BHO

Charles II: December 1677

Pages 486-548

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1677-8. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1911.

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December 1677

Dec. 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the wind was mostly N.W. In the afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats, which left the Brill on Thursday. The Prince was not then arrived. It rained almost all yesterday and last night. To-day the wind is south of west, and the weather very foggy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 44.]
Dec. 1.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 29th arrived here the Mayflower, of this place, in 24 hours from Morlaix in company of one vessel only for Topsham. They saw several ships, but spoke only with a French privateer, which showed them no incivility. After some stop they have liberty again to bring in their cloth and sell it in the market at Morlaix, though not made to the breadth it ought to be and was proposed. They are raising what fresh forces they can at Morlaix and those parts, the drums beating daily about the streets. Some Ostend privateers were lately taken by French men-of-war. We had the other night a very great storm at S.E., which brought some of our boats on shore and did some damage to the ships in Cobb. Wind now N.W. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Ormonde. The enclosed petition of the Duke of Monmouth being to be referred by the established rule to you, I thought it a respect due to him to give it this cover from my own hand, leaving the merits of the case wholly to your judgement.
I do not trouble you further in the two or three matters you wrote to me on some weeks since, till the occasion be given me from those that shall be found concerned in them on this side, which, I think, is the part you mean me to take in them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 178.]
[Dec. ?] The Duke of Monmouth to the King. Petition stating a grant to the petitioner of 1,666l. 13s. 4d., part of the 27,000l. reserved by his Majesty on the present establishment for Ireland, as more fully appears in the annexed draft of a letter prepared for his Majesty's signature, and praying a reference of the same to the Lord Lieutenant in order to the passing the great seal of that kingdom. At the foot,
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof with the annexed draft of a letter to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 116.] Annexed,
The draft of the above letter in the same terms as the letter itself, dated 23 March, 1677–8, which will be calendared in the next volume. [Ibid. No. 116 i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 211.]
Dec. 1.
Dublin.
Capt. Lancelot Bolton to Viscount Conway. I am yet at Dublin. The cause of my stay was that Lord Granard at the rendezvous unknown to me appointed another in my place in kindness to me, though I should have been well pleased it had not been altered, and, just as I was going down, I received this intimation, on which I stayed day after day expecting Roger Jones' landing, but I fear he is lost, for it is a week and more since he was seen to go aboard the Charity at Chester contrary to all advice, being an old rotten vessel. Nothing is heard of her yet, but a league off Howth have been seen the sides of a ship, trunks and bags floating, which are sad symptoms of poor Roger's ruin.
Lord Granard came to town yesterday, the Duke having sent for him. They are preparing for Scotland. The account of that I leave to Lord Granard, who intends to write to you to-day. Yesternight I was with him after he came from the Duke, and had the honour to be alone with him, till he was ready to go to bed. Most of our discourse was of you, and indeed you are exceedingly obliged to him, for not only to me, but to the best here, he is never better pleased than when he is speaking honourably of you and acknowledging his obligations to you. I find by him that his son is extremely in love with your niece, and that it has no ordinary bounds, for he has expressed to his father that he will lose his life rather than her, and begs of his father to set no limits to his affections, but let him take his own rules and measures, for his happiness is wholly in her, and I believe Lord Granard [is] no less in love with her, for he says she is of that modesty, discreet behaviour and goodness, that he had rather have her for his son in her smock than any other alive with a fortune, and, what adds more flame to his desires, she is your niece, which relation he sets the greatest value on. This I heard from himself, and thought it my duty to acquaint you with. I learn by all hands that everybody wishes Mr. Forbes had her, and all are against Mr. Coote, for he has disobliged all there by low and mean things, and the other has endeared all to him by a discreet and generous behaviour. This, I assure you, is the words of all that come from thence.
Two packets came in to-night, and not one word of Scotland. Lord Granard desires you will favour him with a letter by the first; he says he has writ four since he has received one. I can say nothing of poor Roger's safety, though I stayed concluding my letter till past the time. My Lord is very impatient to hear from you, and fail him not. [2 pages. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 117.]
Dec. 2.
Edinburgh.
The Lords of Session and the Commissioners of Justiciary of Scotland to the King. They were surprised with the petition of Alexander Ferguson of Kilkerran, charging both the Lords of Session and Commissioners of Justiciary with injustice and oppression, though naming only the President and the Justice Clerk, who had no interest therein beyond the others. They have carefully revised those processes, and find that in the first the said Alexander obtained a decreet against his own brother with which he was so satisfied that he extracted the same and has procured payment. The second ran against his brother, whom he pursued as tutor to their nieces, in which he seems to have been satisfied; but, pursuing his brother for perjury and his nephew for forgery, the pursuits were found so malicious that the justices at Kilkerran's desire, notwithstanding the prayers of the brother and nephew whose proofs were ready and who desired to be cleared, deserted the dyet, so that he could not have been prejudged. There was no temptation to injustice, the subject matters being of no value, and they were unanimous. They humbly remind his Majesty of the declaration of James V. at the institution of this judicature of Lords of Session, that, as they represent the King's person and authority in doing justice, any persons murmuring at or falsely accusing them should be punished with all vigour. They request that he will vindicate them, and declare his displeasure against that malicious defamer by sending him down prisoner, to convince both nations of his satisfaction with the integrity of those named in that petition and thus show such marks of his princely esteem for all of them as may beget the necessary reverence in his subjects. [Original and copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, Nos. 46, 47.]
Dec. 2.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Caveat at Secretary Coventry's desire that no letter from the King be procured to Manchester College for a Fellowship to the prejudice of Mr. Ogden. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 45.]
Request for entering the above caveat. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 49.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
The King's Message to the House of Commons. (Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 426.) [Ibid. No. 50.]
Dec. 3.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. Since my last I have not heard of any orders from the Lord Lieutenant in these counties to his deputies here concerning the Militia. Last Thursday I sent my ensign, Basil Fielding, into the west of Scotland. He has several acquaintances there and is trusty and discreet, and I therefore chose him as the fittest person I could employ. He is just now returned from Dumfries, and what I understand from him is enclosed. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Dec. 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. A vessel arrived at Scarborough from the East Country, freighted by a merchant of this town, who has been trading there all this last summer, and intended for this port, tells us that the Duke of Brandenburg vigorously proceeds in the siege of Stettin, and that it is generally believed he will be master of it, for he has several hundreds of carpenters at work making houses of deals for keeping the bad weather from his soldiers in their trenches. He likewise says the Swedes have an army of 20,000 men for the relief of the place, but that they must pass through the Poles' country, which the Poles will not suffer. The wind S.S.E., a hard gale. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Dec. 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have continual stormy weather these several days. Wind now W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 53.]
Dec. 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 29th came in the Marygold, of London, from Jamaica, laden with sugars, elephants' teeth and logwood, bound for London. She belongs to the Royal Company, and went out of England about 15 months ago for Guinea, whence she carried 240 negroes to Jamaica. Another came from Jamaica with her, and they were both at Scilly together, but the other putting out a day before this, it is supposed she is passed up the Channel or put into Plymouth. Last night was a very great storm, which has done some damage to some quays, but none to any ships that we yet hear of. The wind S.S.E. A Dutch privateer of five guns came in here yesterday. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no grant pass of the reversion of the Clerk of the Treasury of the Common Pleas without notice to the Lord Chief Justice of that Court. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 45.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Edmund Ashton for a grant of the overplus lands in Ireland, which soldiers and adventurers have above their proportions, and the mesne profits thereof with the arrears thereof, so as he place deficiencies thereon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 211.]
Tuesday morning.
[Dec. 4.]
The Earl of Ailesbury to William Bridgeman. Finding by a letter from my friend at Bedford, Mr. Christie, that a mandamus is like to be very successful, I send the bearer to procure it as soon as you conveniently can. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 55.]
[Dec.] Note of the Earl of Ailesbury's request for the above-mentioned mandamus to the Mayor and Corporation of Bedford to elect Joseph Arrowsmith, chaplain to the said Earl and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, to the hospital and advowson of the church of St. John's in Bedford. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Dec. 4.
Colchester.
Stephen Furly to Williamson. In 1660 I was 500l. concerned in a vessel taken from her anchor in the North Foreland by a privateer with a Portugal commission and carried to Boulogne, where the goods were sold without any condemnation or legal proceedings. I went over and sued seven months at Boulogne and Paris with 300l. charge and obtained by his Royal Highness' letter to the Duke of Vendosme sentence for satisfaction against the illegal buyers, but the Marshal d'Aumont, Governor of Boulogne, who had a large share himself, obstructed execution. Hereupon I made by the Earl of Oxford and the late Lord Lucas application to his Majesty, who granted his letter to the Earl of St. Albans, then ambassador at Paris, which letter cost 7l. besides a broad piece to yourself, but I never could obtain any redress thereby. This and other losses by sea, bad debts, the late unhappy Dutch war, sore sickness, which banished me from business and home, and the fatal fire of the City ruined me, so that from a merchant I became an officer of the Customs here. I am now a prisoner for an old debt of 20l. The fame of your charity makes me beg your assistance for regaining my liberty, having a wife and six children, only my second daughter the Countess of Kent has taken to herself, she being her godmother. Your weighty concerns may perhaps have obliterated me from your memory, but the oysters and eringoes handed you from me by Mr. Lucas, the attorney, who attended you about his Majesty's letter some times for me, may perhaps bring me to your remembrance. If you please to afford your assistance, if conveyed to my daughter Margaret at the Earl of Kent's, in Suffolk Street, it will come safe. I have liberty for a few days on bail, but, if the money be not raised, I must return into custody again. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 57.]
Dec. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Saturday night one of our packet-boats sailed hence, and by another, which arrived here last Sunday and left the Brill the evening before, we understand the Prince of Orange landed that Saturday at Scheveling, about half an hour from the Hague. Yesterday one of the yachts (the Portsmouth, as I am informed) came into this harbour and sailed again this morning. These three days the wind has been very various and the weather very uncertain. To-day the wind is northerly or a little westward of it. A small vessel was cast away last Saturday not far from this, the men all saved. Her lading, apples and hazel-nuts, was cast up on our shore. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Dec. 4.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning the outwardbound Smyrna fleet arrived in the Downs, and suddenly after Sir Richard Munden, their convoy, in the St. David. A topsail gale at N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Dec. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 60.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 60 i.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate. Requiring them to admit Robert Pell, master of the free school at Hull, formerly of Magdalene College, to the degree of M.A. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 59.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the creation of Charles, son of the Duke of York, to be Baron of Dauntesey and Earl and Duke of Cambridge, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 221.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Licence to Thomas Mariet, high sheriff of Warwickshire, to repair into Gloucestershire or elsewhere. Minute. [Ibid. f. 222.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Sir Walter Scott, elder, of Harden, his heirs and assigns, of the ward and non-entry of the lands of Robertowne and Howcleugh and of the mains of Borthwickshiles, which pertained to Sir Gideon Scott of Heychester, deceased, with the relief thereof, when the same shall happen, together with the marriage of Walter, Earl of Tarras, son and apparent heir to the said Sir Gideon Scott, and failing him by decease unmarried, the marriage of any other heirs male or female that shall succeed the said Sir G. Scott in the said lands. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 325.]
Dec. 4.
Dublin.
[Lord Coloony to Viscount Conway.] I make no question you are sufficiently informed by my dear friend, Sir George Rawdon, of what has lately passed between my son Richard and Col. Alexander McDonnell and the sad effects of it, and the grounds of it, which I am as yet a greater stranger to than I am certain Sir George can be, as having been on the spot, and in all likelihood he must know the nature with all the circumstances of it, which, I am certain, he will truly give you an ample account of. Now my most humble and earnest request is, that you will so manage this affair to my poor son's advantage as to procure the King's pardon for him, and so much the rather, because 'twas my ambition of a real relation to you and Sir George that gave occasion for this unhappy accident, which I see not how my son could well have avoided, rebus sic stantibus, if the relation of it be truly represented to me. I know my son and myself will have many great and powerful adversaries to encounter, but I depend principally on your justice, honour and aid so far forth as not to see me and him oppressed below the merit of our cause. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 118.]
Dec. 4.
Dublin.
[Lord Coloony to Sir George Rawdon.] I have just now come from Moore Park, where I stayed since my coming out of Leitrim, not being very well, as now, I bless God, I am. I have written effectually by this post to my dear partner to procure my son's pardon and his second's and remitted the narrative of this sad accident to you, who are better able to circumstantiate it to my lord than 'tis possible for me to do, because of your having been on the spot, and that, I hope, you will do effectually, if you have not done it already, for without the true history of it my lord will be able to do little, were he ever so willing, as I make no question he will be, when he shall consider seriously and as the truth is that my ambition to have a real relation to him and to yourself has been the ground of this sad accident, which otherwise, I am certain, would never have fallen out, had it not been on that score, and I make no doubt it was a picked quarrel on the gentleman's part, he having no other just ground for it that I can hear of. This is my comfort, that God knows the bottom of this affair, though it has been laid ever so deep, and will in His good time compensate the contrivers of it, when they least think of it. Your care and most extraordinary affection to my dearest child I no ways question nor ever did, but such plain-dealing men as you and I have little reason to covet living in this corrupt age, where nothing but Machiavellian stratagems are practised, but there will be a time for reckoning with them by a Judge that it will not be possible for them to elude with all their devices. I would give more than I will now speak of for one hour's discourse with you, that I might unmask or unriddle that letter to you wherein I signified my jealousies of what was intended, though I hoped they would have been at least so generous as to have ventured their own skins in the cause and not have gone this dishonourable way to work. We may in good time meet, and then, you may be sure, I shall unbosom myself to you. In the meantime I beg you to present my most affectionate service to that dear lady, your noble daughter, whom I will ever honour for my dearest child's sake, who, I am confident, loved her most entirely, as I hope she has now no reason to suspect, since he has given such bloody proofs of it. [Nearly 2 pages. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 119.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Whereas on the report of the Committee of Trade read in Council 28 Nov. last concerning a debt due from the City and Senate of Hamburg to Christian and Elizabeth Hayes as daughters and assigns of Col. Patrick Hayes, deceased, it was ordered they should this day attend with their counsel to explain their case, whereof Mr. Jacobson, agent for the said Senate, had notice, that he might attend if he pleased, in pursuance whereof the said parties attending with their counsel, who having fully opened the petitioners' right to the said debt and the dilatory proceedings and injuries they have met with at Hamburg and elsewhere for above 34 years by the procurement of the said Senate, notwithstanding the frequent and pressing instances of the ministers of his Majesty and his Royal father, his Majesty being fully satisfied by the report of the said Committee of the great injustice and oppressions of the said Senate towards his said subjects, ordered in Council that Secretary Williamson forthwith prepare a letter for his royal signature, acquainting the said City and Senate with his great sense of this oppression, notwithstanding the instances of himself and his Royal father, and that, if they do not before 25 March next pay the said Christian and Elizabeth 43,000 rix-dollars capital sum, with interest from 17 May, 1644, till payment, with full satisfaction for all their damages and charges, then his Majesty positively declares that without any further hearing he will grant letters of marque and reprisal, and it is hereby ordered and declared that in such case on the petitioners' application letters of marque and reprisal shall be immediately issued out of the Court of Admiralty against the said City and Senate, their goods and subjects, as well within his Majesty's dominions as on the open seas, till full satisfaction be made of the said debt, interest and damages and such other charges as shall be hereafter expended touching the recovery thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 61.]
Dec. 5.
Tredegar.
William Morgan to Williamson. I hope this will find you at ease from my troublesome wife. I would give anything I had kept her at home, for nothing troubles me more than that she should be so troublesome to you and other good friends, as I hear she has been. If ever I have to do with her again, I shall take care she shall not be troublesome to others, whatever I endure. I fear 'tis not in her power to help it, and therefore I pity her with all my heart, and shall always endeavour, as much as in me lies, for her recovery and doing well. I have sent you up my little bay stone horse. I am sorry he is not bigger, but what he wants in bigness I hope he will make up in goodness. I also send you a black mare of my own breed, which, if I am not mistaken, will match your coach mares. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 62.]
Dec. 5.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday I acquainted you that Sir Richard Munden with the Smyrna fleet arrived in the Downs. They now wait only the opportunity of a fair wind and good weather. Afterwards Sir John Holmes arrived in the Downs and the Mermaid from attending the Prince and Princess. They left him in sight of the Dutch coast with five Dutch men-of-war. Letters from London speak variously about Sir John Narbrough. The least says he took three of the six Turks. More than a topsail gale at S., sometimes a point or two westerly or easterly. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Governor and Council for the East India Company at Fort St. George, Madraspatam, for the trial of John Hartley, living in the factory of Fort St. George, for the murder of William Gilbert, and also of Manuel Brandan de Lina of the same factory for the murder of his Christian servant and for the execution of them or either of them, if found guilty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 198.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Anthony Palmer of Woolfox, Rutland, high sheriff of that county, to live out of it. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 41.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to Simon Beckett, mayor, and the corporation of Bedford. Particularly recommending Joseph Arrowsmith, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and domestic chaplain to the Earl of Ailesbury, to be elected by them to the hospital and cure of the parish of St. John's, Bedford, which, the King is informed, is now vacant and in their disposal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 60.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Theophilus, Earl of Huntingdon, of two fairs every year, to be held on the Tuesday preceding Palm Sunday and on the second Tuesday after Easter Sunday at Loughborough, with liberty to sell horses and all other cattle there on the first six Thursdays after Christmas, it being found by an inquisition taken there 14 June last that it will be no damage to the Crown or to any others or to any neighbouring fairs. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 442.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting grants to Sir James Cuff and William Carr of pensions of 300l. per annum each, to take place on the first determination of any pensions or temporary payments on the Irish establishment, and a subsequent grant to Charles, Earl of Middlesex, and Thomas Felton of a yearly pension of 800l., to commence immediately after the determination of the like pension granted to Sir John Hanmer for three years, which determined at Easter last, and that, in regard the said grant to the Earl of Middlesex and Thomas Felton is subsequent to the said grant to the said Sir James Cuff and William Carr, they might reasonably expect to have their pensions answered out of the said 800l. per annum: yet, they being willing to acquiesce in the said Earl and Thomas Felton being preferred to the said 800l. per annum, so that they may be secure to come in on the next vacancies, authorizing and requiring him to give order for the immediate placing of the said grant of 800l. per annum to the said Earl of Middlesex and Thomas Felton on the Irish establishment, in lieu of and to commence from the determination of the pension granted to Sir John Hanmer as aforesaid, and further to cause a clause to be inserted in the said establishment for payment of the said pensions of 300l. apiece to the said Sir James Cuff and William Carr on the first vacancies of any other pensions on the said establishment, provided that this does not extend to the avoiding any letters patent granted before the said grants to the said Sir James Cuff and William Carr. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 194.]
Dec. 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I wrote in my last that the Prince landed on Saturday, which the master since retracted, and said it was last Thursday. Yesterday was heavy dirty weather and the wind S.E., so that the packet-boat could not well get out till this morning. Now about noon the wind is southerly, but the weather rainy. In her went Mr. Atterbury, who desired me to forward the enclosed. He brought me a letter from you, by which I found I had still a good place in your remembrance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 64.] Enclosed,
Thomas Atterbury to Williamson. Announcing his arrival there at 3, and that he would sail in the packet-boat next morning, and hoping to give him a good and speedy account from the other side. Dec. 5, 4 p.m., Harwich. [Ibid. No. 64 i.]
Dec. 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in here the Jonas, of London, from Kingsbourgh (Königsberg), laden with pipestaves, bound for France. Off Ushant they met with two French men-of-war, which plundered the master and men of all their clothes and took from them several casks of liquors. They pretend to belong to Brest and that they are the King's menof-war. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the place of one of the King's falconers to John Preston for his life with a salary of 50l. per annum in the room of Jasper Everett, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40a, f. 222.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Francis, Viscount Longford, which set forth the letters of 9 June, 1674, for a grant to him, then Lord Aungier, of the manor of Portlester (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–75, p. 278), and that on delivering the said letters the grant was obstructed by means of some instructions to the Lord Lieutenant in Aug., 1674, afterwards confirmed in 1675, that no grant should pass by virtue of any letter till the Lord Treasurer were acquainted with it and his report had thereon, and also by an order in Council of 1 Oct., 1675, above a year and a quarter after the date of the said letters, forbidding the distribution of any lands in Ireland till the common stock of debt and credit was cast up, out of which order John, Lord Kingston being exempted with preference to all others, his agents now pretend to this very land of Portlester, so that the said Viscount was in danger of losing the favour intended him with his charges and trouble in discovering the King's title to the said lands, and therefore prayed to be exempted out of the said order of 1 Oct., 1675, as to this particular, and that the present Lord Lieutenant might be directed to pass his grant without delay, pursuant to the said letters of 9 June, 1674: requiring and authorizing him to take effectual care that there be not comprehended in the said Lord Kingston's grant any of the lands or rents claimed by the said Viscount as aforesaid and that there be not any disposition of them to any others whatsoever till the King's further pleasure be known. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 196.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 120.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the creation of Francis, Viscount Longford, to be Earl of Longford in Ireland with remainder to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to Gerald Aungier, his next brother and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to Ambrose Aungier, his youngest brother, and the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 203.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Starkey's books, now remaining in the Council Office, be burnt to ashes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 66.]
Dec. 7.
5 a.m.
James Hickes to Williamson. These two or three lines are to beg pardon for not waiting on you since the Colonel's leaving us and Mr. Frowd succeeding, but some business Mr. Frowd put on me and other things prevented me. Yesterday a person was here to acquaint me from Mr. William Herbert of Percy Lodge near Towcester that the person in Towcester who usually brought him his letters was dead of the sickness and his whole family, so desired they might be sent to Stony Stratford and he would send for them. The postmaster at Towcester was written to last night on this subject. When his answer comes, I shall acquaint you with it.
Postscript.— This post brings not one word of the sickness, but I expect the postmaster's answer on Monday morning. [S P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 67.]
Dec. 7.
Cambridge.
Dr. Ralph Cudworth to Williamson. Entreating him to accept this book, which Mr. Royston will deliver him, as a small testimony of his gratitude for his many favours and civilities. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Dec.7.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Several vessels are arrived from Ostend and Rotterdam, but bring no news. The wind keeps much easterly with dark, foggy weather. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Dec. 7.
Yarmouth.
Clement Feltham to Richard Bower at the White Horse in Fetter Lane. Requesting him to advise with Mr. Warde how a pardon must be pleaded and send him the advice by the first post, for the sessions are next week, and then Mr. Bradshawe is to plead his pardon.—The town is filled full of noise about the new election of a burgess. Sir Thomas Medowes has declared he will stand, and they say Mr. Huntington for himself; for the townsmen will not hear of any stranger. It is also said that, if Mr. Huntington declines it, Sir James Johnson or Mr. Thaxter will stand. There is all endeavour possible in making parties, and it is supposed the election may be suddenly, it being reported in the public assembly that order was given for the writs last Monday. I request you to let me hear how things go and you shall hear of our affairs frequently. Communicate this letter to my brother, and tell him Robert Bransby is gone into the country to court his mistress, Mistress Anne Garnish, a very handsome person and a good fortune. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Dec. 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 71.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 71 i.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Dr. Holbeach, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. Congratulating him on being chosen to be Vice-Chancellor, and assuring him that whatever addresses the University has to make to him by his hands shall be very readily received and to his power effectually answered. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 106.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of the mayor, commonalty and citizens of London for letters patent for the management of the Intelligence Office, now set up in the Exchange by one Brigs without authority. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 212.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Grant to Richard, Viscount Ranelagh, of the dignity of an earl of Ireland, by the name of Earl of Ranelagh. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 442.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proclamation requiring the attendance of members of Parliament on 15 Jan. next, to which day the two Houses stand adjourned, in respect of several important matters intended to be debated. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 361.]
Draft thereof approved in Council, 7 Dec. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 72.]
Dec. 7. Sir Edward Scott to the King. Petition stating that by orders in Council of 15 Dec., 1675, and 3 Oct., 1676, payment was directed of an arrear of Lord Courcy's pension of 337l., long since due, to the petitioner out of the surplus of the revenue, yet the petitioner had no benefit, for there was no such fund as a surplus of the revenue, and, in regard the petitioner has been at great expense and long attendance in procuring the said orders and in making a journey for Ireland and prosecuting the matter there and that the said arrear has been so long due, praying an order to the Lord Lieutenant to direct the payment of the said 337l. out of such part of the revenue of Ireland as may best answer the same, this sum being assigned to the petitioner by his Majesty in consideration of his great charges in maintaining the present Lord Kinsale and his late mother. Noted, as dispatched that day. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 121.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for payment to Sir Edward Scott of 337l. following the terms of the above petition. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 336, p. 61.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 122.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 202.]
Dec. 8.
Corpus Christi College, Oxford.
Henry Hill, Vice-President, and nine Fellows to Williamson. Hoping he is satisfied that their proceedings in the rejection of Mr. Curtois are just and statuteable, and requesting his assistance in preventing the efforts made for his restoration, which would be a great mischief, not only to the College, but to the whole University, as being a great blow to discipline in all the Colleges, as he was rejected at the end of his probationership for his notorious ill manners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 73.] Probably enclosed,
Vindication from the Statutes, &c., of the conduct of the majority of the Fellows of Corpus Christi College in refusing to approve of Mr. Curtois as a permanent Fellow, with an account of the proceedings under a commission given to the Bishop of Winchester by the King to examine into the validity of their proceedings, charging Curtois with several lascivious passages, arguing that a man may not be sufficiently criminal to be expelled and yet be unfit to be chosen Fellow, and that the decision of the majority is final. [Ibid. No. 73 i.]
Dec. 8.
Kirby.
Lord Hatton to Williamson. I have newly received a letter from Capt. Sheldon, my Lieut.-Governor, of 26 Nov., informing me that a few days before a vessel came in from Ireland, out of which divers quantities of wool were sold in the island contrary to law, which being discovered by my officer, appointed to take an account of all ships that come in and go out, the officer informed the Lieut.-Governor, and by his order stopped the ship and secured the merchant, at which the court there took offence, pretending that no such thing was to be done there but by their authority, and that they would free both ship, goods and merchant, but afterwards they were willing to join in the seizure. The merchant was one Weaver, whom I have often before had cause to suspect, but could never make so full a discovery of his practices. I request your favour and assistance in two points. The first is, that my officers may be justified and encouraged in stopping and seizing such as trade contrary to law, without which no such unlawful trading will ever be restrained, for the islanders and the court there will be always ready to connive at all such courses, being those that deal in the commodities so brought, and will not care how the laws of England are broken so as they can make their advantage. Secondly, since his Majesty, by his letters patent constituting me governor, has granted me all forfeitures there, by which I conceive this ship and goods now forfeited belong to me, I request that in whatever order his Majesty shall give concerning them consideration may be had of my right, and that they may not be taken out of my hands. I must not conclude without a word or two concerning the condition of that place as to defence and reminding you that, since the castle was blown up and laid all in ruins, nothing has been done towards the repairs, so that there is not any place left to keep one barrel of powder or any other stores even from the weather. I know not whether the present juncture may not make this be thought more necessary to be speedily provided for than formerly, but I take it to be my duty at all times to remind his Majesty of it. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 74.]
Dec. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The weather continues dark and heavy, the wind uncertain, yesterday westerly and to-day southerly. The master of one of our packet-boats arrived last night from the Brill, brings no news but that the Prince was received at the Hague with much joy, having stayed at Honslaendike about four days after his landing. He heard no news at all from the army. By Wednesday's packet-boat the Duke of Albemarle sent a present to the Prince of Orange of dogs and pots of venison, &c. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Dec. 8. Warrant for the presentation of James Beauford, M.A., to the rectory of Lanteglos and Advent, Cornwall, void by the resignation of James Lake, canon residentiary of Exeter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 106.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Godolphin, maid of honour to the Queen, of a yearly pension of 200l. during pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 4.]
Dec. 8. Notes by Williamson about the victualling of the Navy. Victuallers called in as to several parts of the contract. 1. As to the 60,000l. credit, they insist, if not all called for, or some part above 10,000l., then none at all to be called for. The sense of this is, that the King may declare short all the first part of the year and think to supply his affairs on this credit. At last they yield and depart from their exception. 2. As to convoys. They insist to have convoys from the ports in the Mediterranean to Tangier, &c. From Cadiz to Tangier the King will always have frigates at Tangier to convoy, &c. From other ports they must do as generally all other merchants do: take what convoys they can get. 3. As to their security of tallies, &c., for their repayment, &c., to have it in the words "before any part be issued, &c." they leave it to the Lord Treasurer to draw it as he pleases. 4. They are to have the old contractors' cask. Sir D. Gauden delays the delivery, &c. They pray he may be directed to deliver them forthwith to them on appraisement by indifferent persons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 409.]
Dec. 8. List of ships fitted out for the Mediterranean. Portsmouth— Rupert, Centurion, Hampshire, Mary; the Hope—Assistance, Foresight; Downs—St. David; Chatham—Defiance; Deptford— Phœnix. [Ibid. p. 411.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the warrant of 28 April, 1676, concerning Sir William Petty and Robert Marshall, calendared in the last volume, p. 92, and the report of the Earl of Essex, then Lord Lieutenant, dated 19 Aug., 1677, calendared ante, p. 404, and that the Lord Treasurer agrees with the said report: that in the first place he issue forth all necessary orders for rectifying the misnomers and double charges complained of and for passing letters patent to the said Sir William Petty and his heirs for all those lands which have appeared to the said Lord Lieutenant to have been intended by the late Commissioners of the Court of Claims to be settled on him, and which have been since held in custodium by him, reserving thereout so much rent at least as he yearly paid for the said custodium, and not exceeding what the Lord Lieutenant shall judge the said lands may conveniently bear, so as not to hinder their improvement and considering their barrenness and coarseness, and taking care that the Farmers of the Revenue be not entitled to any defalcations by reason thereof, and as to the reducing of quit-rents the petitioners declare that they acquiesce and submit to the orders lately given, which extend a general relief to all in that condition, but, it appearing that no progress was made for reducing the arrears of quit-rents on the said lands by reason of some former orders putting a stop thereto till the King should declare his further pleasure, and that the said late Lord Lieutenant and Lord Treasurer conceive it necessary the said arrears should be reduced or otherwise the said lands cannot be planted or improved or the growing quit-rents answered thereout, further directing that he forthwith proceed to make such reducement of the arrears lying now in charge as may encourage the petitioners to plant and improve and enable them to pay the growing quit-rents now settled on the same, and lastly as to the residue of the afore-recited particulars, which have not hitherto been answered, but which according to the former report of the said late Lord Lieutenant and Lord Treasurer have been thought to be as well for the King's service as for the petitioners' relief, that some speedy course were taken therein, directing him to cause all the said matters so remaining to be fully examined and to determine the same according to justice and equity. [7 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 336, p. 62.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 197.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 123.]
Dec. 8.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter of 19 Nov. brought by Mr. Muschamp, and thanking him for his many civilities and particularly for this last favour about a purse. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Dec. 8.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. Brooks, the privateer of Ostend, has made his escape by a rope over the walls of Mont Orgueil Castle. The Court of Justice has made strict search through the island in hopes to catch him again, but I believe he was provided with a [? boat] to make his escape. He endured imprisonment near a year and a half and was brought to no trial. It is very certain it was not he who took the Bristol ship, but one Pell of Flushing, and that he was 5 or 6 leagues off when Pell took her, but, Brooks being in consort with Pell for 8 days, they divided the goods betwixt them, and, when Brooks was seized, he restored all the goods he had to the Bristol merchants' factors at St. Malo. I conceive, seeing Brooks has thus made his escape, his vessel [belongs] to the King. She is but small, about 8 or 9 tons burden. When I was in England last, I could not obtain a double shallop for Castle Elizabeth. I now humbly desire his Majesty will bestow this double shallop [on me], for she will be of great use to correspond betwixt Jersey and Guernsey, and will serve on occasion to waft over 50 or 60 musketeers from Elizabeth Castle to St. Hilary's Hill.
I desire to know his Majesty's pleasure concerning the great ship I seized. Though I have lightened her of planks above 150 tons, a ship of her burden will not like to be grounded too long. I desire you'll let the bearer, my servant, Mr. Carpenter, know his Majesty's pleasure concerning the contents of this. [Torn. S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 63.]
Dec. 8.
Jersey.
Philip le Geyt, Lieutenant Bailly and six jurats of Jersey to the Committee for Trade. Giving an account of Brook's escape, 22 Nov. last, as in the last letter. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 64.]
Dec. 9. Thomas Whittear to James Hickes. Mr. Herbert's man told you a false story in saying the sickness is in our town. We are all well, as I shall inform you at large within these four days.
With note by Hickes that this came since the Chester mail from the postmaster at Towcester with the Birmingham packet, which by waters was prevented reaching the mail at Colshall (Coleshill) as it ought. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 76.]
Dec. 9.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind last week proved variable, so that several ships came in and out here. Among them was one of and for Plymouth from Viana in Portugal, which by storms 40 leagues off the Lizard lost his mainmast. Other shipping news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Dec. 9. Licence to Sir Compton Read, high sheriff of Buckinghamshire, to remain at his house in Oxfordshire or elsewhere out of the said county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 222.]
Dec. 10. James Hickes to Williamson. I expected this morning answer from the postmaster at Towcester concerning what Mr. Herbert's friend reported of the sickness there, but I have none from him, at which I admire, perceiving he is at home by his signing the label. The postmaster of Brickhill writes four or five died there in a week lately, but not of the plague, as he has been informed by very strict enquiry. I would have sent you his letter, but the greatest part relates to business of the office, but I shall rub up the postmaster in Towcester for his silence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 78.]
Dec. 10. J. H. Bulow to Williamson. Requesting to know at what hour he may see him, as he is in the utmost impatience to know if his Excellency spoke to his Majesty yesterday about his business, and whether there are any means of letting him send some resolutions soon to their Highnesses, his masters. As to the other business he hopes it can be decided without the gentleman staying for it here, for, as he has received pressing orders for his return to Holland, he would like, if possible, to leave to-morrow. [French. Ibid. No. 79.]
Dec. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon Sir John Holmes, our Admiral, went towards London. This noon arrived the East India ship Mary, which lost her passage. Everyone believed she had been lost. It blows fresh at S. by W., but varies often to S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Dec. 10.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Adventure of this place from St. Malo, Jersey and Guernsey, but by contrary winds and bad weather was near three weeks from St. Malo, where they are building more men-of-war of 40 guns apiece and have condemned most of the Greenland ships they brought in, viz., those of Hamburg and those of Holland that fought. Others are yet in dispute. Jersey and Guernsey are well, but bread something scarce with them, for which the Governor's orders are come here, to be sent by the first ship.
Some fishermen of our creeks of Bear, &c., are lately returned from fishing at Lynmouth and Porlock, where they had great plenty of herrings, the like not known, a boat of 5 or 6 tons taking 100 last in a little time. Herrings, through the great abundance taken, were sold from 10d. to 14d. a mease, which is 500 at sixscore and four to the hundred. We have had the weather very varying and high blowing winds, now at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 81.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir N. Herne. Mr. Meriton appears in the competition which is like to be before the Grocers' Company for the place of Minister of All Hallows, Staining. He is particularly recommended to me by the Lord Chamberlain for what interest I can help him with among my friends of that Company. I must therefore pray you to engage Sir John Frederick's kindness so far as he is yet free and as he shall find him deserving. I am told he is not unknown to the Company as being a settled minister in the City and that he has a good reputation where he now serves. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 179.]
[Dec.] List of the names of the patrons of the rectory of All Hallows, Staining, void by the death of William Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 82.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Caveat on behalf of the Duchess of Portsmouth that no grant pass of the goods, &c., of Martin Urling, prisoner in Newgate for highway robbery. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 46.]
Dec. 10. Notes by Williamson of the petition from Jersey of Le Mesurier and that of Peter Tombes v. John Pryaulx and of John Pryaulx v. Peter Tombes as appellant from a sentence of the Court of Jersey. The last relates to a debt due from Tombes' father to Pryaulx's father. Pryaulx's father's estate was confiscated for his loyalty, and amongst the rest the said debt, which by an Act of the Court of Jersey was paid to Col. Russell, who gave a receipt for it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 413.]
Dec. 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Very high blowing winds at S. and S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 83.]
Dec. 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday night one of our packet-boats arrived from the Brill, but brought no news. It was the one that carried over Mr. Atterbury, who had an indifferent quick passage. The wind was yesterday southerly, the weather dark and dull. To-day it is westerly and hitherto the weather bright and pleasant, which seems more so because we have had so long so much bad weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 84.]
Dec. 11.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday I informed you that the Mary was arrived. Our seamen thought it was her, but it was the Loyal Subject from Bantam. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Dec. 11. Commission to George Littleton to be ensign to Major Nathaniel Darrell's company of foot in the Duke of York's regiment under Col. Sir Charles Littleton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 227.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Concerning the measures to be taken against field conventicles, &c. (Printed in Wodrow, History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, Vol. II., p. 376.) [3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 325.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation of William Adair, minister of Ayr, and George White, his colleague, to be respectively prebend of Ayr and prebend of Alloway and their successors, ministers serving the cure at the said kirks in all time coming, and to be prebends of the Chapel Royal in Scotland. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 328.]
Dec. 12.
Gray's Inn.
Opinion of Thomas Turner on the case of the Royal African Company on their letters patent, which granted to the said Company the right of trading to a considerable territory the king had acquired from the infidels by conquest and to the whole remainder whereof he had an undoubted right, to the exclusion of all other his subjects on pain of the imprisonment of the offenders and forfeiture of their ships and goods, and also established a court of judicature to be held in the said territory for the determination of all causes relating to the said imprisonments or forfeitures or mercantile contracts and affairs or trespasses and injuries done to any residing in the said territory according to equity, good conscience and the custom of merchants. He is of opinion that the grant of exclusive trading both to the part of the said territory which is in the king's possession, and that to which he has an undoubted right though no actual possession, is good in law, that the court and laws appointed by the letters patent are well established though variant from the common law of England, that the Courts of Westminster Hall may not control the decrees of this new judicature and that this new judicature may have jurisdiction of all causes arising on the seas adjacent to this territory, with reasons in support of his opinion. Endorsed, "Prerogative, 1677/8 Royal Company's Charter." [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 86.]
[Dec. ?] Longer and more elaborate opinion of Thomas Corbett upon the said letters patent, also in favour of their validity as to the grant of the exclusive right of trading and the establishment of a court of judicature and laws. Then follows a note by T[homas] C[orbett] that this case and the queries with the answers thereto being brought by Mr. Deputy Roberts and himself to Serjeant Maynard and his advice desired thereon, although at the first proposal of them he was doubtful, yet at last after conference with him and perusal of them and three weeks' consideration he declared that he was of the same opinion in all the points and that there was nothing in the said answers that was contrary to any law, and that what was there said was all that could be said in the said case, and he could say no more therein, but, in regard it concerned matters of state, he would not give his opinion under his hand. Endorsed, "1677, Prerogative. Charter of the Royal African Company." [14½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 87.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Trustees of the Charterhouse. Requiring them to elect and admit William Aerskine to the place of master of the hospital, void by the death of Martin Clifford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 206.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Appointment by the Duke of Monmouth that Col. Justin Macartie for the future deduct one sol par livre out of all moneys payable to the officers and soldiers of the Duke's foot regiment in the service of the Most Christian King, and receive the same to his own use towards carrying on the charge necessary to the station he holds as colonel, he obliging himself in consideration thereof to defray all such extraordinary charges as shall be requisite for soliciting or otherwise promoting the concerns of the regiment, in consideration of the colonel's good services since he has had the command thereof, and his great charge in supporting the dignity of a colonel, and because the colonels of the other regiments of his Majesty's subjects in France receive out of the pay of their regiments one sol par livre. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 107.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Jeane Widdrington, maid of honour to the Queen, of a yearly pension of 200l. during pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 5.]
Dec. 13.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. Thanking him for his favours to himself and his son, when they were in London, whence they arrived safely on Tuesday night.— If you find any opportunity of employment for him, he is not so engaged here but he will at a day's warning return to London to receive your commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 88.]
Dec. 13.
At 10 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind S.W. Last week and most of this has been very stormy weather, which doubtless has occasioned much shipwreck. A small vessel was cast on shore at Newton, four leagues eastward of this. It is not known what she was, the men being all cast away, as is supposed, for the boat was found a little distance from thence with three oars, one of them broke. In several places parts of wrecked vessels come ashore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 89.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder and the sheriffs of London and Middlesex to release William Mease and Thomas Witherley, prisoners in Newgate, condemned for the manslaughter of Gilbert Ward, on bail for their appearance at the next general sessions, there to plead the King's pardon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 199.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Mr. Bowyer and Mr. Sneyde. I informed the King in Council of your letter of 24 Nov. about Thomas Walker and Thomas Hamersley, suspected as clippers and coiners. He is well satisfied with your proceedings and wishes you to see the prosecution continued, that the country may be rid of such pests. I return the examinations. [Ibid. f. 200.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder and the sheriffs of London and Middlesex to respite the execution of any corporal punishment on Robert Clinton alias Fiennes, found guilty at the Middlesex gaol delivery of the manslaughter of John Ashberry, and to release him on bail for his appearance at the next general sessions. [Ibid.]
Dec. 13. Licence to Samuel Reynardson, high sheriff of Bedfordshire, to repair to London and to remain there as long as his affairs require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 223.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chancellor, after reciting that Walter Devereux, having married Anne, the sole daughter and heir to William, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, was by King Edward IV. in the 2nd year of his reign summoned to Parliament by the title of Lord Ferrers, which title by a lawful and lineal succession came at length to Robert, late Earl of Essex, who died in 1646, leaving Lady Frances, Marchioness of Hertford, his elder sister, and Sir Robert Shirley, the son and heir of Lady Dorothy, his youngest sister, his next heirs at law, so that the title of Lord Ferrers has since been in abeyance and in the King's power to dispose of, and that the King, calling to mind the great and eminent services performed by the said Sir Robert Shirley, lately deceased, to the late King and to himself in his greatest distresses, and considering as well the merits of Sir Robert Shirley, son and heir to the said Sir Robert, as that he now by inheritance possesses the lordship of Chartley, Staffordshire, the ancient seat of the Lords Ferrers, has resolved to restore to him the title, dignity and precedence of Lord Ferrers: to issue out a writ of summons to the said Sir Robert Shirley by the name and title of Lord Ferrers. [Ibid.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that Archibald, Earl of Argyle, in Jan., 1674, presented to them a signature for infeftment of the lands and estate which belonged to the Laird of Maclean, lying in Argyleshire, to be passed in his own favour, and that they refused to pass it till he should satisfy and pay the whole few duties and other duties resting to the Crown out of the said lands preceding the said date, whereupon he was necessitated to give bond for the said duties, and that there are since several few and other duties payable to the Crown yet resting unpaid, and that the said Earl has never had hitherto any benefit of that estate, and has been at considerable charges to procure and maintain his possession and to vindicate the King's authority in those parts: discharging the said Earl of the said bond granted by him and of all few duties and other dues payable to the Crown for and forth the said estate of Maclean in and preceding the month of July next, and, in case any of the said few duties or other dues be already satisfied by the Earl, the same is to be allowed to him out of any other few duties or other dues he is resting to the Crown in July next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 329.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for admitting and receiving James, Earl of Perth, into the Privy Council. [Ibid. p. 330.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Grant to Mary, Countess Dowager of Caithness, of the same precedency as she enjoyed in the time of her late husband, albeit she shall marry with a peer of a later creation. [Ibid. p. 331.]
Dec. 14.
Donnington.
John Fisher to Williamson. My first intentions after my arrival at home were to have given you an account of my journey and of the thanks I owe to yourself and the Bishop of London, but I judged it most rational to defer it till I should find an opportunity of some fuller acknowledgment. I make bold then to present you with a dish of such homely rarities as our country affords, a goose, a turkey-cock and a peacock. If they answer not the dignity and gallantry of your desert, I hope I may prevail for a pardon.
The death of the Archbishop, whose memory is precious with all loyal and orthodox men, and who I heartily wish may be succeeded by the Bishop of London, may open an opportunity of your expression of some signal kindness in the encouragement of my study. There may be many more learned, but none more loyal and very few more aged and experimented than myself, and being your first chaplain I hope I shall not be remembered in the last place. It is well known that I lost the living of Weston, to which I was presented by the College, by Mr. Barlow's (now the Bishop of Lincoln) information against me to Col. Kelsey and Lieut.-Col. Smith, his deputy, for being in arms for his Majesty, and how that rascal Guillum for Oliverian compliance was put into that place. You likewise remember, I doubt not, what a hazard I ran on the day of the thanksgiving for his Majesty's rout at Worcester in reading in my College chapel Psalm lxi. between the lessons as Owen and Conaught and many other grandees of the rebellion were present, and what constant drudgery I submitted to to keep the city of Oxford in its loyalty, and how faithfully I stood to yours and the College interest in opposing Mr. Philipp in the proctorship, though with St. John for my fidelity I was doomed to Patmos, and I cannot conceive that the Royal Oak should be wholly forgotten by you. Certainly the best of livings ought not to be clouded with the meanest maintenance. Barsabas, a man of no great learning, was proposed by the Apostles to God in opposition to the most learned Matthias and afterwards made a bishop. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 90.]
Dec. 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 91.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 91 i.]
Dec. 14.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind this week being N.W., most of the ships here sailed. One ship is come from New York laden with furs, hides and tobacco bound for Amsterdam, which by reason of the cruel cold has been ordered to winter here. Here is great frost and snow, the wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. His Majesty taking notice that St. Thomas' Day draws near, when the Common Council is to be chosen, commands me to let you know he would speak with you before your precepts issue. He supposes Sunday will be early enough; if so, he would have you come to him about 6 or 7 at Secretary Coventry's lodgings at the hour of the Foreign Committee. If you be pressed to issue your precepts earlier, you may hope an earlier time, if you please, to speak with the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 179.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Dame Elizabeth Wyndham, wife of Sir Edmund Wyndham, Knight Marshal, and Francis Darcy Savage, her son, praying that, she having at her own charges prosecuted an information against John Bill in the King's Bench, whereon he was convicted and judgment entered, but he having given her satisfaction and his Majesty having promised the benefit of the fine to her said son, his Majesty would order a Nolle prosequi in the said information or satisfaction on record of the said judgment, so as the same may be effectually discharged, his Majesty being inclined to gratify the petitioners (in case the said fine shall appear to have been set before his Majesty appropriated such fines towards the rebuilding of St. Paul's Cathedral), refers it to the Lord Treasurer to report what he may fitly do in it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 212.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
The King to John Evans, M.A., rector of Llanailhaynner, Carnarvonshire, who is going as chaplain to the factory of the East India Co. in the Bay of Bengal. Granting him a dispensation for non-residence during the time he shall continue chaplain to the said factory. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 60.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Best, Thomas Eure, Jervase Scroope, Hastings Baldock, and Peter Barnesley, gentlemen of the Queen's troop of Horse Guards commanded by Sir Philip Howard, to use all lawful means for the taking of highwaymen and robbers on the highways, and in order thereto they are from time to time with their horses and arms to ride about the highways and apprehend such highwaymen and robbers and bring them before any justice of the peace to be proceeded against according to law, and, in case they have occasion to search in any house suspected of harbouring such highwaymen and robbers, they are to take with them an adjacent constable to their assistance, and requiring all mayors, sheriffs, justices, &c., to assist them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 443.]
Dec. 14. Warrant, after reciting that Laurence Georgerini, late of Milo, an island in the Archipelago, now belonging to the Grecian Church planted in this kingdom, has represented by his petition that he has an art to pickle mackerel so as they shall continue for two years without decaying or perishing, and, the said Grecian Church having as yet no maintenance settled on it, has besought a patent for 14 years of the said art towards the better support of the said church: for a patent to the said Georgerini as prayed, for the better support and maintenance of the said church. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 223.]
Dec. 14. Warrant for a grant to George Wharton of Kirby Kendal in Westmorland of a baronetcy of England, in consideration of his service to the late and present Kings and of his sufferings on account of his loyalty to them, with a discharge for the services and payments. Minute. [Ibid. p. 224.]
Dec. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday one of our packetboats arrived. The master brought over Mr Atterbury, who presently after his landing went for London post. Wind westerly, weather dark and heavy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 93.]
Dec. 15.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Last night arrived here the John and the Amity of this place with linens from Morlaix. They came out last Sunday, lying since some time in Jersey, with one ship for London and one for the Isle of Wight. The masters give me nothing observable, the merchants following their trade, and hope it will be continued without a war, though they express their fear of it there, but much more discoursed here, as if it was a thing desirable. Our drapery sells in France, though not to the same advantage as formerly and their linens are not yet made broader. The wind is newly come E. and by N. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Trustees of the Charter House. After reciting that by letters of 12 Dec., 1676, at the request of Levison Gore he recommended John Drake to be put into the place of John Hewet, supposed to have been recommended as scholar there, but superannuated, and the said Gore has now represented he was mistaken in naming the said Hewet, who was never recommended; but that Gibson St. Leger, a King's nominee for a scholarship, is lately expelled for misdemeanour, recommending John Drake to be elected and put into the place of St. Leger. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 207.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Tufton at Rochester. As at the request of Sir Herbert Pryce he has given leave to his son, Capt. Pryce to come up to London for seven or eight days, desiring him to consent to his absence for that time. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 106.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that John Fanshaw, auditor of the north part of the duchy of Lancaster, by his petition set forth that he has by patent several fees and allowances to support the charge of his riding circuit once a year to take the accounts of stewards &c. within that part of the revenue of the said Duchy, and that the King, having assigned a great part of that revenue to the Queen for jointure, that the fees and allowances might be no charge to her, reprized the same out of her value as was formerly done in the jointures of Queen Anne and Queen Mary, and that several of the said fees and allowances have been lately ordered to be paid to Harold Kinnesman, Auditor general to the Queen, and prayed an order that his said fees and allowances might be paid him as formerly, a reference of the said petition to Sir R. Carr, Chancellor of the Duchy, and his report: for payment forthwith to the said John Fanshaw of 105l. 3s. 10d. yearly for two years, which are now in arrear, and for continuance of payment thereof yearly to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 6.]
Dec. 15.
Lisburn.
Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. Your letter with that enclosed of the 30th to Lord Granard came to me last Monday, and that night he arrived here from Dublin with Sir William Flower and many officers that met here from Belfast. Also Capt. Maitland, a cousin to Duke Lauderdale, came with instructions from the Council of Scotland to inquire of many particulars concerning the posture of this brigade and its readiness to transport, rather importing its delay, that there might be time, as is believed, to try if any other expedient could be found to lay the wicked spirit infused by their ministers into the common people, rather than to invite foreigners, as these are termed, to suppress it, and for that end every one of that Council was summoned to appear at Edinburgh and Duke Hamilton came in thither the same day this captain left, who had not been there since Duke Lauderdale's last coming into Scotland, and upon their result orders are to come to this brigade. It is thought they will not easily all agree to send for this party over. A post is settling between Edinburgh and Donaghadee for letters twice a week.
It is now thought that Roger Jones is lost at sea. He sent a trunk from Chester by another vessel with papers &c., which is safe at Dublin.
As to that affair which has fallen out so exceedingly troublesome to me and from me to you, I think it necessary to inform you more particularly how it happened, since you seem to blame my conduct of it. The General and his son came here together five or six days before Mr. Coote, where I could not refuse to entertain them, the town being full with the officers of the whole brigade and no less than 15 companies besides part of the troops quartering six or seven days together in this parish and Magheragall and Derryaghy, till Lord Granard removed to Belfast and the soldiers to their standing quarters. How could I prevent this, or imagine any rivalry by one that so slighted and reproached your former kindness and mine, until after his father moved it and desired my leave to write to you? I told him I had proceeded far in a treaty with Lord Coloony and could not in honour or honesty allow it, and desired him not to think of it, till that was completed, and he told me he had spoken with Lord Coloony, who had acquainted him with all the particulars of the proposal, which, I said, I was glad of, for then he knew I had spoken truly that I was so engaged, and that I had not treated till a full year and a half after his son had refused the kindness you intended him, in such a manner also as I was 10th to mention now to him. Much other discourse passed of his son's importunities to him to move it and of his being smitten so since he saw her, that he could have no quiet, till he had spoken to me. But her fortune I may suspect the chief motive, though it be professed that your lordship's alliance and the liking to her person is desired more than her portion. This passage may inform you otherwise than you believe of my indiscretion in discovering the bountiful provision intended for her, and also, finding the captain, after his father went to Dublin, came hither sometimes and had instruments of other officers that came to the table and by some of my own servants, I desired Sir Thomas Newcombe (Newcomen), his uncle, to speak to him to forbear my house and her company and that I could not like any should disturb our peace in the family that should come into it to challenge one under my roof, so he never came into it since.
Since this duel and Col. McDonnell's death, occasioned by Mr. Robert Forbes, who brought the challenge to Mr. Coote after supper and called him out of his father's company then in the drawing room, and that it has since appeared on examinations that the colonel came with the captain from Hillsborough after the funeral to this town at 10 at night to be his second, when he challenged Mr. Coote in my dining room privately, I last Tuesday morning, when Lord Granard desired to speak with me about your letter at his going away to Belfast, plainly acquainted him with my dissatisfaction with both of his sons and desired that they might forbear coming to the house, that I might have quietness under my roof, and that it was no time for amours, when the gentleman lay wounded here, and was to undergo a great deal more trouble, that had come to me on so just and honourable an account, so they have not appeared here since and, I hear, are out of humour.
Sir William Stewart is sometimes here and sometimes at Belfast and very discreetly demeans himself between his two brothers [-in-law] and inclines privately much to this here. Mr. Brookes' skill and care have almost cured Mr. Coote, who hopes next week to return to his father at Moore Park, 7 miles beyond Drogheda, in that other road I sometimes take to Dublin, and, if the colonel had been dressed by as good a surgeon he might probably have recovered, for the wound was for 2 days after judged not mortal, but his body was consumptive and he had been blooded 5 times not long before. The Coroner's inquest is Homicida se defendendo, the proofs being plain of the provocation and Mr. Coote's unwillingness, having no quarrel to him, and not drawing his sword till the other made the assault, swearing God damn him, he would kill him in a trice &c. with other circumstances too long to write, but all, that speak indifferently, speak well of his behaviour like a gentleman and man of courage. Bail is taken of him and the two seconds, Mr. Forbes and Lieut. Harwood. Lord Coloony intends to remove the trial by certiorari to the King's Bench, which cannot be sooner than Easter term for several reasons. As to your belief which I asked Lord Granard of, why he writ my daughter had a liking to his son, and which he did not give me any answer to but that he was so informed, my daughter absolutely denies having inclination or liking to either of them or any other in the world, or that Capt. Forbes ever moved it to her by himself or any one else, and, if she have learned the craft of women so soon and deceive me, I think I shall not easily forget her undutifulness. She pretends a desire to be absent, and, if you approve, to go into England, as I wrote in my last, and, when I know your pleasure, I think to get Lady Dungannon to take her into her protection and care at Dublin, till the weather be more fit for such a voyage, which I am confident she will not deny me. Arthur has been much wrought upon by the captain, who hunts with him and has given him a horse and a dog, which has gained him. I allow him to hunt more than I like, which he minds more than his book and other things fit for him to learn, so I am thinking of getting a man of learning to be with him and a French dancing-master is here already, that begins to put him into a better mien and posture and mend his fashion and dancing. He grows in stature and coughs but seldom. As to his maintenance and Lambeg lands, I gratefully acquiesce in your pleasure and acknowledge most gratefully your bounties to me and mine, and shall never forget how by God's good providence first I became a servant in your family and ascribe what I am and have to His mercy in placing me in it and your particular kindness in raising me in the world from a low degree, which my ancestors had reduced my family to. I have now above 50 years faithfully discharged my trust and duty with much diligence and pains to the family, which by your means I have the honour to be accounted a part of. This digression has almost made me forget the former subject, which I think is not seasonable yet to make any further steps in, and that my daughter's absence may be a means thereto till this trouble be over, and then I begin to apprehend it may not be successful, so many cross currents have fallen out therein, but what will be next I dread. Truly these courses of designing and the former contempts two years since I cannot easily forget. Yet what hereafter may happen in this uncertain world I am more thoughtful for, which I think not fit to write of in hope of your coming hither at the spring. I never had a greater desire to see you, save when I heard of your being in prison at Ostend. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 125.]
Dec. 16. Notes by Williamson about the Tower and the various officers and others employed about it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 95.]
Dec. 16.
Ednall. (Edenhall.)
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. The continual floods have cut off all correspondence with Scotland, but now we expect to hear every day and what comes shall be transmitted to you. My father has been dangerously ill but is upon recovery. If his distemper reached Lord Carlisle's ears, it would fire his zeal to secure the government; I doubt not but your kindness would prevent him. According to your commands I have been at Millbeck and shall give you an account of it at my coming to London, which will be before the meeting of Parliament, which surprises all, if not prevented by my father's indisposition. I hear a lady in her coach and six visits you frequently. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Dec. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night the wind came fair. This noon Sir Richard Munden with the Smyrna fleet under his command and about 100 ships sailed westward. A gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Dec. 16.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week the wind was variable with great storms and much rain. Last Friday sailed hence the Success of Falmouth for Alicante with pilchards. Here are a few small vessels for France, wind E. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Dec. 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have continual stormy weather, wind now S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to —. I would rather have improved the new relation I have to you in doing you some service before I had anything to request of you. But, since the opportunity offers of receiving the first obligation from you, I can no more distrust your kindness, than I would have you doubt of my endeavours to deserve it; therefore, understanding you are shortly to elect a burgess to Parliament, I could not but recommend to you Sir Samuel Morland, a person every way qualified to serve his King and country. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 108.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for making certain alterations in the warrant of 14 June last for a grant and confirmation of the charters of the borough of Saltash. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 444.] Annexed,
Alterations and additions in the charter of Saltash from what was contained in a former bill drawn in pursuance of the said warrants. 1. Nicholas Courteney to be Recorder instead of Francis Buller. 2. Nicholas Tyacke, the present mayor, to be a justice in the said borough instead of the town clerk, and to continue after his mayoralty during pleasure, and after his death or the determination of such pleasure the mayor during the year preceding to be a justice till the new mayor be chosen and then to be always succeeded by the last year's mayor. 3. For the better cleansing and preserving of the harbour within the jurisdiction of Saltash, the said mayor and free burgesses, to whom the care thereof doth belong, shall appoint surveyors of all the harbour within their liberties to present all nuisances and to order the lading and unlading of ballast. [Ibid. p. 445.]
[Dec. ?] Request to Williamson that the second of the above alterations relating to Nicholas Tyacke be made. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 100.]
[Dec. ?] Draft of the above alterations, the second being that an alderman elected by the Mayor and Free burgesses be a justice instead of the town clerk. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Dec. 17. Notes by Williamson of the arguments in an appeal by Philip Dumarés from a sentence given against him in Jersey as to a right of warren. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 417.]
Dec. 18. Charles Bertie to Williamson. Having compared Lord Anglesey's privy seal with two tallies and two orders which are misrecited therein stating what corrections should be made. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 102.]
Dec. 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. To-day arrived here the St. David, Sir Richard Munden commander, for the southward with 50 or 60 merchantmen under his convoy. The wind being high I cannot give an account of them all, what I have received I enclose. [Ibid. No. 103.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 103 i.]
Dec. 18. Letter from Secretary Coventry to Lord Winchelsea, lord lieutenant of Kent, for making Sir Francis Lee a deputy lieutenant, according to his lordship's recommendation. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 226.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and the rest of the officers of the Board of Greencloth for payment to the carvers, cupbearers and sewers of board wages at the rate of 4s. a day to each to be computed from 1 Jan., 1675, and to determine on 31 March, 1677, inclusive, being the time that the waiters' table has been suppressed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 9.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Licence to John Phillips, high sheriff of Cardiganshire, to reside at his dwelling house in Carmarthenshire as his affairs shall require. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 2.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Commission to George, Earl of Linlithgow, to be MajorGeneral, in place of Sir George Monro, late Major-General, whose commission is hereby declared void, over all the forces, as well horse as foot, already raised or hereafter to be raised in Scotland, with full power to command the standing forces, the militia and all the troops both horse and foot, that are or shall be drawn together towards the expedition lately ordered for important service in that kingdom. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 331.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation of William Nasmyth, parson of Tarboltown, to be minister at the church of Eckford, vacant by the decease of Mr. Turnbull, late minister thereof. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 332.]
Dec. 18. Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the reference to him of the Duke of Monmouth's petition and the annexed draft letter that the computation, which is the ground of the petition, is rightly made and that there will be paid to the Earls of Ossory and Feversham or their assigns out of the yearly sum of 27,000l. reserved on the establishment 1,666l. 13s. 4d. less during the last three years of their respective grants than during the first three, by means whereof the said yearly sum of 1,666l. 13s. 4d. will be from 25 Dec., 1679, till 25 Dec., 1682, within his Majesty's dispose and may be granted without disappointing or disturbing any of the uses to which at present the remainder of the said 27,000l. per annum has been ordered, but whether his Majesty will therefore grant the said 1,666l. 13s. 4d. for the said three years as in the said letter is contained, being matter purely of favour and bounty, is submitted to his Majesty's consideration. On the back,
Further reference of the above report and the said petition and letter to the Lord Treasurer, 1 Jan., 1677–8, Whitehall, and his report fully agreeing with the Lord Lieutenant's report. 15 Jan., 1677–8. Treasury Chambers, Whitehall. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 126.]
Another copy of the above report and reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 214.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the letters of 21 March, 1675, for a grant to Sir George Gilbert of the office of keeper of the Great Beam and Common Balance (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1675–6, p. 32) and that the said letters and the grant passed thereon may prove defective: authorizing and requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed constituting the office of keeper of the Great Beam and Common Balance and Iron Beam and weights belonging thereto and for a grant of the said office to the said Sir George Gilbert and his assigns for his life and the lives of Robert and Daniel, his sons, and the life of the survivor of them, with power to appoint deputies and to demand and receive all fees and emoluments heretofore taken or now accustomed to be taken by any keeper of the Great Beam or Common Balance or Iron Beam and weights within the City of London or England or Ireland, with a prohibition to all others in Ireland of setting up any public beam or common balance or iron beam and weights in Ireland for weighing any goods between buyer and seller except their own proper goods or such as shall be bought or sold by themselves, without the licence of the said Sir George or his assigns. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 205.]
Dec. John Reeves of Drayton, Hampshire, in behalf of Paul Acton, a scholar in Winchester College, to the King. Petition that he may have letters that he may be put on the roll for New College, Oxford, for the next election, as being 18 years old he will otherwise be superannuated. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 104.]
Dec. 19.
Pembroke.
John Courcy to James Hickes. Last week a great many casks of brandy came ashore in this harbour. We hear of no part of the ship except a mast which was driven ashore near the harbour's mouth, which was so big that an ordinary man could not fathom about it. I am desired by Mr. John Powell to give you this account. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Robert Clinton alias Fiennes for the manslaughter of John Ashberry. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 201.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Hatton, Governor of Guernsey. Signifying that he is employing Sir Bernard de Gomme, his engineer general, to the islands of Jersey and Guernsey for the purpose of bringing him an exact account of their present state as to their safety and defence with drafts of the respective castles and fortifications and of such other ports and places as he shall judge fit, in order that he may not only permit him freely to view the said island and all the ports and places therein, as also to measure and take drafts of the castles and fortifications thereof with such other ports and places as he shall think fit, but to be likewise assisting him in the same with his best information. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 41.]
Dec. 19. Memorandum that there was another letter of the same date and in the same terms to Sir Thomas Morgan, Governor of Jersey. [Ibid.]
Other copies of the above two letters. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, Nos. 65, 66.]
Note that these letters were renewed by Capt. Martin Beckman, who went in Sir Bernard's place, of the same date. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 41.]
Dec. 19. Caveat that no grant pass of the Groomporter's place without notice to the Lord Chamberlain. [Cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 46.]
Dec. 19. Caveat that no grant pass of the rectory of Coulsdon, Surrey, now in the King's gift by the vacancy of the archbishopric of Canterbury. [Cancelled. Ibid.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
The King to the Wardens and other the Electors of New College, Oxford, and of Winchester College. Willing and requiring them to choose Paul Acton, a scholar of Winchester College, for New College at the next election, as he is like to be superannuated, if not chosen at the next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 61.]
Dec. 19. Notes of Williamson of arguments in the case of the David. In 1664 Stocke and another, her owners, employed her to the Straits. She was taken under a pretended commission from Savoy and condemned at Villafranca. In 1665 she was driven in at Dover by weather and was arrested by process out of the Cinque Ports by the old owners. The question only was whether the ship had been taken by commission from Holland. 1670, judgment was given before Sir L. Jenkins that she was never justly taken and so was adjudged to Stocke. The adverse party petitioned the Duke as Lord Warden and got a patent (?) of appeal from him, which was not regular as not being under the great seal and not within the time of appeal. They got a repeal of their first sentence. Then at law, where judgment was against this repeal, then at the Chancery, who stayed to see what was done at law. The sum is:– no authority from the Dutch; the sentence at Villafranca was not as on a commission from Holland; the appeal from Sir Leoline at Dover was not regular as not being under the great seal nor within the time limited for appeals. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 421.]
Dec. 20. Notes about preparations. Present: his Royal Highness, the Lord Treasurer, the Duke of Monmouth, the two Secretaries, the Master-General of the Ordnance. In calculating the Navy charge in a war with France, you ought to reckon that even the biggest ships are to be out all the winter. It will be found as good husbandry to keep your ships manned all the winter as to pay them off at the end of the campaign, and reman them against the spring, reckoning bounty money which is 40s. per man, prest money, charges of vessels to fetch them to where the fleet fits, persons employed to solicit the presses when there is any great fleet to be manned, the pay and victual to the seamen on board while the full complement is getting, &c., &c., and above all the infinite prejudice by not being certainly able to come out earlier than the enemy or as early as the designs would require &c. Therefore it seems better to keep your ships manned all the winter, especially when it is considered how few or rather no months there are in the winter, in which in a war with France you may not act on them by a force at sea, and they may attack, make descents on you &c.; for in a war with France the case is not the same as in one with Holland: 1. The Holland's is a shallow dangerous coast and our bigger ships cannot be safely out on it in the deep winter months, and they, being all frozen up, cannot form any design by naval force on us in those months, so that Nature makes a treaty between us in winter. With France it is otherwise. It is a bold shore never frozen, and lies in the way of all our winter trade, and is advantageously situated for descents to Spain, and to invade even in winter all our western coast, all Ireland &c. Therefore you must be on your guard equally in winter as in summer, at least you must have it in your power to be out at sea in any winter month with a considerable force, otherwise they will be sure to take that season to attempt on you. 2. All the ships to protect your trade in the Mediterranean must be out in winter as in summer. 3. So must also all your ships that are to guard the Narrow seas and Ireland &c. 4. Your ports to the westward are all good in winter as in summer. It is not so in our northern ports, which are of most use in a Dutch war, so as in winter we are forced to lay up in a Dutch war.
Naval force proposed as the least that can be:—In the Channel, 50 capital ships (half Dutch), 10 fireships (half Dutch), tenders. In the Mediterranean, 50 capital ships (half Dutch), 10 fireships (half Dutch), tenders. West Indies, 15, all ours and 5 more Dutch if possible, 2 fireships. Soundings and Coast of Ireland, 10 light frigates, 4th and 5th rates. To the northward, 20, half Dutch. Convoys to be furnished out of these fleets, as trade requires, and as military service can spare. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 106.]
Dec. 20. Notes by Williamson. N.B. French ambassador now speaks louder, plainly declares they cannot quit Tournai, which is to say they will keep a ready passage open through the heart of Flanders. Objection. These conditions are not enough, this does not do our business, i.e. leave him weakened beyond any fear of his overpowering us at his will. Should have driven him so far as the Peace of the Pyrenees, recovered all his usurpations on Spain of 1667 at least. Reply. How far that had been prudent. There appears a necessity immediately to interpose that all Flanders be not lost, nay, that and the rest of the dominions of Spain is to be put in a reasonable safe condition such as our interests require. But beyond that to go to war just to weaken him into a condition to be below us, query if that be according to prudence, especially considering how weak our force at sea is, till the 30 new ships be finished &c. 1. These conditions the Prince of Orange was content with, nay (quod N.B.) he first proposed to the King, being asked what &c., the States readily joined in as happy, satisfactory &c. Spain itself on the Prince's first communication of them readily, thankfully embraced. Vide Pr[ince]. Lord Temple to Mr. Hyde on Mr. Thynne's arrival. Letter 28 Dec.– 7 Jan. Beverning told Sir L. Jenkins Spain was very thankful for them. Letter, 27 Dec.–6 Jan. 2. In the war of '67, when France was as near over-running all (nay nearer at the attack of Dendermonde &c) all Holland asked was the terms of the alternative, never proposed, though then flushed with a glorious peace on England, more than to save what remained, and to quit to France the conquests &c., and let it be remembered that Holland had not only sat down contented with the alternative, but (quod N.B) the King of France charges them to have owned and declared these conditions to be reasonable, to be what they could wish &c. (vide answer to the memorial of Beunigen, 9 March, 1668); and yet it is plain (quod quœre) that the conditions now obtained for Flanders are better for it than those of '67. It's true the Franche Comté is gone, but that is not given by this peace, but is kept, having been taken in the war &c.
The Parliament.– They object the peace is already made and kept secret only to get money. Speaker and adjournment. First try to get it laid aside in consideration of the other great business and how unhappy it should be that the Confederates, all Europe, who are now hoping for a happy agreement between the King and his parliament for their deliverance should &c. Whether if it run high, to ply under it by saying, "Let us consider who is concerned in the point now in question. Is it the King or this House ? What harm (?) is it to him that you should have this declared (?), which I do not know the King at all concerns himself in"? At least let us apply to the King if you please, and for my part I doubt not but the King may readily enough &c. If upon the Speaker, then say, "Have a care of that, for what he did being done in obedience to the King and, as he understood, at least according to the practice of the Chair, and possibly, if we proceed this way, the King may concern himself, when otherwise he would not think himself concerned &c." N.B. Let the Speaker be here ten days before the day. Objection. The Speaker may pretend he had the King's command to adjourn the House immediately the first time, but, since the word immediately was not in his two following messages for the other two adjournments, as to these at least he should not have cut off the members going to speak. Reply. Yes, he had the King's pleasure for adjourning the House these two times immediately i.e. no business to intervene, Vide the King's last message that adjourned the Houses in June &c. (the next adjournment and the adjournment and the proclamations &c.). (This paper is headed 20 Dec. but apparently the latter notes are of a later date). [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 107.]
Dec. 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have had somewhat a sharp frost these last two nights, the wind yesterday N.E., to-day northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 108.]
Dec. 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. After long stormy weather we have now a more serene season, the wind E. and by N. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Dec. 20.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 18th came in here the Princess Maria, a caper of Flushing. They came out nine days ago and met with no purchase. They say the Prince and Princess of Orange were received with a general acclamation and demonstration of joy of all that government. Yesterday came in the Margaret of Falmouth in four days from Nantes, who reports that about 3 the same afternoon they saw off the Lizard 60 or 70 sail, 30 or 40 of them great ships, standing southward, the wind E., so it is judged they are the Straits fleet outwardbound. Wind E.S.E. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Dec. 20.
10 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The weather now begins to settle to be fair and frosty after the long storms, which have done much harm on these coasts. A small vessel, the Charles of Watchet, bound thither from hence laden with coals was in the late storm sunk at sea, but the men all saved themselves with some difficulty in the boat, only a woman, a passenger, perished. Wind now N.E. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Mary Leveridge permission from the Duke of Monmouth to her to sell beer and ale in a little shed hired of – Williams within the Green Mews. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 108.]
Dec. 21. J. Elwes to William Bridgeman. Requesting in behalf of the bearer, Mr. Bradley, that a caveat may be entered to prevent any other grant than what he already has for the rectory of Coulsdon, till he be heard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 112.]
Dec. 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Here has been for the most part frost, since this moon began, now very sharp, the Tees frozen over, very little wind running round. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Dec. 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These three days we have had little wind and pleasant cold weather. Wind easterly, not a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Dec. 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The fleet for the southward under the command of Sir Richard Munden sailed Wednesday morning, and yesterday came in from Bordeaux and some outward-bound about 50 sail. [Ibid. No. 115.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 115 i.]
Dec. 21. Appointment by the Alderman and burgesses of Grantham of John, Lord Roos, to be recorder of the borough. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F, No. 84.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Thomas Morgan. You will find by the King's letter, which Sir Bernard de Gomme will deliver to you, on what ground he is sent to those islands. I take occasion from these new appearances between us and France to pray you early to look out to get, if possible, some way settled for having advices from those neighbouring ports of what shall be stirring of any kind among them. It would be of extreme use to the King's service, if it could be compassed. I would take care to answer the allowance to any such correspondents, if they could be found and engaged. I beg you to try your best skill in this, and in the meantime to let us hear frequently and fully of all that occurs with you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 178A.]
Note that a like letter of the same date was sent to the Deputy Governor of Guernsey and memorandum that these letters were renewed the 31st by Capt. Beckman, who went in Sir Bernard's place. [Ibid.]
Other copies of the above two letters. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, Nos. 67, 68.]
Dec. 21. Notes by Williamson about Ireland. Dispatched to Lord of Ormonde. 1. What charged here by Rider against &c. 2. To examine all on that side and see what they say to the objections made by Rider. 3. After this examination taken, one or more of them to be sent over hither to answer before the King. 4. The Lord Lieutenant after this examination to send his opinion on the whole &c. and particularly whether the 20,000l, can be called for with safety from the farm. 5. To take care the payments be constantly and regularly so made into the receipt there as that as little may stand over in their hands as possible.
The Farm of Ireland.—Let for 7 years from Christmas, '75, at 240,000l. rent yearly and payments to be made thus:– 5,000l. 1 Feb., 5,000l. 31 March, 10,000l. 30 April, so as the last of April they have received from 25 Dec. to 30 April i.e. 4 months' rent and have paid only 20,000l. to the King &c.
N.B. The last Farm was let at 219,000l., but only 204,000l. was paid, to which in this is added the casual revenue, which Lord Ranelagh made 6 or 7,000l. per annum.
N.B. The last Farmers broke, but that was not the Farm but the Farmers, i.e. the Forths &c. and that for having engaged in too many things as ironworks &c., &c. Threw the scandal on the Farm, as if that had broke him. The said 4l. on tobacco, the new alterations in measures of liquors on some late judgment given in a certain case relating to the Excise &c., have increased the revenue of Ireland above 20,000l. per annum &c.
As to the security on these Farms, the King thinks he has 60,000l. which was advanced as a security, but it is objected that 20,000l. of this is the King's, as being by them received in Jan., Feb. and March more than they paid the King in these months. Next, they have 30 days regularly and on forfeiture of 500l. may have 40 days respite every payment. Again, they take up money beforehand on the security of the succeeding months, so as, whenever they have a mind to break, they may run away with more than they have advanced to the King &c. by 20,000l.
Mr. Rider's charge against the present Farmers is under three heads:— 1. False prospect of the revenue and false measures given the King by them. 2. They do not report (?) the revenue in several counties and give extraordinary interest. 3. They remit considerable sums to England,—which are just grounds to alarm the King as to the safety of his revenue on the foot of this farm. That the Farmers have really more of the King's money in their hands than he has of theirs in his, by which means their pretended security given the King is none.
N.B.– Therefore agreed by all that, in case of a war this farm must break, having no clause for defalcations, only a provision that they shall have it a year of peace after the war, which they are never able to stay for, and a respiting of the immediate payment of the rent, &c.
Against resting on promises upon honour, words may be forgotten, only writing is a remembrance and a proof of itself.
Hill, Sheridan out. Rider, Stanyan, Richbell. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 127.]
Dec. 22. The Earl of Bridgwater to Williamson. His Majesty having approved of William Cheyne being made a deputy lieutenant of Buckinghamshire, entreating the dispatch of the signification of his pleasure therein under Williamson's hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 116.]
Dec. 22.
Gloucester.
John Abbot to Burton Goodwyn. I am sorry you think I should be so ungrateful as to slight yours and Mr. Royley's kindness to me, being resolved to demonstrate the contrary by my grateful acknowledgements at least. I had sooner answered Mr. Royley's letter but I waited for Mrs. S[usannah]'s letter which I very earnestly expected every post day since I received Mr. Royley's. Pray give the enclosed to Mr. Royley. With note from Goodwyn to Royley requesting to speak with him to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 117.] Enclosed,
John Abbot to Francis Royley. Explaining as in the last that he had waited, as he very longingly expected one from his dearest friend Mrs. Susannah in answer to his last. 22 Dec., Gloucester. [Ibid. No. 117 i.]
Dec. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Frost and cold weather continue, the wind yesterday was northerly, to-day S.W., though indeed it is almost a stark calm. Capt. Langley tells me all things are ready against the arrival of the expected express. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 118.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Frescheville. Apologizing for not having waited on him before he left, having thought he might have safely reckoned that he would have given his friends one day more. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 179B.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Approbation of William Cheyney to be a deputy lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 54.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Robert Fielding, his Majesty having for the safety of his estate granted him a pardon for manslaughter, and, on his presenting himself for trial being put off to the next sessions in regard of an outlawry not returned by the sheriff, which, if filed, frustrates his Majesty's grace, praying therefore an order to the Clerk of the Peace to retrax the exigent and forbear filing. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 213.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of William Scawen praying, in regard of his services and sufferings during the late times and in regard of his services as collector of the hearth money in Cornwall and some hardships he suffered in that employment, a remission of the fines set for renewing his leases and copies in the duchy of Cornwall. [Ibid.]
Dec. 22. Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. I have enjoyed some quietness this week, for the pretenders have not come into the house, since I desired their forbearance, and on Monday, Mr. Brooks having given Mr. Coote leave to venture on his journey and his wounds almost cured, I went with him and Sir William Stewart, his brother[-in-law], in my coach to Newry, where his father and Sir William Tichbourne and other good company met us from Dublin, and any further prosecution of amours is by consent suspended, till his trouble be over about the duel, and Lord Coloony told me that last August, before his son came over, he acquainted Lord Granard that he intended to send for him on this occasion, but, having heard of a motion long since for his son and they being ancient friends &c., he desired to know if any such pretence was still on foot, and, if it were so, he would desist, and his lordship with many oaths assured him there was not, and that he would never move anything here or elsewhere for him or concern himself for him in that kind during his life, and upon this occasion and further discourse he told his lordship how far the treaty had proceeded, and that he was to settle 2,500l. a year on his son, part in hand and for a jointure and the rest after his and his lady's decease, and I have a particular of it, and his whole land is set clear rent so much above all quit rents, subsidies and country charges whatever, besides 200 and odd pounds were gains above the rent in several leases, which the counterparts of his leases, he said, will evidence, only his demesnes at Moore Park, 500 acres within 12 miles of Dublin, he values at 5s. the acre, which cannot be of less value there, and his demesnes at Coloony seem not less worth than according to his estimation. The only inconvenience I yet see is, that his estate lies so distant and dispersed in several counties. As I writ, my daughter is rather willing to be abroad for several reasons for a time than to incline to marriage and especially not before she see you in England or here, and I am very willing it should be so and that she should be from the company here that have been too busy in her and my concerns, which I shall resolve of, when you give me your advice. (About sending her to Lady Dungannon's as in his last letter calendared ante, p. 509.)
You wrote to me to inquire of your surgeon's sister, who is dead many years, but I am informed that none is left of the name of Neill, the husband, by Freeman, the wife, but he left a daughter by another wife, who was married to Francis Leland, who is dead, and he had a son, Francis, a good farmer, who is still living and has four children.
My old friend, Mr. Walker, parson of Kilmore, died lately a rich man (Dean William Smith has that great living now) and left a son rich, who came to me yesterday mighty desirous to live hereabouts in safety and I think I shall procure him the farm by Hill Hall, where he will build a better house, I believe, but I doubt it will hardly be so settled, unless I contribute your 10l. a year to it for the first or perhaps two years and then that 10l. you allow Mistress Ronin (?) will come to yourself again, which bargain I think to venture on rather than put such a tenant of wealth from us, that will build and improve and is a right Englishman. Mr. Mildmay shows me Mr. McCartney's receipt of the contents of your two bills of 324l. and 216l. and says you are hardly dealt with by Mr. Price. You pay 8 per cent. and none of the others above 6.
Lord Granard came kindly to dine with me to-day and saw the three foot companies here mustered and my troop and is returned to Belfast. None of his sons appeared with him in the house, nor did any word pass between us of his son's amours. I think the Council in Scotland will not invite such guests to them as this brigade but agree rather amongst themselves. [2½ pages. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 128.]
Dec. 23. Monsr. de Veil to Williamson. As it is impossible for me to meet your lordship at your house to pay you my respects, whatsoever efforts I have made to do so, being sometimes in the company of M. de l'Angle, minister of the French Savoy, I believed you would not take it ill, if I took the liberty of doing by writing what I could not do by word of mouth, being assured by Messieurs Claude and Justel that the extent of your charity does not yield to that of your great and important occupations. I venture to be so bold as to represent that I am extremely short of money and have much difficulty in subsisting, besides not having the wherewithal to clothe myself for the winter. I represent my necessities, not with any design of being chargeable to you, but to beg you earnestly to use your powerful influence with whomever you deem proper to procure me an appointment to enable me to continue my work on Holy Scripture for the edification of the church to which I belong. I have a commentary on Hosea ready to be printed, and with your permission will publish it under your auspices with a dedicatory letter. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 119.]
Dec. 23.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. By our last advice from Calais we are told that their army under Marshal d'Humières has invested Ypres and that the King of France is expected at Dunkirk in ten days. From Nieuport they say the French have fortified Vueurne, wherein is an army of near 10,000 men and 22 pieces of cannon lately sent them from Dunkirk, which occasions the garrison of Nieuport to believe they will make an attempt on them, as soon as they have an opportunity of a frost. That place is very badly provided with ammunition and provisions for their soldiers, who are lately quartered on the burghers. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Dec. 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. It being Sunday I have no list of ships. The master of a ship lately come here from Brest reports that the King's officers there are employing all hands they can possibly get to fit 30 of his men-of-war. They work both Sabbath and week days in hastening them. Their design is not made known. This master and several other masters from France report many ships are cast away on that coast, particularly about Belle Isle. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Dec. 23.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind last week was mostly E. There arrived here some ships for and from France among them a Flushing privateer, the Princess Mary. The wind is now N.W. and I suppose the fleet will sail in the morning. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Dec. 24.
Kirby.
Lord Hatton to Williamson. By fresh letters from Guernsey I understand that the Jurats have taken the vessel my officers had seized for bringing wool from Ireland without a licence out of their hands and released her, not holding themselves obliged, it seems, to put the Act in execution, in which they have made good what I before informed you of them and have left me no more to do but to expect your order in this case. Weaver, the merchant, is still in custody. For the other part of what I troubled you with, I hear his Majesty has had so much consideration of the repairs of the Castle as to send an engineer thither, at whose return I hope something will be resolved, and I am told of an order coming to me to raise men to add to the companies, which makes me think this a seasonable time to move that a vessel may be appointed again to attend his Majesty's service there as there was formerly. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Dec. 24.
Ednall. [Edenhall.]
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. By a letter of the 16th from Scotland we received account that the Council at two meetings had great debates concerning bringing in the English and Irish forces for suppressing conventicles, which are many, and great numbers at them. The result was referred to the next meeting of the Council. Letters were sent from the Council to Lords Huntly, Atholl, Argyle and Seaforth to have their militia in readiness. By all that can be learned from those coming from Scotland they apprehend some disturbance will happen, though not immediately. My father last week was indifferent well, but about 8 last night was seized with a very sick fit, which continued two hours. (Particulars of his illness.) These frequent and violent fits shake an old man much, so that I mightily apprehend a sad Christmas to this family. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 124.]
Dec. 24.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Several vessels come in here from Bordeaux report that they met with several wrecks at sea and that some of their fleet were cast away on the Poll head and that at Bordeaux was a great press for seamen, for the King is fitting out with all speed at Brest and elsewhere 20 great menof-war. The Bachelor's Delight of London from Lisbon, come in here the 23rd, reports that last Friday about 60 leagues off Scilly they met our Straits fleet, wind E.S.E. Several vessels are here bound for France. Some have received orders from their owners not to proceed, as they fear a war with France, which makes the others at a stand likewise, but yet they are resolved to proceed without particular orders to the contrary. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Dec. 24.
8 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind N.E. Last week, I am informed, several butts of brandy came ashore betwixt St. David's Head and Milford Haven, some say 50 or 60, marked L.G., nothing of a vessel or any part thereof appearing nor any proprietor to claim them, so that the gentlemen, who own the lands where it comes, seized it as their own, and the country people, calling it God's goods, think they have a share, so that they stave out the heads of casks and drink it and carry it in pots or other small vessels to their habitations to make merry with at Christmas, but, as I hear, three of them drank their last and died on the spot. The proprietors, if they could be known, might doubtless recover what is saved, only paying salvage. It's said a Canary (?) pipe came ashore, but the head was out and all the liquor gone. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Trustees of the Charter House. Requiring them to choose and admit to the first scholar's place void after those who have had previous letters Henry, son of Col. Francis Moryson, in consideration of his father's great services as commissioner in Virginia. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 207.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Steward and the Board of Greencloth, after reciting that the four gentleman ushers of the privy chamber and the four gentlemen ushers, daily waiters, had constantly attended during the whole of the late 15 months' suspension, for payment to each of them of 4s. per diem during the said 15 months' suspension viz., from 25 Dec., 1675, to 25 March, 1677. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 446.]
Dec. 24–31
(sic). London.
The Earl of Danby to the Prince of Orange. The King has sent Mr. Thynne to you on a message for which he had designed Sir W. Temple, but that with infinite earnestness he besought his Majesty to excuse him at a time when some inconveniences in his private fortune would have been so great that the King would not put such a hardship on him. I hope Mr. Thynne will perform all that is necessary in it, which is to get some such thing perfected as may justify the King to say truly to his Parliament that an alliance is already made betwixt him and Holland for the preservation of Franders. The manner of doing this is difficult to us, because both the King and your Highness are greatly interested to have it secret, and we neither know whether your secret Committee can conclude such a treaty of alliance, nor, if it can, do we know whether you will suffer it to go to their knowledge, so that, as you only are judge in this matter, the King has left it totally to your conduct, resolving to govern himself in it by your advice, and I hope Mr. Thynne is so thoroughly instructed in this, that he is able to let you know the King's mind in most things that can be demanded on this occasion. You see we persevere as steadily as you could desire, and yet, I assure you, there is as much done of all kinds from France to shake it as is possible, and truly it has all the appearances imaginable of coming to an absolute war.
We have yet no account from Mr. Montagu more than that he arrived at Paris late the 17–27 instant and went next day to St. Germains, but we know already by M. Barillon that the answer he will have is that they will agree a truce for Flanders or more general, if the King pleases, but can never consent to the proposals by Lord Feversham in the direct terms as they are there demanded and I find the great effort is to keep Tournay, unless they may have some considerable place in exchange. In the meantime we hear that Ypres or Dixmude is by this time invested, and, I perceive, they make no doubt of being master of both before they can be relieved.
I think it were of importance, but I say this without any commission, that, as soon as might be, the ambassadors both of Spain and Holland present memorials to the King, taking notice of his good offices and endeavours for the peace and quiet of Christendom, and that, having so seasonably called the Parliament, they hope he will do something which may contribute effectually to the safety of it, and particularly of the Spanish Netherlands, which are in so imminent danger, and I hope that particular care shall be taken to make Monsr. van Beuninghen declare to all his acquaintance of the Parliament the great satisfaction he receives in all things which concern the States and their allies. When I had writ thus far, I was called to the King on the occasion of a courier newly arrived to the French Ambassador, which brought him powers to offer a general suspension of arms for a year or 14 months, and he told the King that his master had given Mr. Montagu that answer, that he could not accept the propositions, but would give such a suspension if my master pleased, upon which the King replied that that was a matter to which he could not answer without first knowing the minds of the Confederates, but he would take it well if the King of France would forbear his arms in the Spanish Netherlands for two months, in which time he could inform himself of their minds as to the general suspension, but the ambassador said that would only be to lose time, and the King replied that, without time to find new expedients, he could not depart from those he had offered, and the Ambassador has said he will write, and so the affair stands at present, but with all the firmness of resolution of the King's part that he will not hear of the peace upon other terms, and I must do the Duke that justice as to assure you that nobody can carry themselves better than he does through this whole matter. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 1, No. 8.]
[1677.]Dec. 24.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "I would not let this bearer, Mr. Thynne, go without writing to you by him, whom his Majesty sends with powers and instructions to Mr. Hyde, to conclude what you have already approved of. As for Mr. Montagu, we had news from him of his being at St. Germains, but then he had not entered on his business. We expect every moment to hear from him." [Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 12.]
Dec. 25.
Noon. Harwich.
Henry Thynne to Williamson. I arrived here about 5 this morning, having rid all night, which by reason of the badness of the way I found absolutely necessary to do, otherwise I should not have been here in any time. I performed my journey to Colchester in about 7 hours, but there the postmaster, notwithstanding the post warrant and the haste I told him I was in, so mounted myself and my servant that in three miles riding both our horses were so tired that I was forced to crawl to Manningtree, the next town, and, it being after midnight, I was forced amongst the inhabitants, partly by threats but chiefly by money, to procure two fresh horses, with which I came hither, but, the ways being so intolerably bad and the night very dark after the moon was down, I passed several hours with very little pleasure. The Postmaster of Colchester has the reputation of keeping the worst horses of any on the road, and but few days since others have been served by him as I was, so, if his Majesty will have any come in haste this way, that postmaster, who can so obey the warrants, must be removed. The yacht arrived not till about three hours since and the wind is now very contrary, so that I fear we shall be detained here some time. The captain tells me, if the weather continue fair, he will put to sea to-morrow morning. He had much rather have taken me in at Margate, where we might have shifted better with this wind than we can here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 127.]
Dec. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Two of our packet-boats came yesterday. They brought no news. The master of one tells me he left the Kitchen yacht at the Brill last Sunday, which intended to come from thence to-day. About 10 this morning the Katherine yacht anchored here, and, it is said, intends to sail forthwith. A Mr. Thin, as he is named to me, is here, whom this yacht is to transport. Wind S. and S.E., weather dark and heavy. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Dec. 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships not yet given account of. Here is a report that the master of a ship lately come from Newhaven (Havre) has related to Sir Hugh Piper, that there were certain relations there that the French king had by land besieged Ostend with 60,000 men and that ten French men-of-war were gone to block it up by sea, four whereof went from Newhaven. [Ibid. No. 129.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Bastinck. Thanking him for his letter of the 23rd.—I must beg you to write to us by every post in a season when the world says we are to expect our greatest news from the other side over against you. You may remember I prayed you many months since to try to get a correspondent at Calais and another at Dunkirk, that we may know at least the ordinary news there. I would be glad to acknowledge it with a pair of gloves to any good hand you would engage. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 179B.]
Christmas day at night.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Cyril Wyche. I am extremely obliged to your consideration for my cover to the Duke of Monmouth's petition, which yours of the 18th has this evening returned me. I will not fail to let him know your care for this concern of his. [Ibid. p. 180.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Request by the Duke of Monmouth for a pass for Mr. Fox, ensign to Capt. Boad's company in the Earl of Mulgrave's regiment, to be absent in service at sea for 12 months. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 130.]
Dec. 26. T. B[arnes] to —. Concerning the business you know, I have been as careful, faithful and vigilant always, as I have been capable, and have been also at some trouble and charge about it, and, if it have not had answerable effects to you nor me, I am sorry, and should have been willing to have done more, if I had had instructions wherein to do it. I have not only many times sent but also been many times myself to have spoken with you but could not have an opportunity and, as to any shyness about it, if I see you, I may give you many satisfactory reasons, but, whether it turn to any account or not, whatever I can do, I shall not fail to let you know, and am ready to think that the succeeding times may produce somewhat more effectual about it than of late has been.
News in these parts is various. People's minds are full of very great expectations from the coming of the P[arliament]. Some say all will be referred to them. A general talk there is that we shall have war with the French and of the high demands of the French ambassador, yet all are not believers of this. Some agents have, as 'tis said, been employed by some of our old martial friends to try whether they would engage in it, if there were cause, but some of them seem to scruple any future engagements, but others seem a little tickled at such offers, in hopes something may come ont, if they were once more employed, and others think they will hardly confide in such old friends, but conclude, if it should be, that there must be some great mutation in affairs and some considerable persons. 'Tis also said the E[arl] of Sha[ftesbury] will be released again and great things will be done, and as if John Lambert should be employed again and a world of effects to follow, but few believe these discourses to be in earnest, as not consisting with the interest of some, but some conclude a necessity of some such things, if we at present differ with the French. In the meantime there are great complaints from the western parts of the very hard usage of our friends for meetings, how they imprison them and take their goods. One that had been down there lately publicly declared it at Mr. Griffith's meeting the last Lord's day, and there are many doubts and fears about a precept that came lately to the Lord Mayor for suppressing of meetings. I can give you an account of some of the persons concerned in the premises when I see you.
Some printed papers are out about Anne Wentworth's predictions and more to come. If you please to have any of them, I can send them. But 300 of the first are printed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 131.]
Dec. 26.
11 a.m. Harwich.
H. Thynne to Williamson. I am just going on board, though we have hopes of making but very little way, the wind being so contrary. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Dr. Holbeach, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. Requesting him to further the pretensions of Christopher Barker, who has hopes of the University's favour towards him at their next election of a Bedell, as he has been a great sufferer for his loyalty. [S.P Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 109.]
Dec. 26. Pass for Mr. Fox, ensign to Capt. Boad in Lord Mulgrave's regiment, to be absent at sea for 12 months. [Ibid. p. 111.]
Dec. 26. Caveat on behalf of Mr. Legge that no grant pass of the fine imposed on one Foot, an attorney. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 46.]
Dec. 26.
Lisburn.
R. Mildmay to Viscount Conway. Concerning the payment to Mr. McCartney of his lordship's two bills of exchange for 540l. and other payments and accounts and business matters.—I have received all Isabel Johnston's money and ten thousand thanks to you for all your kindness to her son. Sir George has treated all the officers to-day and the house is yet full. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 129.]
Dec. 27.
Ednall. [Edenhall.]
Sir C. Musgrave to Williamson. By letters from Scotland of the 22nd and 23rd they write the Council have written to the Lord Lieutenant and Sir Arthur Forbes their thanks for their great care in the North of Ireland and that the West of Scotland is very quiet. The West was very apprehensive the Council would call in the English forces upon them and fearful that the Highlanders would be drawn down, and, if they continue quiet, it must be ascribed to the fear of the force which may so soon be poured on them from England and Ireland, for questionless their inclinations are to rebel. My father is in a better condition than could be expected when I wrote last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 133.]
Dec. 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I beg pardon for my forgetfulness in my last to inform you that last Saturday one of our packetboats sailed, and I was told a gentleman went in her, who carried the letters expected by an express that day. The Katherine did not sail till between 1 and 2 yesterday afternoon and Mr. Thynne in her, the wind westerly and a very fine day. To-day it is southerly, the weather very black and rainy, yet betwixt 11 and noon arrived one of our packet-boats, which left the Brill about 4 yesterday afternoon. The master tells me there rode a fireship before the Brill and several other men-of-war at Helvoet, ready to sail for the Straits. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Dec. 27.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Since my last I have received no other news from the other side save a confirmation of what I wrote. The master of a vessel arrived here last night from Boulogne says the King of France is expected at Calais to-morrow to remain a day or two there in his way to Dunkirk, of which I shall be able to give you a more perfect account, for I have provided at Dunkirk a correspondent. The like care I have taken at Calais and Nieuport, besides the strict enquiry I will make of all passengers from those parts, and shall constantly acquaint you with what I hear, especially from Dunkirk. I am told that letters from thence are frequently stopped and opened and several of the burghers have been put out of the garrison for giving intelligence, so I have ordered, if any news happen, that I have an account sent me by some passenger for England, who shall have in return his passage in the packet-boat free. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Dec. 27.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wishing him a happy New Year. The wind S. and full of rain. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. I have received yours of the 20th. I cannot refrain from expressing the regret I feel at the bad treatment the King's subjects have received for some little time, particularly the refusal to M. de Lanier of the pay of the troops and of winter quarters for the horse regiment, at least without his consenting to articles which ought not to be imposed on the subjects of a foreign prince. The King has found this proceeding so strange and so little in keeping with the justice and generosity of his Most Christian Majesty, that he has been obliged to take measures for the welfare of his subjects which he would perhaps have never thought of otherwise. I cannot but be very sorry that the occasion has been furnished by a thing of such little consequence. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 110.]
Dec. 28.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The only two standing to be burgess for this town are Sir Thomas Medowes and Capt. Richard Huntington, the first a person ever loyal to the King and true to the Church, the latter one that has been in office under all the late usurped governments, the only friend to the factious, by whose means they are grown so numerous and insolent that it is become dangerous for us to speak our danger. The factious generally cry him up and say he shall carry it, threatening the poor tradesmen here that are free, that, if they will not be for Capt. Huntington, they shall take none of their money, telling them they will be ruined. The whole number of freemen here will not amount to above 600, when the inhabitants are many thousands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 137.]
Dec. 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. A ship, arrived here to-day from Malaga, says 17 English ships were there which would be ready in six or seven days, and that at Cadiz were more, ready to put to sea, and also that those parts were pretty well cleansed from the Argereenes. All foreign news is silenced. Nothing here and in all the country satisfies the people but war with France and an army going from England to Sicilia. More than a topsail gale at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Dec. 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. A ship here from Bayonne reports that, the 19th, an order came from the French King to the customers there to know what English ships were there and of what burden and force, and declared that he would proclaim a war with the English 10 Jan., to which purpose his merchant there that freighted him forthwith dispatched him with two-thirds of his lading. The master of a ship of Belfast arrived here from Havre declares that the French King has sent three of his men-of-war from that port to Ireland to list what volunteers they could there and likewise to hasten away 20,000 barrels of beef for the supply of his army which is there made ready for him. A Dutch man-of-war of 28 guns has brought in here two small French prizes. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Dec. 29.
Kirby.
Lord Hatton to Williamson. Recommending a son of Mr. Adam de Cardonnel, of Southampton, who has been bred with extraordinary care and has spent some time in Holland. Since his return he has had a very great fit of sickness but is now perfectly recovered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 140.]
Dec. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the wind was southerly, and four men of a Newcastle vessel here, trying their boat, which, 'tis said, was ballasted with four pigs of lead, were all drowned near or on the Andrews. To-day the wind is westerly, the weather fair and bright. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. The last, I hear, brought over a Mr. Cornwall, said to be gentleman of the Horse to the Princess of Orange. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Dec. 29.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived the Malaga and Cadiz fleets and other ships, in all about 43. Those from the Straits say all the Turks are whist, scarce budging out, only 7 out of the Straits mouth, who think it a hard matter to get home. Last night it blew a whole storm, but now very pleasant weather, wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Dec. 29.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. This morning we received our French and Flanders letters from Deal, both the packet-boats being forced into the Downs last night by a very great storm, whence the mails were sent for London. Letters from Dunkirk and Calais give no certainty when the King will be there, but he is expected suddenly at both places. The master of the Calais packet-boat tells me he brought over a courier that came to Calais from Paris but yesterday morning, that says the King intends to set forward from Paris towards his army in Flanders next Monday, and that his baggage was already on the way. From Nieuport they say little, but are very apprehensive of their danger, in case the French should attack them, their soldiers being very poor and deserving an alms rather than blows. 'Tis further said from Calais that, on the late review of the French army now in the field in Flanders, they consist of 80,000 men, which the King intends to command in person, but what place they will first attempt is not known. [Ibid. No. 143.]
[Dec. 29.] Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Wednesday six weeks our Malaga fleet came thence under a Dutch convoy as far as Gibraltar. Some of them are now passing by Portland. The master of the pink George of London tells me so, whose pink has just come into the road. There were, he says, about 113 that came out with him from Malaga. [Endorsed, "29 Dec., received 31." Ibid. No. 144.]
Dec. 29.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The Elizabeth of this place arrived here this morning in ten days from Croisic, stopping much of the time in Dartmouth. That place affords nothing of moment, their hopes being of a continued friendship with England, with whom their trade so much depends. Several of our ships are going out with speed for Morlaix and St. Malo, fearing a breach may happen and put a stop to trading with them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 145.]
Dec. 29.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. The wind southerly, cloudy and dark weather. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a congé d'élire and a letter missive to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury recommending William Sancroft, D.D., Dean of St. Paul's, London, to be elected by them Archbishop of that see, void by the death of Gilbert Sheldon, D.D. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 63.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Constitution of Robert Hall to be Clerk of the Passage in the port of Rye in the room of [James] Welsh, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 59.]
Dec. 29.
Dublin.
Lord Coloony to Viscount Conway. I perceive by yours of the 18th some very great mistake either in your construction of my only letter to you or some omission of mine in transcribing it, for certainly, in common interpretation, the relative is not capable of having that for its antecedent which you suppose, nor was it intended by me it should, as you may be fully satisfied by this copy of the letter which I now send, and, that you may be further confirmed it was none of my intention it should, I have sent a duplicate of mine of the same date to Sir G. Rawdon, by which you may easily gather my sense of that matter, so that you cannot conceive without injuring me in the most superlative degree I could be guilty of so horrid and most detestable double dealing, as that would have most necessarily imported, which has been a thing so abhorrent to my nature, as I think none could as yet have any just ground to charge me with any thing that could have the very least tendency thereto. I herewith also send copies of the several examinations relating to that sad accident between Col. McDonnell and my son, by which you may see there will be no need of a pardon from his Majesty, being that it will amount at most to but manslaughter and the Coroner's inquest have as yet but homicide se defendendo. Had I thought it needful, I should have sent a solicitor thither to have negotiated that affair without giving you further trouble than begging a recommendation from you to your most honourable friends in that behalf, which I trust will not now be so very requisite. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 130.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of the office of Treasurer's Remembrancer of the Exchequer in Ireland to William Peirce of Tristernagh, Westmeath, for his life, in reversion after George Houghton, the present patentee. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 203.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Benjamin Parry, D.D., Dean of St. Patrick's, of the bishopric of Ossory void by the death of John, late Bishop thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 204.]
Dec. 30.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. The 28th arrived at Spithead the Assurance, Sir Robert Robinson commander, in 18 days from Cadiz. He had under his convoy above 100 merchantmen bound for several ports, the greatest part for London, who came into the Channel with him and are gone for the Downs. The 29th sailed hence the Marigold pink from Guinea and Jamaica for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 147.]
Dec. 30.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week the wind, being mostly S.E. kept the fleets in the harbour. Friday, the wind N.W., the outward-bound fleet for France sailed, about 70 or 80 sail, and also the homeward-bound fleet. We have a report here by a vessel come into St. Ives from Alicante that the Straits fleet are now in the Channel beating up. Wind now E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Dec. 30. Commission from the Duke of Monmouth for Capt. William Palmer to command Capt. Florence McCartie's troop in his regiment of horse. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 111.]
[Dec. ?] Michael Taylor, Alderman, and twelve burgesses of Grantham to the King. Petition for confirmation of their choice of the Right Honourable John Manners, commonly called Lord Roos, son and heir to John, Earl of Rutland, to be recorder of Grantham in the room of his father, who being very ancient, has surrendered his patent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 149.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth, as a northern fellowship now is, or is expected shortly to be vacant in Christ's College, Cambridge, and as there is none at present of that College capable by the statutes to be chosen thereto, of his consent that his Majesty's letters mandatory be sent requiring the Master, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding, to admit to the fellowship now void or that may happen first to be void, John Cudworth, B.A., of the said College who, the Duke is informed, is very acceptable to the society, and every way qualified to be a member thereof. [Ibid. No. 150.] Probably annexed,
Certificate of Mr. Cudworth's qualifications and that the society, though inclined to do it, cannot elect him to the Northern fellowship now vacant, for which there is no person in the College qualified by statute, because he is not of a northern county, and that a dispensation will not be sufficient, because there is a peculiar obligation on the Fellows of that College to take an oath before they proceed to election that they do it according to statute, so that he is necessitated to have recourse to his Majesty's mandate for his being forthwith admitted Fellow. [Ibid. No. 150 i.]
Another copy of the above certificate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 111.]
Dec. 31.
London.
Christopher Cratford to Viscount Conway. Not prevailing to get the Earl of Dorset and Middlesex's security perfected nor the interest paid, and Mr. Dowdeswell, who has contracted for a great part of the manor, offering to pay 3,000l., I thought fit to receive it, as the sitting of Parliament will occasion a concourse hither and give a good opportunity for disposing of money, so that with interest 2,841l. 8s. remains due. The Dean of Paul's is Archbishop of Canterbury and Dr. Stillingfleet Dean of Paul's. [Conway papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 151.] Enclosed,
Copy of Cratford's receipt for the said sum with an agreement to assign the mortgage to Mr. Dowdeswell, if, 25 Feb. next, he pays the balance then remaining due. [Ibid. No. 151 i.]
Dec. 31.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 28th put to sea about 40 merchantmen which have lain here above two months waiting for a fair wind for Bordeaux and other French ports. About 11 or 12 vessels are off this harbour which, they say, are our fleet from Lisbon or the Straits. The wind now N. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Dec. 31. Commission to Oliver Nicholas to be captain of the Duke of York's company of foot in Portsmouth garrison in the room of Thomas Bridges. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 227.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of the election by the Corporation of Grantham of John, Lord Roos, to be their Recorder. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 447.]
[Dec. ?] Warrant to Lemuel Kingdon for payment to the Earl of Carlisle of 400l. due to him as Governor of Jamaica on account of an allowance of 2,500l. per annum for one quarter from 25 Sept. to 25 Dec., 1677. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America &c., 1677-80, p. 198.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 41.]
Dec.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind &c.:—
Vol. 398. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
153 Dec. 1 2 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday
154 " 2 2 4 2 S.
155 ,, 3 3 4 0 S.
156 " 4 4 4 0 N. The Straits fleet outward-bound are now arriving into the Downs.
157 " 5 7 25 0 S.
158 (fn. 1) " [6] 6 24 0 S.W.
159 " 7 6 0 N.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
160 ,, 8 5 1 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
161 ,, 9 7 33 2 W.
162 " 10 7 0 S.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
163 " 11 6 0 W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
164 " 13 7 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
165 " 14 6 41 0
166 ,, 15 5 0 S.E. Outward the same ships as yesterday.
167 Dec 16 2 0 N.E. The fleet outward-bound are under sail.
168 " 17 2 0 0 N.E.
169 ,, 18 4 0 1 E.
170 ,, 19 4 0 0 E.
171 ,, 20 4 0 0 S.E.
172 ,, 21 2 1 0 N.E.
173 ,, 22 2 1 0 E.
174 ,, 23 4 1 0 S.
175 ,, 24 4 1 0 S.
176 ,, 26 4 2 0 S.
177 ,, 27 4 3 0 S.
178 ,, 28 4 3 1 S.
179 ,, 29 4 3 0 S.
180 ,, 31 5 5 0 E. The Straits fleet are coming in, but we cannot give a particular account, being very foggy weather.
March 17. Warrant for a privy seal, after reciting the privy seal of 20 Sept., 1676, granting to John Brisbane, appointed agent at the Court of France to solicit the affairs of the merchants there, an allowance of 3l. a day for his entertainment and 100l. a year for a clerk and that the charges in that service are extraordinary, for payment to the said Brisbane of 4l. a day for his own entertainment to commence from 19 Dec. last and the said allowance of 100l. per annum for a clerk and such sums for extraordinaries as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State, with a clause for vacating the former privy seal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 218.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Danby. Certifying that Sir William Curtius, now residing at Frankfort, has been a faithful and diligent servant in that post both to his Majesty and his father and grandfather, in consideration whereof his Majesty granted him a privy seal for 2,000l. dated 5 Aug., 1364, of which he says he has been paid only 500l., and representing at his request his long services and present wants. [Ibid. f. 219.]
Sept. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a privy seal for payment to William Soame, appointed envoyé extraordinary to the Duchess Regent of Savoy, of 500l. for his equipage and 5l. per day for his entertainment, and of such sums for extraordinaries as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Ibid. f. 222.]
Dec. 12. Commission to Walter Chetwynd to be Quartermaster to Capt. Henry Slingsby's troop in the Earl of Oxford's Regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 226.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Col. John Strode, Lieutenant of Dover Castle, for admitting Richard Woodward into the place of captain of Mote's Bulwark under Dover Castle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 58.]
[June.] Statement that on Monday, the 18th of this month, the freemen of one great ward in Norwich were summoned to elect Common Council men, which they did, turning out all not qualified, according to the Act for regulating corporations. Those being right men for the established government were re-elected and will qualify themselves at being sworn. The same time the Common Council turned out two unqualified aldermen and chose two in their room. But John Richard (Richer), the present mayor, publicly commanded the town clerk not to enter anything in the book of elections concerning placing or displacing any alderman and openly declared he would not swear any alderman so chosen, notwithstanding that he had but two days before received Sir Robert Sawyer's opinion that all magistrates, who had not subscribed the declaration appointed in the said Act, [should be displaced], and that the mayor was bound to swear any new magistrate elected instead of any as should be displaced for not so subscribing, so now the government of the said city is all in a flame not to be quenched except his Majesty will send a letter mandatory for the freemen of every ward forthwith to proceed according to their charter to elect or re-elect new aldermen to fill up the vacancies of those displaced according to the said Act. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 181.]
[Before July 10.] Case of Philip Dumaresq, lord of the manor and lordship of Saumarais, appellant, v. the Procurators of the Commonalty of St. Hilary, defendants, on an appeal from a sentence of the Royal Court of Jersey dated 25 Sept., 1675, against his right of free warren on a hill in the liberty and precinct of the town of St. Hilary. With note that the case is to be heard before the Privy Council, 10 July. (See ante, p. 513.) [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 69.]
Names of the Members of Parliament sitting in that year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 182.]
Names of the Livery of the Clothworkers Company. [Ibid. No. 183.]
List of Clergymen's sons. [Ibid. No. 184.]
List of gentlemen of Glamorganshire, setting forth the estates, the age and parts and the inclination to the government of each of them, and to whom each is married and what children he has. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Proposals for a large lexicon of the Turkish language, containing not only their ordinary language but the learned part thereof, whereby their language and literature will be learned more easily and sooner, and interpreters procured with less charge in their breeding and better able to transact the great and public affairs which pass through their hands. Merchants likewise or others may hereby attain with much less difficulty unto a knowledge of that language. Price, 40s. to subscribers. [Ibid. No. 186.]
"A Commentary upon the Present Condition of the Kingdom and its Melioration." (This is a printed copy of the pamphlet calendared ante, p. 128.) [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
"Proposal to increase trade and to advance his Majesty's revenue, without any hazard or charge to anybody, and with apparent profit to everybody," by establishing warehouses for disposal of goods in pawn, on which bills of credit may be advanced; with regulations for the same and answers to possible objections. By M. Lewis. [Printed. Ibid.]
"Lamentable news from Sea: being a true relation how a ship call'd the Cherry, was lately cast away, and all the men drowned, except 7, who got upon a rock, and remaining there without any sustenance, 5 of the strongest kill'd 2 of their fellows, eat their flesh, and drank their blood to asswage their hunger and thirst, and thereby preserved their own lives for the space of 7 days and nights, after which boats came and carried them to shore, where 2 of the 5 immediately died, I ran mad, and the other 2 are still alive and in health, attesting the truth of what is here related." The ship belonged to Denmark and was wrecked on a voyage to Holland on their own coast near Halmstadt, about the beginning of August. [Printed for D. M. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
The Hague. A true relation of events during the journey of the Prince of Orange to England and of his marriage with the Princess Mary, eldest daughter of his Royal Highness the Duke of York; with all the ceremonies on making the new Lord Mayor of London, and other affairs which happened in England: with their arrival in Holland, and entry into the Hague. Sold by Crispinus Hoeckwater. [Printed pamphlet. Dutch. Ibid.]
Notes by Williamson headed "the War." N.B. Unlucky that Messina is abandoned before Spain is tied to us. 1. Spain will give us worse terms. 2. will be harder to bring to a peace; were much more in fear before than now. Happy, if it could have looked more as the effect of the terror we give France &c. The greatest advantage might have been made possible, if the two kings had agreed in it. De V[? icque]. N.B.—therefore it's plain there's no intelligence between the King and France &c.
Werden—Sparre. Speaking to Sparre of the Duke. They knew he was a Papist and we shall never suffer him to be our King &c.
The Army.—Why not the King of France pay the army? Furnish wherewithal. Why not under pretence of fear of the French raise forts, citadels, wherever the King would desire on all the coast &c.—Make hay while — [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 425.]
Informations. 22 Sept. Mr. Bridgeman. Count Wallenstein told A.B. that the King was a good prince and that there was easy access to him, but that the public ministers must still follow his ministers for their answers and that the whole ministry was French &c.
A.B. is forced to decline their companies and meetings as not thinking it fit or safe to hear such indecent expressions as they give of the King. Count Wallenstein has told A.B. that they made no great account of the King's mediation. They could, when they saw fit, lay aside the King as they had done the Swede, and of themselves make up a peace in the Empire, and Borgomaniero said as much on the part of Spain. Count Wallenstein told the Resident of Venice that he had sent to complain to the Emperor of his ill treatment here in the style &c. of the answer to his memorial. Hamilton, now lately come from the Duke of Neuburg, told Gloxim(?) he came to engage the King's offices in favour of the Duke, his master, to have some ease in the matter of contributions for France. He had spoke with his Majesty about it, but found him fort froid &c., adding that he found all French, or something to that effect.
Van Beuningen told Mr. Br[idgeman] 20 Oct., that the Imperial and Spanish ministers gave out the return to our express now lately arrived confirmed what they had said of a likelihood in Spain to seize our merchants' estates &c. This so alarmed Van Beuningen that he came to know the truth of me &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 429.]
Notes by Williamson. August, September. At the same time M. de Borgomaniero at London spreads and countenances reports as if Spain were taking a resolution to break with England, and that they would begin with seizing the merchants' estates, the Spanish ambassador at Nimeguen laughs at it &c. to Sir L. Jenkins, so all Borgomaniero does is art and malice to raise murmurs and disorder here among the merchants &c.
Our people, parliament &c. cry up the Triple League and call on the King for something to be now done like that for the saving of Flanders &c., and yet Spain are so little thankful for the Triple League, nay so incensed at the King for it, that Don Juan said in a secret conversation he had with a certain person (the B[? aron] de V[? icque]) in September, that it was the ruin of the Spanish monarchy &c.
And as to the Triple Alliance, N.B., that, when the Spanish Netherlands were as near lost as they could be, and indeed worse than ever they can be till they are wholly lost, that is, when the very heart and bowels of them were possessed by France in 1667, all that Holland itself could be brought to, at least all they then thought their and our parts to do in favour of them was to make the Triple League, which was not to engage us to go into wars to beat the French out of what they had conquered, right or wrong, but only to tie the French King's hands there, where matters were, that he should not go further. N.B.—This sort of help the King has offered from 1674 to Spain, crying out still to make peace, and even in that peace to have that of 1667 mended by a change of Charleroy, Aeth &c. But nothing will serve but for us to go forsooth into the war &c. And to carry all as far as the peace of the Pyrenees &c.
As to the King's proceedings against Salinas and Fonseca, whatever the ministers say of it, to gain a victory of the King and to foil, his dignity, the D[uke] d'Alva told the B[?aron] de V[? icque] that the King had done ill, he had not taken off their heads (letter of 26 Aug.) and the Duke told Sir W. Godolphin the same. When England and Holland were to save Denmark from the Swede in 1659 and 1660, did they enter into the war with Denmark to beat the Swede out of Blecking, Halland and Schonen &c. No such thing; only to tie matters where they found them and that Sweden should not proceed to a total conquest &c. This the King would have done for Flanders as early as 1674 and every year since and would yet do. But nothing will be heard but to go as a party into the war.
As to our necessary dependence on them in our trade.—They in some parts depend more on us, as in the Canaries, all that wine being solely brought into England, so that the Islanders would rebel, should Spain interdict the English that trade, or should the King of England, in case of such a war, strictly prohibit it to his subjects. They of Aragon had like to have killed Don Pedro d'Aragon, 1677, left commissioner at their States, for having prohibited their commerce with France.
Mr. Bridgeman, 15 Oct.—That Gl. . . . . . told him C[ount] Wallenstein had said that the Lord Treasurer, Lord Arlington and J. W[illiamson] governed the King and that they were all French. That speaking of J.W. they even called him the Secretary that is pensioner to France. That Borgomaniero had said that the Prince of Orange ought to look to himself how he had any hand in making a peace, lest he be served in Holland as De Witt was. That he had said, Let the King have a care what he does, for that they in Spain had a ressort to play, if put to it, that would be able to set such a flame of war in England that it would not be easy de l'esteindre &c.
How little security in their promises, if we were in their alliance.
Denmark and Brandenburg make a new treaty, 1677, without saying one word to Holland. Beverning to the Mediators 15 Oct. The Emperor, Elector of Cologne, Duke of Neuburg and Bishop of Münster the same, and not a word said to Holland.
24 Oct. C[ount] Hamilton, envoyé from the Duke of Neuburg, told me, a certain person (he desired not to name him) had said to him that for a certainty the Lady Mary was contracted to the Dauphin and that J. W[illiamson] was present for one at the passing the contract. He had before told me that C[ount] Wallenstein had plainly told him that he saw there was nothing to be hoped for here &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 433.]
Notes by Williamson. Spain.—M. de Borgomaniero about 29 or 30 Aug., when he had spread the alarm of that King's seizing English merchants' goods &c., would have had the Resident of Venice to have given out underhand to the King's ministers, that M. de Borgomaniero was expecting a courier, which was to bring a resolution from Spain of great importance, meaning something of a declaration that, if the King would not &c., then the King of Spain would seize &c. But the Resident desired to be excused from being made the instrument of any such insinuations &c. This the Resident told Mr. Bridgeman to tell me privately.
Their scandalous reports of Flanders raised upon the Prince of Orange, that he raised the siege of Charleroy by the persuasions of the Earl of Ossory, sent by the King on purpose to poison the Prince's counsels &c., was most barbarous. If to do this had been in the King a betraying the duty of a mediator, the false accusing his Majesty what is it?
Was written to Vienna; Vide Skelton's letter and the enclosed copy in High Dutch, received about 9 or 10 Sept. Our English everywhere affronted in Flanders upon it, even those that went to serve in the Confederate troops, as Duke of Albemarle not received at all in his passage through Brussels by the Governor.
The Prince forward to justify himself and the Earl in a letter to the States (as said), but most certainly to Beverning. (Sir L. Jenkins' of 6 Sept.)
All the while Wallenstein and Borgomaniero here press expressly the King to come into a war and declare it is an unhappy mistake the greatest part of the princes of Europe are in to think any conditions of peace could be advisable.
The Imperial and Spanish ambassadors at Nimeguen treat of a peace, call with impatience for Sir W. Temple's return to know the conditions of the peace, tax France to be backward and slow to a peace &c.
The King notwithstanding all their ill usage, when Oran was feared to be in danger, ordered Sir J. Narbrough by an additional instruction sent down in great haste to him after he taken his leave, in the first place and before going to Argiers to stand over to Oran and to save the town &c.
Objection. We are blind to our own interest in suffering France to grow so great.
Answer. The King sorry for it. Foresaw it in May, '74, warned the Prince of Orange of it, but he was obstinate, would hear of nothing less than the Peace of the Pyrenees. The King neither could nor would then go into that war and yet they pursued it against all sense. Must now the loss(?) lie at the King's door. The King all along presses for a reasonable and sure peace. The Confederates hitherto have been more averse to a peace, even in the midst of their losses, than France can be proved to be in all its prosperity, never talking of less than the Peace of the Pyrenees.
Were not Spain as blind to their interests that suffered us to be overcome by Holland and France in 1666 and '67, they refusing to come in on any conditions to our help? nay not then, when they were certainly told the storm was preparing against them in 1667, as it actually proved. The King saved Flanders in 1669 by the Triple Alliance and so he would now. But how was that? by judging what conditions of a peace were reasonable between the parties and obliging both to them; so he would do now possibly, but Spain will not let it come to that, will neither say what conditions are reasonable, nor suffer the King to determine what shall be such. The terms of the Peace of Aix, where even Holland itself was judge jointly with the King, were taken upon a reasonable measure of the state of things and posture of the fortune (?) of France and Spain. Holland endeavouring all this spring and summer to buy Sweden off from France, Beverning the instrument. Owns it to Sir L. Jenkins, vide letter of 6 Sept.
The King saved Flanders by the peace of Aix, for which he yet never received thanks from Spain, nay, they reproached it often and often as a mortal offence and unkindness. N.B.—How will they judge of their own good! In our treaty of '72 with France the King expressly confirmed the treaty of Aix. The King dissembled the Spaniard throwing men in '72 into Boisleduc, Breda and Bergen op Zoom, by which means alone those towns were saved, expressly contrary to our secret act of 1667 with Spain, as also their placing men at Dam, Sluys &c. for securing Zealand, in case the English had attacked it in '72 and '73.
The King issued a proclamation forbidding his subjects to serve the rebels in Messina (calling them rebels), at which the French stormed extremely. Got the French King to send ambassadors, to the assembly, though the Emperor to this day will not requite the King in the matter of Prince William. Got the Duke of Lorraine his title in the passports. Suffered 8 or 10 months' insolences of the Ostenders '74, taking not less than 60 or 70 English ships expressly against the treaty of '67. Suffered a second inroad of those insults &c. in '76.
As to our merit from them in that peace of Aix.—The first proposition of it was from the King by Sir W. Temple passing disguisedly by the Hague. Holland would not sign that treaty till we bought it of them, i.e. till they made us release to them our right to have that scurvy marine treaty of 1667 at Breda mended and till we engaged to work it punctually. When Sweden was to be hired in by subsidies and they would not have anything to do with Spain or take them for their paymasters but would have us and Holland to answer for the subsidies and be their direct paymasters, the King frankly offered to pay his half of the Spaniards' quota in money and take their obligation to be repaid when they could; Holland would not pay the other moiety, unless Spain would give Geldre, Ruremonde and Venlo into their hands for caution. This the King thought a barbarous demand and wrought at last Holland from it &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 437.]
[1677.] Narrative of the case of John Collins, who was first a clerk in the Kitchen, spent some time during the troubles in the Venetian wars, before the restoration was made accountant of excise and, presenting the King with important accounts relating thereto, was recommended for continuance in his employment, that after the fire, the excise office being burnt, the London farmers took the business into their hands, and dismissed the old officers, several of whom afterwards got half their salaries allowed, but that of Collins is in arrears 4¾ years, from Michaelmas 1672 to Midsummer 1677, being 237l. 10s. 0d. He was employed by the Commissioners at Brook House, but did not like their pressing things so far, and lost thereby, and can show many frauds committed in the King's affairs. He then served the Council of Plantations, became conversant with their business and made collections thereon. His salary falling into arrears, he resigned, and Mr. Slingesby employed him till 1676 in delivering out farthings. With statement of his endeavours for relief by petitioning for arrears of salary; proposing to examine the accounts of Sir William Warren, who furnished Navy stores during the former Dutch war; offering to write a treatise on Navigation for Christ's hospital, or to teach Baron Bertie's nephews mathematics, as a means to obtain payment. He fears that his family will be ruined in consequence of his condition; that the Royal Society, which elected him member, though a mean person, for his knowledge in Mathematics, will be prejudiced, and that the King's revenue will be damaged more than he is willing to mention. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 187.]
[1677 ?] Paper headed "The First, Second, and Third Parts of Hudibras." After reciting that — Butler has published a certain poem by the title of Hudibras and has already caused two parts of the same to be imprinted, granting him the exclusive rights of reprinting the said book or any part thereof already composed and made public or which hereafter shall be composed and lawfully made public or imprinted by the said author, as the same now, or hereafter shall be so published by him, or otherwise howsoever counterfeited and disguised &c. (See ante, p. 444.) [Draft in Williamson's hand. Ibid. No. 188.]
Case of Dr. Assheton. He was maintained 7 years at Oxford by his parents, but was then told, there being other children, he must shift for himself. He continued 7 years longer in his College and commenced B.D. in which time he borrowed 400l. In 1672 he was received into the Duke of Ormonde's family, where he was a year and half without any preferment, on which account and by taking his D.D. and by institution, first fruits, &c. he was compelled to borrow 300l. more. His preferments are the rectory of St. Antholin's, a donative in Wales and a prebend in York, amounting to 136l. 6s. 8d. out of which he has to pay 42l. interest, so he has only 94l. 6s. 8d. to maintain himself, to get books and to pay 700l. debt. (See ante, p. 46.) [Ibid. No. 189.]
John Jolliffe to Williamson. I was this morning to have waited on you, understanding you desired to speak with me, and finding you were lately gone to bed was loth to disturb you, but I acquainted Mr. Bridgeman that as to the Company's concern no doubt Agent Hebden (sent to Russia in 1676, see last volume) has had as full an answer by this time as can be expected and therefore I could see no reason to detain him longer there, and as far as his message is granted or denied, the sooner his Majesty is acquainted with it, the better. No doubt by this time he has spent all or most of his money, therefore 'twere fit he were discharged. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Legal opinion that before the statute of 16 Car. I. c. 1 a prorogation of Parliament beyond a year would not have been lawful, because by 4 and 36 Edw. III. a parliament ought to be holden once every year, but that since the statutes of 16 Car. I. and 16 Car. II. it may be prorogued, so that it be not beyond the space of 3 years. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 398, No. 191.]
James Bonnell to the King. Petition for some employment in the Church, having passed his degrees (M.A. 1676). He was 9 June, 1666, granted the office of Accountant-General of the Customs and New Imposts in Ireland, with 200l. a year salary, in consideration of the services and sufferings of his father Samuel, formerly merchant in Italy, which he enjoyed for three years and was sent to Cambridge by the Duke of Ormonde's orders, but this salary was withdrawn by a new establishment in 1669, whereby he and his aged mother were deprived of their only maintenance. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Edward Lord Herbert, Baron of Cherbury and Castle Island, (died 1678) to the King. Petition for a pension for himself and his wife, the daughter of George, Lord Chandos, deceased (in Aug. 1676). He, as well as his ancestors for three generations, has been a great sufferer for loyalty. His former request for a sum of money or a place as Commissioner of Customs was not granted: he sees others rewarded, and is unconscious of having ever offended his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 193.]
William Potter, cheesemonger, to the King. Petition for an order to Sir D. Gauden and others, Commissioners of provisions for the Navy, to pay him 2,273l. 15s. 2d., the balance due for butter and cheese supplied to the Navy since 1674, for part of which the said Commissioners gave bonds payable 21 March and 21 May, 1677, which have not been paid. The petitioner is a poor tradesman unable to go to law with them. [Ibid. No. 194.] Annexed,
Case of William Potter, presented to Sir J. Williamson, Secretary of State, showing the state of the debts due to him. [Ibid. No. 194 i.]
William Potter's account with the Victualling Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 194 ii.]
Thomas Prise to the King. Petition for the next vacant place amongst the clerks of the Greencloth, he and family having in the late rebellious times lost for their loyalty above 20,000l., and his Majesty having promised to gratify him whenever he could find out anything for his advantage undisposed of. [Ibid. No. 195.] Annexed,
Representation of the services and sufferings of Thomas Prise and his family. His grandfather, Thomas Prise, was one of the first in Herefordshire who opposed the proceedings of the Long Parliament and drew up the protestation sent up against them, for which he was ill used and imprisoned, and had to compound, losing above 3,000l. Many of his family engaged in the war. His father, Col. John Prise, lost 11,000l. in houses, timber, &c. at the siege and taking of Hereford, was exiled 16 years, and was only allowed 14l. a year out of his whole estate. The petitioner always endeavoured the restoration, and in every design for that end was imprisoned, especially in Sir George Booth's. He raised a foot company and brought them to Sheppey when the Dutch fleet came into the river, and another in 1673; has behaved with all duty 16 years as member for Herefordshire (elected March, 1661), and wants employment to evolve himself from his great debts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 195 i.]
John Proctor to the King. Petition for a pension and a warrant for the making of a baronet, being left unprovided for by the sudden death of his dear master the late Duke of Newcastle (died 25 Dec., 1676), and 50l. a year given him by the present duke is all he has to live upon, which is insufficient for his wife, two children and family. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Richard Berry, M.A., of Brasenose College, sometime chaplain on board the St. Andrew, to Secretary Williamson. Petition stating that the petitioner was engaged as chaplain from the beginning to the end of the great expedition against the Dutch in 1665 and '66, and that his Majesty had promised to make a competent provision for all chaplains, who served in any expedition at sea and returned with a good report of their behaviour, yet the petitioner has never received any benefit thereof and praying his assistance towards obtaining the same. Noted by Williamson, Col. Parks, Col. Carter of the Council of Virginia in Tower Street. (Parks left England about August, 1677, S.P. Col., America &c., 1677–80, No. 388.) [Ibid. No. 197.]
James Dover of Cockermouth to Secretary Williamson. Petition that his son might be one of the two boys at Cockermouth School, on whom his Honour bestows some yearly maintenance. In the margin is noted in pencil, "Lord Hatton's leave. Captain, Train Bands in his absence and of the Lieut.-Governor." [Ibid. No. 198.]
The Messengers of the Chamber to Secretary Williamson. Petition showing that they are above 5 years in arrear of their pay, being more than the rest of the King's servants, notwithstanding orders every year from the Commissioners of the Treasury and the Lord Treasurers to the Treasurer of the Chamber to pay them, and requesting him to procure speedy payment from his Majesty to enable them to continue their service. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Thomas Tiffin of Silly Wrey, Cumberland, to Secretary Williamson. Petition to recommend him for some employment, however mean, having suffered great hardships in prison, but, being now at liberty, having to seek his fortune in the world. (See ante, pp. 150, 158.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 200.]
Robert Stockdale, late collector of Customs at Dover, to the Lord Treasurer. Petition for pity and to represent his case to his Majesty that he may be capable of that mercy which his present miserable condition pleads for. Having served as collector from 29 Sept., 1671, to 12 April, 1676, he was the end of March last charged with an arrear of about 3,000l. On Monday, 16 April [1677], he paid over to the Commissioners of the Customs in London 460l. 10s. and desired time till the following Thursday, but on that day he was arrested and imprisoned by the Commissioners' orders and an extent executed on his goods at Dover the following Monday and he himself turned out and his books of account delivered to the Commissioners' order. He could have discharged whatever arrears were due, had not his reputation been ruined by this extraordinary proceeding. This arrear was not contracted by design, but whatsoever he is charged with arises from his own accounts, which he might have as easily contrived to his own advantage. Since 2 March last he remitted by bills to Mr. Mounteney, 3,134l. and had in his hands till the last of March 2,000l. in order to pay debentures for corn and has paid to the Commissioners since his coming 765l. He has not incurred this arrear by any prodigal expense or adventure, and before this hearing after 4½ years employment was worse in his estate than when he first entered in it. Therefore whatever arrears may be found must principally arise only from some error in his account, most probably to his own wrong. He has been all along at very considerable expense, through all the adjacent ports of France and Flanders for intelligence relating to the Customs. He has raised the Customs from 18,237l. 4s. 7½d. in the first year of his employment to 22,779l. 18s. 9½d. in his last, and the whole charge for collecting 108,202l. 19s. 10d. has been only 3,215l. 11s. 3d., including salaries of 16 officers, incidents, and building a shallop. He has totally suppressed the transporting of wool and has settled the taking of herring, formerly taken and brought to Dover by the French only, whereas now our own people take annually no less than 300 last. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 201.]
Statement that Robert Stockdale, made Collector of Customs at Dover 29 Sept., 1671, entered into bonds for accounting for all moneys received by him; that at Christmas, 1673, Arnold became one of his securities, not knowing that Stockdale was then in arrears above 4,200l.; that after he became security Stockdale paid 1,300l. more than he collected, till his discharge on 10 April, 1676, but Mr. Litcott, the Accountant-General, cunningly tried to show that the arrears due were incurred after Arnold became security, so as to make him accountable. [Ibid. No. 202.]
[1677 ?]
Monday. Fulham.
The Bishop of London to Secretary Williamson. Recommending the bearer, who by his long attendance is driven to a necessity that craves relief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 398, No. 203.]
List of several members of parliament, including Herbert Parrott, elected 14 Aug., 1677, and Richard Long, who died in 1678. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Friday morning.
From my Chamber at Westminster.
The Earl of Norwich to William Bridgeman. I steal out of the house in the middle of a cause wherein I have some concern, to desire you to speak with this bearer about a certificate I desire for the vindication of my reputation from his Majesty, which alleging matters of fact, 'tis necessary that matter appear to Mr. Secretary, ere he offer it to his Majesty, after which I shall desire his Majesty's favour in it, that it may be dispatched. You will therefore please assist this bearer to speak to Mr. Secretary and, if he be not at leisure, yourself to view the matter, that, when I wait on Mr. Secretary myself, he may be no stranger to this favour desired by me. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Lord O'Brien's (ob. Sept., 1678) instructions for treating with the Earl of Thomond concerning Billing. To proceed no further if the rigour of the decree be demanded, by which the Earl of Thomond is to enjoy Billing free from all encumbrances and part of Lord O'Brien's estate, settled on him at his marriage, is made liable to indemnify the Earl against them. These encumbrances are part of Lady Peterborough's portion which her brother, the Earl, ought to have made good out of his estate in Ireland, had it not been charged on Billing, and Lady Cullen's legacy left her by her father Earl Henry, the pretended grounds for this unjust decree being that during the treaty for Lord O'Brien's marriage settlement the late Countess Dowager of Thomond (ob. April, 1675) said she thought Billing after her decease would come to her son, Thomond, who was thereby induced to give his son 500l. a year additional maintenance. Lord O'Brien notwithstanding, from his affection and duty to his father, offers to indemnify him from all encumbrances but that of the Earl and Countess of Peterborough. [Ibid. No. 206.]
"Een kort en grondigh Verhaal, waar uyt de Oorlogh tusschen Vranckrijck, Engelandt en desen Staat gesprooten is, tot onderrechtinge voor de Vreede-lievende Onderdaanen &c.," i.e. "A short and accurate narrative of the causes of the war between France, England and this state for the information of all peace-loving subjects," by [Sir] J. Rothe. It alludes to the ambitious spirit of the Prince of Orange, supported by his future father-in-law, the Duke of York, and to the peace negotiations at Nimeguen. There is a note at the end that the author has published nothing since 12 December, 1675, and that anything that has since appeared under his name is the work of others and that he knows nothing of it. [Printed pamphlet of 8 pages. This copy is addressed to Alderman Sir John Frederick. Dutch. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
[1677 ?] John Andros and others, natives of Guernsey, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petition showing that in 1671 the petitioners bought the ship then named the Lamb, which was made a free ship by the name of the Charles of Guernsey, that the petitioners are the sole owners of the said ship and at the end of December or beginning of January, 1675[-6] obtained a passport for her for a voyage to the Straits, that last March she was driven ashore on the coast of Brittany and much damaged, where the petitioners were obliged to repair and refit her, and that, when she was so driven ashore, her said freedom and passport were lost, and, as she is now ready for a voyage to Newfoundland and thence to the Straits, praying for a copy of the said freedom exemplified and for a passport for the said ship. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 70.]
[Philip Learmitte, master, and the owners of the John of London] to Secretary Williamson. From the late experience of the owners of the Charles of Guernsey how his Honour was instrumental in obtaining a pass for their ship, others hoped some rules and directions for passes would have been made for all other vessels of those islands, but Philip Learmitte of Jersey, coming to renew a pass for a vessel which belongs to subjects of Guernsey, which was granted last June, was told that it could not be renewed by the Lords of the Admiralty without special orders from the Privy Council, for which end he has to-day presented his petition, which the said master and owners beg his Honour to further. [Ibid. No. 71]. Annexed,
Philip Learmitte to the Privy Council. Petition for an order to the Lords of the Admiralty to renew the pass for the said vessel, for which the petitioners obtained a pass 14 June, 1676, from the Lords of the Admiralty, who have declared that, as the vessel is not in the port of London, the pass cannot be renewed without an order from the Privy Council. [Ibid. No. 71 i.]
Newspapers for the Year.
1677. The London Gazette published twice a week from No. 1161, Monday, 1 Jan., to Thursday, Jan. 4, 1676-7, to No. 1264, Thursday, Dec. 27 to Monday, Dec. 31, 1677, No. 1203 being missing.

Footnotes

  • 1. Misdated the 5th.