against Nonconformists were so effectually executed that not a conventicle was to be seen in the town but, if discovered, was immediately prosecuted. But in '66 when Mr. Thaxter, our new made major, and Capt. Huntington came to be bayliffs and Sir George England, our new colonel, a justice, the scale was turned, the Nonconformists then publicly met, and not the least check on them, which the narrative sets forth, and, if you peruse the address to Richard, Protector, you will find those chiefly concerned in it to have the greatest share in the government of this town from '65 to the present day, from whence the Nonconformists here took encouragement to contemn both the laws and the King's commands and to grow so numerous as they are. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 74i.]
July 12.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. I had no sooner sent my packet to the posthouse, but Mr. Giles Dunster, surveyor general of the customs, came to my house and told me the Surveyor's place for this port was vacant, and, if I would accept it, I might do his Majesty a singular service, and he would write to the Commissioners that I might have it. He will do so to-night, so, if you will but write a line or two to them in my behalf, it will, without peradventure, be granted, if it come to their hands in time. I do not so much regard the advantage I shall make of the place, as it pleases me to fancy how the country will take it, Capt. Huntington's business being noised all over the country, by their showing the copies of my letters. [Ibid. No. 75.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Charles Gerard, son of Charles, Lord Gerard of Brandon, for the feloniously killing of Robert Clarke. Sign-manual. Countersigned, "J. Williamson." [Ibid. No. 76.]
July 12. Warrant for a grant to Thomas Evans of the King's interest in the estate of John Sampson, convicted at the last Surrey assizes of the murder of Mary Bartlett and executed, whose estate was thereupon forfeited. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 210.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Poulett. Enclosing his Majesty's approbation of Mr. Savage to be a deputy lieutenant in Dorsetshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 104.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of George Savage of Bloxworth, Dorset, to be one of the deputy lieutenants of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 33.]
July 12. Warrant to Sir John Cotton in the usual form for preserving the game within 10 miles of Stratton, Bedfordshire. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 182.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
List of the persons to be inserted in the new Commission for the Privy Council of Scotland, who appear by the next document. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 55.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a new Commission appointing the Duke of Albany and York, the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor, the Archbishops of St. Andrew's and Glasgow, the Duke of Lauderdale, Lord President, the Marquis of Athole, Lord Privy Seal, the Duke of Buccleugh and Monmouth, the Marquis of Douglas, the Earl of Argyle, the Earl of Erroll, Lord Constable, the Earl Marischall, the Earls of Mar, Moray, Winton, Linlithgow, Wigton, Kinghorne, Kellie, Seaforth, Weymes, Airlie, Aboyne and Dundonald, Lords Elphingstoune, Rosse and Belhaven, Sir James Dalrymple of Stair, President of the Session, Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput, Sir John Nisbett of Dirleton, Lord Advocate, Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, Justice Clerk, Sir James Fowlles of Collinton, Major-General Sir George Monro, Thomas Dalzell of Binns, late Lieut.-General, Sir John Keath, Knight Marshal, Sir Andrew Ramsay of Abbotshall, Sir John Wauchop of Niddrie, Sir George Kinnaird of Rossie, and William Scott of Ardrosse, together with the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Treasurer of England, the Duke of Ormonde, and the principal Secretary of State for England attending his Majesty to be the Lords of the Privy Council of Scotland with power to do and exercise all and everything that the Privy Council of Scotland did or might have done any time heretofore. [Over 4 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 56.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. Warrant after reciting that on the petition of the now Earl of Traquair a warrant was granted for taking the depositions of several witnesses to prove the tenor and cause of amitting a discharge of the whole taxations and annuities of teinds granted by the late King to John, Earl of Traquair, some time Lord Treasurer of Scotland, deceased, dated 19 June, 1641, and that it appears by the report of Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie and Sir Peter Wedderburne of Gosford that the late King did grant to the said deceased Earl a discharge of the taxations granted in June, 1633, or any other preceding taxation for whatsoever his lands, &c.; for granting to the now Earl such valid acquittances of the same as shall be a sufficient exoneration thereof in all time coming. [Ibid. p. 61.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Patrick Scott of Rossie, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of the Miltoun of Rossie and divers other lands in the Barony of Rossie and shirefdome of Forfar and of the lands of Balkilie lying naturally within the shirefdome of Forfar, and by annexation within the shirefdome of Kincardine as for the principal, and all the lands of Dudhop in special and real warrandice to the said Scott of all the lands above specified primarily disponed by Charles Maitland of Halton to the said Scott against any claim to the same by Sir David Carnegie of Pittarro, with a novodamus and an union of the premises into the barony of Rossie. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 62.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to David Bruce of Clackmannan for three years. [Ibid. p. 64.]
July 13. Lewis Prescott to [Sir Robert Southwell]. As he cannot attend himself, sending a paper received last night, which is to be delivered at once to the Committee for Trade. It should have been signed by Mr. Palmer, but he lives 4 miles off, and so cannot be got to attend. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 77]. Enclosed,
Proposals of the terms on which the farmers of the intended tin farthings desire to exchange them for the copper farthings in the Mint, and about the coinage of the tin farthings in general. [Ibid. No. 77 i.]
July 13.
[Received.]
[John Watson] to the King. I make bold to write to our blessed Sovereign to let me have quiet travelling for Cumberland, where are my friends and relations and where I was educated. I am of an honest parentage but impoverished by a cross adventure in fortune, as being deeply injured by Miles Martyer of Great Bookham, who in a slighting naughty manner reproached your blessed and sacred name to us your subjects, and gave out words against our Church privately in his own house in a reply to his grandfather, who, more like a devil than an honest Protestant, spoke against your illustrious, pious, and blessed son, the Duke of Monmouth, whom I pray Jesus Christ to secure from all dangers and bodily harms.
I dare not come to Whitehall as in a beggarly abused condition like David's servants coming from the children of Ammon.
Out of Psalms xxix and lxviii (sic): "I would give thy judgments unto the King and thy righteousness unto the King's son."
I have means in the North to set me up like a man to the value of 70l. which I intend to bestow on a good horse and decent apparel and to return in Michaelmas Term, and then I desire to swear allegiance to my sovereign liege and our blessed Church. [Unsigned, but endorsed "Watson." Ibid. No. 78.]
Thursday night,
July 13.
Col. Roger Whitley to Williamson. Sending two letters which were flung into the office window that night during the crowd. [Ibid. No. 79.]
July 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind continues northerly and the weather fair. Many ships that last week put in for shelter here are now sailing. [Ibid. No. 80.]
July 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. Fair weather. [Ibid. No. 81.]
July 13.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 11th came in the Katherine of Bideford with tobacco, which came from Virginia about five weeks since. She says that place is very much disturbed by the Indians, so that the whole island is up in arms, and that the Governor has laid a tax of 500lbs. of tobacco on the head of every man, woman, child, and servant for the maintenance of the war, so that tobacco is very scarce.
The Indians near Virginia have hired those living further up the country to assist them, so that they appear in great numbers, and do much hurt to the bordering plantations.
The same day put to sea the ketch put out by the East India Company to meet the homeward-bound East India ships and to put waiters on board. There is now shipping here for Rouen above 120 tons of tin. [Ibid. No. 82.]
July 13. Bond for 200l. given by Peter Monamy to secure his attendance before the Committee for Trade till the business touching a counterfeit warrant for the freedom of a ship is determined. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 83.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to John Knight, serjeant surgeon, for constant and faithful service, of the estate of Thomas Wells, of Bredfield, Suffolk, forfeited by his having been felo de se. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 210.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Windsor. Captain Robert Draper, a poor knight of Windsor, having represented by petition that being reported possessed of an estate that rendered him incapable of his place of poor knight, the matter was referred to the Dean and Chapter, with order that he should enjoy it till their report; but meanwhile he was expelled on another pretence, founded on the false reports of a rude, drunken woman, without a hearing in his own defence, this being done by the Dean and only five canons, though several of those then absent protested against the proceeding. The case was referred to the Dukes of Monmouth and Ormonde, and the Earls of Arlington, Bedford and Mulgrave, Knights of the Garter, who reported that Captain Draper has given just cause of scandal with Judith Neal, his servant maid, but that the Dean and Chapter had condemned him irregularly and without due warning contrary to the statutes, and that none but the King has the right of expulsion, and therefore recommended Draper's restoration to his place, till convicted of any crime, or proved to have an estate fallen to him; we approve of the said report and order his restoration accordingly, any act of expulsion notwithstanding. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 85.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that, it having been represented to him by the widow of Mr. Kenton, clothier, that Robert Mason is indebted to her 178l. 17s. 4d. for goods sold to him by her late husband, which he refuses to pay, relying on his privilege as one of his Majesty's servants in the stables, he has given her liberty to prosecute the said Mason, and to take such course as is by law allowed for the recovery of the said debt, any privilege or immunity he may pretend to notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 52.]
July 13.
Dublin.
Viscount Granard to Viscount Ranelagh. Desiring him to befriend Sir Thomas Newcomen, who has a mind to be of the Council there. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 45.]
July 13. Sir Nicholas Armorer and Sir Gabriel Silvius to the Committee of Trade. Petition identical with that to the Lord Treasurer, calendared ante, p. 219, except that the petitioners, being informed that their lordships have appointed that day to hear the complaints of the clothiers, pray to be heard by their counsel. [Ibid. No. 46.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, after reciting the petition of the Earl of Norwich, Earl Marshal, which represented that he had obtained an Act for building and improving the ground belonging to Arundel House, where he designs to build a house for the residence of his family and posterity, and prayed, as well for the more beautifying the said buildings by bringing them to a more just symmetry and proportion all along the river, as for enlarging the gardens of the house, a grant from his Majesty according to his former promise of the inheritance of the soil 40 feet in depth from the wall of Arundel House, all along the said wall from Strand Bridge to Milford Stairs: that his Majesty having viewed the platform and design thereof granted the petitioner's request, and ordered Secretary Williamson to prepare a warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General to prepare a grant as desired, with a proviso that the ground taken in be used only for a garden to the intended house, and that no wharves, brewhouses or any other dwellings be erected thereon. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 383, No. 84.]
July 14.
[Read.]
John Cooke, William Welch, and other merchants of London to the King. Petition showing that on their former complaint against Henry Jackson, a pirate, who had seized the Arms of Waterford, and brought her into St. Ives, it was ordered that Jackson be apprehended and that the case be referred to the Judge of the Admiralty, who, on Jackson's refusal to submit to orders, appointed appraisers to value the ship, but Sir John Godolphin, Vice-Admiral of the north of Cornwall, would not permit the appraisement, and that on the prosecution of the petitioners' correspondents in France Jackson was condemned to be hanged; and praying that Sir John may be called upon to show cause for his obstruction of justice, as the petitioners' goods on board are in a perishing condition. [Ibid. No. 85.] Annexed,
Copy of proceedings at St. Malo in the cause of William Welch of London and others v. Henry Jackson and others, relative to the seizure of the galliot Arms of Waterford, near that port, and the carrying off the ship Francis of Morlaix, from that port, in which Jackson in default of appearance was sentenced, 11 July (N.S.) to be tortured and hung, with certificate by 7 merchants of St. Malo that Nicholas Bouleur, by whom the above sentence is signed and declared, is registrar of the Admiralty of Brittany and that the seal is the royal seal of the province of Brittany. [Ibid. No. 85 i.]
Attested certificate by William Worth and George Hammond that they were unable to execute a commission received from the Admiralty to appraise the Arms of Waterford and the goods on board, because the persons in possession said they were forbidden by Sir John Godolphin to open the hatches without his express permission, with certificate at foot by Denis Russell, notary and tabellion public, of the truth thereof. 7 June, 1676. [Ibid. No. 85 II.]
[July ?] Capt. Henry Jackson to the Committee for Trade. Petition that, he having by virtue of a French commission seized a ship of Rotterdam, which now pretends to be of Waterford, and which was forced by stress of weather into St. Ives and was put into the charge of Vice-Admiral Sir John Godolphin by order of Council of 22 April, no order for appraisement may be granted in favour of the pretended owners till he is heard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 86.]
July 14.
[Received.]
John Watson to the Duke [of Monmouth]. Setting forth his sad crosses and losses, especially in Waverton in Cumberland by a jury who would verdict by the evidence of two forsworn fellows, if Richard Studholme, bailiff to the Countess of Northumberland, had not refused their verdict, but 7 or 8 went and forswore themselves at the Carlisle sessions against his grandmother, a poor servant girl and himself, which he knows was false. Was forced out of Cumberland at the suit of Bouch, an extorting attorney. In the meantime the two Atkinsons and Wood played the whore with his wife, by simplicity, he thinks, and confiscated his moneys and goods to the value of 13l., and backset her to turn thief. He requests this letter should go to the Lord Chief Justice or some other judge to have a strict warrant without oath in the above written wrongs. [Ibid. No. 87.]
July 14.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 88.]
July 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Dutch fleet, which has lain here so long, with the men-of-war that came for them, sailed hence yesterday morning, but, the wind proving contrary and blowing hard, put in here again last evening. [Ibid. No. 89.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 89 i.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Commission to William Legge to be cornet to the King's troop of horse in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 34.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Pass for Jacobus de Gregoriis, an Armenian priest, who is returning to his own country. [Latin. Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 182.]
July 15.
Laycock.
Sir John Talbot to Williamson. I have met the ill news of Major Wyndham's death, and that Mr. Bertie is removed from lieutenant to his Majesty's troop to the command of Wyndham's. Some years since, when I sent my son abroad, I received his Majesty's gracious assurance that he would take him into his service, when he returned, and several times since I have moved for a colours in that regiment. On this remove I presume a colours will be void in one troop or the other. I do not pretend to it on my own merit or my son's, but as I served in the Foot Guards from ensign (after having been a captain of horse) to first captain, and had now had a right by succession to be major, if not lieut.-colonel, had not his Majesty disposed of me to the command in the dragoons, which were suddenly after disbanded, and seeing that there was no officer who during the war was drawn out of that regiment to other employs, but either retained his employ or had liberty to dispose of it, except myself, I hope his Majesty will in due time give my son such an employ as I have pretended to for him, since I am in a condition neither to purchase it for him or to maintain him at the rate I have bred him on this presumption. If this comes too late, it would be a great obligation, if you would inform yourself of his Majesty's intentions towards my son on the next occasion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 90.]
July 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday about midnight one of our packet-boats arrived, but brought no news, the expectations of the Hollanders being wholly fixed on the proceedings at Maestricht.
The wind yesterday somewhat brisk at N.E., to-day mostly S., the weather dark and inclined to rain.
I shall not trouble you with an account of the late loss of one of the doggers of the Royal Fishery by a French caper, as it is said, nor of the seizing of their nets which they had bought in Holland, by the Brielaners. [Ibid. No. 91.]
July 15. Commission to Sir Francis Compton to be major of and captain of a troop in the regiment of horse under Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, in place of Sir Francis Wyndham, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 165.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Commission to Peregrine Bertie to be captain of the troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment, whereof Sir Francis Wyndham was late captain. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 33.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the warrant of 23 July, 1674, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–1675, p. 313, for a grant to Viscount Grandison and Edward Villiers of lands of the yearly value of 1,000l. in Ireland in consideration of their interest in the Phoenix Park, and the order in Council of 1 Oct., 1675, directing no grants to be passed of undisposed of forfeited lands, till a representation be made of the whole debt satisfiable out of such forfeited lands, whereby the passing of the said intended compensation receives an obstruction and might be frustrated: requiring and authorizing him, as soon as the deficiencies due to the Duke of York and Lord Kingston, to whom the preference has been granted before all others, shall be satisfied, to cause effectual letters patent to be passed according to the said letters of 23 July for a grant to the said Viscount Grandison and Edward Villiers in lieu of the said Phoenix Park of so many forfeited undisposed of lands in Ireland, which they have or shall discover, as shall amount to the said value of 1,000l. per annum above the quitrents, the said order in Council of 1 Oct. or any other order, instruction or direction to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 39.]
July 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. At the Winton assizes last week no person was condemned, and but a very small assize of that use to be. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 92.]
July 17. Deposition of Thomas Griffith and John Bull, of London, merchants, that the Prosperous and the Turkey Frigate are both English-built and really belong to the deponents and other subjects, and that no foreigner has, directly or indirectly, any share or interest therein, and that the Turkey Frigate sailed from London about October last, and the Prosperous about last April twelvemonth and that both had passes according to the form then used, and that they believe both the said ships are manned with three-fourths of his Majesty's subjects, and now are or lately were at St. Malo bound for the Straits or Cadiz. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 93.]
July 17.
Custom House. London.
The Commissioners of the Customs to the Committee for Trade. They have considered the petition concerning the Prosperous and the Turkey Frigate and it is certified by George Elton, their surveyor, that the latter is an English-built ship launched 14 Sept. last and by Mr. Callwell, a searcher of this port, that she cleared for France 30 Sept. last. (Recapitulating the statements of the above deposition.) [Ibid. No. 94.]
July 17.
Council Chamber.
[W. Blathwayt] to S. Pepys. Expressing the opinion of the Committee for Trade that passes should be granted for the Scanderbeg of Barnstaple and the Rachel and Katherine of Southampton and enclosing the papers concerning them received from the Commissioners of the Customs. [Ibid. No. 95.]
July 17. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. This comes to acknowledge the honour you did me and the ladies of my family at our leaving town. They begin to settle, but the thoughts of London will not out of their minds. My son and daughter make you their compliments. I believe, if they hold on, as they begun, in one fortnight they will be absolutely wild. We all join in one request, that you will not forget the windmill. [Ibid. No. 96.]
July 17. The Bishop of Oxford to Williamson. Having lately printed Lord Clarendon's book against Mr. Hobbes, I hasten to send you a copy, under whose auspices it is that we have some quarter with our adversaries, the Stationers, who, had they not a greater regard of you than they have of us, would be ever enterprising on our interests. We go forward as we can, and hope we may in time emerge and do something considerable. [Ibid. No. 97.]
July 17.
York.
Sir John Otway to Williamson. I perceive Dr. Barwick has attended you with my son's case, and, if the Bishop had found him defective either in his life or learning, I had been silent, but to put a force on the statutes and to give an exposition contrary to the plain literal meaning looks like a very arbitrary way of proceeding, if it amount not to an encroachment of a higher nature. I leave all to your prudence. [Ibid. No. 98.]
July 17.
York.
Samuel Scudamore to Lord Frescheville. I showed Mr. Hawley your letter, and made inquiry concerning Albert Binlow alias John Albert, in all the companies here, and there is no such man, nor has there been any such. Here are two officers commanding at Hull, and they say they know no such man there. I suppose Mr. Hawley gives you a very exact account as to any concern of the garrison, but as to the fires you mentioned, I know no cause for it, only a drunken woman that was burnt in her bed with taking tobacco. [Ibid. No. 99.]
July 17.
Edenhall.
Sir Philip Musgrave to the Earl of Carlisle. I am glad the bearer has succeeded so well in obeying your commands, and taking a notorious robber. I own as a great favour to me your allowing me at my last waiting on you to discourse my concerns in public affairs in these counties, where you have the highest trust, for, you having thereby a perfect knowledge of all those affairs, I do not much weigh the trouble any person is able to give me in them. You know very well faction in any country is not for the King's service. I never wished nor will endeavour to support myself that way, yet I must not desert a duty or the sense of my own honour. I am not an enemy to any. I can as soon and as willingly be on fair terms with those that appear not to be my friends as they can cease to deal unkindly with me. I have struggled with greater difficulties in the like kind than yet I meet with, and my integrity brought me safe off from the snares laid for me, and I hope it will do so now, my acting being laid clearly before your lordship, and your lordship the reporter of them, if need be, to the King. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 100.]
[July?] The Earl of Carlisle to Sir P. Musgrave. Yours by Gilbert Wakefield was very welcome. The little opportunity we have of doing our King and country service ought not to be lost, and I fully concur with what you mention as to inconvenience of factions as prejudicial to his Majesty's affairs, and I shall readily do my part to cure the evil of it here. I was apprehensive of being involved in a contest by some proceedings of your son's, but, that being ended, I am ready to pursue the method I have many years proposed to myself of reconciling my neighbours and impartially setting matters to rights between them. As concerns yourself your merit will always have just weight with me. [Copy. Ibid. No. 101.]
July 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W.N.W., somewhat cloudy. [Ibid. No. 102.]
July 17.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 103.]
July 17.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 14th came in the John and Thomas of London from Holland for the Straits. They report that the Dutch are fitting out a squadron of 26 men-of-war or more to reinforce their and the Spanish fleet in the Mediterranean, and that four are gone already and the rest will follow in a month or six weeks, all hands being at work to make them ready. Several vessels put to sea to-day and yesterday, wind S.W.
You may remember you wrote to me concerning the prize office, my partner having had 100l. for his salary, and you may procure me an order to receive what you think fit out of the King's moiety of the seizures in this port by the Custom house officers. Though it may be long before it comes, I shall mind it, being concerned in the said office. [Ibid. No. 104.]
July 18. Sir R. Franklin to Williamson. I desired my brother [-in-law] Musgrave to inform you that I had spoken with my son Robin's master at Eton, and find that, though he cannot say any ill of him, yet for what reason I know not, he is not likely to be his friend at the election, which begins next Sunday. I perceive he has acquainted Sir Thomas Page, and I believe more than once, that my son was not designed for a scholar, which I wonder at, considering what you said to him about a twelvemonth since. Without your favour I have no hopes. Were you inclined, I could wish a mandamus was sent down, without which, I fear, no good will be done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 105.]
July 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The little wind there is is westerly, weather hot and fair. [Ibid. No. 106.]
July [18].
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night I came home. This noon happened a great and sudden fire, but, it being a considerable distance, I know not the certainty. Some hope 'tis nothing but old straw in the field.
They have a way in Deal with drawing ropes on the ground in the Downs to sweep or weigh anchors, &c. To-day one of our boats swept and weighed a copper gun, Spanish make, of 2,442lbs. weight as appears by the mark thereof. Not one breath of wind, Good harvest weather. Dated 19 July, but see post, p. 223. [Ibid. No. 107.]
July 18.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night the packet-boat from Calais arrived. The passengers report that Aire is very closely besieged by the French, commanded by Count Schomberg, and that it is verily believed it cannot hold out many days, the garrison of St. Omer being prevented by 2,000 horse posted near them from contributing anything to their assistance. The packetboat from Flanders arrived to-day, from whence we have no news.
To-day a Zealand caper passed by from the westward for the coast of Holland, having been cruising sometime on the French coast and taken three privateers, one of 18, one of 12 guns, and a small sloop of Calais. The latter he sent in here and landed her men under the castle, but the captain is fled for fear of being apprehended here for plundering some English vessels. The other two he carried away with him.
To-night with the packet-boat I intend for Calais on my way to Dunkirk, where my stay will be short. [Ibid. No. 108.]
July 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 109.]
July 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 110.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 110 i.]
July 18. Appointment by the Mayor, Aldermen and capital burgesses of Derby of John Bagnold to be town clerk, coroner, and steward of the Court Leet. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F., No. 78.]
July 18. Warrant to the Justices of Assize and the High Sheriff of Hertfordshire for the reprieve of John Swingley, convicted of pocketpicking. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 160.]
[July.] James Winstanley and three other merchants of London to the Lord Chancellor. Petition that he would accept their bail on behalf of Francis Jenks and would order a writ for his discharge. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 383, No. 111.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. The Lord Chancellor having acquainted the King in Council with a petition delivered to him by James Winstanley and three other London merchants on behalf of Francis Jenks offering bail and demanding a writ of mainprise to deliver the prisoner, accompanied with a note of precedents, whereof the last was in 3° Rich. II., his Majesty declared he would suffer no minister of his to deny the subject any of his just rights, but yet thought fit to advise with the judges, touching his due rights in a case wherein no precedents had been showed in some hundreds of years, and therefore ordered that copies of the said petition with a note of the precedents be delivered to the judges as soon as they return from their circuits, who are to deliver their opinions what ought by law to be done on this petition. [Ibid. 112.]
July 19.
[Received.]
Reply of Sir John Godolphin to the order in Council of 14 July, stating that Capt. Henry Jackson is a Frenchman, and seized the vessel under a French commission; that he, Godolphin, gave no orders beyond what were required by order of Council of 22 April, which he could not disobey on a commission from the Admiralty Court; that Jackson is not condemned as a pirate in France, but on the contrary the ship and goods are there condemned as lawful prize, that he corresponds with him only officially for maintenance of justice, and does not obstruct the petitioners in recovering any goods that may belong to them. Noted, as read 28 July. [Ibid. No. 113.]
July 19.
Derby.
Robert Coke and four others to William, Earl of Devonshire. Recommending the bearer, John Bagnold, who has been elected town clerk by the Corporation of Derby on the decease of Mr. Gery, with note by the Earl that he is very well satisfied with the recommendation that the writers, four of whom are deputy lieutenants of the county, give of Mr. Bagnold. [Ibid. No. 114.]
July 19.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Our meetings are all laid down. The most considerable of them for estates come now very orderly to church, and of the others a very considerable number, and I am confident that, if any encouragement were given, if no other than the approbation above of what has been here done, a thorough reformation would here be suddenly effected, but, if this remain doubtful, and they favoured by many, who would be accounted King's men, yet no friends to the Church, what is done will in time come to nothing, for of this sort of people the number here is very considerable, several of the Customs officers being among them as the Surveyor, Mr. Watts, Mr. Wakeman and some others, who can comply with anything to gain an office, receive the Sacrament and never come at the church since, which is about three or four years past, and can declare that it is a madness to lose an office for a bit of bread and a cup of wine. He had been out several times, but that the Lord Marshal kept him in, which he makes his boast of. This is the Surveyor, whose place being void, he went up to London last Monday sennight and reports that the Lord Marshal went with himself, and got him to be made Surveyor for the coast between Lynn and this place. It is reported here to-day that Lord Yarmouth is made Lord Chamberlain and his son Lord Lieutenant of this county. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 115.]
July 19.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday I acquainted you with a fire in the country. It happened at Gardner's, a smith, in Kings would parish 3 miles from Deal in the Dover road, about 10 a.m. yesterday, as was supposed by a spark flying on the thatch of the dwelling-house where the woman was washing having a coal fire. It is thought stirring up her fire, the house being low and the thatch very dry, caused the house to fire. In little more than an hour it burnt down his dwelling-house, outhouse, barn and forge, and almost all their goods. They had little help till too late, because the people were in the harvest field. About 8 last night it blew a whole storm for about 4 hours, afterwards the wind decreased and now there is little at S.W. [Ibid. No. 116.]
July 19.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. We had yesterday and this morning in port the following ships belonging to this place, the Adventure from St. Malo, the Unity from Morlaix, the Samuel from Croisic and the Concord from Barbados. The first made some stop at Guernsey, and the master says that island is well, and that the seven men-of-war set out by the Malouins sometimes bring in some prizes, of late two ships, Dutch-built, but manned mostly with Englishmen and bound for Holland, but they pretend to belong to Yarmouth. Those from Morlaix and Croisic met with some of those French men-of-war, but they did them no prejudice. The master of the last from Barbados in six weeks left that island well, but came forth alone, leaving above 40 English merchantmen taking in their loading with what speed they can to come away, being not without some fears of a hurricane, the season of the year they had it last drawing near, the effects of which they are still sensible of.
The fire at Tiverton Wednesday last week burnt down 32 houses, and it being occasioned by a vagrant, who is said to begin it in an outhouse with a pipe of tobacco, makes the country full of fears that it is designedly. The person was taken into custody. [Ibid. No. 117.]
July 19. Warrant for a pardon to Richard Josselyne of Littlebury, Essex, convicted at the last Chelmsford assizes for the manslaughter of Roger Marshall, but respited for further information. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 161.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Allestree. You know the tenderness I have to press upon the freedom of elections, but I am not ignorant there is a latitude for favour in all those cases. A year ago I recommended to Mr. Rosewell's particular care a son of Sir Richard Franklin's under all considerations I thought might take with a man of that plain honesty you had represented him to me. I had hoped a year of the young man's industry assisted with Mr. Rosewell's help might have brought him easily within the compass of that allowance which is practised in such cases by one friend to another. I have several times since, by those that I thought might have more credit with Mr. Rosewell than I found I had, repeated my suit but with little success. I come now to you as my last help, that, if Mr. Rosewell has not obliged the father and me to ripen him, or rather recover him, for I found the poor youth had lost much time in the school, to what might be wished, you might strain what is possible to supply it with your charity and friendship. The youth has nothing to rely on, but what the way of the University and scholarship is to give him, and the father, who is otherwise extremely well deserving of the King and the Church, will be wholly at a loss if his son miss being elected this election. I am very tender of pressing too hard in these matters, yet I must say I might have expected more from Mr. Rosewell's consideration of me and my recommendations to him so often repeated than I have found, and I think there are not many men in England of his profession from whom I should not have found it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 104.]
July 20.
Council Chamber.
Sir Robert Southwell to Elia Palmer. The Committee for Trade desire him to send in all the papers relating to his former proposals about making tin farthings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 118.]
July 20. [Sir Robert Southwell] to the Officers of the Mint. Sending a paper from Sir William Smyth, to which the Committee of Trade wish them to put any objections they may have into writing, and to attend the Committee at nine next Monday. The Comptroller of the Mint is to send in the contract with the Swedes about copper, that with the King about copper farthings, and any other papers relating thereto. [Ibid. No. 119.] Enclosed,
Proposals made by Sir William Smyth, as to tin farthings, showing that the loss on the exchange of them with the copper farthings will be from 11,296l. to 16,000l., that it should not fall wholly on the farmers of the tin farm, who are to pay the King 12,000l. a year for the farm of the tin, and will have much trouble in restoring the value of tin, and proposing certain methods by which they may be relieved from part of the charge. [Ibid. No. 119 i.]
July 20.
Council Chamber.
Sir Robert Southwell to Mr. Townsend or Townley (Townson), deputy to Sir John Shaw. Requiring his attendance at the Committee for Trade on Monday, with his books and warrants, when the granting of blank warrants for making ships free will be considered. [Ibid. No. 120.]
July 20.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
The Committee of Trade having appointed 9 next Monday morning for the further inquiry touching warrants for making ships free, Mr. Payn, Mr. Messervy and Mr. Monamy are to attend, whereof Wickham, the messenger, is to advise them. [Ibid. No. 121.]
July 20.
Council Chamber.
W. Blathwayt to S. Pepys. By command of the Committee for Trade remitting him the enclosed report of the Commissioners of the Customs concerning the Prosperous and the Turkey Frigate with the annexed papers, that passes may be granted as in the like cases, if the Lords of the Admiralty think fit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 122.]
July 20.
Queen's College.
Dr. Timothy Halton to Williamson. The Vice-Chancellor desires that the enclosed paper may be put into the next Gazette, that the punishment inflicted on the Terræ filii may become as public as the scandal they gave. I received the paper from my lord of Lincoln, who makes the same request and assures me that it was written by the Vice-Chancellor's own hand. [Ibid. No. 123.]
July 20.
Oxford.
Francis de la Motte to Williamson. Since I live here on the gracious effects of your liberality I think I am obliged to give you an account of my behaviour and studies, and I do it in English, though I am not ignorant you know French better than I do. I do what lies in me to be not altogether useless in the Church of England. I have got that tongue already well enough to peruse the English books and to read prayers, which I have done in several churches, and I have made three sermons I am ready to preach in a fortnight. Some scholars I have showed them to, have found but very few faults in my expressions. I hope to do better in a short time, for I pronounce English well enough to be understood by the people, and have a great facility to write it, having perused to that end many of your best English divines, so I hope in three months to be able to preach every week. I hope your lordship will make good my troubling you with this letter, considering I am in a manner obliged to do so to acknowledge the exceeding charity you have showed me, which makes me offer every day my humble prayers to God for your prosperity. [Ibid. No. 124.]
July 20.
Stamford.
Francis Wingfield to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, his friend, who is chosen town clerk of Derby and needs his Majesty's approbation. [Ibid. No. 125.]
July 20.
The Assurance, in the Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. A brass gun of 2,400 weight was taken up two days since. The like having been taken up in Sir John Lawson's time who begged the King's part, which is one third, I beseech you to speak to his Majesty in my behalf for the same. I wish you will accept of my draft of Newfoundland and my papers concerning it. They shall be sent you at your pleasure.
To-day I sent out the Rose, Greyhound and Drake to look for privateers and secure the seas for his Majesty's subjects. [Ibid. No. 126.]
July 20.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. These three days a great many loaden colliers have passed by to the southward, the wind being W. and N.W. It is now E.S.E. Here is a very great drought, and the springs have not been known so low that any can remember, for there are several places in the wolds and Holderness where they are forced to drive their cattle four or five miles to water. Corn is very good and plentiful in these parts, as has been these many years, though the old corn is much drained out of the country by the great quantities daily exported. [Ibid. No. 127.]
July 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. These two days the wind has been southerly, at present S.E., weather fair. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 128.]
July 20.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.E., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 129.]
July 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., inclining to rain. [Ibid. No. 130.]
[July 20.] Secretary Coventry to the Constable of the Tower. The king has given leave to Sir John Robinson to be absent from the Tower for his health's sake and has appointed Lieut. Francis Rainsford to act as his deputy, but during the absence of his lordship and Sir John, Mr. Rainsford is to give frequent accounts to Sir Thomas Chicheley of all considerable matters happening within the Tower, that the king may be informed thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29,p. 168.]
July 20. Declaration by the King of his approval of Lieut. Francis Rainsford, as deputy keeper of the Tower, in the absence of Sir John Robinson, on his private affairs, or for the sake of his health, impaired in the king's service; also ordering the said Rainsford, in the absence of the Earl of Northampton, Constable, and Sir John Robinson, to give an account of every considerable matter that happens, to Sir Thomas Chicheley, who commands a company in the Tower. [Ibid. p. 169.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Dr. John Troutbeck praying for an order for payment of the arrears of his pension of 200l. per annum and that he may hereafter punctually receive it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 124.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant, in fee simple, of the inheritance of the soil as prayed, to Henry, Earl of Norwich, Earl Marshal, who had obtained an Act for the building and improving the ground belonging to Arundel House, where he designs to build a residence for his family and posterity, and had prayed as well for the more beautifying the said buildings by bringing them to a just symmetry and proportion all along the Thames as for the more conveniency of enlarging the gardens of the house he designed, a grant of the soil 40 feet in depth from the wall of Arundel House, all along the said wall from Strand Bridge to Milford Stairs, the King having viewed the platform and design thereof and considered it would be an ornament to the City and no prejudice to the River. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 184.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Sir George Lane, Principal Secretary of State in Ireland, and the heirs male of his body, to be Baron Lane of Tulske, co. Roscommon, and Viscount Lanesborough, co. Longford. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 41.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring to the Committee for Trade the following petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383,No. 131.] Annexed,
The Officers of the Mint and others employed in coining copper to the King. Petition showing that Eliah Palmer and others have, by false informations and calculations, prejudiced the Lord Treasurer and the Committee for Trade against the petitioners, representing that they had cozened his Majesty in the making of copper money, and requesting that any such charge may be formally delivered in to be answered by them, and that they may be heard before his Majesty in Council. [S.P Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 131 i.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the justices and other magistrates whom it may concern grant licences to all persons selling by retail any coffee, chocolate, tea or sherbet, to continue the sale of the said liquors for six months longer from 24 June last, under the same conditions and securities mentioned in the proclamation concerning coffee-houses of 8 Jan. last. [Ibid. No. 132.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Dom Francisco de Mello, Lord Chamberlain of the Queen's Household, attend his Majesty in Council next Wednesday, the 26th, at 10 a.m. [Ibid. No. 133.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Anthony Lawrence, bookseller, being brought in custody of a messenger for printing a Popish book entitled The Great Sacrifice of the New Law, produced for doing so a warrant under the hand and seal of Dom Francisco de Mello, whereon the Board told him that was no warrant to justify him in this unlawful work, and commanded him forthwith to deliver to the Wardens of the Stationers' Company the original and all the copies of the said book, and to forbear, at his peril, the printing those or any other Popish books for the future. [Ibid. No. 134.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Anthony Lawrence be continued in the custody of a messenger, and that he attend the next Council day to inform the Board whether he has delivered to the Wardens of the Stationers' Company all the books entitled The Great Sacrifice of the New Law. [Ibid. No. 135.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Wardens of the Stationers' Company enter the house of Anthony Lawrence and seize the book entitled The Great Sacrifice of the New Law and all other Popish books they shall find there, and deliver them to the Bishop of London, to be disposed of as the law directs. [Ibid. No. 136.]
July 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Thunder, lightning and rain yesterday afternoon, wind from S. to N., where it now is with showers. [Ibid. No. 137.]
July 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 138.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 138 i.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Laurence Hyde, appointed Ambassador to the King of Poland, took his leave on the 15th instant. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 185.]
July 22. Attestation of Thomas Maisters and John Thompson, master of the Hopewell of Hull. Arriving at Elsinore, 2 June, 1676, with a lading of Scotch salt and a few herrings, being designed for Stralsund and ordered to inquire on our arrival there if we could proceed without obstruction, we acquainted Sir John Paul with our order for that port, who informed us that Stralsund, Greifswald and several other places were beleaguered both by sea and land, and that it was impossible to come there without endangering both ship and goods; that, if anything but good should happen to either, we might expect no assistance from him, for he had received a letter from his Majesty to acquaint all masters therewith. When we heard this we produced his Majesty's pass, which was particularly for Stralsund, and besought him to peruse it, but he would not look on it and told us the capers would not regard it. Finding so great discouragement we dared not proceed on our intended voyage, which proves to our great prejudice, for we are come to a market where our commodities cannot be disposed of. [Original and copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, Nos. 139, 140.]
July 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arriving yesterday morning we are informed by the passengers (some of whom were, as they said, at the leaguer) that the besieged in Maestricht treat their besiegers very sharply by sallies and continual firing on them, so that they report those in the leaguer are in more danger than those in the trenches. The Prince of Orange is wounded in the arm with a musket shot and Col. Fenwick with two in his leg, Major Archer and Capt. Sabin slain with several more officers and many common soldiers.
They further report the present posture of things in Holland does not look well, the commonalty discontented and murmuring, the De Witt party appearing again and increasing, but of this we expect further.
The wind is southerly and after the great storm of hail and rain with so much thunder and lightning as we had yesterday morning, the weather has been calm and fair. [Ibid. No. 141.]
July 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived in the Downs John Bant, commander of the Hopeful Adventure pink of London. Between Dungeness and Dover he was hailed by two Calais capers, who commanded him on board, which he refused. They shot many small shot into him and at him under Dutch colours. At last one came on one side and the other on the other side of him under French colours, entered the pink, sent four of his men prisoners on one of their ships, and locked the rest in the pink's great cabin, and broke open the hold, but what they have taken the master knows not. On their coming on board they deeply cut the master in two places in the head and one in the arm, and struck him many times with the butts of their muskets, much bruising him, and also wounded two of his men, and took the pink as prize and carried her to Calais pierhead, where she grounded and beat and at last lay on her side, and afterwards sent the master away for the Downs. This afternoon he was brought ashore in a sea cradle, not being able to stand or sit. This relation I had from some of her crew, but write much less than what was spoken. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 142.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Pass for William Worsdell to embark from any English port and to transport to Nimeguen three horses for the use of Sir Leoline Jenkins, one of the King's Ambassadors extraordinary and plenipotentiaries for the treaty of peace there. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 185.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Royal approbation of the election of John Bagnold to be town clerk, coroner and steward of the Court leet of the borough of Derby. With note that this approbation was renewed for the same person, 15 Aug. [Ibid.]
July 22.
Bristol.
Certificate by Rowland Thrupp, collector, and others that the Prince of Bristol cleared for Rochelle and the Sound 11 April last with a pass according to the treaties with Spain and the United Provinces and that security had been given for the return thereof within one year in pursuance of the treaty with the King of Denmark. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 160.]
July 22. Certificate by the said Thrupp that the within is a true copy of the freedom of the Prince of Bristol. Prefixed is the said grant of freedom dated 15 April, 1668, with certificate by Robert Townson dated 8 Aug. that in the duplicate of the ships made free in Bristol he finds the within mentioned ship. [Ibid. No. 161.]
July 23. T. B[arnes] to—. As to your affairs that you know, I have and shall do faithfully what is in my power. I sent you something about 23 June. I waited many hours to meet you according to your appointment, but could not.
The enclosed, as I am told, should have been spoken to by some last Thursday at the Common Hall, but was not. As soon as it came to me, I got it transcribed by a friend to send you. Perhaps you may have it already. If any considerable thing offer about your own business, you shall find me ready to let you know of it, but I desire a few lines how I may send to you. If you send any answer, let the bearer bring it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 143.] Enclosed,
The speech printed post, p. 254 in "An Account of the proceedings at Guild Hall." [In a different hand from that of Barnes except the last line, which is in his handwriting. Ibid. No. 143 i.]
July 23.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Ships daily come here from the Baltic who all confirm the success of the Dane against the Swede, and how little probability there is that the Swede should be able to make any considerable resistance either by land or sea.
A ship of this port, which came not long since from Stockholm, has been very ill-used by a picaroon of the Duke of Brandenburg's, the master, mate, and most of the men having been stripped of all their clothes and 20 dollars taken from them.
I am entreated by the Masters of the Trinity House here that complaint may be made to the Brandenburgers' agent, if any such be here. Indeed we suffer much on all sides. [Ibid. No. 144.]
July 23.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Account of the outrage on the Hopeful Adventure as in Watts' letter, calendared ante, p. 238. [Ibid. No. 145.]
July 23.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. The 21st a French prize laden with salt was sent in here by a Dutch caper, who took her with six more some two days before. He offered her here for sale, but our Mayor caused them to put to sea immediately according to the proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 146.]
July 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 147.]
July 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. It being Sabbath, I have no list of ships. Yesterday arrived from the Straits the Bristol, Sir John Berry, commander. He brought in with him a French banker of Rochelle, which he met this side of the Northern Cape. He commanded her to strike by firing a gun, which she refused, on which he sent his boat aboard her, who kept her off with her small shot. The boat being sent again and again, the Frenchman at last fired a round shot at her, on which Sir John took her. Last night, through the carelessness of a shipkeeper, a ship of about 200 tons belonging to Sir John Frederick, of London, and two others of this town, newly coming off the ground unrigged without any goods on board took fire, and is burnt even to her lower deck. She was at anchor in the midst of several ships in Catwater, where was the Dutch Admiral and several other big ships, but they all escaped. [Ibid. No. 148.]
July 23. Blank commissions for Mr. Haughton to be second lieutenant and Mr. Fitzmaurice to be ensign. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 53.]
Sunday,
July 23.
John, Bishop of Ossory, to Williamson. The Duke of Ormonde lets me know that, being within a day or two to go out of town, he intends to-day by your assistance to dispatch the concern wherewith you were pleased to oblige me. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 47.]
July 23. Notes by Williamson about Ireland. Lord Ranelagh, pay for the Army before Christmas. Wants only 10 or 11,000l. to complete the whole arrears due to them at Christmas. The regiment and troop of guards are paid already. Those troops that are to march now being paid as they will be immediately, there will only want 10,000l. In three weeks or a month he will pay this. January [rent] will be paid in May, February in June, and so on. The military establishment is about 34 or 35,000l. every quarter. As to the March pay, not one complaint. There will be in the treasury enough to pay this party that march into the North. Out of the rents now growing due on the farm of the first payment at March last, 24,000l. is repaid to Lord Ranelagh as due to him on his last farm. The farmers are to pay by their covenant, 20,000l. per mensem for seven years. The first payment was paid in May (i.e. Jan., 1675–6), the second in June, of which 24,000l. is paid to Lord Ranelagh, 8 or 9,000l. to other uses, rests possibly 7 or 8,000l. in the Exchequer. [Ibid. No. 48.]
July 24. List of ships made free from Feb., 1673 to 11 Sept., 1674, taken out of the Earl of Arlington's book of signings, as given in by Mr. Richards to the Committee of Trade. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 149.]
[July ?] Lists by Mr. Townson of English ships, as well prizes as others, made free by the King's orders from 1 Jan., 1668, to 24 July, 1676, for which Sir John Shaw has granted certificates, one list being arranged alphabetically and the other in order of dates. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, Nos. 150, 151.]
July 24.
Council Chamber.
William Blathwayt to Sir Patience Ward. The Committee for Trade having examined several blank and counterfeit warrants for freedom of ships, and understanding one of that nature has come into your hands desire your attendance at 10 on Friday morning. [Ibid. No. 152.]
July 24.
Council Chamber.
William Blathwayt to Mr. Townley. By order of the Committee for Trade commanding him to give them an account of what copper blanks have been delivered by him or by any other by his order into the Mint at the Tower, and at what times, and what numbers remain unpaid for. [Ibid. No. 153.]
[July ?] John Herring, labourer in the parish of Eardisley, to the King. Petition for pardon, he having about 3 months ago stolen a sheep, his wife and three small children being in extreme want for food, for which at the last Hereford assizes he was found guilty of felony, but was allowed the benefit of his clergy, which he ignorantly refused, whereon he stands condemned to die. [Ibid. No. 154.]
July 24.
Ersley(Eardisley).
Thomas Baskerville, Samuel Hall, vicar, and others to Thomas Duppa. Entreating him to use his endeavours with his Majesty to procure a transportation or in the first instance a reprieve for the petitioner. Prefixed,
John Herring to Thomas Baskerville and the rest of the worthy parishioners of Eardisley. Petition to use their endeavours with Thomas Duppa for procuring him a reprieve for saving his life or for transportation. [Ibid. No. 155.]
July 24.
Richmond.
Thomas Samborne to Williamson. I have ordered Mr. Le Bas, my nephew, to deliver you the enclosed from Monsieur Bregett for you, which has been sent me here, where I am come to try to recover my health, and to know if you desire me to write anything to Paris on what concerns Mr. Skelton's negotiation, and to beg you to keep secret the information given you of that letter which the King of France is to write to his Majesty. [French. Ibid. No. 156.]
July 24. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I have delivered the letter according to your commands to Sir Carr, who will speak for himself. In the meantime please accept my thanks for your kindness towards my nephew. If the quarrel for my writing first still sticks in your stomach (I hear Sir C. Musgrave is in the country) we will decide it by the windmill when you come down, and he shall be second to both. But, if you make so frequent visits to Hammersmith, as I perceive you intend, perhaps the little esquire may shorten your journey. I am sorry one weathercock near Whitehall is not demolished, for that never went true, and I am afraid you (now those are destroyed) will be more apt to be governed by that than formerly. Did not our waters purge choler both ways, the women here would have been stunt, but with one voice they enjoin me to present you with their services. My son and daughter are your servants and hope they are no ways criminal. We cannot read a word in a letter from London. It is either that libellers or liars are to be discountenanced, if the former, we are glad, but, if the latter, northwards we are overjoyed for as many reasons as the welfare of king and kingdom can afford. Your health is heartily drunk in these parts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 157.]
July 24. Sir John Talbot to Williamson. With all thankfulness I acknowledge your remembrance of your absent servants relating to the affair of the hospital, which I formerly told you was the greatest mortification I ever received, to have it forced away after passing the Palatine Seal. I hope your brother secretary will think it reasonable, if Trevor be dead, that I might have the benefit of the King's promise, but I fear the Bishop will deny his Majesty the disposal of it, unless he lay his positive commands that he do it in performance of his royal promise made before he was in his intentions for bishop of that diocese. You judge rightly that the concern was Sir Gilbert's, if he outlived Machon, the present master, and John Mason, clerk, my nominal master in trust likewise living. I expect Sir Gilbert to-night from Bath. [Ibid. No. 158.]
July 24. Brune Clench to [Williamson]. Requesting him to defer the renewing of Sir Thomas Wyndham's commission till he waits on him again. [Ibid. No. 159.]
July 24. Dr. R[alph] W[iddrington] to Thomas Covell at Hornsey. Just now the Master called the Fellows together about the nomination of a proctor, and they will not nominate or elect your brother in his absence, unless you can obtain a letter from his Majesty to this or the like purpose, specified in the enclosed paper, but what you do must be done forthwith, for the Master will proceed to the election next Thursday after dinner. I hope you may be here by that time well provided, and here I will be on purpose to attend you before dinner. It's a great pity your brother should be praetermitted, and a junior elected altogether unfit for such an employment. A word from his Majesty will determine the business, if you procure it before noon next Thursday. Sir William Boswell of Jesus, I am informed, was elected by the college and presented by a proxy to the ViceChancellor, and John Poley of Pembroke Hall, being in the King's service abroad, was admitted and sworn by his proxy, who executed the place for him throughout the year. I am going to Much Munden in Hertfordshire near Puckeridge, and, if you come thither on Wednesday night, I will accompany you back hither on Thursday morning. For your brother's honour and the honour of the college, I would not have this opportunity neglected. If you appear in person at Cambridge or only send a trusty messenger to your friends here, I doubt not the thing may be done. Your brother has but two seniors capable of the proctorship, and they both refuse it. [Ibid. No. 160.] Enclosed,
The said paper. In all elections and nominations the Master and Fellows of Christ's are by statute obliged to prefer the senior ceteris paribus.
At this time they are to elect one of the society to be presented to the Vice-Chancellor as one of the proctors for the ensuing year.
The Fellows senior to Mr. Covell have refused to be nominated, and so of right Mr. Covell ought to be nominated according to his seniority, and, when he first went to Constantinople as chaplain to Sir Daniel Harvey, his Majesty commanded the college that he during his absence should fully enjoy all the profits and advantages of his fellowship, as if he was not absent.
Some of the college and some of the university, who know Mr. Covell and his eminent abilities, would fain have him nominated by the college and presented, and, in case of his not returning before 10 Oct. next, admitted by a proxy, as was done in the cases of Boswell and Poley, yet some of the junior Fellows associate to deprive Mr. Covell of his birthright, and set up a junior, not in any respect to be named in the same day with him, as if he deserved to suffer only because he is employed in his Majesty's service. As five of the senior Fellows are absent at present and all the juniors at home, it is impossible to preserve Mr. Covell in his undoubted right, unless his Majesty can be prevailed to declare his pleasure that he should not suffer by his absence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 160 i.]
July 24.
The Assurance, in the Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. (Concerning the outrage on Mr. Bant as in Watts' letter of the 22nd calendared ante, p. 238.) We have two sloops of Dunkirk stopped here for some days, against whom are several complaints by the merchants, but on board us we use them very kindly, till we receive orders for their discharge. Yesterday came in the Greyhound with an Ostend caper, taken off Dungeness as were the others, all which we detain till further order, and send forth the frigates again for clearing our coast.
Last night arrived the Loyal Subject from India. Four or five more are daily expected. [Ibid. No. 161.]
July 24. Account by Sir John Berry of an encounter between himself and a Rochelle ship from the Bank, which, believing his vessel to be Dutch, refused either to parley or to strike the flag, and fired several shot at the Bristol and her boats, but submitted, on threat of boarding her. He resolved to bring her in, to answer for the affront to the King. He had originally supposed her to be a Sallee man-of-war. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 162.]
July 24.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 163.]
July 24.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 164.]
July 24. Warrant for delivery or payment to Edward, Lord Latimer, of all such prize goods as were taken between 13 June, 1642, and 29 May, 1660, and not accounted for, and of all such sums as should be recovered in respect of the same, such part as shall be allowable to the persons employed in prosecuting and recovering the said goods only excepted. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 211.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
Commissions to John Webb to be lieutenant to Captain Richard Richardson, and to John Downing to be ensign to Captain Herbert Jefferyes in the King's regiment of Foot Guards. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 34.]
July 24. Commissions to James Kendall to be cornet and to Francis Byam to be quartermaster to Captain Peregrine Bertie's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minutes. [Ibid.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to take into custody Peter Monamy to answer before his Majesty at the Privy Council on strong suspicion of being an accomplice in counterfeiting the King's sign manual and the handwriting of the Earl of Arlington when Secretary of State in several warrants for making foreign-built ships free. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 186.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 383, No. 165.]
July 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 1.]
July 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived here very early this morning. The master tells us that at Rotterdam and the Brill they confidently say the Prince will be master of Maestricht in 14 days, but one of the passengers, who was in the trenches there last Wednesday, reports that the Prince himself said to some, who told him it again, that, if in that time he could not get it, he should hardly obtain it this summer, and that he heard some experienced soldiers at that siege, who very much doubted the gaining of it this campaign, and that the French make a very resolute defence. Wind S.W. and weather fair, though cloudy. [Ibid. No. 2.]
July 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Mr. Bant, it is now hoped, will recover, but is so sore with the blows given him by the privateers with their muskets, that as yet he cannot stir, but as he is helped. He was bound to Oporto, but cannot go the voyage and another is put in master.
A Barbados man now arriving speaks no news, but a Virginian coming in says things go not well in their parts. All things from beyond sea are whist.
Wheat harvest is over in Thanet, a great corn country in sight of Deal. This week will take up most of our wheat. It blows fresh between S.W. and S. [Ibid. No. 3.]
July 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., rainy dull weather. [Ibid. No. 4.]
July 25.
Plymouth.
—to Messrs. Herne. Giving an account of the destruction of their ship by fire as in Lanyon's letter of the 23rd calendared ante, p. 240. There was nothing in her to occasion it, but the bare hull and her cables without fire or candle. By the declarations of some that saw her first on fire, I certainly find it was done intentionally to destroy the Dutch fleet, now in the said harbour, for within half a pistol shot of her lay the Dutch admiral, a fireship, and a ship of 700 tons loaden with ammunition miraculously preserved. She fell aboard the ammunition ship all of a light fire, which occasioned a sad outcry amongst them all that they were destroyed, but by great prudence they put her off, and so she drove ashore, where she burnt. By oath tendered two fire-balls were seen, which mounted from her into the air to the bigness of blazing stars and continued 6 or 7 minutes in their elevation. One of the shipkeepers was scalded, another like to be burnt, never the like seen in our parts, as I suppose Mr. Tillard will inform you. Great watchings are now aboard all ships fearing further mischief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 5.]
July 26.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Mayflower from Morlaix and the Windsor and Elizabeth from St. Malo, all of this place. The first made her passage in 24 hours and met no ships on her way. The master says a little before his coming away there was great rejoicing for the victory their fleet had at Palermo, and that they continue to list soldiers and send them away to their armies. The two latter having stopped at Jersey and Guernsey have been a week from St. Malo. The masters say that some Ostenders plying about these islands take several French merchantmen, six laden with salt, while they were there. Some ships are now coming in. Wind S.W., fresh. [Ibid. No. 6.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Pass for Captain Pinock, one of the Duke of Monmouth's tenants, to pass to and fro between England and Scotland on his occasions with his servants and horses. Noted, as recommended by Sir James Stansfeild and Mr. Snell. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 52.]
July 26. Warrant for searching for and bringing before Williamson, Patrick Ker, for having carried to the Press a most seditious and scandalous libel entitled "A precious and prophetical letter to the Lady Irving (Irvine)," and for having contracted for the printing of the same. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 187.]
July 27. Memorandum that the Lord Privy Seal is desired by the Committee for Trade to move his Majesty in Council that, whereas several petitions have been referred to them by orders in Council praying that passes may be granted to divers ships now in the Mediterranean and other parts of Europe, they offer their opinions that they can do nothing contrary to the rules lately established for obtaining passes, but that, if his Majesty be inclined to give relief in cases differing from the present regulation, it will be proper that those cases be first reported to his Majesty in Council by the Lords of the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 7.]
July 27. [W. Blathwayt] to S. Pepys. By the command of the Committee for Trade transmitting him the enclosed report about the Young Man's Endeavour with the annexed papers, that the Lords of the Admiralty may do therein as they think fit. [Ibid. No. 8.] Enclosed,
The Commissioners of the Customs to the Committee for Trade. They believe that the certificates therewith transmitted that the Young Man's Endeavour of Plymouth is an English-built ship and is wholly owned and manned by his Majesty's subjects are in the hand of the collector of that port, and that by a list returned by him of ships that have gone from that port to Newfoundland this year they find she cleared from thence in March last. [Ibid. No. 8i.]
July 27.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The master of a vessel of this port from Holland informs us that a Holland man-of-war had taken an Argier man-of-war near the Isles of Orkney, the captain and master being both Scotchmen, renegadoes, and that the man-of-war came into Holland when he was there. Two Englishmen, slaves, that had been in her, were freed. They report that two more Argier men-of-war were in their company. Wind S.S.E. with rain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 9.]
July 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind continues southerly and the weather fair. [Ibid. No. 10.]
July 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., windy weather. [Ibid. No. 11.]
July 27.
Truro
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Great quantities of pilchards appear on the coast and some small [quantities] are taken, which gives us hopes [of a good] year of fishing which will be very acceptable [to] the adventurers in that craft. Wind E. full of rain. [Torn. Ibid. No. 12.]
July 27.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 24th came in the John of Guernsey bound for San Domingo. They have on board 24 Frenchmen and 20 Frenchwomen. They say they are persons of quality being some of those that rebelled against the King of France. At Rennes they are banished for 30 m[onths]. Several others have been exported before. Two of the men on Wednesday night got ashore in their boat and so escaped into the country and cannot yet be found.
The same day came in the Providence of London from the Bay of Campeachy, loaden with logwood bound home. The master is dead, so that one Taylor is master. They received some damage in their rudder several leagues at sea, so with much difficulty they got into harbour. They did not call at Jamaica, but say all things are in a good posture in those parts.
The 26th came in here the Dover dogger of London in 6 weeks from the Barbados. They say they have been 28 m[onths] out of England, and have been several months on the coast of Guinea, where they took in 82 negroes and landed them at Barbados except 6 or 7 that died in their passage. They sold them at good rates. Several ships are there, and sugars are very scarce, so that many of them will come home dead freighted. About the Line they met a French man-of-war, who was very civil to them. There came out in their company only one Bristol man. Wind now S.S.W. Three vessels loaden with tin are gone to Rouen and one or two more ready, but are stopped on the King of France's levying an imposition of 12 livres a hundred more on tin; so that the whole duty is now about 25 livers per cwt. [Ibid. No. 13.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Herefordshire to defer, till the King's further pleasure be signified, executing the sentence of death passed on John Herringe, labourer, of the parish of Eardisley, Herefordshire, at the last assizes for the said county for stealing a sheep, which crime being within the benefit of clergy he was allowed it, but through indiscretion refused it, and was thereupon condemned to die. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 187.]
July 27. List given in by Sir Edward Scott of the names of the Reformed Officers belonging to the Lottery in Ireland containing 32 names. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 49.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Secretaries of State cause lists of all warrants that have passed their respective offices under the Sign Manual and Privy Signet for making foreign-built ships free since the last Dutch war to be transcribed and sent to Sir John Shaw, surveyor of the Act of Navigation, who is to compare the same with the entries of the warrants in his office for making ships free, and he is to make a schedule of any warrants there entered not contained in such lists, and present the same to the Lord High Treasurer, who is to give order for the stop of all ships mentioned in the said schedule, as soon as they come into any English port, and, having caused their particular cases to be examined, is to make report thereof to his Majesty in Council. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, Nos. 14, 15.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the Privy Council to Thomas Dixon, messenger, to take into custody Mr. Dimock, and bring him before the Council next Wednesday to answer to several great misdemeanours sworn against him. [Copy. Ibid. No. 16.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the Privy Council to John Wickham, messenger, to deliver to the Keeper of the Gatehouse Peter Monamy, who was committed to his custody on suspicion of counterfeiting the Sign Manual and Lord Arlington's signature to several warrants for making ships free. [Copy. Ibid. No. 17.]
July 28. John Watson, of Waverton in Cumberland, to the King. Petition complaining that he is deeply wronged in law by several persons, especially by Martyer of Great Bookham, his uncle-in-law and master, and in the north was forced out by his wife's whoreish tricks, her father and brother having all confederately conveyed and stole his goods from him, so that the poor fellow knows not what to do. [Ibid. No. 18.]
July 28.
Waltham Cross.
John Watson to "the illustrious prince, my lord and master, Robert Steward, Prince of Wales." Setting forth his impoverished condition especially by the law, but many more grievous wrongs, whereby his money and means are unlawfully detained from him at Great Bookham, but especially at Waverton in Wigton parish, Cumberland. To Cambridge he goes almost naked for lack of clothes, and would be glad of some small employment in some college by way of exercise and learning, which will not be unless by his worthiness' means, which he begs. [Ibid. No. 19.]
July 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 20.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 20I.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Col. Roger Alsop and Sir Palmes Fairborne, commanders in chief of Tangier, to give into the custody of the captain of a frigate appointed by the Lords of the Admiralty, Augustine Garland, prisoner in Tangier, to be conveyed to Portsmouth and to remain there till the King's further pleasure be known. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 161.]
Warrant for a grant of the office of paymaster to the Band of Pensioners to Sir John Kirke and John Kirke, his son, during their lives and the life of the survivor of them, on the surrender by the said Sir John of letters patent of 30 Aug., 1664, by which he now holds the place. [Precedents 1, f. 156.]
July 28. The King to Sir Harbottle Grimston, Master of the Rolls. After reciting letters of 28 June last, calendared ante, p. 193, and letters of 20 Oct., 1674, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–5, p. 380, for preventing all disputes and securing to John and Philippa Culpeper the effects of the King's gracious intentions, revoking the former letters in favour of Thomas, Lord Culpeper, and those of 20 Oct., 1674, and signifying his pleasure that the Duke of Ormonde and Sir Thomas Culpeper have the nomination of the person to be admitted into the six clerks' place first vacant in favour of the said John and Philippa Culpeper and that these letters take place in the same order as the said former letters in behalf of the said Lord Culpeper and William and Anthony Hammond, his assignees, had they not been revoked, any former letter in favour of Silius Titus or Thomas Tufton or any other person touching the same place notwithstanding. [Ibid.]
July 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived about noon yesterday. Some who came over in her affirm that Col. Widdrington is slain before Maestricht and that the besieged continue to do the besiegers much mischief, so that the last are said to be very much discouraged and are much disheartened also by their fear of the mines of the besieged.
The wind has been uncertain yesterday and to-day, now N.W. I know not whether the enclosed Amsterdam Courant be worth your while to transmit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384,No. 21.]
July 29.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning the wind blew fresh at N.E. Yesterday came in three ships for Oporto, which sailed this morning, as also Mr. Bant's ship under the conduct of his mate for the same place. Mr. Bant will scarce come out of his chamber by Michaelmas. His bruises and blows by the butt ends of their muskets are more prejudice than their cuts.
The only report these two or three days is that Maestricht is taken, but it bears little credit. Some say the confederates have so posted themselves that the French cannot come to engage them without great loss, nor Phillipsburg relieved. [Ibid. No. 22.]
July 29.
The
Assurance,
in the Downs.
Sir Robert Robinson to Williamson. Since my last about the frigates coming in from cruising, and the Greyhound's bringing in a vessel with wool commonly called an owle, I have only to acquaint you that yesterday went to sea the Rose, Drake and Greyhoundto cruise between Dover and Beachy for 8 days for securing trade and seizing such privateers as they meet, belonging to either France or Spain. To-day sailed all the merchant ships to the westward and southward, the wind being fair, so we have but three merchant vessels in the Downs and of the King's, this, the Garland and Hunter. Wind N.N.E. The Garland's victuals will be put in good order to-day or to-morrow to be ready to sail when commanded. One third of the vessel with wool and all, comes to the King, and will come to about 25l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 23.]
[July ?] Sir Thomas Peyton and nine others to the King. Petition stating a grant by letters patent of 15 Aug., 1661, to the petitioners and to others since deceased in fee-simple of the rectory of East Church in the Isle of Sheppey with all tithes, &c., thereto belonging, upon trust to permit the vicar of the said parish for the time being thereafter to be presented by the petitioners to receive the rents, issues and profits thereof to his own use, with a clause that, if any doubt should afterwards arise on the validity of anything to be thereby granted, his Majesty would grant other letters patent with such amendment, explanation and addition as by the Attorney-General and the petitioners' counsel should be thought fit, and that doubt has since arisen whether the placing of a vicar there belongs to the petitioners or whether they be entrusted for any other, and therefore praying a grant of the advowson of the said vicarage to the petitioners. At the side,
July 30.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back,
His report that his Majesty had granted to the petitioners and others since deceased and their heirs the said rectory, on trust to permit the vicar to receive the profits thereof, and that there are words sufficient to show his Majesty's intention that the petitioners should have the right of presentation to the said vicarage, such as in the case of a grant by a common person, would have given such a right, but, not being express words, they are not sufficient to confer such a right from his Majesty, and conceiving that, for clearing of all doubts that might arise touching the validity of the grant of the advowson of the vicarage, it will be fit to grant the petitioners other letters patent containing in express words a grant to the petitioners in feesimple of the advowson of and right of presentation to the said vicarage. 10 August. [Ibid. No. 24.]
July 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. Fair weather. [Ibid. No. 25.]
July 30. Commission to Matthew Palmer to be ensign to Capt. Sackville Tufton in Col. Russell's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 35.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Being informed that John Covell, M.A., one of the Fellows of that College, at present attending on the ambassador at Constantinople as his chaplain, ought, if present, to be nominated by them one of the proctors for the ensuing year, and that by reason of his absence some endeavours are used to nominate one of his juniors for the said proctorship, signifying his pleasure that they nominate the said John Covell for one of the proctors for the ensuing year to be sworn at the usual time, in case he return not sooner, by proxy, and dispensing with any statute &c. to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 31.]
July 31. Memorial by Elia Palmer, in the form of a diary of the whole proceedings in his proposal to make tin farthings, inserting the following documents:—
Four propositions presented by him to Council on the need of making small coins of silver, copper or tin, and recommending tin, July 24, 1665. p. 2.
Representation by him to Lord Treasurer, the Earl of Southampton, and the other referees giving a history of the English coinage and showing the desirability of tin farthings. p. 10.
Report by the said referees to the King, recommending the proposal as being the only mode of saving the farmers of the tin from ruin, 18 May, 1666. p. 24.
Proposals by the Officers of the Mint for the making of copper farthings. p. 27.
Petition of Elia Palmer to the King for permission to supply the kingdom with small tin coins, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, Jan. 13, 1668 [–9]. p. 35.
Answer addressed by him to the proposals of the Mint Officers, for a coinage of copper farthings, and their objections against tin, 29 May, 1669. p. 37.
Sir Edward Ford's proposal to the Council of Ireland, for coining copper halfpence, 1671. p. 46.
Elia Palmer's answer thereto, 1671. p. 49. [52 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 26.]
July 31. Questions to be proposed to Mr. Palmer as to the intended length of his grant for coining farthings, the number, weight, mode of coining and distributing his coins, &c. [Ibid. No. 27.]
July 31. Order of the Committee for Trade that the questions which Mr. Slingsby wishes to put to Sir William Smyth about his proposals should be sent to Sir William, and his reply to Mr. Slingsby, and that they should meet before the Committee so that the Committee should have only their points of disagreement to discuss. [Ibid. No. 28.] Annexed,
Additional questions on Sir William Smyth's proposals, as to the intended mode of making and distributing tin farthings. [Ibid. No. 28I.]
July 31.
Eton.
Dr. Richard Allestree to Williamson. I was a little surprised by the apprehensions you seem to have entertained of Mr. Rosewell's dealing with Sir R. Franklyn's son. I know as to the care in his education he has done his part, and so as not to have deserved some returns he has found. He has done all that could be done except that, which if he had done, I should not have looked on him as that honest man I represented him to you. The young man has a place, which, I believe, will speed. As to the youth you recommended to me, Walsingham, he is in the very bottom of the school, nor will he a good while be capable of any place from me. When he comes within the rules no one shall be readier to obey your proposals than I. [Ibid. No. 29.]
July 31. Thomas Covell to Williamson. I received from you the mandate for my brother John being proctor for the ensuing year. The Duke of Monmouth being at Newmarket bestowed his letter on me and sent a gentleman with me to Cambridge thereabout. Dr. Cudworth, the Master of our College, promised the Duke's gentleman that the election should be put off till this morning, but, as soon as he was gone, he convened the Fellows, and chose Mr. Smithson, my brother's junior, proctor, about half an hour before the mandate came to me. He smoothed me up but gave no relief. Dr. Widdrington has sent up a state of the proceedings, who affirms their huddling up the election proved unstatuteable, and we hope to void it. I believe Mr. Bebington will give you further trouble herein. I beseech your favourable assistance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 30.]
July 31.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Charity and John of this place, the first from Croisic with salt, the other from Morlaix with locrams and oakum.
In both places they raise forces daily and send them to the army, to which the king, it's said there, intends this summer to return. The passage of the Charity 7 days with 10 more English merchantmen so laden for these western ports, the John in 24 hours and met no adventures by the way. Within these three days we have had fair weather and N.W. winds which have carried several of our outward-bound ships for foreign parts. I have just now knowledge of Col. Sealy (so called) sometime governor of this place being at a house formerly his own about 20 miles hence. I shall hearken after him while in these parts. [Ibid. No. 31.]
July 31.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W., dark weather. [Ibid. No. 32.]
July 31.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 33.]
July 31.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Last week arrived in this road from Barbados a small ketch of Bristol bound homewards. The master reports that the late hurricanes have done much prejudice there, not only to the shipping, but to houses and plantations, so that the vessels there will scarce come home with their full loading, nay some not half loaden, the commodities being so scarce. The news there from New England was that the Indians were grown so very numerous that they dared a battle with the English.
A vessel from Minehead tells us of the Norwich being in that road, which waits to take in the Earl of Orrery and his lady for Cork, who has waited this week for her arrival. All things here are in a quiet posture, and the harvest in great forwardness and an appearance of great plenty. [Ibid. No. 34.]
July 31. Commisssion to John Atkins to be lieutenant to Major John Clerke in Lord Craven's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 34.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to search for and keep in safe custody Henry Bruges, printer, living in the parish of St. Bartholomew's, near Smithfield, to answer before his Majesty at the Privy Council to the matters laid against him concerning the printing and dispersing of a pamphlet called "An account of the proceedings at the Common Hall, held 24 June, 1676, relating to the City's petitioning his Majesty for a new Parliament." [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 188.]
July 31. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy of England to Richard Head of Rochester and the heirs male of his body. [Ibid.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Lieut.-Col. Fitzpatrick and nineteen other officers of all plate and other lotteries (except the Royal Oak lottery) in Ireland for 13 years to commence after the expiration of the term granted to several loyal officers by letters patent of 3 July, 1669, with prohibition to all others of holding any lotteries (except the Royal Oak lottery) within the said 13 years. With note that this warrant was afterwards renewed. [Ibid. p. 202.]
July 31.
Custom House, Exeter.
Certificate by Richard Ellis, collector, that Thomas Oakley, Master of the William of London bound for Norway or some port in the Baltic, had a pass in pursuance of the treaty with Spain and the United Provinces dated 16 Dec. last and that he had given security in 100l. for delivery up within a year of the date thereof of the pass to be obtained in pursuance of the treaty with Denmark. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 162, 163.]
July. Statement that on the death of Sir W. Conney, Sir F. Mackworth, John Crook, Hastings Corney, Thomas Botteler and Thomas Weedon, late commissioners for licensing hackney coaches, his Majesty choose in their room Sir Reginald Forster, Edward Progers, Sir W. Bowles, Sir John Kirke, Sir Thomas Geere (Gery) and Henry Progers to fill up the commission, and a warrant was granted accordingly, but, Forster, Bowles, Kirke and Geere not being in the way, none of them were put in the commission, it being managed by Bradshaw, Burton and others to make themselves fortunes. They intend to get 200l. a year apiece from the poor coachmen. His Majesty is pleased to have the commission renewed and to have his own servants put in and then people of good quality. To those above it is suggested to add (then follows a list of 14 names). [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 35.]
[July ?] Similar paper, but suggesting only 13 names, Simon Parry being omitted. [Ibid. No. 36.]
[July ?] List of the present Commissioners, being those appointed by warrant of 26 May, calendared ante, p. 130, with the names of Forster, Bowles, Kirke and Geers appointed amongst others, 13 Jan., 1674–5. [Ibid. No. 37.]
[July ?] Another list of persons suggested as Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 38.]
[July ?] Brune Clench to the King. Petition for some office or employment, he being deprived of the place of which he held as clerk of the troop of the royal regiment of horse, under the late major, Sir Francis Wyndham, by his successor, Capt. Peregrine Bertie. (See ante, pp. 227, 228, 242.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 384, No. 39.]
[July.] An Account of the proceedings at Guild-hall at the Tolke-moot (sic) or Common Hall, held 24 June, 1676, relating to the City's petitioning for a new Parliament. Mr. Jenks said:—It seems vain for this court to be serious about the choice of magistrates, except they first take care to remedy the many grievances the City now groans under. London has been once burnt, and firing is now such a trade that not only London but all the places of principal trade throughout the kingdom are perpetually in danger. Such is the general decay of trade that, if not remedied, it must ruin the whole City, which is conceived to be very much occasioned by the French, who have laid such imposts on our manufactures that we have almost lost our trade with France, and they have spoiled our trade with Holland, Flanders and Germany by war. They have ruined our home trade by the quantity of their silks and other unnecessary commodities imported, so that on the balance of trade between us and them we lose 1,100,000l. every year. By this means those who in Queen Elizabeth's time might not be suffered to build men-ofwar are now so powerful at sea as to be able to beat both Dutch and Spaniard and they have made themselves in a manner sole masters of the Mediterranean. They daily injure and affront our English merchants, sometimes in our own ports. Their privateers daily take and plunder our merchant ships and strip, imprison and torment our seamen to the great discouragement of our navigation. What is worse than all the rest is the just apprehension on the minds of good men of danger to his Majesty and the Protestant religion.
I have endeavoured several times to bring these things before the Common Council, but could not. At the last Common Council I desired the Lord Mayor that a Common Council might be speedily held to consider a petition about trade, subscribed by a great number of citizens of good quality, and he then promised that one should be speedily held. But it is a good time since and there have been many fires and losses but no Common Council. Therefore I move that some members of this Court may accompany the sheriffs and the Common Serjeant, before proceeding to any other matter, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to desire that a Common Council might be speedily held to petition his Majesty that he would, according to the statutes of 4 and 36 Edw. III., timely call a new parliament.
Scarcely were the words "A new parliament" pronounced, but a very great number cried out "Well moved, well moved" and, though none spoke up formally to the sheriffs, yet several spoke enough to show high approbation, and no one word was spoken in contradiction, which when the Common Serjeant saw, to prevent, as is conceived, others speaking to the same matter, he spoke as follows:—
What had been moved seemed to be the general sense of the whole Court. His opinion was that it was not so proper to carry up the message as first to determine their election and then carry up an account of these and that together. But many insisted on the motion and desired a message to be sent up immediately. Then one of the sheriffs acknowledged that was said by the first speaker was true, but that he had long known Common Halls, and believed that the proper work of the day was the election of officers and therefore desired the Court would proceed to that, and not carry up the message till afterwards. To which one replied that that Court was one of the ancientest, greatest, and most powerful in the City, and, though the customary business of the day was the choice of officers, yet the Court had cognizance of any thing relating to the good of the City, and therefore nothing was more proper than this, which concerned the preservation of the City from utter ruin.
On which the other sheriff said, that what the gentleman had moved was true and not unknown to most of those present, but he was of his brother's opinion, that it was fit not to carry up the message till after the election. Many being still dissatisfied and calling for a present message to be sent up, the gentleman who first moved requested that, since there seemed to be a difference touching the time, they would proceed to election and carry up the message with the persons elected, which was unanimously agreed to.
On which the Common Hall made their election of sheriffs, and sent up an account thereof to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen by the Sheriffs and Common Serjeant, as is usual. The Lord Mayor and Aldermen presently came down and took their seats in the Court of Hustings, on which the Common Serjeant read the names of the persons elected. Thereupon the Common Hall called for an answer to their message, on which the Common Serjeant, stepping forward again, said he had acquainted his Lordship and the Aldermen with their request, and that his Lordship had commanded him to declare that he would be ready to join with them in that or any other thing for the good of the city, and with that the Lord Mayor and Aldermen left the Court and dismissed the Assembly.
Speech intended to be delivered at the Common Hall, held 20 July (see ante, p. 239).
After enlarging as in Jenks' speech on the dangers of fires, the increasing power of the French at sea and their outrages on English ships and the decay of trade caused by encroachments of French manufactures and the impositions in France on English manufactures, it proceeds:—Not only our houses, trades, liberties and lives but our Protestant religion is in eminent danger. The Papists amongst us lift up their heads and say their day is near, and the English monasteries and convents abroad openly declare they shall have their ancient church lands and convents again by the French king's aid. The people are so frighted that scarce any man dares buy church lands, and those that will run the risk declare two years' purchase abatement of the price of other lands, because of the danger of Popery returning. Is there any more than the breath of our king between that and us? If the presumptive heir of the Crown be a Roman Catholic, what security can be given that the king shall live 8 or nine months? And what safety is there provided for the Protestant religion, if a Catholic shall possess the Crown? This being our sad condition, what can save this city, but laws fitted by a parliament for every grievance? May not our case and the kingdom's too be desperate, if we shall wait 8 or 9 months for the parliament's meeting?
You were lately moved to desire the Lord Mayor to call a Common Council to consider an address to his Majesty to call a new parliament speedily according to the statutes of 4 and 36 Edw. III., whereby a parliament is to be holden at least every year, the parliament being so prorogued that it cannot be convened within a year. Was a more seasonable and necessary motion ever made? How could a citizen consult his fellows in a more proper place and time? How could he move more modestly, than to desire the debate of the matter to be had in their lesser assemblies? How could he be more studious of peace than to avoid doing anything by that numerous assembly, lest it might be tumultuous? What can be more innocent than to pray that the citizens' authority should show their case to the king and their thoughts of the means for their relief?
Yet such a harmless needful motion is now taken by some of the king's Council to be seditious and tumultuous, and your fellow citizen and one of your Common Council is made a prisoner for it. Our Common Hall is the great authority and power in our City. You are instead of the whole body of the freemen, to whom all our ancient liberties and customs have been confirmed by the Great Charter and by 30 or 40 Acts of Parliament, but, if any of you may be imprisoned for mentioning the City's grievances to you, or for moving for an Address to the king according to law, you are no more an assembly of any authority or use. Your ancient liberty and all the Acts of Parliament are become void to you and all your members, if, when you are assembled, you must be dumb. Was it ever heard of before, that a member of a lawful assembly was imprisoned for making a lawful motion in it, for praying only that the king might be moved that the statutes concerning parliaments might be put in execution, when need so urgently requires it? If it be said that such a motion was not the work of the day, which was to choose officers, can any be deceived of their prime and greatest liberty? To think that the lesser authority of the City can confine the greater to do nothing but what the lesser pleases, were to turn the government of the City topsy turvy and make the will of the Common Hall inferior to that of the Lord Mayor? In the present case less power was exercised than 12 of the Common Council have frequently used in demanding a Common Council of the Lord Mayor, and this Common Hall was only moved to pray it. Had the assembly been only a common meeting of Englishmen, might not any have lawfully discoursed the City's or country's grievances and dangers, and showed his opinion that nothing but a new parliament, speedily called, was likely to relieve them, and that it was fit to address the king for it. What can be more modest, innocent and dutiful to his Majesty?
Even the law of the 13th of this king for preventing tumult and disorders in petitioning never restrained any man or assembly from petitioning or soliciting others to petition for any thing agreeable to the laws established, but allows the Lord Mayor or Common Council to address against matter established by law thought by them to be grievances; how then can a motion be criminal that a Common Council should address for a parliament, as the law requires?
If you, the Common Hall, shall by your silence agree that your members may be lawfully imprisoned for such innocent, peaceful motions, you must bid adieu not only to all the rights and liberties of your City, but to the common liberty of Englishmen, you must bid farewell to the happy security of our lives, liberties and estates by the laws, whereby every man ought to be safe in his person and estate, unless he transgress the law, and must yield yourselves subject to the wills of a few courtiers and be buried in gaols, or otherwise destroyed, if you displease them, though in praying for what might be demanded as your right.
Had there been no need of a parliament being presently called before this strange invasion of all your City liberties and all English freedom in imprisoning one of your members without bail for doing his duty, this alone were sufficient reason for you to address his Majesty for a speedy parliament. [Printed. 14 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
An imperfect copy of the above being pages 1, 4, 5 and 8 forming one side of a sheet, probably seized before the other side was printed. [Ibid.]
[July ?] Affidavit by Roger Newton, master of the Essex ketch, that she is navigated by English seamen, is English-built, and belongs to inhabitants of London, and that she is the same ship which has been surveyed by Isaac Cooke, surveyor, 24 July, 1676, and that he knows of no other name she ever had, or of any other pass she had save one dated 30 June last, now delivered up to be cancelled. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, No. 164.]
July.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 384. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
40 July 1 5 16 0 S.W.
41 " 2 3 19 0 S.W.
42 " 3 2 23 3 S.W.
43 " 4 2 23 2 W.
44 " 5 1 6 0 N.W.
45 " 6 1 0 0 N.
46 " 8 1 0 0 N.E.
47 " 9 1 1 0 N.E.
48 " 10 2 1 0 N.E.
49 " 11 3 1 0 N.E.
50 " 12 3 3 0 N.E.
51 " 13 2 1 0 N.E.
52 " 15 2 2 1 S.E.
53 " 16 2 1 1 S.W.
54 " 17 2 2 2 S.E.
55 " 18 3 5 3 S.E.
56 " 19 5 6 0 S.E.
57 " 20 2 4 3 S.W.
58 " 21 2 5 2 W. About 50 Flemings passed by here this morning, 5 whereof were men-of-war, and 3 flag ships.
59 " 22 3 10 6 S.W.
60 " 23 3 10 7 S.W.
61 " 24 4 10 2 S.W.
62 " 25 3 11 1 S.W.
63 " 26 3 12 0
64 " 27 6 13 0 S.E. To-day the Greyhound, cruising between Dover and Calais, met a small vessel laden with about 16 packs of wool and brought her into the Downs.
65 " 29 3 3 0 N.E.
66 " 30 3 2 2 N.E.
67 " 31 2 4 1 S.