BHO

Charles II: January 1678

Pages 548-617

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1677-8. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1911.

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January 1678

1678.
Jan. 1.
Pembroke Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. As several of his juniors both in his own and other colleges have by the interest of their friends obtained considerable benefices which they enjoy with their fellowships, hoping his Honour will not be offended at his present importunity, as, having not met with the like success, he is forced to fall on the old troublesome theme, humbly requesting his Honour's assistance in order to the speedy advancement of his fortunes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 1.]
Jan. 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats sailed last Saturday night. None has arrived since my last. The wind has been these three days westerly, the weather hard. It blew last night a sudden fret and gust. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 2.]
Jan. 1.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 1 this morning the Calais packet-boat landed by bad weather the mail in the Downs. Our advice from Calais says that yesterday the King set out from Paris and is expected there Friday and is to reside some time there and at Dunkirk. He brings 5,000 foot with him to be quartered in and about Calais. 'Tis said some sudden attack will be made against Nieuport, some troops having been lately ordered from Dunkirk to march to Vueurne. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. 1.
between 10 and 11. Portsmouth.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. I am just alighted from my horse and by all information I yet have the Charlotte yacht is not yet arrived. If she be, I will presently set sail. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Jan. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Merlin yacht sailed this evening for Spithead, full of pressed men. [Ibid. No. 5.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 5 i.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Cradock to be chaplain to the garrison of Sheerness, Kent, obeying the orders of the commander in chief of the garrison. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 237.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench and the Recorder and sheriffs of London for the reprieve of John Findley, Katherine Crofts and Cicely Poley, who will be indicted at the next sessions at the Old Bailey for the murder of William Ferrall, in case they or any of them be found guilty of manslaughter. With similar warrants dated 1 and 2 Jan. to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and in his absence to the Treasurer and Comptroller of the Household and the Steward of the Marshalsea for reprieves, in the first warrant to the said persons, and in the second to the said John Findley and to John Butler, who are indicted at the present sessions of the Court of the Verge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, pp. 448, 449.]
Jan. 2.
Rye.
Robert Hall, that served Lord Chancellor Hyde, to Williamson. Begging that, as the King has admitted him to succeed Mr. Welsh, who is lately dead, in the small place of clerk of the Passage, he may do the like in his good opinion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 6.]
Jan. 2.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Hope and the Thomas and Mary of this place. They took in their lading of fruit and wine at Malaga, and were convoyed thence to Cadiz by a Dutch man-of-war, having 20 sail of his own besides English, of which he took equal care, and also to Plymouth of some English merchantmen. Sir Robert Robinson in the Assurance brought out of Cadiz 110 English, but off the Burlings most of the fleet were dispersed, and our men complain that Capt. Robinson took no care of them or of his fleet, but those, that could keep him company, might. About 6 Nov. Sir J. Narbrough came to Malaga from Tangier with 7 or 8 frigates, the three Turks men-of-war he had taken and some merchantmen he had pressed and went up to Algier. Fruit dear in Spain and corn very dear, of which there is no supply from France; a prohibition and no exportation of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 7.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Templer, serjeant at arms, to take into custody Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, and convey him to the Tower and there deliver him to the constable or his deputy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 202.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James, Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower, to take into custody Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, committed for speaking blasphemy and other misdemeanours, and keep him till delivered by course of law, or till the King declare his further pleasure. [Ibid.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the bailiff and jurats of Jersey informing them of the pardon of Thomas Le Grosse, convicted there of stealing mutton, and requiring them to allow him to return and reside peaceably in that island. [Ibid. f. 203.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to Henry and Sir Cecil Howard, commissariesgeneral of the musters. As Capt. George Rookes, lieutenant to Capt. Charles Middleton's company of foot in the Duke of York's regiment, stands respited on the muster of Sept. last, ordering them to take off the respite and allow him on the said muster, as he is employed on a voyage as commander of the Newcastle frigate, and also to allow him on all succeeding musters, till his return from that voyage. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 227.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Robert Fielding desiring a reference to the Attorney-General to enquire into the particulars of the process against him, and to report the legality or illegality of the same and in the interim to stop the filing of it in the King's Bench, his Majesty, remembering that some days ago he referred the petitioner's case to the Attorney-General and having been further moved in the petitioner's behalf, refers this petition to the Attorney-General to enquire into the particulars of the said process and to report the whole matter with his opinion on it, and what his Majesty may legally do for the petitioner's relief. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 215.]
Jan. 2.
Lisburn.
Viscount Granard to Viscount Conway. Sir George Rawdon will give you a more particular account of one Douglas, a Scotch preacher, who fled thence to this country, and, I find, is proscribed there. His examinations are likewise sent you to be communicated to the Lord Treasurer. I am of opinion they are of moment. The originals signed by his own hand I have sent to the Lord Lieutenant, which likewise will be sent to the Secretary. One thing is omitted in his depositions, which on my first discourse with him he told me, that those in Scotland had sent to their friends in London for a supply of money for the better carrying on of God's cause, and that they had already received 2,000l. and were promised more. He seems willing to make all their combination appear and has promised me to produce their association signed by several hands both of gentlemen and others, which he himself was busy in procuring, but of this and other particulars relating to this affair you may expect a fuller account by next post. I expect by the next post an order to send the prisoner to Dublin.
Since first I had the honour of your acquaintance, your kindness to me has been so great, that it is impossible to put my acknowledgements in writing, yet your last and transcendent favour in recommending my pretences to Sir George was so great and so noble that you have made me from a servant your slave. That affair seems to go on as I ever desired it. The young couple have no aversion, I presume more than ordinary affection, which, all things first and last considered, may seem strange. Their will wants nothing but the continuance of your favour to make me and my family happy in the enjoyment of the best and most virtuous lady I know. What I have written on this subject is by your niece's approbation, who has read and approved of every word in this part of my letter. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 131.]
Jan. 2.
Lisburn.
Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. I thought it unfit to interpose any other matter in the other letter that perhaps may be read by the Lord Treasurer or to add anything of my own apprehensions of this intended rebellion, which, if Mr. Douglas say true, as I verily believe he does, it seems strange and as incredible that such provision should be made for a war, and the whole Council at Edinburgh be asleep and have no discoveries thereof, or that they are involved in the design in some measure. Lord Granard forgot to question him particularly if he heard or knew of any supply sent from France, but intends to send him hither. If this had been done when he was taken first, he would have been kept more private than he is at Belfast and perhaps more particulars learned of these transactions. His lordship came hither on Saturday and is now returning to Belfast and desired me to write, as I have done to you, which I have showed him that it be according to his own sense. We have been in daily expectation these last ten days of advice from the Council at Edinburgh about this brigade, but nothing is come. Perhaps they may have got some part of this intelligence and are about it and finding out arms and rebels, which if not prevented, it may easily be foreseen our condition here will be troublesome, and this country's dance will be after their pipe, though Lord Granard hopes his influence on the ministers to be very much to prevent it.
As to my particular trouble about the amours to your niece, which my lord and his friends and dependents have caressed to incline her affections, I still suffer under it, so that I have been very open with him to let him know I could not bear it, or permit any other pretender till the treaty in hand was fully ended one way or other. But now Mr. Coote was returned home, his hope was, he said, that I would permit his son's access to the house, which I had forbidden, and the cause was removed for which it was done to prevent further quarrels between them here. I told him he himself was as welcome as any man living except your lordship, but doubted that it would not be convenient, but he pressed it so far as I consented to his coming as other strangers but not as a pretender, and that, if he did, it would be a great discomposure of my family, for I would certainly remove it or her and would not endure it, so Capt. Forbes and his brother supped here last night with their father and I find it will have no good effect, but that one way or other ways will be found to attain their designs. The younger brother brought a diamond ring of value from Lady Forbes, which Mall refused, and my lord himself took it and put it on her finger, and she brought it to me, and I have advised her to seal it up and write to my lady and either send it back or write she keeps it in safety for her and to make her some return the first conveniency, &c. These caresses will make a jealousy in the other party, and I perceive she is so averse and made so to Mr. Coote that she will never consent to it, nor, if she dissemble not strangely, has she any the least inclination to Capt. Forbes, yet, if you approve, I think it best for my own quiet to send her away somewhere and for her honour. I have yours of 18 Dec., and, as I wrote before I had it, I had resolved by her desire to delay any further progress as you advise and have her promise to observe it and not to admit any address further in any kind from any whatsoever, but am jealous of women's promises in such matters. I had a letter last post from Lord Coloony and a copy of his letter and your answer about help to bring off his son and an excuse of his mistaken charge upon me that the birth and growth, &c., was from me and he promises to write to you his meaning. I answer, if he mean the quarrel, it is a gross mistake, and, if he intend the first treaty, it is so likewise, for, as I writ to you, the motion came from himself, who was twice at my chamber in your house about it, before he could have an opportunity to break his mind to me, and then did it with much earnestness.
Your lieutenant is here and a complete Christmas man of merriment, and Arthur disposes himself much abroad with the hounds this fair weather, which I disapprove not, that he may be out of the way of the good fellowship the officers practise at this time. [2 pages. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 132.]
Jan. 3.
Edinburgh.
Proclamation forbidding all noblemen, heretors and magistrates of burghs royal to leave Scotland without special licence from the Privy Council. (Printed in Wodrow, History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, Vol. II., p. 381.) [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 8.]
Another copy of the above in Thomas Barnes' hand, probably enclosed in one of his letters. He adds:—Some say that since this proclamation there is in Scotland a very strict declaration that allows the soldiers to quarter on, to kill, plunder and abuse such as do not obey some former edicts and to make forfeitures of such lands as any meetings that are not allowed shall be upon. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Jan. 3.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. Sir Richard Head having applied to the Lord Treasurer for the amendment of some mistakes or omissions in the Privy Seal for discharge of his fine as a baronet, he has commanded me to transmit the enclosed amendments, desiring you to cause them to be made in the bill. [Ibid. No. 10.] Enclosed,
The said amendments. [Ibid. No. 10 i.]
Jan. 3.
Ednall (Edenhall).
Sir C. Musgrave to Williamson. I had yours, and fear my resolution to begin my journey on Monday will be prevented by my father's weak condition. He is very sick and a general decay is very visible, so that I very much doubt his continuance any long time. I therefore submit to your judgement whether his Majesty and Royal Highness ought not to be acquainted with his condition, to prevent their being surprised, if it shall please God to call him out of this world. All care shall be taken to give you an account out of the West of Scotland. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Two fly-boats are in the bay, one from Dunkirk, a French prize bought there, and with her came a small vessel of this town. The master tells us, they bring in prizes daily there. This fly-boat was a Hollander from the West Indies and belongs now to London. Wind now much westerly. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A westerly wind has raged so high last night and this morning that the packet-boat durst not weigh in the night and with much ado got her anchor clear and sailed between 10 and 11 to-day. This harbour and town is open to a westerly wind in a straight reach of 10 or 12 miles. It is seven days since any of our packet-boats arrived from Holland, till one now about noon. Though the wind be high, the weather is fair with sunshine. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 3.
10 o'clock. Portsmouth.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. The wind is come to W. by N., so we shall sail at high water, which will be at 2 this afternoon. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Jan. 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 1st came in here the Flying Horse of Middelburg in 6 weeks from Surinam with sugars bound home. They report that colony to be in a very good condition and that they have made much sugar there the last and this year, so that they want ships to carry it away. Wind W. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 16.]
Jan. 3.
[Received.]
Statement by Thomas de la Marche charging Peter Monamy with forging passes for ships to the same effect as his deposition of the 5th. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 3. The King to Henry and Sir Cecil Howard, commissaries-general of the musters. He having made George, son of the late Ferdinando Lyttleton, ensign to Capt. Nathaniell Darrell's company in the regiment of Sir Charles Lyttleton, on account of the singular merits and services of his said father, although he is not yet. of age, and therefore incapable of taking the oaths, and performing things requisite for an officer on entrance into his charge, he is to receive his pay from the date of his commission, and any respite put upon him is to be taken off, till he shall be capable of performing the said duties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 228.]
Jan. 3. Licence to Francis Sandford, Lancaster herald, of the exclusive right for 15 years of printing a Genealogical History of the Kings of England and Monarchs of Great Britain from the Conquest, 1066, to the present year in seven parts or books, containing a discourse of their several lives, marriages and issues, times of birth, death, places of burial and monumental inscriptions with their effigies, seals, tombs, cenotaphs, devices, arms, quarterings, crests and supporters, all engraven in copper plates, on which he has been employed near 15 years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40a, f. 224.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and the rest of the officers of the Board of Greencloth, after reciting that George Maunder of the Chaundry and Elizabeth, his wife, formerly deputy laundress to the Person, had by their petition represented that they had faithfully served the King for nine years and upwards till the battle of Worcester, and had disbursed for his service several sums as chaundry man and laundress amounting to 968l. 18s. 9d., by which means they are become very poor, a reference thereof to the Board of Greencloth and their report that the petitioners are fit objects of charity: for settling in lieu of the said debt on the said George Maunder and Elizabeth, his wife, for their lives and the life of the survivor the yearly pension of 60l. to commence from Michaelmas, 1676. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 10.]
[1678.]
Jan. 3.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "At length this bearer, Lord Ossory, has got leave to go to you, at which he is very well pleased and will lose no time, and so goes to-morrow morning, being not willing to stay for the express we expect from France, though we look for him every hour, but I keep Cornwall here on purpose to send you word what the express will bring, which will either be peace or war, and, now that I have said this, I will not defer letting you know I do easily believe the trouble you had for the loss of my son. I wish you may never have the like cause of trouble nor know what it is to lose a son. . . This bearer can inform you of all things here." [Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 13.]
1678.
Jan. 4.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The frost and ice are all gone out of the river several days ago with high winds at S. and S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 18.]
Jan. 4.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The whole country stand amazed to hear that Capt. Huntington should stand competitor for a burgess with Sir Thomas Medowes, a person never worthy of any honour, that has not a house or a foot of land, that the other day was so necessitated that he begged an employment of the town which he still keeps, when Sir Thomas has above 900l. in lands and houses besides a very fair stock and is a person who received the first honour of knighthood in the town, and has been high sheriff of this county and twice head bailiff of this town and is now J.P. for both Norfolk and Suffolk, and his loyalty and faithfulness to the King and Church was in all the late unhappy times without spot or stain, whereas Capt. Huntington joined with and was very zealous for all the late usurped governments.
Since I came home, I was informed by a person, that one Johnson of this town to his dying day complained to him of Capt. Huntington and one Arnold, how he was drawn in to set his hand to bring the late King to his trial under pretence it was only to get a convoy for their Iceland men. Our town books will make it appear he was one of the committee that drew up their address to Richard Protector, where amongst their canting they called the King and his friends sons of Belial and their endeavours to gain his birthright cursed plots. In the Committee of Safety's time he was very active, being then both in the civil and military power. Since the restoration he never came into power but he improved it to support and strengthen the factious, by whose means and his accomplices it is become dangerous to speak our danger. Besides, our condition is become such that the chief magistrate durst not do justice or afford those the benefit of the law, if they take a disgust against any for speaking of the danger we are in. Our minister not long since should have been bound to the behaviour for speaking something to this purpose.
You may read this Capt. Huntington by his own words, who maintained that the Nonconformists were as good subjects as those of the Church and that it was no offence to be a Dissenter, if they paid the penalty when they were taken, and that he could with as good a conscience hear a tradesman preach and receive the Sacrament from his hands as from a minister in orders. At church he so misbehaves himself that he brings a contempt on the ordinance, for, when others are kneeling or standing, he is sitting. For him all the factious join and boast they will have him, telling us he is for their interest and they will carry it, to which purpose they threaten people to spoil them in their trade and to turn them out of their houses. They promise others to make them.
Yesterday the Bailiffs with the Aldermen and Common Council met about the town affairs, when above 50 petitions were put in for freedoms to make them capable to elect, some under age, others about 40 years, who, it is believed, would never have petitioned for it but on this occasion, but in the Assembly Sir Thomas' party were too great, so all the petitions were laid aside. Here are also all the indirect practices imaginable, upon which some told them they would put the laws in execution against their conventicles, if they went on at this rate. They answered, They would meet in spite of their teeth. They are so bold and confident, that we know little difference here between a King and a Protector, the creatures of the latter do so ride the other. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 19.]
Jan. 4.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. By a vessel lately arrived here from Morlaix we are credibly informed that the King of France is equipping at Brest every ship there belonging to that Crown to the number of between 20 and 30 stout ships and that such others as are in the river of Charente belonging to that King are likewise getting ready with all possible speed, all bound, as the report is there, for the Straits. I hope there is no fear of a surprise on Sir John Narbrough and those few ships there with him. It is in everybody's mouth in France that they will have a war with England. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Jan. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. I most humbly beg your pardon for that you have had so unintelligible lines in the lists of ships lately sent you. It is by reason of the death of the person I formerly had account from, and now could have no one to give me so true an account of them as the person now employed, but for the future I shall take great care to have the enclosed list copied and sent you in better form. [Ibid. No. 21.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 21 i.]
Jan. 5. Deposition of Thomas de la Marche. As for the probability of Mr. Monamy's counterfeiting the King's signet the following witnesses have declared that they heard Mr. Payne, the graver within Temple Bar, aver that the said Monamy had proffered him a reward to counterfeit the signet. (Names and particulars of the said witnesses, and where they informed de la Marche.)
As for the second ground of the probability of Monamy counterfeiting the seal, Davis, a limner, that lay in the same bed with Monamy at the house of Mr. Todin, a pewterer in St. Martin's Lane, about the suspected time of his counterfeiting the signet, declared to Mr. Phillips that to his knowledge Scobell, a graver, had engraven this counterfeit signet and had received money of Monamy for it. This Mr. Phillips declared to Mr. Cheavins (Chiffinch) and myself at Lewis' Coffee-house 31 Dec. last.
I shall only add that Charles Demeure, a serivener, about two years and a month ago wrote 24 blank freedoms for ships, which the said Monamy had, to which he, as may be very well presumed, applied the counterfeited signet, as well as to counterfeit his Majesty's and Lord Arlington's hands, which it appears he did, because, when he received these blanks which have since been signed and sealed as aforesaid, it was upwards of a twelvemonth after Lord Arlington was made Chamberlain, for proof of which I myself have seen some of them in the hands of one Petit, who then said he had them from Mr. Swinock and Mr. Milles, merchants, and I dare presume the said scrivener has written none since. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 22.]
Jan. 5. Notes by Williamson of the part of the above concerning Demeure. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Jan. 5. Susanna Royley to [John Abbot]. I have received yours, by which I understand my mistake, but I hope the fault is pardonable, since in your sex it is usual, and you say time will manifest your intentions, yet, as I ought in obedience to my father, until I know his intentions and yours, I shall proceed no further. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Jan. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday and to-day the weather has been and is very dull and dark, the wind for the most part westerly. Since my last no packet-boat has arrived. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Jan. 5.
Cowes Castle.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. Last Thursday we could not come further than into this road, the wind coming to S.S.W., where it still continues very stormy. There is news that a ship is cast away this morning on this island. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the royal assent to the election of Dr. William Thomas, Dean of Worcester to the bishopric of St. David's, void by the death of Dr. William Lucy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 106.]
Jan. 5.
9 p.m.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl of Ossory. The King would not have you part to-morrow morning, though you should find the weather proper for it, he having a little matter in which he may possibly make use of this occasion of your passing to the Prince of Orange, which will not be ready till to-morrow evening. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 180.]
Jan. 5. Allowance by Williamson of the bill of extraordinaries of Bevill Skelton, envoyé extraordinary to the Emperor, from Lady Day to Michaelmas, 1677, amounting to 500l. 10s. 6d., since he has his Majesty's leave to allow this bill, notwithstanding that the accountant is not able according to the rule to make oath of the truth of it, only the last particular of fees paid to the Farmers of the Hearth Money for their advance he must leave to the Lord Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 450.]
Jan. 5. Dispensation to Francis Forster, high sheriff of Northumberland, to be at his house in the county Palatine of Durham or elsewhere out of the said county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 225.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Commission to the Earl of Dalhousie to be captain of the militia troop of horse raised within the shire of Edinburgh principal in place of his father, the late Earl. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 333.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Commission to Richard Elphingstoun of Airth to be major in place of Seaton of Touch of the militia regiment of foot raised in the shires of Stirling and Clackmannan, whereof Charles, Earl of Mar, is colonel. [Ibid. p. 334.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to James Bruce of Belfoules for — years and to Robert Menzies of Bofallie for 3 years. [Ibid. p. 335.]
Jan. 6. The Earl of Ossory to Williamson. Requesting him to try what can be done upon the paper presented by him to the King in behalf of the Grooms of the Queen's Privy Chamber, as by reason of his sudden departure for Holland he cannot pursue it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 27.] Enclosed,
John Every and five others to the King. Petition praying that, according to his gracious promise and intention that the Grooms of the Queen's Privy Chamber should receive the like advantages as his Majesty's Grooms in the like places, being 60l. per annum each for board wages, he would confirm their allowance thereof and cause them to be entered in the present book of the establishment of the Household. [Ibid. No. 27 i.]
[Jan. ?] The same to the King. Similar petition praying an allowance of 10 groats per diem each for board wages. [Ibid. No. 28.] Enclosed,
Motives for the King's granting the petitioners' request, viz., that all the Grooms of his Majesty's Privy Chamber are allowed board wages, and so are all the officers of the Queen's Privy Chamber, the six Grooms in ordinary only excepted. [Ibid. No. 28 i.]
Jan. 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. At least 60 ships are now come out of France. Many for fear of a war came half loaden. Besides well nigh 100 are come from Cadiz, Malaga and the Straits, but no news presents. More than a topsail gale at S.W. Little harm done all these high winds. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Jan. 6.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. I suppose you do not wonder at the stay of the mails at the other side, for besides the contrary wind at W. it has blown a storm since Thursday night, so that the Calais and Nieuport mails that arrived here from London Friday and last night remain here still. The weather abated last night and, the wind being near S.W., the packet-boat would have gone to sea, but this storm has cast up so much beach between the heads that no vessel could go in or out, and whereas there was usually 16 feet of water, there is now not above 4. But such care is taken to expel the beach from between the heads that in the morning the packet-boat will undoubtedly sail and in one tide, after the beach is so expelled, no vessel will be hindered going out or coming in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 30.]
Jan. 6.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind last week being W.S.W. few vessels came into harbour. About midnight last Thursday, wind W.S.W., happened a great storm which continued till about 2 on Saturday night without intermission, but did little damage. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Jan. 7.
Stoke Hammond, Bucks.
Thomas Disney to Williamson. Requesting his good word and contrivance to endeavour to get for him Dr. Stillingfleet's prebend at St. Paul's now likely to be made vacant by his remove to be Dean of that cathedral, and praying him to use the enclosed at his pleasure. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Jan. 7.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Since my return here I have sent you two letters, one of 28 Dec. and the other of the 4th instant. Here is such foul play used by the factious people about the election, that I fear my letters may mis-carry. However, I have not writ anything but what I will justify and no more than what I publicly declare. The difference is grown so high and the divided parties so well known to one another that the dispute is here whether a Church or no Church, insomuch that I fear on the election the peace will scarce be kept. The factious here have been since '66 abetted by our partial Conformists and they backed by old Sir William Doyley, who has been the father to them all, to take off the friends of the loyal party here, who at present have none, and, if they should find any, it would be very acceptable and would highly oblige them. Sir Thomas Medowes must carry it by a considerable number notwithstanding the factious are all joined as one, if they do not prevail by those illegal ways mentioned in my former. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Jan. 7.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 4 this morning the Calais packet-boat landed the mail in the Downs, bringing over the Ambassador Montagu's Secretary and several couriers. At Calais they are uncertain when to expect their King, but from Dunkirk they write that the King will come directly thither from the army and not by way of Calais. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 7.
Cowes Castle.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. The contrary wind keeps us still in this harbour. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Hatton. I beg your pardon that I have not acknowledged several of yours, and given you an account of the orders Mr. Beckman, the engineer, is gone with to the islands. They now go enclosed with a desire you will oblige your Lieut.-Governor to give us frequent accounts of what passes in those parts, as I have desired of him myself by Capt. Beckman, a copy of which I also enclose. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 181.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Recommending to them and willing and requiring them to admit John Cudworth, B.A., scholar of the College, to the Fellowship first vacant, whether southern or northern, and dispensing with any statute or constitution to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 62.]
Jan. 7.
Westminster.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. Letter missive recommending William Sancroft, D.D., Dean of St. Paul's, to be elected to the Archbishopric, void by the death of Dr. Gilbert Sheldon. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 207.]
Jan. 7.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for the delivering to Patrick Lamb, master cook to the Queen, in consideration of his livery due at the last Feast of All Saints of 40l. 0s. 6d. and for the delivering to him at the next and every subsequent Feast of All Saints during pleasure for his livery of the following pieces, viz., 14 yards of black satin for a gown at 10s. the yard, 3 yards of black velvet to guard the same at 18s. the yard, one fur of budge to the same, price 8l., for furring the same gown 3s. 4d. and for making the same 6s. 8d., 8 yards of black velvet for a coat at 20s. the yard, 8 yards of cotton to line the same at 8d. the yard, 2 doz. silk buttons at 8d. the dozen, two oz. of silk at 2s. the ounce, and for making the same coat 6s. 8d., 3 yards of velvet for a doublet at 20s. the yard, 3 yards of fustian to line it at 8d. the yard, one yard of canvas for the same 6d., 2 doz. silk buttons for the same at 8d. the dozen, one ounce of silk at 2s. the ounce, for making the same doublet 3s. 4d., 2½ yards of marble cloth for a coat at 12s. the yard, 2½ yards of russet velvet to guard it at 18s. the yard, 6 yards of cotton to line the same at 8d. the yard, 2 doz. silk buttons at 8d. the dozen, 4 oz. of silk at 2s. the ounce, and for making the said coat 6s. 8d., 2½ yards of green cloth for another coat at 12s. the yard, 2½ yards of green velvet to guard it at 18s. the yard, 2 doz. silk buttons at 8d. the dozen, 4 oz. of silk at 2s. the ounce, 6 yards of fustian at 8d. the yard and for making the said coat 6s. 8d. [Over1 page. Ibid.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for admitting John, Earl of Glencairn, into the Privy Council. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 335.]
Jan. 7.
Guernsey.
William Sheldon to Lord [Hatton]. To-day Serjeant Perkings was buried, whom you had appointed to survey all ships whose masters required a pass belonging to this island according to the instructions you sent us. Mr. Greene will officiate his place till he hears from you. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 72.]
Jan. 8.
Borough Bridge.
Sir C. Musgrave to Williamson. Enclosed is the last account from Scotland. My father is better than at my last writing, though under great weakness, yet he would not admit that to be a consideration to detain me from discharging my present duty to his Majesty. I am thus far on my way, which is very deep, but hope on Sunday night or Monday morning to be at Stanhope House to receive your commands. I do not hear of any of my countrymen's coming suddenly to town except Lord Morpeth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 36.] Probably enclosed,
It is supposed the killing of Garrard, one of the Guards, might occasion an apprehension that some trouble might ensue thereon. This Garrard was employed by the Bishop of St. Andrews to apprehend Welch, a great preacher. The Bishop being come to London, I suppose you will have the particulars at large. At present all is quiet in Scotland, but I fear some disturbance may happen, but who should head this rebellious rout cannot be conjectured, but Col. Fox, an Englishman, is a companion of Welch's and is well mounted and attended. The militia of the several counties have met and returned to their homes with orders to be ready on 24 hours' warning, and those that are of the North to bring money to maintain them till they come to Stirling and then provision shall be made for them. Lord Lauderdale has made Lord Ross lieut-colonel of the Foot Guards (10 Nov., 1678). The reason of displacing the other is not known. On the death of the Governor of Edinburgh, Lord Lauderdale has made one that married his kinswoman governor; his name is now Macklen (Maitland). I hope such a course is taken that I shall have an account if any disturbance happen and what else is most considerable in that country, which shall be immediately transmitted to you. [In Sir C. Musgrave's hand. Ibid. No. 36 i.]
Jan. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday morning arrived one of our packet-boats which came from the Brill last Sunday afternoon. The Master says he left there the Katherine yacht, which attended Lord Inchiquin and intended to sail yesterday, and that several capital ships of war belonging to Holland are about Goree, and that they are filled fuller of men than ever they had used to be, and were ready to sail for the Straits. Betwixt 11 and 12 this morning the Katherine yacht anchored in the Rolling Grounds and sent one ashore in her boat, but it is said my lord remains on board. Wind yesterday westerly, to-day southerly. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Jan. 8.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Since my last we have had very much stormy weather, wind at S. and between S. and by W. [Ibid. No. 38.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 38 i.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Dean and Chapter of the metropolitical church of Canterbury to grant a dispensation to Dr. William Thomas, Dean of Worcester, now bishop elect of St. David's, to hold in commendam the deanery of Worcester with the said bishopric. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 107.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Charles Churchill to be captain of a company in the Duke of York's regiment, whereof Sir Charles Littleton is colonel, and to Thomas Hussey to be lieutenant and Edward Browne ensign to the said Capt. Churchill. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 231, 232, 234.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Capt. Beckman. I have received several of yours since your parting and the last giving an account of your having been put into Cowes. His Majesty directs you, in case this find you still in the Isle of Wight, while you are detained there, to view the condition of the island and the state of the fortifications there and to send or bring an account of it. But this is to be done only if you are necessarily detained there by the weather, otherwise you are not to stay your other intended voyage a moment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 181.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Sieur Carlin, who is going to Germany, bringing with him horses for the Dukes of Brunswick and Lüneburg, and intends to return to England with other horses which the King has commissioned him to buy for him. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 451.]
Jan. 8. Pass for the Earl of Leicester to go into France with his servants, his coach and eight horses, 50l. in money and his baggage &c. and to return. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40a, f. 225.]
Jan. 8–18.
London.
The Earl of Danby to the Prince of Orange. "Your Highness will find by the King's letter, which Lord Ossory brings, that he has yesterday received such an answer from the King of France, as makes him conclude that his Christian Majesty will no longer defer his march into Flanders, nor does he give us any other than dilatory excuses, which has much dissatisfied the King and no less the Duke, who is wholly disposed for going into the war, but the business will now be to adjust matters for the war, so as to keep us in the same good humour, and for that end the King does absolutely insist on having Ostend in his hands for recruit of his men, and sending provisions to them, insomuch that we have several times acquainted Marquis de Burgomaine (Borgomaniero) with this demand of his Majesty, and he still answers that he must first know the mind of the Duc de Villa Hermosa, although he has had three weeks time to do it, and, till that be consented, the King will not begin to make levies of men, but, in that case, intends only a war by sea or in other places, but not in Flanders. For what will concern Holland, the principal business will be to have the naval preparations very considerable, viz., 70 capital ships at least, and in that particular his Majesty expects to be assured immediately on the part of the States. The rest of the matters which will be necessary to be concerted in order to the war your Highness will find his Majesty desires that somebody may be sent hither to adjust as soon as may be, where the Ministers of the Emperor and of Spain will also be empowered to undertake for their masters. In my last I acquainted you that the French ambassador said he would write to his master for the respite of two months from war, while the King might send to all the Confederates to know their mind about a general suspension of arms for a year, and the answer to that has been that whatever the King of France shall take betwixt this time and 1 March shall be all restored, in case the general suspension shall be agreed on all hands before 1 March, but he will not agree to stand still two months, because he says that is to lose so much time and then not have the suspension accepted. This expedient the King does not approve, nor will he, I am confident, any other they can make, unless either the Parliament fail him or that Spain shall refuse him Ostend during the war and Port Mahon in the Mediterranean or that Holland shall not furnish a proportionable number of ships with us. I desire your Highness will please not to take any notice of these propositions from France, but they have been received so very coldly here that I am confident the French King will thereupon take all his measures for a war with us, and, because his Majesty has also writ already to Mr. Montagu to desire the Duke of Monmouth's regiment of horse may be immediately sent over hither under the pretence of some disorders in Scotland, Lord Dumbarton goes also to-morrow to bring away his regiment and orders will go in two or three days more for recalling the rest of his Majesty's subjects in that service. Order is also given to the Governor of Gravesend to let pass any that are going into the service of the States, but his Majesty will not yet have that order made public. I wish your Highness could promote the King's demands from Spain to get them dispatched, because, till that be done, there will be such a backwardness on our parts in making levies &c., as may lose the most necessary time of the year for our assistance, besides that I am of opinion they ought to desire us to keep it if we did not demand it. I suppose there will be no difficulty made in signing the defensive treaty which is to take place after the war, and it will be of use in the Parliament to let them know that such a treaty is made as well as the present treaty of alliance. I should be extreme glad to have your opinion in what manner you conceive the war might be made with most advantage against France, when we shall come into it, if this be not too great a trouble, which I would not put your Highness to, but with intention to serve you by it." [Over 4 pages. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 1, No. 9.]
[1678.]
Jan. 8.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "You will now receive an account by this bearer, Lord Ossory, of the answer his Majesty has had from France, by the which you will see we must prepare for a war, which we are doing here with as little noise as we can, till the Parliament meets, which, you know, is to be this day sennight, and we are hastening away, as fast as possibly we can, the ships designed to strengthen our squadron in the Straits, which, I hope, may be ready to sail, wind and weather permitting, in ten days, and, when they have joined Sir J. Narbrough, he will have with him 25 sail of men-of-war and two fireships, and we must increase the number of fireships, so that, if you increase likewise the squadron you are now a sending thither, we shall, I hope, be master of that sea, for all the French are, or may be, so strong there, and it will be necessary to consider what force will be necessary to be masters in these seas, and to be in a condition of giving them trouble upon their sea coasts, which is all I shall need say to you now on this subject, his Majesty saying he will write to you to desire you to send over somebody hither to adjust and settle the plan of what is to be done at sea and what number of ships will be necessary to be sent out and their several stations. As for other things this bearer will inform you." [Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 14.]
1678.
Jan. 8.
Portmore.
John Tattnall to Viscount Conway. About the horses at Portmore, sending over bulls from England, providing wine against his lordship's coming and other business. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 133.]
Jan. 9. George Fairfax to Williamson. Requesting his influence and assistance in procuring for him the mathematical mastership at Christ's Hospital, which Mr. John Leeke is about to resign. His father, Dr. William Fairfax, who died in 1655, suffered much for his loyalty, was imprisoned, sequestrated and plundered. He has himself studied mathematics for 25 years, has buried 9 children and has 4 surviving. He makes this application by the advice of Samuel Peops (Pepys). Latin.
Postscript in English.—I never was a member of any college, but the things I have attained to and have of late begun to teach are:—Arithmetic and logarithms, planimetry, stereometry, gauging, surveying, fortification, gunnery, plane and spherical triangles, use of the globes, projections of the sphere, description of all maps or charts, navigation, dialling, perspective, with the use of tables, lines, scales and instruments pertaining thereto. I name not architecture nor algebra, being not fully enough as yet versed therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 39.]
Jan. 9.
Gloucester.
John Abbot to Francis Royley. Requesting his favourable approbation to his affections to his virtuous daughter, Mistress Susannah, who, as indeed duty obliges, refers herself wholly to his fatherly guidance. On the back is a draft of Royley's letter of the 24th calendared post, p. 594. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Jan. 9.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. It is at present a healthful time in these parts, which of late were very sickly. By the great abundance of water coming down there must be great floods in the country. The wind for three days past has been S. and by W. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Jan. 9.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Last night arrived the Elizabeth of this place in three days from St. Malo, laden with linen cloth. The master tells me they are under some apprehensions there that we may have war with them, which those people of trade look to be much against their interest. It was said there the King was marched toward Flanders. While the master was there, an English ketch arrived from Amsterdam laden with powder. They build ships there both in number and greatness strangely, one now ready to be launched of 50 guns and many others of 40 and downwards lately, with many of which they go a privateering. The King offers to put a garrison into the place, which they dislike, but, whether he intends to get money out of them or what other issue it will have, time will discover.
The master stopped at Jersey and Guernsey and spoke with the Governor of each. They both expect recruits from England. Wind S.W., blowing fair after much wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 42.]
Jan. 9. Commissions to Francis Izod to be captain of a foot company in the Duke of York's regiment and to Charles Progers and Andrew Abington to be his lieutenant and ensign. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 231, 233, 234.]
Jan. 9–19.
London.
The Earl of Danby to the Prince of Orange. I had closed my letter of yesterday and was gone to bed, when Mr. Thynne arrived with your letter. He has brought back the treaty with some alterations, which his Majesty finds necessary to have again altered, which I shall not mention, because the whole business is sent at large to Mr. Hyde to explain to you. I will only tell you that the King takes his honour to be highly concerned not to have it thought he knew the mind of Spain any more than of France before the signing of the treaty and, for what concerns the Emperor, he thinks himself to be at no certainty at all as the treaty is penned. I believe he intends to respite the sitting of the Parliament till the treaty is returned, because he thinks it would be rather of ill consequence than good that they should enter upon business before he can assure them of an alliance perfected betwixt England and Holland. I am sorry for this delay at this time, but I hope it will be nothing more, for I assure you we make all the preparations for a war that we are capable of without the assistance of a Parliament. M. de Burgomaine has this day desired the King to send 2,000 men to Ostend, saying that they have not 500 men there, and therefore that his Majesty will be master of the place, but that (though he have power sufficient to give it) he dares not without special order; insomuch that I believe the King will send an envoy expressly to-morrow to the Duc de Villa Hermosa to know his mind in it, which we shall know about the time of receiving the treaty back from Holland, but, in the meantime, we shall delay those levies, which would have given us the liberty of sending 3 or 4,000 of our old men into those parts for their present assistance. You will find that in the secret article the King has been as careful as you can desire of your particular concerns. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 1, No. 10.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Additional Establishment for increasing the 24 companies of Col. John Russell's regiment of Foot Guards, the 12 companies of the Coldstream Guards, the 12 companies of the Duke of York's regiment, and the 11 companies of the Holland regiment and also fourteen non-regimented companies to 100 soldiers each and for adding a sergeant to each company and a drummer to each company except to those of the Guards which have two drummers already, the additional pay being 127l. 19s. 10d. per diem and 46,716l. 19s. 2d. per annum. Sign Manual. Countersigned, "Danby, J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 43.]
Jan. 10. Thomas [de la Marche] to Williamson. Yesterday I went to London, where I discovered where the widow of John Faultras lives at one Johnson's, pawnbroker, by Whitechapel. I am informed that Faultras sold several of those pretended freedoms to Swinock and Milles, merchants, and then went by the name of John Baudouin, having the said freedoms of Monamy, and having changed his name by his order, and further that the said Faultras wrote several of the said freedoms for Monamy, and lastly that, if the said Johnson, his wife and others were examined by oath, it shall be found that the said Faultras wrote several for Monamy, as also to have Faultras' widow declare by oath what she knows touching the letters Monamy wrote to her husband during the said Monamy's imprisonment to get him to fly from Guernsey to France, that he might not be called as an evidence. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Jan. 10.
Edenhall.
Sir P. Musgrave to Williamson. I have not till now acknowledged your letter sent by my son Christopher, wherein I find the continuance of your great favours to me and mine, you having spoken with his Royal Highness in our concern. I hope we shall not appear ungrateful. I request you will credit what I have entrusted my son Christopher to say to you, in order to the discharge of my duty to the King. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 10.
Kirkby near Mansfield, Nottinghamshire.
Cl[ement] Elis to Williamson. It is now more than a year since I was told by my friend Thomas Musgrave, that you remembered me and expressed some dislike at my long silence. I then assumed the boldness to present you with an ill-penned letter such as is to be expected from one who for above 15 years has conversed with none but plowmen and carters, for my want of health confines me for the most part to my little parish, wherein I cannot see a gentleman or a scholar. I have some cause to fear that letter was never delivered, because I could never since meet with or hear from the gentleman who carried it. Now a very worthy friend has promised by one of your acquaintance to see this safe in your hands. Had I any worth that might entitle me to your favour or make me hope you should have no cause to repent of a kindness to me, you might have a very importunate beggar in me, but, though my wants be great enough, having a wife and four young children and a small living, seldom more than 80l. per annum, which affords us no more than a comfortable subsistence for the present, I am resolved to trust Providence wholly and not seek after any things that become not my meanness, such as all those ecclesiastical dignities which lie most in your way. I am fit for nothing but a country parsonage, and in such the largeness or scantiness of the revenue makes usually no difference in the work, but he that is fit for a poor may be as fit for a rich benefice, did I not see so many excellent persons everywhere above, of whose eminent abilities and more useful studies the latter ought to be made the encouragement and reward. Think not that by a feigned humility I go about to insinuate myself into your favour. I am apt enough to have too good thoughts of myself, yet I will never seek or accept anything for which I find myself too weak. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 46.]
Jan. 10. P. Legay to John Braman. I received your kind letter yesterday, giving me notice that Samuel Masters and others complain that I oppress him by charging 200 faggots to his account which I sent to one Addison. (Expressing his willingness to amend any mistake and referring the matter to Braman himself, and asking him to enquire of Masters when he bought 200 faggots of him for Addison and who paid for them, that he may search in his book after it, for he does not remember any such thing.) [Ibid. No. 47.]
Jan. 10.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday came in a vessel of this town, which left Ostend five days since. The master says he did not hear at his coming away that the French had besieged any town in Flanders, but those people daily expected they would besiege some town or other. At Ostend they had built six new ships for capers, which they were fitting out with all diligence, and it is much feared by most traders in these parts, that, if we have war with the French, which is much talked on in Flanders, that the Ostend and Nieuport capers will be all Dunkirkers, &c., Wind E., very little. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Weather uncertain, sometimes rain, sometimes fair, and the wind these three days S. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Jan. 10.
Cowes Castle.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. The wind is now come fair so we shall sail at 5 to-morrow morning towards Jersey or Guernsey as the wind will favour us. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Jan. 10.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.E., fair weather. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Jan. 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 8th came in here the Industry of Bristol, which came out of Morlaix last Monday. They say that most of the French men-of-war at Brest are fitting out, and, as the report goes there, are intended for the West Indies.
A French prize, the Shaverlere (? Chevalier) of Rochelle laden with wine, brandy and provisions for the West Indies, was sent in here by a Dutch caper, the Princess Maria of Flushing. There was also taken in her company a frigate built ship laden with the same goods also for the West Indies. Both were taken last Saturday in the Bay of Biscay. They much fear the caper may come to some damage, they leaving her in the Channel, the wind blowing very hard at S. They can give no account of the other prize neither. Wind now W.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 52.]
Jan. 10. The King to Henry, Bishop of London, and the President and Chapter of St. Pauls. Having appointed Dr. Edward Stillingfleet, chaplain in ordinary, and residentiary of St. Paul's, to the office of principal minister, void by the surrender of Dr. William Sancroft, late dean, requiring them to elect him dean, and the bishop and chapter to perform all things for perfecting the King's determination. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 107.]
Jan. 10. Commissions to Edward Harris and Thomas Cutler to be captains of two foot companies in the Duke of York's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 231.]
Jan. 10. Commissions to Henry Trelawney and — Strowde to be lieutenant and ensign to the said Capt. Harris. Minutes. [Ibid. pp. 232, 234.]
Jan. 10. Commissions to Samuel Scudamore to be captain in the Duke of York's regiment and to Edward Brownell to be his ensign. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Jan. 10.
The Chapter House, Canterbury.
The Dean and Chapter of Canterbury to the King. Certifying their election of William Sancroft, D.D., Dean of St. Paul's, to be Archbishop of Canterbury. [On parchment. Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G., No. 1.]
[Before Jan. 11.] Alphabetical list of the adventurers of the Royal African Company of whom those marked with an asterisk are incapable, by their adventures, of being chosen assistants; with list of the court of assistants and the number of appearances of each at 94 courts held within the year, and regulations for the ensuing election of officers and assistants, of whom the Governor, Sub-Governor and Deputy Governor were to be chosen on Friday, 11 Jan. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 53.]
[Before Jan. 11.] Notice of Courts of the Royal African Company to be held on Friday, 11 Jan., for the election of Governor, Sub-Governor and Deputy Governor and on Tuesday, 15 Jan., for the election of 24 assistants. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 54.]
Jan. 11.
8.15 a.m. The Cleveland Yacht.
Thomas Atterbury to Williamson. The wind at N. I have attended my Lord of Ossory on board, where I have your black box very safe. My lord will sail immediately in hopes to stem the tide, it being now young flood. The wind comes somewhat westerly and a small gale, and, if it stands, I hope to give you a good and speedy account from the other side. My lord is very well and just laid down to sleep.
Postscript.—My lord has altered his resolution, intending not to sail till the ebb tide. The captain will obey Mr. Peepes' (Pepys') order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 55.]
Jan. 11.
12.30 The Cleveland Yacht before Greenwich.
Thomas Atterbury to Williamson. My Lord of Ossory weighed anchor exactly at 12.30, the wind at N., it being just the ebb tide. It blows a small gale, so we hope to get down. I have your black box very safe. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Jan. 11.
Rushton.
Viscount Cullen to Williamson. I have hitherto forborne pressing Sir Lewis Palmer for payment of the 245l. allowed me by his Majesty out of Lord Exeter's division, and now in requital he has underhand got an order from the King and Council to keep it himself. This he told a gentleman, whom Lord Exeter sent to him to press him to pay me the money. Since you were pleased to get the King to give it me, be so generous as to inquire into the truth of it, and by your advice and assistance let me not receive so great a baffle. I value not the money but the King's favour, and can sooner part with my life than that. [Ibid. No. 57.]
Jan. 11.
Tredegar.
William Morgan to Williamson. By this worthy gentleman, my cousin Morgan your fellow member, I was very unwilling to omit my dutiful respects and services to you. After keeping a bashful son of mine, who delights in nothing but books, at Westminster and Oxford near four years, I doubt his modesty, if he had any encouragement there, will spoil his preferment. He writes a pretty good hand and, others say, is a good Latin scholar, which might with your favour to write or at least copy or translate Latin letters as an under clerk in your office render him a little serviceable to you there, which would be a perpetual obligation, and I must leave my kinsman, though I acquainted him nothing of it, hereafter to thank you, besides the honour, which I hope you would do me in May, when I shall be in London to send my youngest son to my relations in Jamaica, to accept a pair of coach horses for doing that favour to my eldest, the poor scholar. Being I was born a younger brother and was a sufferer in the late good King's time, I could do little for them besides. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Jan. 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind has been southerly for weeks together. This morning it came to N.W. with a shower of snow. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Jan. 11.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. We now have a certain account that in the late violent storm the master of a Sandwich pink, having lost all his anchors, ran her aground near Sandwich on the ooze, but that tide, her men being near home having gone to Sandwich, she floated and went to sea and was never since heard of, not one soul on board her.
About the same time a Mr. Wilman rode in Margate road with a ship of above 300 tons, which sank at anchor, but every man was saved. It is said that a ship in the same storm going through the Narrow struck and brake suddenly in pieces, and every man was drowned. We hear of several harms done on the other side and great shipwrecks. There are 10 or 12 English vessels bound to Calais and Dunkirk who are much afraid of a war with the French King and have lain here eight or ten days. Not a topsail gale at N.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 60.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Francis Bastinck. Thanking him for several letters and praying him to continue daily to let them know what passes of all kinds and above all, what he recommended to his care, to get some friend at Dunkirk and Calais that will but write the ordinary news that everybody knows and talks there, what passes at land and sea of public news. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 182.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Walsh (Welsh). I received some days since your letter intimating your father's death, which I am very sorry for, and as much that I know it not early enough to have served you for his place, but it had been already disposed of to Mr. Hall. I shall be very ready to serve you or your friends for your father's sake. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Notes by Williamson about the Groom Porter's office, which the Lord Chamberlain claims by right of his staff to dispose of, with arguments of counsel in support of the King's right to appoint thereto and also of the Lord Chamberlain's right. [5 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 445.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for reprinting the articles of war for the forces in Scotland, signed 26 Feb., 1674–5, with the following additional article to be inserted after Article 75 in place of the clause formerly printed after that article, viz., that the foregoing articles shall extend and be of force not only as to those of the militia and others already called to the King's assistance, but to all others as at any time hereafter shall be called out to the fields for the King's service. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 336.]
Jan. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday we had the wind northerly. Two packet-boats arrived since my last, one on Thursday evening which left the Brill on Wednesday and the other, which came from the Brill the Friday before and landed her mail at Yarmouth, not till yesterday morning.
To-day the wind is westerly and has brought cold and snow.
The news the passengers bring is over confidently of a peace, but to my apprehension as yet so far from a certainty that it does not appear it can be made out on a seeming probability, the general presumption of a peace interfering with a vigorous preparation for war. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 61.]
Jan. 12. Commissions to Thomas Whaley to be captain in the Duke of York's regiment and to John Whaley and Charles Cratchrode to be his lieutenant and ensign. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 232, 234.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Capt. Blood having represented that he has a cause depending before you, which requires his presence in Ireland, the King has commanded me to signify to you that the said Blood is detained here on his particular service and by his command, so you may take order that he be not prejudiced by his stay here. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 183.]
Jan. 12. Caveat that no grant of any lands in the barony of Decies, co. Waterford, pass till notice be given to Mr. Philips, the Earl of Anglesey's steward, that his lordship may be heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 46.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Joseph Ivey of Waterford, merchant, of all crimes and misdemeanours committed by him in or by the transportation of wool out of Ireland to France or other parts beyond the seas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 451.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for fixing the prices of wines for the present year, as valued by the Lord Chancellor and others. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 362.]
Jan. 13.
Rotherby.
Sir William Hartopp to Williamson. I am at present so afflicted with a violent fit of the gout that I must give obedience to it and daily expect such an interval that I may be able to wait on you at Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 62.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles, Earl of Carlisle, captain general and governor of Jamaica, to cause drums to be beaten in and about London, for raising 200 men for service in Jamaica. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 230.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Commission to Charles, Earl of Carlisle, captain general and governor of Jamaica, to be captain of a foot company of 100 men raised and to be raised for service in the island. [Ibid. p. 235.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Sir Henry Morgan, lieutenant governor of Jamaica, to be captain, to Ralph Fetherstonhaugh, to be lieutenant, and to Usher Tyrell to be ensign of a foot company of 100 men. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13. Commissions to Elias Markham to be ensign and John Tolderoy lieutenant to the Earl of Carlisle. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13. Commission to Sir Francis Watson to be major-general of the forces employed and to be employed in the island of Jamaica. Minute. [Ibid. p. 237.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of the offices of clerk of the crown and peace throughout the province of Leinster and within every county thereof to Robert Aickin and Arthur Podmore for their lives and the life of the survivor in reversion after the present patentees of the said offices or any of them. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 209.]
[Jan. ?] The Grooms of the Privy Chamber and the Gentlemen Ushers Quarter Waiters to the King. Petition reciting the allowance to the Cupbearers, Carvers &c. of 4s. per diem in lieu of their diet at the Waiters' table during the late 15 months' suspension (granted 18 Dec. see ante, p. 513) and praying a grant of the like allowance to each of them respectively during the said suspension. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 63.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Additional establishment for 8 new companies to complete the Coldstream regiment of Guards and for the like addition of companies to the Duke of York's regiment and to the Holland regiment so that each of these regiments may consist of 2,000 privates besides officers, that is of 20 companies, and, as the Holland regiment by the establishment of 7 March, 1673–4, consists of 12 companies of 50 soldiers each, eleven of which by the establishment of the 10th instant were made to consist of 100 soldiers each besides officers, for adding to the twelfth company one sergeant, one drummer and 50 soldiers to make it equal in numbers to the other 11 companies; with memorandum that, whereas the soldiers of the companies of the two regiments of the Guards are computed at 10d. a day pay, yet when any of these companies be quartered elsewhere than in London, Westminster or Southwark, the pay of each private in them shall be but 8d. a day. The total of this additional establishment amounts to 117l. 17s. 2d. per diem and 43,018l. 5s. 10d. per annum. Sign Manual. Countersigned, "Danby, J. Williamson." [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 14.
Gloucester.
John Abbot to Burton Goodwyn. I sent a letter of the 9th to Mr. Royley desiring his approbation of our concerns, as my last from Mistress Susanna of the 5th advised, and so, when I receive Mr. Royley's answer, she shall be sure to hear from me. In the meantime, if you understand anything of their inclinations, pray send me word in your next. 'Tis reported here we shall certainly have a war with France, which, if true, will, I suppose, cause my lords (the Duke of Grafton and his brother) to return to England. If you hear anything of it, pray acquaint me with it, for I doubt not they will according to their promise give me some preferment, when it lies in their power. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Jan. 14.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week the wind being generally W. and N.W. very few ships came in. (Account of the French prize as in Holden's letter of the 10th calendared ante, p. 567). The 12th and 13th much hail fell about these parts. Wind at present N.E. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Jan. 14.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last Wednesday came ashore near Padstow 40 or 50 lids of the ports of ships and some chests, silk stockings and some part of English colours, so it is supposed to be some great Straits man or man-of-war, for some days before a great ship was seen from the land, so it is believed it may be the same, for the wind was very violent at S. and S W. It is now N.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 67.]
Jan. 14.
8 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. I am advised of a vessel of London bound homewards from the Canaries that put into Milford Haven last week. Her master being sick died and was buried at Nangle (Angle), a parish within the said harbour, and the vessel sailed for London the 11th. The brandy that came ashore near Milford is considerable, 50 or 60 pipes. No proprietor appears, so the several owners of the land, where it came ashore, seized it for their own use. Two or three country fellows killed themselves by drinking it. The three days past there has been a very great snow and frost and it still freezes very hard. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Jan. 14. Acknowledgment by John Allin that he had sold to John Braman a gold watch for 7l. with his receipt for that sum. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Jan 14. Commissions to Capt. John Parker to be captain of a foot company in the Duke of York's regiment and to Charles Harrow and —Paschall to be his lieutenant and ensign. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 232—234.]
Jan. 14. Licence to Thomas Harrington, high sheriff of Lincolnshire, to be absent from the county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 42.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley for delivery to such officers as shall be appointed by the respective colonels, governors of garrisons or other officers commanding the regiments, companies and garrisons now to be recruited to 100 soldiers in each, with a sergeant to be added to each company and a drummer to each that has not two drummers already, according to the proportion following of arms, halberts and drums, viz.,
Numbers to be armed in each regiment and garrison with— Muskets. Pikes. Bandoliers. Halberts. Drums.
960 soldiers to complete the 24 companies of Col. Russell's regiment of Guards 640 320 640 24 0
480 to complete the 12 companies of Coldstream Guards 320 160 320 12 0
570 to complete the 12 companies of the Duke of York's regiment 380 190 380 12 12
500 to complete 10 companies of the Holland regiment, the other company to be recruited and armed with Jersey 334 166 334 10 10
150 to complete the 3 companies in Jersey, one whereof is of the Holland regiment 0 0 0 3 3
100 to complete the 2 companies in Guernsey 100 0 100 2 2
250 to complete the 5 non regimented companies in Portsmouth 167 83 167 5 5
100 to complete the 2 non-regimented companies in the Isle of Wight 67 33 67 2 2
100 to complete the 2 non-regimented companies in Plymouth 67 33 67 2 2
50 to complete Sir Francis Leake's company at Gravesend 36 16 4 1 1
3260 soldiers in all 2109 1001 2109 73 37
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 54.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the royal assent and confirmation of the election by the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury of William Sancroft, D.D., Dean of St. Paul's, to be archbishop of that see. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 63.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment to the Grooms of the Privy Chamber and the Gentlemen Ushers Quarter Waiters, in the same terms as the warrant of 24 Dec., calendared ante, p. 525. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 446.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chancellor for a writ of summons to Henry Howard by the name of Henry Mowbray, chevalier, returnable to the House of Peers the 15th instant. [Ibid. p. 452.]
Jan, 15.
Whitehall.
Additional establishment for two non-regimented companies for each of the garrisons of Hull, Portsmouth and Plymouth and for two non-regimented companies for the island of Jamaica, the pay of which amounts to 36l. 9s. 4d. per diem and 13,310l. 6s. 8d. per annum and for a chaplain for the fort of Sheerness at 2s. per diem. Sign Manual. Counter-signed, "Danby, J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 70.]
Jan. 15. The King to both Houses of Parliament. Message for adjournment. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII. p. 129; Commons' Journals, Vol. IX. p. 427.) [Ibid. No. 71.]
Jan. 15.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Sunday night it lightened here exceedingly from 12 till near day. The wind has continued since last Friday W. and N.W. with sharp frost and showers of snow and is still W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 72.]
Jan. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Saturday night, wind N.N.W. sailed hence one of our packet-boats and Col. Bellasis in her.
We have a certain report of a vessel that slipped her anchor off the Kentish shore and got safe either by or over all the sands into Woodbridge haven. Her longboat, it's said, was fast on board and all her hatches close and none of her lading touched. It is further said that her master was here by land to inquire for her and that all her company were ashore when this happened. The weather is fair, though very frosty and the wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Jan. 15.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. I have yours of the 11th and have fixed correspondents at Calais and Dunkirk, whence I have several letters every post, but by the last not one word of news, nor when their King is expected. I have to-night ordered the master of the packet-boat to go himself to Dunkirk, as soon as he arrives at Calais, to carry my letters, by whom I shall have a particular account of what is to be heard of there and at Calais, for I have been told the Intendant of Dundalk has opened all letters going and coming to that place. I will use all my endeavours to obey your commands. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Jan. 15.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. The 14th two foot companies were sent from here on board the Hampshire riding at Spithead to be carried for Guernsey and Jersey, one commanded by Capt. George Howston, the other by Capt. John Lee. She lies ready to sail but wants a pilot for the said isles. The same day the drums of this garrison beat for volunteers to fill up the several companies to 100 each.
The Assurance came this morning into this harbour from Spithead. The ships ordered out of this port are fitting with all diligence. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Jan. 15.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind N.W. We have here a very certain report that we shall suddenly have a war with France, which if so, it will undoubtedly lie in your power to do me a great kindness, supposing a prize office be settled here, wherefore I beseech you to recommend me to be a commissioner or at least storekeeper or surveyor. In the war before last I was in the then prize office here commissioner and deputy treasurer. After the war, I being in London on my own affairs, when there were commissioners at Brook House to examine all that had been in public employments, I having received as deputy treasurer 200,000l. went voluntarily to Brook House, when the commissioners presented me my account and demanded whether I owned it. I having owned it, the chairman gave me my oath, asking whether that account were to the best of my knowledge just. I answered it was very just, after which they told me I had taken a very wholesome oath, for they had not had so good an account from any port in England as mine. I believe Sir R. Southwell can give you an account of me.
In case of war I most humbly take the boldness to present to you the ill condition of the garrison of Scilly. I having formerly lived there makes me to know the place very well. It is of very great import to England. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 76.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 76 i.]
Jan. 15. News from Scotland. A quorum of the Council sits at Glasgow the 24th instant, and that same day the regiment of Foot Guards and the Horse Guards, 16 foot companies belonging to Edinburgh and the whole militia of Stirlingshire muster at Stirling. There go along with them nine wagons for carrying their ammunition and other necessaries with two field pieces. The names of the quorum are not known yet that go; here is the proclamation. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Jan. 15. Commissions to Charles Herbert to be captain in the Duke of York's regiment and to John Montargis and Guilford Slingesby to be his lieutenant and ensign. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 232, 233.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Lady Darcy for the payment of an arrear of 1,800l. due to her late husband, Thomas Offley, groom porter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 216.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Presentation of William Aston, M.A., to the rectory of Houghton, Hampshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 64.]
[1678.]
Jan. 15.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "I believe this will still find you at the Hague, for, by the last French letters which came yesterday, I do not find that King was yet upon his march, though all things in a readiness for it. Some will have it that he was resolved to see what temper the Parliament would be in before he undertook anything, but I hardly believe he will stay for that, now that the Parliament was adjourned this day till the 28th . . . . which was done for reasons which, I believe, you have been informed of. In the meantime we are preparing all things here for what may happen and are recruiting all our old companies to 100 each and have given out orders for the raising of 24 new companies to make Lord Craven's, mine and Lord Mulgrave's regiments 20 companies apiece." [2 pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 15.]
1678.
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of recognition of the lands and barony of Towie Barclay in favour of William Berkeley, son to John, Lord Berkeley of Stratton, which formerly pertained to William Barclay of Ardley, tutor of Towie, and to Capt. William Barclay of Auchrydie, now pertaining to his Majesty by reason of recognition by the alienation made thereof by the said William and Capt. William Barclay to the said William Berkeley, his heirs and assigns, without his Majesty's consent, and with an union of the premises into the barony of Towie Barclay. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 4, p. 337.]
Jan. 16. Thomas [de la Marche] to Williamson. Last night I was with a gentleman from Quickswood, and, Mr. Blood happening to come in, I gave him notice that the said gentleman was one of the witnesses I had named to you, whereupon Mr. Blood spoke to him and had the same information from him against Monamy as I had given you. I have been this morning to Mr. Sharpe, who declared to me that the said Monamy had not only addressed himself to Mr. Payne but also to others for counterfeiting the signet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 78.]
Jan. 16.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Giving the direction of the wind from the 10th to that day. On Monday was a storm with a great tide, one ketch driven ashore was lost, but the men saved. On Tuesday a hard frost with snow. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Jan. 16.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. The 7th I gave you an account of a pink come into this bay by drift, laden with wine and brandy. The Saturday following I noticed that the same vessel was put into the news book. I you had commanded notice to be given to the merchant, Mr. Ally, undoubtedly I must have had a reward, for mine was the first intelligence, but now I must expect to lose the charges I have expended. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Jan. 16.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. In these two days arrived here the Content of Bridgwater which came in the late fleet from Cadiz, but has been at Weymouth to put out part of her lading, also the Concord of this place from Rotterdam but near three weeks from thence, being stopped by contrary winds. The master only says they express infinite joy for their most excellent princess and the hopes they have of continued friendship and assistance from England. Several of our ships went over for France with the late N.W. winds in hopes of making a speedy voyage before a breach with France, which is here much talked of as likely to be. Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Jan. 16. Release by Thomas Aylwin of Chichester to his mother Katherine, the executrix of the will of his deceased father, and to John Aylwin, his uncle, and John Braman, his cousin, whom he had appointed his guardians during his minority. [Copy in Braman's hand. Ibid. No. 82.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of John Baskerville, B.D., to the vicarage of Wakefield, Yorkshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 108.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James, Earl of Northampton, constable of the Tower, to discharge Edmund Everard, committed prisoner 18 Dec., 1673, without payment of fees. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 203.]
Jan. 16. Commission to James Fortrey to be captain in the Duke of York's regiment whereof Sir Charles Lyttelton is colonel. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 232.]
Jan. 16. Commissions to William Pearson and John Hill to be lieutenant and ensign to Capt. Richard Bagot in the same regiment. Minutes. [Ibid. pp. 233, 234.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Robert Crawford to be captain lieutenant of Capt. Sir Charles Lyttelton's company of foot in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 233.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Theophilus Blechinden to be lieutenant to Sir Bourchier Wrey's company in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commissions to — Fitzgerald and — Man to be lieutenant and ensign to Capt. Henry Herbert in the same regiment. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Jasper Churchill to be ensign to Capt. Humphrey Cornwall in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 234.]
Jan. 16. Commission to George Churchill to be lieutenant to Capt. Thomas Cutler in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commission to — Townshend to be ensign to Lieut.-col. Churchill in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Richard Fowler to be ensign to Capt. George Lyttelton in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Henry Hawley to be ensign to Capt. James Fortrey in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16. Commissions to Henry Hawley to be lieutenant and Giles Spicer ensign to Capt. James Fortrey in the same regiment. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 248.]
Jan. 16. Commissions in the Coldstream Guards commanded by the Earl of Craven and in the Holland regiment commanded by the Earl of Muigrave, the last dated from the 8th to the 16th. (Printed in Dalton, English Army Lists, Vol. I., p. 221, where Aldnes ought to be Aldues and Manning Mannaring.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 56.]
Another copy of the commissions in the Earl of Craven's regiment agreeing with the above except that the ensign in Talmash's company and the lieutenant in Parry's are omitted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 83.]
Jan. 16. List of the captains in the Holland regiment. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Jan. 16. Memorandum that Richard Note be substituted in Rodney's place as ensign to Capt. Newport's company in the Earl of Craven's regiment. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Jan. 16. Note by Sir Charles Wheler desiring commissions in the Earl of Mulgrave's regiment for Trever Wheler as captain and Robert Deane as ensign, the lieutenant not being yet named. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Jan. 16. Notes by Williamson of proceedings at the Council Board.— Goldsmiths.—Abuse in not making plate of the standard, or at least in not making search and assay of plate, as by the laws they are bound. Infinite abuse in the assay of plate. That they may be ordered to put the laws in that part in execution. The Common Serjeant for the Goldsmiths' Company. The Company warned all of their Company to bring in all such sorts of plate to be touched. The offenders, who are the very petitioners, came and confessed their faults and offered to prosecute others, on condition they would be authorized to do it by the Company. A warning was sent out according to what these petitioners could then offer to make it effectual. N.B. The Company cannot break open to search and try what goldsmiths make any such, &c. So as according to the utmost of the Company's power they have and do act.
Mr. Attorney.—Name who of the petitioners have been offenders and he will prosecute them. The Company does what it can, but wants powers to break open doors, &c.
Newfoundland.—Mr. Attorney for the Western towns under the King's charter.—All that's asked is, that the rules of the charter may be observed, i.e., that more men be not carried, &c., leaving the point of the bringing off those that are there to another time, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 453.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a lease to James Clarke of a brick house near the new Custom House, Dublin, in which the Auditor-General at present keeps his office, for 99 years at the yearly rent of 13s. 4d. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 209.]
Jan. 17. Memoranda by Williamson about adjournments. 1. The House does certainly adjourn itself; that is to be allowed, it is their right. 2. But the way and manner in which the House has ever executed this right on signification of the King's pleasure to adjourn presently, &c., has ever been in the manner the Speaker now does it, i.e., by declaring it as the pleasure of the House that the House be adjourned, &c., without, 1, putting any question on it, 2, without suffering anything of however little length or consequence soever to intervene, not only as a debate but even not such as to be ordered when it is plain that no debate would arise, and of this Mr. Speaker charges himself to undertake the defence. N.B. Never any message for a present adjournment but in 4 Car. I. and then there were two such messages.
Copy out for Mr. Speaker the proclamations for adjournments, &c., and the extracts of messages, &c., for myself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 87.]
[Jan. 17 ?] Notes of proceedings at adjournments of the House of Lords, the first being 20 Dec., 1586, and the last 15 Jan., 1677–8. [Ibid. No. 88.]
[Jan. 17 ?] Other notes of proceedings at adjournments of the House of Lords, the first being 19 Dec., 1667, and the last 3 Dec., 1677, one copy concluding "the same words are entered on the adjournment made 3 Dec., 1677, to the 15th of this instant January." [Ibid. Nos. 89, 89A.]
Jan. 17.
Caius College.
Robert Brady to James Vernon, secretary to the Duke of Monmouth. We cannot say how much we are obliged to the Duke for his favours to this university and must ever acknowledge it our happiness that we have such a kind and indulgent Chancellor, whose great care to preserve our just rights and immunities we have every day experience of. In the reference of this case to me, if I knew how to do it as I ought, I would make an acknowledgement agreeable to the favour. The case propounded is short and I shall as briefly state it. Mr. Barker is a very deserving person and I have no reason to believe but that he is likewise very acceptable to the whole society, and think that, as his particular case is now circumstantiated, he might without any violation of statute be fairly elected. Yet some in another case not long since, out of a private disaffection to one that then stood fair to be elected, bound themselves (in my judgement) by an unreasonable sense they put on one of our statutes for elections, by which they have debarred themselves of their own suffrages for Mr. Barker, though he is without doubt most desirable to them, unless they should disown their former pretended sense of the statute, which 'tis not to be supposed they will do, for there are other men besides Nonconformists that are opiniative, pertinacious without reason and much swayed by humour and passion. I am further informed it is the advice of some of these opinionative men he should proceed the way he is now in. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Jan. 17.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Friday came into this road two ships of Newcastle from Amsterdam. They came out of the Texel Saturday sennight. The masters tell us nine men-of-war were then in that river and two fireships and a great fleet of merchantmen intended for the Straits. They were to sail when the wind presented. We have had very much snow here with frost last Saturday and Sunday with stormy weather, the wind W. and N.W. Yesterday it began to thaw, the wind coming W.S.W. The ships are loosed and gone for the Northward, the wind being now S.S.W. and most of the snow gone. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 91.]
Jan. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About noon yesterday one of our packet-boats arrived, having been at sea ever since Saturday with a westerly wind. It brought over few passengers and little or no news. Another sailed hence last night. Wind for most of yesterday and to-day S.W. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Jan. 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. At least 40 vessels are in the Downs, Dover pier and other piers near us bound to Dunkirk and hither parts of France, all English, that refuse going to France because of the great report of war. In most vessels the men mutiny and refuse going, and indeed not only foremast men but all are afraid. Our greatest expectations are now news from Whitehall. All vessels coming either from the Southward or Northward speak of their meeting with great wrecks. It blows very fresh at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Jan. 17.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Since my last we have had such stormy weather that the French and Flanders mails remain here, no vessel being able to endure the sea. Two mails are wanting from Nieuport and one from Calais, the packet-boats being all wind-bound. We have had the wind here at W. and northward of W. and now at W.S.W. Our harbour is again in a very good condition. The late high tides our pents have carried away all the beach the sea in the late storms cast up between the pier heads. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Jan. 17.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Since I wrote, the Calais packet-boat is arrived, leaving behind some persons of quality that would not trust the seas so rough, but intend to stay for a yacht there, that waits for fairer weather. From Dunkirk not a letter is come to any person here nor any passengers out of Flanders. From Calais we are told that the King of France set forward for Flanders out of Paris last Monday. From all parts of France they talk of wars with England, and are in great expectation of news from hence. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Jan. 17.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. The 15th the Hampshire sailed from Spithead, the wind N.W., for Guernsey and Jersey, but the wind altering she put back into Cowes Road, where she now rides. Wind now S.W. a storm. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Jan. 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W. and by W. very high and blustering weather. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Jan. 17. Mrs. Rand to the Church at Petty France. Acknowledging their truly Christian and tender epistle, and blessing God, that has stirred them up to quicken her to a diligent watchfulness against those temptations, slumberings and lukewarm tempers, that Satan, our inbred corruptions and an evil world cast in the way of the Christian race to heavenly glory, and still begging the assistance of their prayers, with numerous citations of texts. Endorsed, "The copy of the answer of Mrs. Rand's letter from the Church at Petty France." [Copy in John Braman's hand on the outer sheet of a letter addressed to him. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 98.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Archbishop of Canterbury. I am desirous by all ways and means to own the interests of the University of Cambridge and am very sensible of the security thereof and their great satisfaction under your Grace, who, having dwelt so long among them, and whose kindness already has been so remarkable towards them, need not be solicited in their favour. However my relation to them obliges me to recommend them to your Grace, and, if you have not already chosen your domestic chaplains, I desire your favour for Dr. Wattson of St. John's College that he may at least be received into the second place. I question not but on enquiry you will be well satisfied with him. He is one of my chaplains and his being so was designed the reward of his answering the public Act at my request, but it has not hitherto been advantageous to him as I designed, and, because the preferments of the Church are out of my way, I am desirous to put him into your hands to deal with him as he deserves. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 112.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Recorder of London. The indigent officers interested in the Royal Oak Lottery have been to bewail themselves with me for the unkindness they find in the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Before they go further for help, I have taken leave to try what may be obtained for them through your hand by entreaties from the Court. If that do not do, they must go where they usually applied for support, which is the King and Council, though, as far as I can judge, the Lord Mayor strains the point a little with the highest. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 183.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, upon reading the report of the Committee of Trade of 5 Jan. on the reference to them of the petition of Sir Benjamin Ayloffe and Thomas Tuson of London, merchant, which alleged that the petitioners and William Hobbs are sole owners of the Hopewell of London, whereof the said Hobbs is master, which on a voyage from Riga to Bordeaux was lately taken by a caper of the Elector of Brandenburg and carried into Colberg, though she had a pass in due form from the Lords of the Admiralty dated 4 July last, that Secretary Williamson prepare letters for his Majesty's signature to the Marquis of Brandenburg desiring the restitution of the said ship and her cargo, there appearing no colour whatever for the seizure or detention thereof, and that also the Envoyé of his Highness here receive intimation of the injury received that by his interposition a more speedy redress may be obtained: that Secretary Williamson proceed thereon according to their lordships' opinion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 99.]
Jan. 18.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. High blowing winds, southerly since Tuesday last with showers. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Jan. 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Since my last we have had S. and S.W. winds and very stormy. Notwithstanding we have as yet no news of any wrecks on this coast. Yesterday came in an Ostend caper and brought in a French prize from Marseilles laden with oils. In my last I made bold to recommend to you the sad condition of the garrison of Scilly, which I do once more, humbly desiring you to present it to his Majesty. I also presented to you my most humble request and most humbly beseech you for a line in reference thereto. [Ibid. No. 101.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 101 i.]
Jan. 18. Ode to the King by the Sieur Des-Chants, printed at the Savoy by Thomas Newcomb for Andrew Forrester in King Street, Westminster, and licensed on that day. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G.]
Jan. 18. Commission to George Fitzjames to be captain of a company of foot raised and to be raised in the garrison of Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 236.]
Jan. 18. Commissions to George Wharton to be lieutenant and Francis Manley ensign to Capt. George Fitzjames in Portsmouth. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 238.]
Jan. 18. Commission to Sir Francis Windebank to be lieutenant to Sir Roger Strickland in Portsmouth garrison. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 12 June, 1669, to Thomas Tilson and Edward Corker and the survivor of them of the registrarship of the Court of Chancery in Ireland during good behaviour, for a grant of the said office to Thomas and Richard Hill and the survivor of them during good behaviour in reversion after the said Tilson and Corker. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 210.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a petition of the Master, Wardens and Company of Tobacco-pipe Makers in London, which set forth that contrary to the Act of Parliament great quantities of fullers' earth, fullers' clay or tobacco-pipe clay are as ballast for ships transported from the Isle of Wight and elsewhere into Ireland and thence into Holland to the prejudice of this kingdom and the ruin of the petitioners' trade; requiring and authorizing him to cause the said Act to be duly observed in Ireland, and that the commissioners and officers of the customs there be strictly charged to seize all such earth or clay imported contrary to the said Act. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 211.]
Jan. 18.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. I received his Majesty's letter and one from yourself the 13th by Capt. Beckman, whom I find a diligent knowing man. I give him all the assistance I can and hope he will in a little time give his Majesty full satisfaction as to our present condition.
As to settling a correspondency amongst our near neighbours, I shall use my utmost skill and hope to accomplish it and shall not fail to give you an account of anything worth advice. About three weeks since we had here nothing but rumours of wars between England and France by letters from St. Malo and other French ports, advising the merchants to withdraw their concerns as fast as they could, and by letters from St. Malo to some merchants here, it was advised that letters were come to St. Malo from Monsr. Colbert directing them to be careful about their English effects, but of late their talk is all; Peace with the King of England. Those of St. Malo deal very rigorously with the English that have any trade with them and make them pay above 5 or 6 tons more than their real tonnage, and so they do in all ports in France. Several masters of ships have complained to me and tell me they must give over trading with them, and lately there was carried into St. Malo a great fly-boat laden with coals and other merchandize bound for London, consigned to Alderman Ford as I am informed. She, as I was told by some of the seamen that came here to get home, belongs wholly to Scotland and was sailed by all Scotchmen and the French barbarously abused them and stripped them. If a war should break out, our near neighbours of St. Malo are now so strong in shipping and many of considerable size that, if not curbed in time, they are like to be worse than ever the Dunkirkers or Ostenders were. In a word they deal very severely with the Englishmen and Jerseymen in their ports and at sea. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 73.]
Jan. 19. Edward Leigh to Williamson. I was to wait on you Saturday last, when your servant told me you were shooting behind Clarendon House and would be at your office at 5, where I punctually was, but you were gone to the Council. I have received fresh commands from Col. Kirkby to acquaint you the gout has hitherto detained him in the country but he suddenly intends for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 102.]
Jan. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Betwixt 3 and 4 on Friday morning we had much, some that were on the water say dreadful, lightning and several claps of thunder. A little after 5 followed a violent storm, the wind about S., in gusts with rain. In this harbour we suffered little damage, but fear the effects of it at sea. I had rectified my account of the vessel mentioned in my letter of the 15th, if I had not met with that account in the Gazette and would have desired that Aldeburgh might have been set down instead of Woodbridge. To-day the wind is S.W., a bright sunshine morning, but now about noon overcast. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 103.]
Jan. 19. List of most of the lieutenants and ensigns for the new companies of the Holland regiment calendared ante, p. 578. Endorsed by W. Bridgeman, as received that day with his lordship's desire that the blanks be filled up at the nomination of the captains. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Jan. 19. Commissions to Edward Cornwall to be captain, Richard Pope lieutenant, and John Cole ensign to a company of foot in Portsmouth garrison. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 236.]
Another copy of John Cole's commission. Minute. [Ibid. p. 238.]
Jan. 20.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. About 3 in the morning of the 18th happened some dreadful claps of lightning and thunder. The Hampshire, then riding in Cowes Road, had her maintopmast shivered to pieces and her mainmast cleft from the head to the partners. Fourteen sailors, who were on deck, were all struck down and six of them remain senseless and speechless, all living, and have no outward hurt to be discovered, only one of them has a small spot by his right temple and can speak a little. He says he has a hole through his head, but the chirurgeon cannot discover it. 'Tis hoped they will recover. The 19th she came up from Cowes to Spithead to set a new mainmast and maintopmast. She has received no other damage. Two of these men had their hair burnt from one half of their heads without other hurt. The wind now blows hard at W.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 105.]
Jan. 20.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. I have been slenderly provided for here these several years as to men, ammunition and provision. About 12 years ago a small store of biscuit and cheese was sent me which with all possible care I delivered out for many years and renewed the stores accordingly, but now with waste, mouldering, rats and mice it is come to nothing. I beg you to intercede with his Majesty for my liberty to come for England for so long as he thinks fit, in order to make such necessary provisions as he shall think requisite, having also several things to acquaint him with, which I dare not commit to paper, but will impart to you at meeting, which particularly relate to the preservation of his interest in this island. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 74.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth of his consent and desire that his Majesty's letter be sent to Caius College, requiring the Master and Fellows to elect and admit into the senior fellowship now vacant or that shall be next vacant Ralph Barker, one of the junior Fellows, who is very acceptable to the society and would be chosen by them into one of the senior Fellowships now vacant, but that on a late interpretation of their statutes (though contrary to the received sense thereof and the known practice of the college) some scruple is raised of his incapacity unless by his Majesty's mandate. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 106 and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 113.]
Jan. 21. Capt. Christopher Gunman to Williamson. The bearer, Mr. Wandervelle (Vanderveldt), is the person who drew all the seaskips on board the Mary yacht, which you commanded me, when you were on board, to send him to you. I am well assured he will please you both with his work and price, for he is a very honest good man and works very well. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 107.] Perhaps enclosed,
Statement by William van [de] Velde, senior, that for his Majesty's and his Royal Highness' satisfaction may be drawn which is hereunder specified of most of the sea fights in Europe by way of journal. Among them are several sea fights in the war between England and the States General during the Commonwealth, the King's embarcation in Holland and landing at Dover in 1660, the battle in 1666 between the Duke of Albemarle and De Ruyter, the fight fought long since between the Swedes and Danes near Fehmern, of which he had made 4 pieces for Gen. Wrangel for making tapestry, the battle of Solebay, the fight between the English and French and the Dutch in 1673, her Royal Highness embarking at Calais, her crossing to Dover and her going by water to Whitehall, the King's and the Duke of York's voyage to Portsmouth (in 1675) with the town, and the Dutch and Danish ships lying before Danzig for its security. He has drawn besides above 100 of his Majesty's ships, most of the Dutch ships and many French, Swedish and Danish ships. [Ibid. No. 107 i.]
Jan. 21.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last night the Providence of Southampton, Henry Wall master, came into our road, bound for Southampton. He came last Friday month from Lorotado (Orotava) in Teneriffe without any company, most of the ships there being come away above three weeks before. He left there the Nonsuch and seven merchantmen, one whereof was an Irishman and four were Londoners, for whom the convoy intended to stay a week longer. This morning a small barque of our town, Joseph Dudley commander, which came from the Canaries above a fortnight before Mr. Wall, is come into our road bound for London. Mr. Wall says he was driven to the westward of the Madeiras, having a cross wind, and had no fair wind till 4 days ago. The wind has blown hard here these three nights past, though it has been something calm at day time and last Saturday night it thundered hard. The wind is now W. and by S., but for two or three days past it has been sometimes W. and sometimes S. and by W. Dudley was driven 70 leagues to the westward of the Madeiras. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 108.]
Jan. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have continued tempestuous weather with thunder, hail and rain. The wind is now very lofty at N.W. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Jan. 21.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind last week being W. and S.W. very few ships came in here, only three small Liverpool vessels in ballast bound home. The prize I gave an account of in my last is still in harbour and the Dutch Surinam ships. We hear that the man-of-war with her other prize is at Plymouth. All this week it has been very stormy. The wind is at present S.W. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Jan. 21.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The stormy weather in these parts has continued very violent and last week a small vessel, the Providence of Padstow, sprang a leak near this and was lost, the men with much difficulty saved themselves in the boat. We hear another small vessel of St. Ives, bound from this place with coal, was cast away on the Cornish coast, the men saved. We are told a vessel of about 100 tons was last week put into Oxwich Bay, and has lain at anchor there 4 or 5 days, but, the storm being so violent, no coal could go out to her. It's supposed she is some stranger to this channel. The storm this morning is somewhat abated, wind W., not very high. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Jan. 21. Notes by Williamson. Parliament.—As to the point of admitting any business to intervene after the King's pleasure signified to adjourn presently.
1. In case it be found that the custom of Parliament has been universally otherwise, even the consequences of a change could not be foreseen. Yet it were not advisable to admit of any, especially matter of proceedings of Parliament relating to the prerogative of the King's power and to the House of Commons' rights, privileges, &c.
2. It will oblige the King hereafter to prorogue and to lose all the business depending, which will bring odium on the Crown, &c., or else to let them sit and do what they please and as long as they please, as 4 Car. they held the Speaker in the chair till they drew the Remonstrance.
3. Whenever the King sees it necessary that the Parliament part, as that does and will happen frequently, he must never trust them to adjourn themselves, in regard he cannot be sure they will do it, &c., so as it must in those cases be always prorogations, &c.
4. Money being given for example, the King's affairs may call for their parting before other public bills be ready, &c., as in this last case of January(?), would it not prove very odious in the King, that in such a case it must be a prorogation and so all the bills lost? And as at our parting in 1675, when the great aim was on the Saturday to have sat and drawn a kind of remonstrance, foreseeing the adjournment (query, if it were an adjournment and not a prorogation) and argue from it accordingly.
5. This necessity of the King's proroguing the Parliament being once established, and the King coming, as he must on all occasions, to use it, when he sees cause to have the Parliament part, or let them sit as long as they will, &c. will not the consequence be, that the House will never finish and send up a money bill, but in conjunction with bills of grievance, &c., and so clog the one with the other, &c., and so the King must take both, or have the odium of taking money and doing no grace and relief to the people?
Speaker.—Mutinous, to call on another to the chair or to speak of putting in another Speaker.
1. The Speaker being dead, the chair being actually void, yet we cannot fill it, we must have the King's leave to choose another.
2. As the case now is, the Speaker being out of the chair it was no longer a House, but the words spoken by Thomas, &c., are to be answered for every jot, as much as if spoken at Charing Cross.
Whether the King having signified his pleasure to the House to adjourn forthwith or presently or immediately, the House may notwithstanding proceed on any motion of a member or otherwise to order, direct or dispose of any matter, how much soever of form or unquestioned it may appear.
1. It is a question of right, which cannot be answered but by matter of fact, i.e., the usage, and, as that is found to have been, such must be the resolution of this question. It must be as it has been universally or even generally, therefore ante omnia examine diligently how the usage of Parliament has been. 1. See precedents. 2. Argue from them and what other topics may be found as messages by the Black Rod, messages from the Lords communicating the King's pleasure to adjourn.
2. In case upon diligent and thorough search it be found that hitherto the constant or even the general usage has been, that the House did not proceed to do any even the least business after such a signification of his Majesty's pleasure, it would be most unadvisable, most dangerous for the House to admit a change in the point for the future. With notes of passages to be copied out of the Journals and Williamson's books. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 112.]
Jan. 21. Commissions to Richard Crofts to be ensign to Sir Roger Strickland's company in Portsmouth, and to Thomas Philips to be ensign to Col. George Legge's company in Portsmouth. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 238.]
[Jan. 21 ?] Commission to Capt. Cussy to command Capt. Hill's troop in his Grace's regiment of horse in France. Minute. Noted, as sent to Mr. Magenys 21 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 112.]
Jan. 21.
Lisburn.
Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. I expected before this to have sent you the second part to the same tune of my late letters, but Col. Jefferyes and another (Capt. Rutherford, sent since into Scotland) are not yet returned. Douglas was sent up with a guard six days since to Dublin, where he pretended his papers and subscriptions would meet him by the post from Edinburgh to London and thence to Dublin to make good his informations, so perhaps the Lord Lieutenant may as soon as this have sent them to his Majesty. I have been there five or six days tormented with gravel, so that I am very unfit and unable to write. Your cornet is going this morning towards Dublin, by whom I send this, and Mr. Farewell goes with him up to the term. Lord Granard is here, expecting Col. Jefferyes, who, he believes, is at the water side attending a passage, but the wind has been westerly and southerly many days, for his lordship is willing, I perceive, I should be with him when his letters come, also the post from Dublin will be here this morning. He still believes his influence on our Scots preachers here will prevail to keep peace in these parts, which I much doubt. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 134.]
Jan. 21.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. Since my last several intelligible merchants of this isle came from St. Malo, who bring news the French make all the preparation they can for a war with England and that they have there ready fitted at least 20 ships from 16 to 40 guns, and that they have an agent at Paris staying to bring them commissions and to take upon the English as soon as they have orders from Paris, and that they are there building a considerable number of double shallops to row with 12 oars and I believe these may be designed to attempt something on this island. I doubt they may come before I shall be in a condition to give them a rencontre, for I am very slenderly provided, if a war happen. I desire you will acquaint his Majesty with the contents of this and intercede with him that those recruits to fill the companies here may be hastened over and a troop of horse or dragoons and three or four foot companies more with ammunition and provision, for our stores of provision are all expended. All the English factors at St. Malo, as I am informed, make all the haste they can to ship their concerns for England. No part in his Majesty's dominions is in more danger than this island, therefore I humbly desire he will set me in such a condition that I may be able to defend and secure his interest here, and that such recruits, ammunition, and provision may be hastened over with all convenient expedition, for I doubt the French will begin before we can be supplied.
Postscript.—When his Majesty sends any forces here, I desire his order to the magistrates here, that I may quarter them in the town of St. Hilary or any part of the island where I shall think fit. Without an order they will not give house room to one soldier, except I constrain them by force of arms. I doubt we shall be blocked by those of St. Malo before we can be supplied. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 75.]
Jan 22. Memorandum by Robert Dunbarr to procure a letter from Sir J. Williamson to Sir Francis Chaplin, Lord Mayor, for obtaining a freedom of the City for Francis Walker, by which means Dunbarr may be freed from his captivity. Endorsed, "Sir Gilbert Talbot." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 113.]
Jan 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. On Saturday night one of our packet-boats sailed hence. The wind was for the most part southward of W. which hindered till about 10 last night the arrival of that packet-boat, which should have come from the Brill last Wednesday night, but by reason of bad weather could not get out till Saturday and on Sunday landed the mail and Mr. Atterbury at Lowestoft. The weather these last three or four days has been very uncertain, several sudden gusts with rain, much lightning and one extraordinary tide like a springtide. The master says the Prince of Orange is still at the Hague and that Lord Ossory was forced in the yacht to Zerickzee in Zealand. Wind to-day about N.W. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Jan. 22.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. No ships are arrived since my last. From the west we have advice there is a big ship cast away in the North Channel, so big that one of the straps of her blocks that came ashore was 9 inches about, and there is no news of any man saved. In Mount's Bay are come ashore about 30 or 40 tons of tallow, no men saved. What both the ships are, no man knows. I most humbly beg you will order one of your clerks to give me a line in answer to two of my last letters. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Jan. 22. News from Scotland. There go with the Committee of the Council 8 cannon, viz., 4 brass from Edinburgh Castle and 4 from Stirling Castle. There has not been in our time such an ample commission granted as this Committee has, for they have not only liberty to sequester men's estates and to denounce them fugitives, who will not subscribe the bond for keeping of the peace, but, if they meet with the least opposition in their march, to put all to the sword before them. I hope against this day eight days to give you an account of the Council's progress, for I have a trusty along with them. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Jan. 22. Notes by Williamson about Parliament.—As to expenses, when that's spoke of.—The islands.—2 companies at Jamaica, 6 at Leeward Islands, 2 at Barbados, magazines, &c.—Auxiliaries to Flanders. N.B. D. V[ork]. All the impressions we can make reasonably on France must be on the sea coasts. In Flanders will want no men. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Jan. 22. The Sieur Des-Chants to the Duke of Monmouth. Describing a vision he had seen of an adorable mortal, the exact image of the Duke. Printed by Thomas Newcomb at the Savoy for Andrew Forrester, King Street, Westminster. Licensed 22 Jan, [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Caius College, Cambridge. Recommending to them and willing and requiring them to elect and admit Ralph Barker, one of the Junior Fellows, to the Senior Fellowship now void or that shall be next vacant, as he is very acceptable to the Society and would be chosen by them to a Senior Fellowship but that on a late interpretation of their statutes of election some scruple is raised, which may obstruct his election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 64.]
Jan. 23.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Giving the direction of the wind from the 17th to that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 118.]
Jan. 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day the wind came up to N.E. All the outward-bound ships weighed and sailed, except those for France. Of 40 sail not above 3 or 4 are gone over. The rest suffer rather to be protested against by the freighters than to venture their wages, ships and ventures. Not a topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Jan. 23.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Yesterday evening arrived here the packet-boat from Calais, bringing over Sir W. Godolphin, who came overland from Ostend, where a vessel attended to bring him over, but could not get out of the harbour by reason of the bad weather. Our letters from Dunkirk and Calais give us no news but that the French at present make no further attempts and that they question whether their King will visit those parts or not this campaign. We expect every hour the arrival of the Flanders mail, the wind being this morning shifted to S.S.E. The fleet of merchantmen outward-bound is now sailing by this place, that have lain so long in the Downs for a wind.
Yesterday morning between 2 and 3 happened a violent fire next door to the victualling office, but by the violence of the wind at S.W., that blew the flames backward from the victualling office and other houses adjoining, and the great help of seamen it was soon extinguished without doing further mischief than burning the back of the house and the outhouses. 'Tis supposed it happened by the carelessness of some person that went into the stable, being a victualling house, to give a horse meat. The horse was burnt alive. The owner was the same day secured on suspicion of being a horse-stealer. He confesses he has sold several horses here, but can give no account where he had them, nor can we at present find out the marks of the horses. He says his name is William Smith, a tall man, his hair black and long, of a swarthy complexion, aged about 50. He says he lived lately at Bexley? (Bexhill), about 5 miles from Hastings. I give you this notice that, if you think fit, he may be mentioned in the Gazette. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant for the restitution of the temporalities of the archbishopric of Canterbury to William Sancroft, D.D., he being duly consecrated Archbishop, such restitution to commence from the death of the last archbishop. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 65.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Joseph Ivey of Waterford of all felonies, crimes and offences whatsoever by him committed before that day, for which the benefit of clergy is not taken away, and of all pains, penalties and forfeitures by reason thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 453.]
Jan. 23.
London.
The Earl of Danby to the Prince of Orange. I had yours of 15–25 Jan., the day after the arrival of the express from Holland with the treaty of alliance. You had an account yesterday that it was accepted without any alteration. This day Mr. Godolphin returned from the Duc de Villa Hermosa, who has treated him civilly, but (under the rose to your Highness) so very foolishly as to their own concerns in Flanders, that, unless some remedy can be given by your influence on him, I know not whether it may not change all our measures here or at least to the sending any force into Flanders. Although the Duke's discourse has been mixed with great folly and greater ignorance (as particularly in his belief of the port at Nieuport, that it was capable of receiving a good ship, when the King's yachts dare not go in there), yet the King is of opinion (and I said it to-day to the Marquis de Bourgomaine (Borgomaniero) before his Majesty) that the Duke is betrayed in his "councells," or else it were not possible to do many of the things we see done, nor to leave undone many of the things which are of such absolute necessity for their defence, and, in this particular of Ostend, it is most certain that they have now put arms into the hands of the burghers and seamen of the town, whose interest it is to be under France, and who have declared their willingness to be so, insomuch that I look upon it as a garrison kept for France, when they please to come to it. This has not only broke our measures as to Flanders but to the Parliament, who will not at first believe it possible that they have refused to let us put auxiliaries into Ostend and Nieuport, and will think we have some other design for those men and ships which were designed to have carried 3,500 men to those places, the men and ships being both ready. His Majesty was very glad to find that he had done that which you say in your letter would have been of more use now than 10,000 men a month hence and certainly none but madmen could have thought otherwise of it; but, since they must be saved against their wills or not at all, I think it will be a principal step towards their salvation, if you can retrieve this false measure they have taken by sending some considerable messenger speedily to get their error amended in time, for I fear the King will defer the Parliament another week upon it and a little time now will lose the whole benefit of the campaign. The French ambassador now begins to think there is no further hopes of peace with England, and the French King has answered that as to the return of our troops the capitulations shall be kept, which are not to return till 30 days after the war declared betwixt France and England, and in the meantime he has ordered the regiment of Douglas to march into Dauphiné. 'Tis said the King of France begins his march with his whole court towards Metz to-morrow, and that his designs are on Treves, Luxembourg or Charlemont, but every thing is so easy to him on this side, viz., Ypres, Dixmude, Nieuport and Ostend, that 'tis believed there will be men enough left to take some or most of those places at the same time. To that part of your letter which concerns Mistress Villiers, the King said it was a very ill time for him to give money, but he did not refuse it, only said he would consider of it and both in obedience to your commands and to show the great kindness I have for Monsr. Bentinck, I will not fail to improve the King's good intentions as much as I can possibly.
The Marquis de Burgomaine has carried himself so very ill in this matter, that nothing can be said worse of it than he deserves. [4 pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 1, No. 11.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Mortagh Dowling by his petition set forth that Sir James Shaen, having purchased amongst other lands the lands hereafter mentioned in Meath and Westmeath from several adventurers and soldiers and having claimed the same before the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation as assignee of the said adventurers and soldiers, who were proved to be in possession thereof on 7 May, 1659, the said lands were adjudicated to be confirmed to the said Sir James as the two-thirds of the lands claimed by him in right of the said adventurers and soldiers, retrenchment being made of the other third according to the said Acts, but that the said Sir James, expecting to have the whole lands claimed by him confirmed to him, neglected passing any certificate for the said lands from the said late Commissioners or any letters patent thereof, and desired that, the said Sir James having conveyed his interest in the said lands to the petitioner and his heirs and the petitioner being to be confirmed in the said lands by the said Acts, and the said Sir James, the petitioner and those claiming under him having constantly paid the quit rents for the said lands and the yearly value charged thereon, letters patent might be ordered to be passed to the petitioner of the said lands, and that the petitioner's request has been recommended by the Earl of Essex, then Lord Lieutenant, who has sent a report by Thomas Taylor, a sub-commissioner to the said late commissioners, whereby the truth of the said allegations appears, and a reference of the said petition and report to the Lord Treasurer, who by his report of 19 Jan. last certified that he has nothing to object against this letter approved by the late Lord Lieutenant: requiring and authorizing him to cause an effectual grant to be passed to the said Dowling, his heirs and assigns, of the lands hereafter mentioned, viz., in Donore and Coolfin 206 acres, and in Ballvilabane 233 acres, all in the barony of Moycashel, Westmeath, the towns and lands of Newcastle containing 680 acres, Kilcorney containing 256 acres 2 roods, in Great Possextown 49 acres, in Cornellstown 48 acres, all in the barony of Moyfenrath, Meath, the towns and lands of Marshall's town containing 216 acres and in Curtistown 117 acres one rood in the barony of Deece, Meath, containing together 1,805 acres, 3 roods profitable land, Irish plantation measure, under the several quit rents payable thereout by the said Acts of Settlement and Explanation. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 212.]
Jan. 23.
4 p.m. St. Aubin's Fort, Jersey.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. I have done all I have to do in this island and intend to sail to-morrow for Guernsey and hope within 8 days to return for England. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 76.]
Jan. [24].
Great Sanctuary, Westminster.
Francis Royley to John Abbot, M.A., East Street, Gloucester. I had answered yours of the 9th before now, had I not met with a misfortune that prevented me, with which I suppose Mr. Goodwin has acquainted you, whose patient I am, and of the mending hand. Lest matter of money should frustrate matrimony, I desire to know what portion you expect with an only daughter, and, if my ability will answer your reality, it shall be performed with all fidelity by me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 121.]
Jan. 24.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Only two light vessels are in this road at anchor. Last night and this morning it has blown very hard, wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Jan. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats from the Brill. She came thence last Monday. The master says the Prince was at the Hague when he left. At night another sailed hence and in her Mr. Atterbury, by whom I received the confirmation of the high favour I have to be in your well-wishes and memory. The wind yesterday about noon got into the E.N.E. and so continues; it has brought cold and snow. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Jan. 24.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 8 this morning arrived here the Nieuport packet-boats that have been some time wind-bound, bringing over four mails. They tell us several wrecks have happened lately on that coast near Ostend, and that the garrison of Nieuport consists of between 2 and 3,000 men, a considerable part are Scots and Irishmen. They have sent out lately, since the French are drawn out of Vueurne, several parties of foot that returned on horseback with other cattle, also taken from the boors about St. Winnox' Berghen. The same boors had liberty to come into the garrison at the public sale of their cattle to buy them again, unless any other outbid them. We hear nothing of the motion of the French army in Flanders. By a vessel arrived here this morning from Dunkirk we have advice that the English merchants there, being apprehensive of a war between us and France, are preparing to remit their effects from thence with all speed. They have a very great garrison, near 10,000 men, that are, as 'tis said, suddenly to march to the army and some new raised troops are expected in their room. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 124.]
Jan. 24.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. The Hampshire, having set a new mainmast and maintopmast at Spithead, lies now ready to sail for Guernsey and Jersey and will be gone this next tide. Wind N.E.
Postscript.—The Hampshire is now a peak and under way. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Jan. 24.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. My last gave you an account of a vessel put into Oxwich Bay, but, the sea being so high, no boat could come to her or they come ashore, so then it was not known what she was, but yesterday she was forced from her cable and anchor, having lost her other cable and anchor before, and is now put ashore at highwater mark without either cable or anchor, and it is now springing water and the wind blows hard at E. If it continue, it will endanger the loss of the vessel and most of the goods. Some help is gone hence to her. Her name is the Lancaster of London, Joseph Tucker master outward-bound, but he died the next day they came out of Virginia. His mate, cook and two foremastmen died in the country. The new master is William Gadgecombe. Her loading is tobacco from James River, and she is bound, they say, for London. The wind continues to blow very stiff at E., if it alter, there may be hopes of saving vessel and goods. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor, Corporation and Freemen of Queenborough. Expressing how sensible he is of his obligations to their kindness and goodwill and desiring them to command him on all occasions where the interest either of the town in general or of any private freeman or inhabitant may be concerned. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 184.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a pension of 1,000l. a year to Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, for his life, to commence from the death of William, Lord Crofts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 11.]
Jan. 24. Allowance by Williamson of the bill of extraordinaries from 25 March, 1676, to 25 March, 1677, amounting to 336l. 14s. 6d., of Sir Edward Wood, envoy extraordinary to Sweden, except as to the article for the carriage of goods, which he thinks it not safe to allow for the ill precedent it would set, and as to the article of advance of money he must leave that to the Lord Treasurer's judgement, his Majesty having for this time dispensed with the oath which the accountant according to the rule ought to have taken to the truth of the account. Prefixed is a detailed account of the items, among them 4l. to poor people that set up summer poles at Wood's gate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, pp. 453, 454.]
Jan. 24.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. I cannot write too often, considering our present condition, and how powerful our near neighbours at St. Malo are in shipping and riches. They boast that, so soon as a war is declared, they will set out 40 men-of-war and, if they be not curbed, I am confident they will do more harm than all the rest of the seaports in France. I am persuaded they have a design on this island and that speedily, and, if the truth were known, St. Malo has undertaken it with Brittany and the upper part of Normandy. I have sent the bearer, Mr. Carpenter, for England, to hasten over supplies of provision, ammunition and soldiers that I may be put in a condition to defend his Majesty's interest here. I shall want 100 tents, for I intend to camp on the hills near the seaside to attend their motion. Use your best endeavour with his Majesty to hasten supplies over, for there was never more need than at this time. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 77.]
Jan. 25. Edward Nelthorp to Williamson. Requesting him to permit the enclosed advertisement to be inserted in Monday's Gazette, their creditors having appointed to meet on the Friday following and others living out of town and their habitations being unknown. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 127.]
Jan. 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Tuesday the wind came to N. and Wednesday to E. and by N., and yesterday the same and blew exceedingly with frost and snow. To-day it is E. and by S., a fresh gale. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Jan. 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The wind has been these two or three days S.E. and S. and blew very high till to-day, being now somewhat abated. This evening came in a Dutch caper of 22 guns from the West Indies, where he met, as the captain says, a French man-of-war of about 28 guns, with whom he fought two days and a half, losing four men and many more wounded, by which his voyage is overthrown and so he returns home again. To-day came in the Assistance with some other ships, but too late to give you the list of them.
Yesterday arrived a vessel from Morlaix. The merchants there told him that forthwith there would be an embargo, so they brought their goods aboard, and he was forced to sail without stowing them. To-day arrived the Frederick of this town from Havre. The merchants there hastened him away, telling him that, if he stayed two hours longer there would be an embargo. [Ibid. No. 129.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for a pardon to Richard Neale convicted of perjury at the summer assizes for Nottinghamshire in 1676. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 203.]
[1678.]
Jan. 25.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "I have received just now yours by Lord Ossory and do assure you I take very kindly the proposition you make to me in it, though as yet I can say nothing to you upon it, for, till we know what the Parliament and Spaniards will do, we cannot make any plan, how or which way to carry on the war when we enter into it, and you will see by what Mr. Hyde has to inform you of, what little probability there is of our having any men in Flanders, since without Ostend we cannot send a considerable body into that country. I have not time to say more, it being now late, we having been all this night about preparing things for the meeting of the Parliament, which is to be on Monday." [1½ page. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 16.]
1678.
[Jan. 25 ?]
Homage of William Sancroft, D.D., elected and confirmed Archbishop of Canterbury. (Confirmed 24 and consecrated 27 Jan.) [On parchment. S.P. Dom. Car. II. Case G., No. 2.]
Jan. 25.
Lisburn.
Sir George Rawdon to Viscount Conway. Col. Jefferyes and Sir Robert Hamilton with him landed yesterday from Scotland and by their relations the case seems to be suddenly much altered there for the better, and that, though somewhat was true of Douglas' information, yet some was otherwise, and the Highland forces raised by their lords of their own vassals with such diligence are descended like a torrent, and were to rendezvous yesterday at Stirling, near 6,000, to the exceeding great terror of the Lowlanders. By their covenants and customs they are bound to attend their lords so far on their own charge and after they are to live upon free quarters, which the Council have ordered them now to do and doubt not that by them and the standing forces, though not many, and with some of the militia that they confide in to quiet the kingdom and disarm the militia and the ill affected in the Western parts without the help of this brigade, as also by gentle compulsion to persuade the noblemen and gentlemen &c. to subscribe the like engagement, which those in Fife (where the Lord Chancellor's estate is and he has a great influence) have begun, that neither they nor their wives, children, servants, vassals nor tenants shall meet at any conventicles, but, if any transgress, to render their persons to be amenable to the laws and to suffer such punishments and pay the fines imposed on such offences, &c. And more it is now hoped by the Council they will gain upon them, that they shall oblige to conform and to apprehend and secure all their fanatic preachers.
The people generally are in such a consternation by this inundation of the Highlanders, that, if this design be hotly pursued, while they are in this humour, it will be effected, and doubtless the sending hither of this brigade so near them with such diligence was well timed to prevent their appearance in rebellion last October, which they intended, as is the general opinion from very pregnant circumstances, for thereupon their ministers all deserted their scabbed flocks and fled and absconded since, advising the people not to inquire of them, and that soon after the meeting of the Parliament in England they would return and advise them what was to be done. And, though no arms have been found where Douglas informed, though strict searches were made for them presently after Col. Jefferyes' arrival at Edinburgh, yet his discovery has so awakened the diligence of the ministers of state and the loyal subjects there, that it is to be hoped a great mischief has in a great measure been timeously prevented.
I received your letter of the 15th yesterday written by the Lord Treasurer's direction and sent it immediately to Lord Granard, who thereupon came hither late last night and brought Col. Jefferyes and Sir R. Hamilton with him, who are in the house here, and they are going now towards Dublin, to account what they have seen in Scotland, but the post brought no account yesterday from thence of Douglas, but that his Grace and our Lord Chancellor had been examining him the most part of two days, which, I suppose, will be represented to his Majesty as soon as this and their judgement on his discoveries, but I perceive our Field Marshal's informations of him from Scotland have lessened his lordship's good opinion of him and of his merit in this service. [2 pages. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 135.]
Jan. 25. Notes by Williamson about Ireland. The farmers appear to pretend to the 80,000l. left unlevied by Lord Ranelagh at his quitting the undertaking.
Mr Rider.—Offers that, having four others of his choice out of the present persons in the farm to be authorized by commission from the king, of whom three to be the quorum, he will undertake:— 1. To make good the present rent. 2. Under the same covenants. 3. To disclaim all pretence to the 80,000l. 4. The others now in the farm shall continue to have their shares in the profit of the farm, in case there be any. 5. The four to be Farwell, Richbell, Stannian, Piggott, who is an assignee, so as the only persons left out will be Shaen, Muschamp.
N.B.—This year they have certainly made of the farm 280,000l. and the rent is 240,000l., the management is yearly 16,000l, i.e. 24,000l. profit, but out of this must be discounted for repayments, insolvencies &c. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Jan. 25.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. Since my last I hear nothing from St. Malo but of the great preparation for a war against England, for I have intelligence twice or thrice a week by our merchants who are drawing their effects from thence. They have now ready to put to sea 3 or 4 and 20 frigates from 16 guns to 40 and are building a great number of double shallops flat-bottomed, burden about 6 tons. These, I am confident, are designed to attempt something on this island. A French merchant has written to a merchant here, that, if he loved himself, he might send his best concerns to him and he would secure them. They bear a great malice to this island. Intercede as much as you can, to his Majesty that I be not left thus naked, for I am persuaded we shall be speedily assaulted by St. Malo, Brittany and the upper part of Normandy, if war be once declared. I beg that ammunition and provision for the castles here may be hastened over with all expedition and a troop of horse or dragoons with six foot companies, which is the least I can desire. The Trained Bands of this island are indifferent good firemen, but I do not know how they will stand before an enemy, except they have some of the standing forces to make way for them. I have informed myself, as much as I can, concerning the condition of St. Malo, that, if four of the third rate and fourth rate frigates were here with two fireships, we might burn all their shipping in their harbour, and, if I were in England, I could acquaint his Majesty of much more. The French are much afraid that the King of England will possess himself of Belle Isle. St. Malo has so many skulking frigates abroad, that I dare not send the great fly-boat hence without a convoy and a pilot to bring her to London, for I am certain, if they could take her, they would carry her to St. Malo, and plead their right for her there. Do what you can to hasten supplies to us, for there was never more need. The bearer, Mr. Carpenter, whom I send on purpose, will receive your commands. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 78.]
Jan. 25.
1 p.m. On board the Charlotte yacht.
Capt. Martin Beckman to Williamson. We are just now anchored in this road under the castle of Guernsey and I intend to go over this night with Sir Philip Carteret for Sark, and hope to be in England the end of next week, if wind and weather will favour. I had order from the Ordnance Office to return to Portsmouth about the fortification there, but I think it more material that I come presently away for London, to give his Majesty and yourself a report of the dangerous conditions of these islands, of which you would be pleased to let me know your order, which I will look for at the post house in Portsmouth, as soon as I arrive there. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Jan. 26.
Council Chamber.
The Committee for Trade to Sir Thomas Exton and Sir Richard Lloyd and Dr. William Trumbal, surrogates of the Court of Admiralty. On the case of the Sherard of Boston, condemned on revision in France without other reason given than that she had not touched at an English port since the purchase of her in Holland, desiring their opinions on the following points:— 1. Whether every prince being in war has not power, according to what is practised and allowed among States, to make what laws he please as to the trade that friends or neuters are to exercise with his enemies? What goods to be prohibited and under what penalties? even though such goods &c. be not otherwise according to the general law of nations contraband; supposing there is no treaty or rules of commerce between such prince and his allies. 2. What sort of publication is necessary for such prince to make his allies concerning such laws before they are put in execution? 3. Whether there be any ordinance in France forbidding to purchase foreign ships that can operate against his Majesty's subjects, so as to justify the capture and confiscation in this case according to the law of nations. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 130.] Annexed,
The said Surrogates to the Committee for Trade. Giving their opinion:— 1. That no prince in war can prohibit his friends and allies to trade with his enemies, but 'tis in his power to prohibit them to trade in such goods as are generally accounted contraband, and such other goods as are for the support of the war and encouragement of the enemies, and these he may prohibit under the penalty of confiscation, if there be no treaty providing for their freedom; 2. It is necessary that such prohibition be proclaimed or made public and that a convenient time be allowed for it to arrive to the knowledge of those it shall affect, and it is agreeable to the law and practice of nations that, where a neuter trades with a nation in war with another and carries thither or from thence goods not expressly contraband, but such as may be judged by the other nation in war to be advantageous to the enemy, to send over to expostulate the case of such trade and to give them notice to desist from carrying such goods under pain of confiscation. 3. We know of no such ordinance in France, and, if any such be, it cannot operate against his Majesty's subjects so as to justify the capture and confiscation, for, if she were really bought and paid for, she cannot by the law of nations be condemned, though taken before she touched in an English port. Feb. 2. [Ibid. No. 130 i.]
Jan. 26.
Gloucester.
John Abbot to Francis Royley. My humble thanks for your most kind letter received this morning. I am sorry for your mischance, but am glad to hear 'tis mending. I hope my dearest Mistress Susannah is well, to whom present my most humble service. I know not what portion you design to bestow on her, but suppose 'twill be proportionable to your fatherly affection to her, as being your only child. Father Goodwyn represented it to me between 4 and 500 pounds, but, whatever it be, I hope you will have no cause to repent it. Pray in your next acquaint me with your resolutions concerning this. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Jan. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 8 last Thursday night arrived one of our packet-boats and in her the Earl of Ossory, who after a small stay here took coach for Colchester. I had not the happiness to wait on him, because not only his time here was very short but I had no knowledge of his or the packetboat's arrival till too late. I doubt not you have heard more amply concerning the fire in her Highness' lodgings in the Court at the Hague and of all other affairs in those parts concerning peace or war than I could glean up after the passengers, but of this I am informed, that the generality of the commonwealth of Holland, since they have entertained such hopes of his Majesty's good intentions towards them, do not so much dread the power of the French as they did.
Wind E., the weather fair though dark. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Godsgift College, Dulwich. Requiring them to choose James Alleyn, senior fellow of Dulwich College, for the place of warden, void by the removal of the late warden to be master, he being not only a single person and of the name of the founder, but being well acquainted with the statutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 108.]
Jan. 26. The King to the Wardens of Winchester and New College, Oxford, and the other electors of Winchester School. Recommending Cornelius Norwood, who is already on the roll of candidates, and is proficient in learning, and requiring them to choose him to New College at the next election of scholars. [Ibid. f. 208.]
Jan. 26.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Williamson. I received by yours of the 2nd the signification of his Majesty concerning Capt. Blood's detainment in England by him, while his cause, which is depending in the Chancery here, may come to a determination. I have not yet this term heard any motion in that matter, but shall take the best care I can that he suffer nothing therein by his absence on his Majesty's commands. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 137.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting that Henry Draycott of Mormans-town by his petition set forth that he was by the late Court of Claims declared innocent and restored to the lands and hereditaments, whereof he and his ancestors were dispossessed by the late usurped powers, that by the said decree only an estate tail was decreed to the petitioner and the heirs male of his body and the absolute fee on failure of such issue male was left in the Crown, by reason whereof he cannot by fine or recovery or any other assurance settle any jointure on his wife or limit portions for his younger children, and prayed, as he and his ancestors have always been faithful and loyal and in regard of the merit and services of the ancestors of Elizabeth, his wife, a grant to her of the reversion of the estate, to which he was decreed as aforesaid, for her life, and of the remainder thereof to him in fee simple, reserving the like rents and services as are now answered out of the said estate tail in possession, a reference thereof to the Earl of Essex, then Lord Lieutenant, and his report that by decree of the late Commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement dated 2 May, 1663, the petitioner was adjudged innocent and was restored to several hereditaments therein mentioned and as to other lands therein mentioned was left to law to recover the same, which said lands by the said decree were to be held by the petitioner and the heirs male of his body, the reversion thereof remaining in the Crown, that by the civil survey all the lands, except those for which the petitioner was left to law, are returned to have been the property of John Draycott, the petitioner's father, deceased, in 1641, that, whilst the reversion of the said lands and tithes remains in the Crown, the petitioner cannot, as the Lord Lieutenant conceives, either by fine or recovery bar the same, so as to make any settlement on his wife or any provision for his younger children, that the said lands and tithes being vested in his Majesty by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation for the uses therein mentioned, he conceives his Majesty may grant the petitioner letters patent of the reversion to his wife for her life with remainder to the petitioner in fee simple as desired, he placing such deficiencies thereon as the Lord Lieutenant for the time being shall prescribe, and also on such grant the quit rent payable by the said Acts being reserved, such grant to extend only to such of the premises as are restored by the said decree and whereof he is now possessed, and not to the lands for which he is left to law, and a further reference to the Lord Treasurer who agrees with the said report: for a grant to the said Elizabeth, wife of the said Henry Draycott of the reversion of all such lands and hereditaments as he was restored to by the said decree and whereof he is now in possession, for her life, and of the remainder thereof to the said Henry Draycott in fee simple, he placing such deficiencies thereon as the Lord Lieutenant for the time being shall prescribe, reserving thereout the quit rents payable by the said Acts or such other rent and services as are now answered out of the estate tail in possession. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 214.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that James Barnewall of Bremore set forth by his petition that the Commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement decreed him innocent, and being satisfied that he was entitled to a remainder to him and the heirs male of his body in the lands in that decree mentioned under a settlement by his father Matthias Barnewall, deceased, restored him thereto, and that the remainder on the failure of heirs male of the petitioner remaining in the Crown he is disabled from making any jointure to his wife, settling portions on his younger children or taking any sure course for payment of his debts, and prayed, in regard the said lands have been the ancient inheritance of the petitioner and his ancestors, who have been always loyal, a grant of the said remainder in the said lands under the like rent and services as are answered out of them during the continuance of the said estate tail, and that a clause may be inserted in the said grant for creating the said lands into a manor, pursuant to the letters of 28 Oct., 1669, with these alterations only that the town and lands of Batranstown, Baynanstown, Denanstown, Racastown and the lands and tenements in Carbalagh and Duleek in Meath, and that part of Garristown and Tobergragan in co. Dublin, which were decreed to the petitioner, be adjoined to the manor of Bremore, and that all wrecks happening therein may be granted to the petitioner, and that the lands of Stakeny, co. Dublin, be adjoined to the manor of Piercetown Marshall, Meath, and that the fair appointed by the said letters to be at Bremore may thenceforward be held at Piercetown Marshall, a reference thereof to the Earl of Essex, then Lord Lieutenant, and his report, which was that by decree of the Commissioners of the late Court of Claims dated 30 March, 1663, it appears that all the lands and hereditaments, whereof Matthias Barnewall, the petitioner's father, was seised in fee, were by deed of feoffment, dated 4 Feb., 1635 [–6], made over to feoffees in trust for the use of himself for life, with remainder, after some estates since ended, to the use of the petitioner in tail male with remainders over, and the petitioner was adjudged an innocent Papist and restored to all the premises accordingly, and that by the deed of uses of the said feoffment it appears that, in case the petitioner should die without issue male of his body, remainders are limited to Edward, Robert, and Andrew Barnewall, uncles to the said Matthias, and the heirs male of their bodies severally and successively, but that it does not appear by the said decree or any other record of that court that any of the said persons in remainder were declared innocent, by reason whereof he conceives that the estate in fee after the decease of the said James Barnewall is vested in his Majesty by the Act of Explanation, and that his Majesty may, if he thinks fit, grant to the petitioner the remainder in fee of the said premises, he placing deficiencies thereon, with direction to create the particulars mentioned in the petition into a manor to hold under such rents &c. as is therein desired, a further reference of the said petition and report to the Lord Treasurer, and his report that he fully agrees with the above report: requiring and authorizing him to cause letters patent to be passed granting to the said James Barnewall the remainder in fee of all the premises to which he has been restored by the said decree of the late Court of Claims under the like rents and services as are answered thereout during the continuance of the said estate tail, he placing such deficiencies thereon as the Lord Lieutenant for the time being shall think fit, with a clause for creating the said lands into a manor, pursuant to the said letters of 28 Oct., 1669, with the alterations desired in the said petition. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 224.]
Jan. 26.
Jersey.
Sir Herbert Lunsford to [Williamson]. The 21st I brought the remainder of 150 soldiers from the Tower on board the Katherine yacht commanded by Capt. Lovell, consisting of 80 soldiers. Tuesday night we reached the Downs, where the captain took a pilot, who undertook to carry us to Jersey, but, had not Capt. Lovell's vigilance and prudence far exceeded the pilot's care and knowledge, we had, on the Norman shore, been sacrificed to Neptune, but on Friday night, the 25th, we safely arrived in Bouley Bay in this island, which, the wind being southerly, was secure. But, early the next morning the wind coming easterly, that road is dangerous, being full of rocks, which moved the captain's passion, which constrained us suddenly to get to shore with the soldiers and arms. The captain, to secure the noble yacht, immediately weighed and, finding the wind fair, made all sail for England without seeing the Governor.
I understand that great preparations are making in St. Malo for setting out vessels, considerable in number and force, who threaten this island much, but, since his Majesty is concerned for us, I doubt not but all will amount only to a French vapour.
I find the islanders are ready to expose all and, had they arms and ammunition, they will raise a considerable number of good men.
This island will be wanting of provision, corn and all things are already at great rates, but, since the Governor has acquainted his Majesty with the particulars, I presume not to enlarge these lines.
At this instant the Kitchen yacht is arrived with the 70 soldiers I shipped at first. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 80.]
Jan. 27. T. B[arnes] to —. As to news, you cannot but know there has been of late very much of a war with the French, but the discourse of that is dubious, some affirming that the French offers to draw his armies from Flanders or at least not to molest them at this time and that they proffer much money and other high proffers to us and some say the P[arliament] will not sit long, but be prorogued, till matters be more ready, but to write the several contradictory discourses there have been of late and the several doubts and fears of some would be too tedious, but, if any thing considerable offer, you shall have a faithful and speedy account ont, as soon as I have it. I sent one letter lately from the Post Office, I hope you received it. I do what I can at present in your other concern. If you advise me wherein I may serve you, I shall be willing, but I am at present weak and crazy and in some straits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 133.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. Repeating the news of the sailing of the Hampshire. The wind is easterly. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Jan. 27.
Dartmouth.
Ambrose Mudd, mayor, to Williamson. The enclosed was intended for you yesterday, to which I refer, but this afternoon is come in a vessel of this port that came out of St. Malo yesterday morning. The master gives me account of above 40 ships making ready for war, of which two are gone to sea three days since and above 10 more are ready to sail of from 8 to 20 guns, and several others are graved of from 20 to 40 guns or more and some 5 or 6 of above 50 apiece. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Jan. 27.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. Just now I received the enclosed letter from a gentleman I employ at St. Malo. He durst not put his name to it, lest it should have been intercepted. I have sent my agent, Mr. Carpenter, for England to hasten over supplies of provision, ammunition and soldiers. I have written at large for England, and something may be picked out of my letters, that may conduce much to his Majesty's service, I mean with respect to that potent town of St. Malo. I will use all diligence to gain intelligence of what passes amongst our near neighbours and shall impart to you what shall happen. I desire you to intercede to his Majesty that supplies may be hastened over to me with all expedition. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 81.] Enclosed,
— to SIR THOMAS MORGAN.
The rumours of a near rupture 'twixt England and France have been the entertainment of all persons, since I am here. All that signified no more but what you knew before, for which reason I thought it not worth imparting. But, hearing since from credible parties, that the Syndic of this town ('tis as if one should say the mayor in England, though he has not so much authority), received last post letters from the agent of this commonalty or corporation in Paris, bidding him by Monsr. Colbert's order encourage the men of this town to fit out with all expedition as many vessels for war as they could, promising them all favour from Court, and, the said agent intimating the war 'twixt England and France to be indubitable, I thought it my duty to give you my information of it. The stirring of armateurs since confirms the truth of the news. It is thought that in a short time more than 50 or 60 privateers of considerable force, some from 40 to 50 guns, will go out of this port. 'Tis also reported there is a great number ready prepared in Dunkirk, expecting but orders, so they promise themselves a great harvest on English vessels. To thus much amounts the news from Paris, and, if those of London lessen the appearances of a rupture, 'twill be a wonder. They are expected with greediness, having failed the last ordinary, which is imputed to foul weather, and so there is nothing yet known here of the transactions of the Parliament. Both English and French here are expecting the war, and, if peace should continue, it would be a surprisal. 1678, [Jan. 24-] Feb. 3. St. Malo. [Ibid. No. 81 i.]
Jan. 27.
Guernsey.
Capt. William Sheldon to Williamson. I received by Capt. Beckman two days since his Majesty's commands of 17 Dec., which I shall most faithfully obey, and also yours of the 31st, the contents whereof I will to the utmost of my power endeavour to effect, and I have already done what is requisite in the business you entrust me with of so great concern, and shall from time to time give you an account. As for the last news, I understand from St. Malo that several great ships are building there, and that those that are fitted are commanded to be in a readiness and likewise that the French merchants have unloaden our English ships that were bound to Spain with linen cloth on their account and shipped the merchandize in their own frigates for the same voyage. I cannot hear as yet that any soldiers are drawn towards the coast. Capt. Beckman is gone to Sark with Sir Philip Carteret. I expect his return every day and then will wait on him in obedience to his Majesty's commands. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Jan. 28. The King's speech to the Parliament. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 130, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 427.) [Manuscript and printed copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, Nos. 136, 137.]
Jan. 28. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which sufficiently appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., pp. 130, 131, except as follows:—The Lord Chancellor acquainted the lords of the condition of matters concerning the lords in the Tower, showing how and upon what terms they are enlarged, viz., that it was conditional and that thereupon he sent them a letter to acquaint them that they must expect to make an acknowledgement to the House as they had done to him of their offences and thereupon on reading the Duke of Buckingham's petition for his enlargement presented by the Earl of Berkshire, they ordered that the Duke should in person make his acknowledgement at the bar.
The House being informed that the Duke attended their pleasure at the door, he was called to the bar and being told that his petition was read and that they were ready to receive his acknowledgement, which being taken out of the journal of last Feb. and presented him and he reading it, he was restored to his place. The acknowledgement was:—My Lord, the lords have received your petition and are well pleased to find your lordship disposed to give them the satisfaction they expected and read to him these words, I do acknowledge that my endeavouring to maintain that the Parliament is dissolved was an ill advised action, for which I humbly beg the pardon of the King's Majesty and of this most honourable House. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Jan. 28. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons on that day which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 427. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Jan. 28. Thomas [de la Marche] to Williamson. The said Davis, limner, lives next door to the sign of the Angel in St. Alban's Street. If you think fit, your servant would willingly wait on you, when the said Davis shall be commanded to attend on you, in order to ask him several questions, as, if he never saw the said Monamy apply the signet to some of those freedoms in his chamber, as also if he has not seen several blank papers in Monamy's chamber where there was only C. Rex at top and Arlington at the bottom. Sharpe, gunsmith, lives in Exeter Street by Exeter Exchange. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Jan. 28.
Lyme.
Na. Tyderleigh to Sir Courtenay Pole. I return my hearty thanks for yours of the 22nd. I am very sorry for your indisposition and hope this will find you better. I hope, as you have condescended to begin, you will prosecute that design for me or any other in which you judge me capable. I wish I had an opportunity of waiting on you in London, which, if any thing might offer as to any preferment, I should gladly do. Mr. Story is not yet returned from Poole having been there near a fortnight, but last Saturday arrived a vessel from St. Malo, and on board her two tuns of claret, which is what you intimate in your letter. I expect Mr. Story to-morrow or Wednesday. If he come not, I shall take care to enter it and get it into custody. In the meantime I have charged the master that it may not be abused, as too often such things are here, which he has promised shall not nor cannot be yet, for the wines are in the bottom of the vessel and cannot be come at these four or five days. This vessel from St. Malo and four more of this town from Morlaix arrived at Plymouth were forced away by the advice of the English merchants from those places for fear of an arrest. The commonalty begin to be very abusive on the apprehensions of a war with England and particularly in St. Malo they will soon have ready 40 men-of-war to infest our coast, 20 of which are so ready that in two hours after they have advice they will be ready to sail, so that they in all probability may do us much mischief ere they may be opposed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 141.]
Jan. 28.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 26th arrived the Society in 24 hours from St. Malo. (About the English ships being hurried away and the French preparations as in the last letter.) We have news of several of our ships arrived at Plymouth, the wind being easterly last week, but one was cast away to the westward of Falmouth, but the men were saved and much of the goods. Wind S.S.E. blowing very hard. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Jan. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have constantly very stormy weather and reports of several wrecks. Wind now W., very turbulent weather. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Jan. 28.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The former part of last week the wind being E. and E.S.E. very few ships came in, till Friday last, the wind coming S.W., several came in, among them the Samuel and Elizabeth and the Supply both of London bound for the Barbados. The wind continuing S.W. Saturday and Sunday several came in, the masters not being here yet to report, the weather being so boisterous. I shall give you an account in the next. (About the wreck of the vessel of Lyme as in the next.) The Princess Mary of Flushing is come in for her prize, which I gave an account of. Wind S.E., blowing very hard. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Jan. 28.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. In a creek near this on Thursday night was cast away a small vessel, the Pearl of Lyme, laden with linen from Morlaix. All the men and goods saved though much damnified and the vessel like to be lost. The 26th, passed before this harbour above 100 merchantmen from the Downs and out of Plymouth under the convoy of the Assistance bound for the Straits and other ports to the southward, the wind E. The 27th, at evening came in the Assistance with 9 or 10 merchantmen, the wind blowing hard at S.E., so it is believed the rest will be in to-day. For all the great noise here of war with France several vessels are come in here bound for France. Wind now S.S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 145.]
Jan. 28.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. My last gave an account of the Lancaster being run ashore in Oxwich Bay. She remains there having landed on the beach some tobacco to lighten her, but the wind continues still easterly, and at present blows a very stiff gale, which is very bad for her, and may, if it continue 48 hours, endanger beating her in pieces, though most of the goods may be saved. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Pass for Donald Crokatt, who is going to various places abroad, particularly to Sweden and Denmark. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 334, p. 454.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Bradley, messenger, to search for a seditious and scandalous pamphlet called Harrington's Case, which has been lately printed and dispersed, and for the author, printer, or dispersers of the same and to bring them before Secretary Williamson. [Ibid. p. 456.]
Jan. 29. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords on that day which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., pp. 132, 133. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 147.]
Jan. 29. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons on that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 428. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Jan. 29. Notes of the following speeches. Sir W. Coventry:—No peace, but that of the Pyreneans. Whatever may do the Hollanders' business, this only does ours. Stopping trade does all. King of France cannot have fleets to need so great a force, cannot fight at sea. Landmen must not fight single only auxiliaries. The dependence, the wee bit longer than the two miles. Must not get any towns &c., the Hollander will be jealous. Auxiliaries from Q. Elizabeth—from Cromwell. Hobson's saying, "If you make not less haste &c." Seems by the King's speech as if the influences of France were not so far off—to fight with the greatness of the demands. Objection, how continue the Wine Act, when a war with France is intended ?
Powell:—To have satisfaction what kind of peace ? The Pyreneans. The House to know &c. What assistances in the war &c. ? What alliances ? What sort ? The confederates themselves, some of them, do not know it. We may insist on too high terms with Spain. What way to manage the war ?
Leigh:—Not certain if a war, how then money raised ? Why not communicate the treaty ? The Triple Alliance was. Why not take in others as well as Holland ? This is rather for a peace. To ask the King to explain what help we have from others and not have all this lie on us. 200,000l. per mensem.
Birch:—The terms will not do, must be the Pyrenean. To know what the treaty is. What proportion Holland is to bear ? Did heretofore 20 ships and 6,000 men. If all this be only to carry on the project, fears it above all. What shall we do with France after a peace. That an article that no trade or commerce with France &c. To make alliances with other allies. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 149.]
Jan. 29.
Lombard Street.
Sir Robert Vyner to Williamson. My nephew, Thomas Vyner, has been long solicitous and very lately thought himself sure of an employment under the Duke of York, but yet is disappointed, and, in regard the military employments seem now to be more plentiful, he makes it his humble request with his mother's and mine that you would favour him with your assistance and make him a cornet in the new raised troops, not doubting but he'll deserve the character of a bold young fellow and of a very good horseman for his years. I had gladly waited on you myself but have kept my bed almost three weeks by the poor gout. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Jan. 29.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Yesterday came in here four vessels of this place from Rotterdam but they brought no news. The wind continues easterly with frost this morning and much snow. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Jan. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We believe that packet-boat which last Wednesday transported Mr. Atterbury could scarce reach her port in due time, the wind being E. If she had, she would not have been long with this wind returning hither. We have looked out very sharp for her these three days.
Yesterday afternoon the wind blew a hard gust which tempestuously continued all last night and this morning. The wind is now at noon somewhat N. of E. and the weather very cold. One of our packet-boats sailed on Saturday. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Jan. 29.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night arrived the packet-boats from Dover and Calais. From Calais we have little news. They are fearful of a war with us. I have enclosed what account I had from Nieuport. This day passed by about 100 Hollanders bound for the Straits. Most were very great ships, but we could not discover above 16 men-of-war. They had never a flagship. They had the wind E.N.E., a very fresh gale. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Jan. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 154.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 154 i.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Capt. Beckman. I have received yours from Jersey and Guernsey and thank you for your care to inform us of all that passes with you. I have shown his Majesty what you write, and he commands me to signify his pleasure that immediately on your arrival at Portsmouth you repair to Court to acquaint him with the present state of those islands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 185.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Col. George Legge, Governor of Portsmouth, and ten others, after reciting that the King has thought fit at the present conjuncture to repair and strengthen the works of the town of Portsmouth and likewise to fortify it on Gosport side and to secure it from any foreign attempts or invasions with new works and fortifications according to a draft made by the chief engineer and approved by the King, constituting them commissioners for the strengthening, raising and building the same, giving them full power to treat and conclude with and to pay all persons justly for all the ground taken in by the design of the said draft and to manage the said works and to contract for the progress and finishing thereof as they shall think fit or find themselves directed by the instructions of even date therewith and such others as shall be sent to them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, f. 57.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Instructions to the above Commissioners. 1. You shall with all expedition and diligence see that the fortifications of the town be repaired and made according to a draft presented by Sir Bernard de Gomme, the chief engineer, and further apply yourselves to raising a new fortification and other works at Gosport according to another draft made by the said Sir Bernard, both which drafts the King has approved of.
2. You shall divide the earthwork of the new fortification at Gosport into as many equal portions as there are or shall be companies in Portsmouth during the carrying on of those works, delivering to each company their portion, which shall be agreed for by the great or by the shaft, that is 12 foot square and one foot deep, as may be most beneficial to the King's service, the officers of each company to oversee the work.
3. If any of the ground on which the said fortification is designed belongs to any particular person, you shall make it your first care to treat the best you can for our service and to agree for the purchase thereof, reserving to the King the approbation of the contract, fixing a day for payment out of the money designed for this work, that no room may be left for complaint or pretence of injury to any.
4. The money for the said work is to be consigned to the Treasurer of the Ordnance, who is to issue the same by way of imprest and on account to you according to the directions of the Master of the Ordnance and by bills of imprest signed by the principal officers thereof, and you are to issue the moneys received with the consent of any three or more of you on vouchers and receipts countersigned by the said chief engineer or his deputy, Capt. Arthur (sic ? Martin) Beckman, leaving you always a latitude to advance part on account, as the King's service or the necessity of the labourers shall require.
5. You shall employ an experienced and discreet person as a clerk to keep the accounts of the work, allowing him a reasonable salary.
6. In the whole prosecution of this fortification you shall principally observe the directions of the said Sir Bernard, and shall call to your assistance the said Capt. Beckman, who in Sir Bernard's absence is to be aiding you in the whole work.
7. You shall be very watchful that no officer or other person entrusted with this work shall make any advantage to himself by taking directly or indirectly any presents or profits from the undertakers, artificers, soldiers or labourers or deducting any of their pay.
8. One or more of you, as you shall agree among yourselves, shall daily attend and oversee the said work.
9. For this work several tools, materials, palisadoes and rails have been appointed to be sent you with all expedition, on the arrival whereof you shall immediately begin the work, securing yourselves on the breach or failure of any of them by bespeaking certain proportions in that town or the neighbourhood.
10. You are to give the King accounts of your proceedings and progress by the Master General of the Ordnance, from whom you shall receive further directions on all emergencies. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 58.]
Drafts of the last two documents. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, Nos. 155, 156.]
Jan. 29. Warrant for a grant to Thomas Neale during his life of the office of Groom Porter and of the oversight of all common billiard tables, bowling alleys, dicing houses, gaming houses and common tennis courts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40A, f. 225.]
Jan. 29. Notes by Williamson about Jersey. A troop of horse to be made up of 4 men out of each troop of Lord Oxford's regiment and new men to be raised to make it up to 60. Lord Oxford's troops to be immediately filled to 60 apiece.
Foot.—Three other companies (Sir Bourchier Wray's, Capt. Morgan's and Capt. Harris' of the Duke's regiment) to be forthwith sent from Plymouth and orders from here for the shipping.
Ammunition to be forthwith furnished by the Ordnance Office to Jersey from Portsmouth and a vessel to be hired at Southampton—60 rounds, 1,000 good arms, match, hand grenadoes proportionable, tools &c. 100 French tents to be furnished forthwith.
Beckman to have orders to attend his Majesty, as soon as he arrives at Portsmouth and Sir B. de Gomme to go down forthwith to the works at Portsmouth. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 83.]
Jan. 30. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons on that day which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 428. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 157.]
Jan. 30.
Harwich.
William Shaw to Williamson. Last Saturday I arrived here, just as the post was parted for London, and about 11 the same night was called to go on board the packet-boat, so I did not think to disturb you till I was the other side of the water. The wind was then but small at N.E. and continued so till Monday noon. In the afternoon it freshened, and, the sea running very high, we bore up to windward all that night, but on Tuesday morning it was so very stormy and our vessel so very leaky, that the master thought it best to bear away before the wind for this again, where we arrived last night between 6 and 7, after being above 50 hours at sea. Indeed the boat took in so much water by her leaks besides what came over us, that we were obliged to pump near 2 hours in 3 all the night, and I believe the seamen apprehended themselves in some danger. We think to go to sea again this evening. I hope we shall have better luck and that your next news of me will be that I am come safe with my charge to the Hague. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Jan. 30.
Deal
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon at the eastward side of the Goodwin sailed westward about 100 Dutch merchant ships for Setubal, Malaga and the Straits and with them 30 men-of-war.
The last letters our and the Dover merchants receive from Calais, Ostend and those parts speak as if our sovereign had made up the general peace, but our news from Whitehall speaks otherwise. Not a topsail gale at S. and E. The country people near speak much of the sudden deaths of their horses. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the King that, by the report of the Bishop of Winchester, he finds that Matthew Curtois has been deprived of his fellowship in Corpus Christi College, Oxford, by proceedings not agreeable to the statutes thereof, and that irregularities have been committed which, if connived at, may tend to the violation of the discipline of the College; that therefore the bishop, as Visitor, is to determine the matter according to reason, justice and the statutes of the College; this declaration to be entered in the register book of the College as a direction in the like cases in future. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 208.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower, to release Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, committed for blasphemy and other misdemeanours, that he may take his place in Parliament, the House of Peers having requested his release on consideration that the proof against him was by a single witness together with his petition detesting the fact with which he is charged. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 204.]
[Jan. ?] William Hoare, his Majesty's chaplain, to the King. Petition for the rectory of Cowlsdon, Surrey, now in his Majesty's gift by the vacancy of the see of Canterbury. The petitioner served a cure in Southwark all the time of the late plague, yet never received a living. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 160.]
Jan. 31. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords on that day, which sufficiently appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 133. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Jan. 31. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons on that day, which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 429. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Jan. 31. Robert Dunbarr to Williamson. Reminding him of his promise to Sir Gilbert Talbot touching his letter to the Lord Mayor for obtaining the freedom of the City for Francis Walker, a shoemaker, by which the writer shall be discharged from his captivity. He is the more importunate, because he is at great charge daily in coming abroad for attendance and otherwise. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Jan. 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat that sailed hence on Saturday night last was by badness of weather and contrary winds forced back again on Tuesday night, but, the wind getting northerly, she sailed again early Wednesday morning. We have not yet heard of the packet-boat which carried Mr. Atterbury over yesterday sennight. The wind was yesterday N.N.W., and is to-day to the westward of N. and has brought with it cold frosty weather. I return my most humble thanks for the great news received last night. Last night sailed hence one of our packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Jan. 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Thanking him for his Majesty's speech. Every one that has seen it blessed God for his resolutions either for procuring a general peace by his request or commanding it by his sword. Pray send this to Mr. Thomas Williamson, if in town, and pay my service to Esquire Bridgeman. In the two former wars I was agent for prizes. I intend the end of next week to see London. It blows hard at N.E. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Jan. 31.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to Williamson. The 29th came into this road a small vessel of Guernsey, which went out with the Hampshire last Saturday. The master says that Sunday the frigate was in sight of Guernsey, but, the wind abating, she anchored to prevent falling to leeward with the tide, and, seeing this small vessel near the shore, they sent their longboat to tow her on board, but the tide, running too strong for their oars, drove the longboat away and this small vessel followed and took them up. The wind rising, they were forced to put back for the Isle of Wight, and brought the longboat's crew with them, but the boat was lost from their stern. The master thinks he saw the Hampshire off the Isle of Wight Monday and concludes she is put for Plymouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 166.]
Jan. 31.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Since my last we have continual stormy weather till to-day, the wind at E.N.E., very cold and full of snow. These three days past we have had the drums beating for volunteers to go for Plymouth garrison, there to receive further orders. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Jan. 31.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in 8 or 10 merchantmen from Bordeaux. They came out six days past, being about 60 or 70 sail. The rest, they suppose, are beating it up, the wind fresh at E. They made the more haste away because an express came to the Superintendent, which they thought might bring a stop for the ships, there being a general talk of war. Several other vessels are come in from Rochelle, Nantes and Croisic. Those from Rochelle say there is such a talk of war there that the grand party makes those English ships that take in salt on their account give bond in the value of the salt to make good the money to them, in case there should be a war, so that it is on the English account, if war. About three leagues off this they saw a vessel of about 40 or 50 tons with all her sails abroad and no man on board, but, the weather being so tempestuous, they would not venture on board. Last Tuesday came in a Dutch man-of-war of about 40 guns bound for Ireland to take in soldiers for that State's service. Wind fresh at E. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Jan. 31.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The wind is now N.E. and a hard frost. The Lancaster I formerly gave account of is now beneaped on the beach; they hope next spring tide to get her off, having landed part of her tobacco. A seaman come here from Milford reports he was on board a vessel of Wexford bound to Bristol with goods for the fair and was cast away near Milford. Five of the men were saved and two drowned with some passengers. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. John Tillotson, chaplain in ordinary to the King and Dean of Canterbury, of the prebend of Oxegate belonging to St. Paul's, and also of the residentiary's place in the same church, void by the promotion of Dr. William Sancroft to the archbishopric of Canterbury. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 109.]
The grant directed by the above warrant. [Latin S.P. Dom., Entry Book 72, p. 239.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of William Hoare, M.A., chaplain in ordinary to the King, to the rectory of Cullesdon, alias Coulsdon, Surrey, in the King's gift pro hac vice in consequence of the vacancy of the see of Canterbury. [Ibid. f. 110.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 170.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Thomas Morgan. I have received yours of the 18th, 20th, 21st, 24th and 25th, which have been all read to his Majesty, and am commanded to recommend you to continue to advertise us daily of whatever occurs of any kind in those parts and especially to fix as many good correspondents in your neighbour ports as is possible for love or money.
Orders are given for such supplies of all sorts to be immediately made you as the suddenness of the occasion can bear and more will follow according to the particulars your agent will be able to give you. As for your return hither his Majesty cannot think it safe for you to be away, till he has found out how fitly to supply your room in your absence in this uncertain and hazardous state of things. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 185.]
Jan. 31. Certificate by Thomas Taylor that amongst other lands Sir Theophilus Jones, who claims as a soldier, has claimed the manor, castle and lands of Lucan, containing 947 acres Irish plantation measure, valued at 300l. sterling per annum, and other lands all in the barony of Newcastle, co. Dublin, amounting in all to 1,295 acres 0 roods 16 perches, valued in all at 472l. 10s. sterling per annum, and that he also claimed in the lands of Clane 72 acres 1 rood 12 perches, valued at 15l. 5s. 10d.; Cappoge, 349 acres 3 roods 1 perch, valued at 69l. 19s.; Ballincappoge, 268 acres 2 roods, valued at 53l. 14s. 4d.; Betaghston, 191 acres 0 roods 35 perches, valued at 38l. 4s. 10d., all which lands lie in the barony of Clane, co. Kildare, and also 791 acres 2 roods 13 perches, valued at 197l. 17s. in the barony of Naas, co. Kildare, and also Allonswood, 98 acres, valued at 24l. 10s., in the barony of Salt, co. Kildare, amounting to 1,775 acres 1 rood 21 perches, valued at 399l. 11s. sterling. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 338, No. 138.]
Jan. 31. Thomas Cox to the reverend father Manus O'Quin. John Duffy, who is in Cavan prison, presses to get out and will give security to bring in the man you know alive or dead and assures that some friend in the Fews will assist him therein, but I hope the man you know will prevent all this danger by performing what he gave me under his hand, that he would depart about the 14th. Here he shall be secure and Sir John will bring him in his coach and I am assured he shall not long stay out of his native soil and that none will be molested on his account after his departure. The assurance he gave me at Jane McKenna's house is in the great man's hands and it will avail him and his wife and children all their lives, but, if he should not perform his word, it would be to his and their eternal ruin. Let her come up four or five days before him and he may stay here, when he will come, for some days with as much assurance as in any place in Europe. He will be well relieved in London and here, and I am sure I will be shortly freed from the obligation I gave her of 10l. per annum. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Jan. Charles Davenant to Williamson. I must pay my humble thanks and acknowledgements for those kind things you said of me to Sir Leoline Walden, but this is not my first experience of your goodness. That kind character you gave of me has done much to the settling me in the liking of him, whose only daughter I am to marry and whose utmost ambition is to see me in some post of business, that has made him willing I should lay out part of what I am to have in some employment, but according to your usual goodness you think I need not do that, since I may expect something from the King and from my friends at Court. But I must confess I had rather give a sum to some person in whose way it may lie to help me forward. He that accepts it would oblige me extremely and may be certain of my silence. I have 500l. ready to lay at anyone's feet, by whose interest I may get into some employment convenient for me. In the meantime I shall follow your counsel. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 400, No. 171.]
[Jan. ?] Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley for delivery to such officers as shall be appointed by the respective colonels of the regiments to which new companies are added, viz., eight companies to the Coldstream regiment, eight to the Duke of York's regiment and nine to the Holland regiment, according to the proportions following, viz.:—
Partizans. Halberts. Drums with sticks to each. Muskets Pikes. Collars and Bandoliers
For arming the 8 companies of the Coldstream regiment 8 24 16 550 274 550
For arming the 8 companies of the Duke's regiment 8 24 16 550 274 550
For the 9 companies of the Holland regiment 9 27 18 618 309 618
In all 25 75 50 1,718 857 1,718
(See ante, p. 572.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 40.]
[Jan. ?] Warrant to Col. Sir Charles Lyttleton for quartering the 8 new companies to be added to the Duke of York's regiment under his command in the city of Canterbury and liberties thereof. [Ibid. p. 41.]
[Jan. ?] Warrant to the Commissaries General of the Musters, after reciting that there is but one commissioned officer with Capt. Langley's company of the regiment of Foot Guards now at Portsmouth, by reason whereof they cannot close the musterrolls for want of another commissioned officer's hand to them, for taking, until there be together two commissioned officers with the said company, the subscription of the officer commanding in chief at Portsmouth together with the subscription of the commissioned officer now present with them. [Ibid.]
[Jan. ?] Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley for delivery to Captain— 33 carabines with 33 backs, breasts and pots for the arming of 33 new raised troopers of his troop of horse. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 42.]
Jan.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 400. Number. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
172 Jan. 1 4 10 4 W.
173 " 2 5 11 0 W.
174 " 3 5 W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
175 " 4 6 11 0 W.
176 " 5 6 0 S.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
177 " 6 6 11 0 S.
178 " 7 6 0 S.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
179 " 8 6 13 0 S.
180 " 9 6 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
181 " 11 6 15 0 N.
182 " 12 6 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
183 " 13 4 23 0
184 " 14 5 0 N.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
185 " 15 5 25 0 N.W.
186 " 16 5 0 S.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
187 " 17 6 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
188 " 18 6 29 0 S.
189 " 19 6 0 S. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
190 " 20 6 35 0 S.W.
191 " 21 6 0 S.W. The same ships outward-bound as yesterday.
192 " 23 5 0 N.E. The fleet outward-bound are all under sail.
193 " 25 8 0 0 S.E.
194 " 26 8 0 0 S.E.
195 " 27 7 0 0 S.
196 " 28 6 0 0 S.
197 " 29 5 0 1 E. This day passed without the Sands 70 ships outward, but we know not what they were.
198 " 31 6 1 0 N.E.