BHO

Charles II: April 1670

Pages 144-193

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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April 1670

April 1.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Trial of Bristol from York River, Virginia, has been forced in by foul weather, having lost her anchors on the coast of Ireland. Lord Broghill sailed for Ireland last week. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 101.]
April 1.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Williamson. The Golden Wheatsheaf of London, from Virginia with tobacco, and the Providence of Plymouth, from the Canaries, have come in; the Holmes and Hampshire also arrived, and have sailed again with 7 ships named, bound for the Straits, Tangiers, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 102.]
April 1.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A Deal pilot from Holland says that there are 12 men-of-war at Amsterdam, ready for the Straits, which are designed against the pirates of Barbary; and that they talk much in Flanders of recruiting for Spain, which is requisite, the soldiers being very poor, feeble, and old. Mr. Clarke is in the Downs, bound for New England. [Ibid. No. 103.]
April 1. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. The Guernsey, Forester, and Fountain will sail with the next tide, having all their stores aboard, and having been detained by contrary winds. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 132.]
April 1.
Woolwich.
W. B[odham] to Thos. Hayter. I received the Board's order for repair of the hemp-loft over the tar-house, but the 10,000 tiles and the 40 bundles of lath demanded are not mentioned in it. Where am I to procure them ? I can get nails from the dock, and lime hereabouts. [Ibid. No. 133.]
April 2.
The Advice, Spithead.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I am under sail for the Downs, having all the soldiers and 140 men on board. None of the pressed watermen have arrived. [Ibid. No. 134.]
April 2.
Emsworth sloop.
Capt. Walter Perry to [the Navy Commissioners]. I received his Royal Highness's order, which I will observe; but it does not say from what ships I am to press. Am I to press out of those outward, as well as homeward bound ? [Ibid. No. 135.]
April 2.
Portsmouth.
Contract by Peter Hasler with Capt. Abr. Ansley, for 10 dozen ash oars from 15 to 21 feet long, at 16s. 8d. for every 100 feet. [Ibid. No. 136.]
April 2. Grant to Wm. Poley, in reversion after Thos. Sparkes and Wm. Longueville, of the office of chirographer to the Court of Common Pleas. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 18.]
April. Docquet of the above, dated 14 April. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 167.]
April 2. The King to the Provost and Fellows of Eton. We grant a dispensation to Henry Bold to hold, with the fellowship in your college to which you have elected him, the dignity of prebendary and canon residentiary in Exeter Cathedral, which he now holds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 2.]
April 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. There is scarcely any news to send; 3 or 4 ships are here bound for Norway. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 104.]
April 2.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. No news; I have received a letter from Mr. Ellis. [Ibid. No. 105.]
April 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Advice sailed for the Downs; 3 Turkish men-of-war are plying about Scilly and the Land's End, causing great alarm, as several vessels are expected. The Swallow and Kent have gone to Spithead, as convoys for Newfoundland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 106.]
April 3.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Williamson. The Edward and Mary of Dover for the Canaries, the John and Frances of Hampton for Madeira and New England, and the Ruth of Plymouth from Bayonne, with wine and brandy, have arrived. [Ibid. No. 107.]
April 3. The King to the Treasury Commissioners. On 9 May 1668, Sir Rob. Southwell, our Envoy to Portugal, had a privy seal for allowance of 3l. a day during his employment (which has been longer than first intended), with his intelligence expenses, &c., and 243l. was to be paid him in advance; but afterwards we allowed him 4l. a day, and 300l. for equipage, which from 31 March 1668 to 15 Aug. 1669 comes to 2,308l.; and whereas he has paid 165l. in Portugal gold, and spent 1,362l., and 159l. for intelligence, &c., total 3,994l., towards which he has received 861l., the balance, 3,133l., is to be paid him, deducting 647l. and 479l. 10s. 1d., paid in Portugal, as part of the Queen's portion. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 108.] Annexing,
Sir Rob. Southwell's debtor and creditor account, with the interest due to him for borrowing money to supply his allowance of 4l. a day, and 300l. equipage, according to the establishment, from 1 April 1668 to 1 April 1670, total 2,437l., of which, in 1669, 1,576l. was the balance due to him. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 108i.]
April 4. Caveat in favour of Sir Thos. Sandys, that nothing pass of [the estate of] John Falconer of King's Clere, co. Berks (sic). [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
April 4. Warrant to give allowance to Sir Thos. Bond, Bart., controller of the household of the late Queen Mother, of several sums of money amounting to 570l. 3s. 6d., paid by him during her life, for her service. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 159.]
April 4.
Advice, Downs.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. We sailed from Spithead on the 2nd, and arrived this morning in the Downs, where I hope to furnish myself with some good men, having many on board that must be changed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 137.]
April 4.
Tower.
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. I took Lord Arlington a treasonable paper in prose and verse, which was printed and scattered abroad, but know not whether you have heard of it. Yesterday being Sacrament Sunday, I could not go to Whitehall, and have to attend the Lord Mayor to-day at Spittle[fields], and take care that good order is kept these holidays, of which—as you may see by the paper sent to one of the Lord Mayor's servants—there is need. Pray mind the commission for the City Militia and your promise of seeing us these holidays. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 109.] Annexing,
John Hawkes to Mr. Kettle. Coming through Finsbury Fields last night, after visiting a sick patient, I was like to have been murdered by a company of about 14 young men, who came out of an alley in the higher fields where, as I understood, some murder had been committed, and laying hands on me, they swore that they would kill me, and that on Monday next they would assemble the rest of the apprentices, with swords and lances, and raze the brothel house where the murder was committed, as also one house opposite, occupied by Mrs. Cresswell or Treswell. After receiving several blows and threats, I was preserved by the appearance of other persons, when the villains fled. I thought it good to make the Lord Mayor acquainted, that the public peace may be preserved.—3 April 1670. [Ibid. No. 109i.]
April 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. There have 60 or 70 sail passed here for the Thames. Several passengers have arrived in the packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 110.]
April 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. I have no news to send. [Ibid. No. 111.]
April 5. The King to the Master and Fellows of Emanuel College, Cambridge. We recommend Edmund Coates, B.A., of Christ's College, to one of your fellowships now vacant, for which he is duly qualified, and we dispense with any local statutes that may prejudice him by reason of his county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 155.]
[April 5.] Petition of Marion Lidgold to the King, for a letter to the Governors of the Charterhouse to admit her son into the first vacancy— her father and brother, Henry Hall, were both divines, the latter chaplain to the Duke of Ormond, and made Bishop of Killala and Achonry in Ireland, but soon after died. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 112.]
April 5. Letter to the Charterhouse for admission of Charles Lidgold on Mr. Treasurer's recommendation. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 47.]
April 5.
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I sent my agent an order for victualling the Monmouth yacht at Dublin, which would have been sooner attended to, had he not been to Limerick on extraordinary business. I must remind you that the victuals provided last year lie perishing at Kinsale; I hope some speedy course will be taken therein. Noted that the Kinsale business is to be laid before the Duke. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 138.]
April 6.
Woolwich.
W. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. Shall I repair the rigging, &c., of the Violet hulk, and supply her with new sheers, having mended her hull ? I have found the anchor near the wrecks, and have fitted the buoy, and laid it there again. We are in great want of water for the yard, having to fetch all we require from the river; this is a great hindrance, and the pumps and pipes are all decayed, which will be dangerous if another fire breaks out. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 139.]
April 6.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. We want a supply of tar, there being only 19 barrels in store, which will be spent in 14 days. [Ibid. No. 140.]
April 6.
Emsworth sloop, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. I pressed 18 single men, who are the best for a Newfoundland voyage, for the Eaglet ketch, and know not how to accommodate any more from our smallness. I wish the Eaglet was here to receive them before they study mischief. I have but little employment for them, and if rain comes on, I cannot stow them and their clothes away. They will also slacken my provisions, as I had only sufficient for 14 men for 28 days on Saturday last. I hope I may have a speedy supply. [Ibid. No. 141.]
April 6.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Three Virginian ships report that colony in a flourishing condition. The Advice and several other ships have sailed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 113.]
April 6.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Lord Ailesbury, and his lady and son, have sailed for Calais, in his Royal Highness's yacht, the Ann. The Merlin is waiting for the Countess of Lauderdale. Two ships with tobacco from Virginia have passed for London. Are the King and his Highness coming to Dover this month or next ? There is a report that they are. [Ibid. No. 114.]
April 6. John Lerie to Lord Arlington. Pray deliver a letter enclosed to the King as soon as may be, as it is of importance. [Ibid. No. 115. See p. 151, infra.]
April 6.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Sir George Aiscue has arrived from Ireland, and is setting forward for London. His Majesty's pleasure boats the Mary and Monmouth have come in, to transport his Excellency Lord Berkeley to Dublin. [Ibid. No. 116.]
April 6.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Judith and Francis of Lyme have arrived from Morlaix, and continue the news of the three Turkish men-of-war coming into the soundings. It is since reported that they are come into the Channel, with some English vessels taken by them, which causes apprehensions for those homeward bound from Virginia; but the going out of some ships fitting for that purpose will put an end to those fears. [Ibid. No. 117.]
April 6.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. Pray use your influence in obtaining the deanery of Bangor for my kinsman, Mr. Asheton; I cannot but imagine it will be soon vacant, the present dean being 88, Mr. Asheton might procure the King's promise himself, being known to his Majesty from a serviceable tract which he penned. [Ibid. No. 118. Griffith Williams held the deanery till Feb. 1672.]
April 6. List of 28 persons committed to the Gatehouse, Newgate, &c., since the last general quarter sessions, distinguishing those bailed and those now in custody; with particulars of each offence, and names of the committing justices. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 119.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir Thos. Grosveneur, Bart., of Eaton Boat, Cheshire, with John Edesbury and — Gaillard, to travel beyond seas for his education and experience, and remain as long as convenient for these ends. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 154.]
April 7.
Portsmouth.]
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Swallow and Kent will sail for the Downs with the next fair wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 121.]
April 7.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Please to send Mr. Mayors to Capt. John Shorter and Mr. Dyson's yards, and to another near Mr. Smith's sawing mill, to view and agree for some timber seen by me, which is required for the works on the London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 142.]
April 7.
The Fanfan, Dover.
Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. I have been cruising for several weeks on the English and French coasts, but having only 6 days' provisions, I have put into the Downs, and desire an order to the victualler for supply. [Ibid. No. 143.]
April 7.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. I desire a warrant for entering 25 or 30 riggers for the hulk and the London, all things being ready for masting and rigging them. [Ibid. No. 144.]
April 7. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Asks a warrant to Woolwich for receiving 28 loads of elm timber, purchased of George Westarbe for the new ship. [Ibid. No. 145.]
April 7. Thos. Kent to the Navy Commissioners. I can testify that in April or May 1668, Capt. Ridley was commander of the old Providence fireship, and that while in the Downs, he embezzled one of the anchors and a new hawser, and sold them to the master of a ketch there; the Providence was lost in Tangiers Road, and if the anchor and hawser had not been sold, they might have saved the ship. [Ibid. No. 146.]
April 8.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Excuse my not writing on my return home, on account of illness. I inquired concerning the men who deserted the service, but cannot find the ringleader, they all excusing themselves; many are very perverse and stubborn, especially our shipwrights in ordinary, who having his Royal Highness's warrants, assume a privilege to walk about in idleness, with their rules in their hands. The master shipwright has complained of several of them, of whom Thos. Wiggens, carpenter of the Old James, is one. I have suspended him and his servant, and there are two or three others, great disturbers of the yard. The two in prison have offered bail, but I will not accept it unless ordered. I am much troubled at the great charge for wages his Majesty will be at in the repair of the Newcastle, by this great neglect and idleness, and hope his Royal Highness will be made acquainted with it.
I want instructions as to purchasing 20 trees of Sir Roger Twysden, and as to allowing the pressed calkers time on Fridays to go to market, which they say was promised them. I beg that Howting, the porter, may be allowed, as before, 6d. a day for doing watchman's duty while the men are off work, and for seeing that the watch is set. The officers here have altered the watch as directed, which is much disliked in regard of the tediousness of the long winter nights.
I have ordered Mr. Gregory to get the quarterly books ready, so as to pacify the people who are in expectation of their pay. I must have timber, or some of the men will have to be discharged for want of work. The single dock is finished, and if ordered, I will dock the Greenwich for calking; she will be ready to launch in a month or six weeks, by which time the Newcastle will be ready to go in to complete her work. The Little Lion and Francis fireships are fitted and gone to their former station, and I hope their companies will be paid at the next pay that comes to the yard, they having nearly two years' due. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 147.] Enclosing,
Contract with Edw. Hills for 50,000 bricks at 15s. a 1,000, ready money.—23 March 1670. [Ibid. No. 147i.]
Contract with Thos. Chambers, of Burrome [Burham ?], Kent, for 15,000 reed at 16s. a 1,000, ready money.—26 March 1670. [Ibid. No. 147ii.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. I desire you to hasten down the butter and cheese for the Kent and Swallow, they being ordered to the Downs, and their commander having complained of the want thereof. [Ibid. No. 148.]
April 8.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Shorter will let the purveyor have what timber he likes to pick, for the works on the London, at the same price as his last contract. I cannot find the merchant who owns the standards, but am assured they may be bought at a reasonable price. The carver having but two or three men at work, the carved work will not be cut in twelve months unless you hasten him. [Ibid. No. 149.]
April ? Petition of Peter Prideaux, student of Exeter College, Oxford, to the King. Being recommended by his Majesty to the Warden, &c., of All Souls college for a fellowship, void by death of Fras. Talbot, the Warden entered his name on the buttery book, which is a sort of admittance; but when he demanded a more formal one, a chapter was called, and the Fellows unanimously refused obedience, and have sent up Dr. Millington, put into the society by the usurped powers, to justify their disobedience. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 122.]
April 8. The King to the Warden and Fellows of All Souls College, Oxford. We are surprised that our letters in favour of Peter Prideaux are disputed, but hope the Warden will do all he can to favour his admission; the Fellows having presented a petition against his admission, we can allow no such contempt of our authority, have rejected the petition, and are much offended at their undutiful proceeding, especially of those who, having violently intruded into the places of honest and loyal persons during the late usurpation forget how little right they have to oppose our letters. We require you forthwith to admit him to the fellowship, on taking the usual oath. The Warden is to return a speedy account of your compliance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 48.]
[April 8.] Draft of the above [by Williamson], much corrected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 123.]
April ? Petition of the Warden and Fellows of All Souls College, Oxford, to the King, to withdraw his letter mandatory, commanding the election of Peter Prideaux, of Exeter College, to the fellowship void by death of Fras. Talbot. He is incapable by their statutes, being but of 2 years' standing, instead of 3; they cannot elect except on All Souls day, and, if elected, he would have to remain a probationer for a year, having only diet and lodging. They are pressed between the duty of obedience, and their oaths not to violate their statutes. [Ibid. No. 124.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the sheriff of Kent to stay the execution of William Cox, should he be convicted of felony, a free pardon having been granted to him on the intercession of the Duke of York. [Ibid. No. 125.]
April 8. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 19.]
April 8. Minute of the said grant. [Ibid.]
April 8. John Lerie to the King. A great and important business now lies before your Majesty, being a law prepared to impose severely upon a great part of your people, in matters relating to the worship of God, which I take to be harsh, most incongruous to Christian charity, and foreign to your disposition and clemency. I hold that whatever God demands, it is the foundation for obedience, and what not, is not to be imposed.
The bishops and their party are eager to impose by law, under a heavy penalty, against the peaceable assembling of Christian people to serve God as commanded, the main argument being that plots and sedition have their rise therefrom. It is a thing utterly impossible, and beyond all precedent, that such open and public assemblies should be a place for setting such wickedness on foot, whereas taverns, coffee houses, bowling greens, Tunbridge waters, horse races, fairs, markets, or private chambers, are the places where men may more conveniently resort to transact such matters. Neither the horrid massacre at Paris, nor the hellish design of the Gunpowder Plot, was prevented by such restraint, or needed the umbrage of a conventicle to hatch their wickedness in.
It has been urged that [Thos.] Venner's prodigious adventures arose from such meetings, whereas his meetings were held privately by a select company, with doors locked, and their principles pointed against all magistracy and magistrates, and not only against your Majesty's government, but also those that preceded; had this meeting been held publicly and free, they could not have done such things undiscovered, nor adventured upon it. Those against whom this severe law is edged have disclaimed Venner's wicked acts, and not one soul was found to abet it, nor can it be reasonably said to affect the Nonconformists—who disowned the persons, principles, and practices—any more than [John Atherton] the Bishop of Waterford's actings, who was hanged for most notorious and abominable crimes, affect the order of Episcopacy; or the massacre at Paris, the barbarous murder of many thousands of innocent Protestants in Ireland, or the devilish design of the Gunpowder Plot in England, affect the whole body of Papists, many of whom abhorred them.
Pray consider what a strange rigour it is to force and violate men's consciences in the worship of God, when they are commanded thus to assemble together. I hope your Majesty will not forget your former declarations that you were against persecution for conscience' sake. The Bishops are the principal authors in the matter, and they stretch beyond the compass of the apostle Paul, who told the Corinthians that he had no dominion over their faith. What evil effects has your past clemency produced ? Let not the sufferings of thousands of persecuted Christians be the price of a pecuniary compact.
I think that those persons who make such noise in forming these coercive laws are those that have the least sense of religious duties, and are of debauched practices. Will the wealth and honour of the nation, the rents of land, or the customs' duties, be increased thereby, or sobriety, piety, and the peace of the people, be established ? The Turks have a more tender sense and respect for those Christians who live among them, and suffer no one to interrupt or infringe on their liberty in their worship; I trust that we shall not be less compassionate, or more unreasonable, than those deluded Mahometans, and that we shall not resort to the old paganish and antiChristian mode, of forcing men to religious ways of worship, as men drive sheep into Smithfield, or destroying them because they will not be so driven.
If your Majesty is drawn into this business, you will find your hand in the wrong box, as there is more than religion in it. I hope it is not some foreign intrigue, intermixed with some sinister designs at home, to put your affairs into such a posture as that they may the more easily accomplish their own ends. If my argument should fail of convincing and deterring your Majesty, consider whether the body of Nonconformists, together with those who will pity and sympathize with them, are so contemptible, either for number or quality, as that you should repress them in this manner, and thus divest yourself of their good will which will not be regained.
Consider whether it is not a strange time to pursue such counsels, when France is so formidable, his naval strength beyond compare, and still increasing, and his merchants and trade encour aged to the highest. When the Algerines are braving us nigh our own Channel, and wasting our trade at home and abroad, and no ships of your Majesty's to countenance our seas at home, nor sufficient to suppress an enemy, though but piratical, abroad. When the commerce of the nation is notoriously sunk, lands fallen in value, rents unpaid, the city labouring under the weight of its rebuilding, and a general decay and consumption of men's estates. God direct you to use such counsels as may be to his glory. [3½ pages folio, closely written. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 126.]
April 9. Summary of Chancery proceedings on an appeal [made from a Chancery decision to the Lords], John Morris and Rob. Clayton being plaintiffs, and Thos. Dove, executor of John Dove, defendant, relative to a claim on the property of John Prettyman and Sir John Prettyman, his son. Two decrees having been given in favour of the plaintiffs, the defendants appealed to the Lords, praying that they would rehear upon the proofs, and reverse the decree, or direct the Lord Keeper to do so.
With order that the case be heard at the Bar of the House of Lords, on the same proofs and evidence as taken in Chancery, when the decree of 26 Jan. 1664 was made. [Ibid. No. 127. See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., pp. 315, 378.]
April 9. Receipt of Con Magenis for 36l., for three years' wages from Viscount Conway. [Ibid. No. 128.]
April 9. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London, not to deliver Alex. Bining to be transported, but to suffer him to have his liberty, on condition that in 14 days he depart for Scotland, never to return. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 19.]
[April 9.] John Musson to Lord Arlington. I am undone for resisting sedition and treason in the worst of times; the admission to my place was long delayed by the enemies of God and the King, but I hope the Lords of Council will mingle charity with equity. I have served 30 years without reward, 20 being before the King's restoration, and, besides my pains, charges, and losses by sea and land, and imprisonment twice, I have from time to time been overwhelmed with perplexity, for the miserable disturbance of my King and country. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 129.]
April 9.
Emsworth sloop, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. The Eaglet ketch has left with the 16 men I pressed for her. There were 18, but 2 being great adventurers in the Virginia trade, and being in danger of losing what they had, I gave them liberty to go, upon promise to return. I have given Capt. Pearce a list, and should have furnished the men with tickets, but had none, so I promised to write to you as to the date of their entry. Noted that the Board agreed to allow the men from the day they were pressed on board the ship to which the Eaglet shall deliver them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 150.]
April 10.
Spy, Dover.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I am waiting for orders, and have only 10 days' provisions on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 151.]
April 10. The King to the Duke of York. James Pearse, surgeon-general of the fleet in the time of the late Dutch war, had 130l. a year for his services. Since the retrenchment of this, the Navy Commissioners have often had occasion for his attendance in time of peace, and they think 100l. a year should be allowed him. We request an order for payment of the said sum from the Navy Treasury, as long as his attendance as Navy surgeon is required. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 49.]
April 10.
Whitehall.
Privy seal for 20 tuns of French and Spanish wines, custom free, to Dr. Gasper d'Abrin, Envoy Extraordinary from the Prince of Portugal, provided this be not made a precedent, contrary to the Act of Council, but considered an allowance for the past, as granted to the French and Venetian Ambassadors who arrived about the same time. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 19.]
April 10. Pass for 60 horses for Lord Berkeley, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Minute. [Ibid.]
[April 10.] Warrant for a grant to Rob. Eddowes, on surrender of Nath. Smith, of the office of writer for the Great Seal of all presentations to advowsons, and other spiritual promotions, except archbishoprics and bishoprics. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 130.]
April 10. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 19.]
April. Docquet of the above, dated 30 April. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 171.]
April 10. Warrant for a licence for Robert, Earl of Leicester, to build on Leicester Field and the bowling green adjoining, on plots described, 320 feet from north to south, and 300 from east to west, near the garden of Leicester House, and the dwellings of Sir Phil. Howard, Sir Hen. Oxenden, and Rich. Rider. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 20.]
April 10. Presentation of John Rocke to the rectory of Tenby, co. Pembroke, void by resignation of the last incumbent. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 3.]
April. Docquet of the above, dated 13 April. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 165.]
April 10. Grant to Chris. Raughley of pardon for killing John Smith. [Ibid. No. 162.]
April 10. Grant to Peter Prideaux to be a Commissioner of Appeals concerning the revenue of excise, in place of Robt. Scawen, deceased; fee, 200l. a year, to be paid by the Farmers of Excise of London. [Ibid. No. 163.]
April 10.
The Revenge, Cadiz Bay.
Sir Edw. Spragg to Williamson. Thanks for written and printed extracts received at Lisbon and Cadiz. I have been reduced to great straits from the non-arrival of the victualler, Sir Thos. Allin only giving me 100 pistoles at parting, to defray all charges for myself and the squadron. If it had not been for my credit, which was stronger than my purse, it would have gone hard with us. I recruited out of my own pocket as long as my money lasted, and then took to bills of my own. I hope they will be met, and thus preserve my credit among the merchants here, who will not hear of a bill on the Navy Treasurers, though the consideration be ever so great.
I was treated most unkindly at Lisbon, but have pretty well humbled them. On my arrival there 7 Dec., the chief minister, Condé Di Torre, sent Consul Maynard with a message to me to take in my flag. Being surprised at the request, I answered that if the King of England ordered it I would willingly obey, but if the Prince of Portugal would have it in, it should only be by force of arms; upon which they immediately put up their flag on board one of their frigates, which had neither men nor guns. Not being certain what might happen, most of my guns being out and the rest of the squadron having theirs in, I gave orders to them to keep them in until I better understood the Portuguese meaning, being resolved, if they had offered an affront, to have made them remove their lodging. But the Condé, with an excuse as weak as his brains, sent word by the English Consul that they knew not whether I had a commission to wear my flag; so taking no further notice of their ignorance, I proceeded to clean my ships, which was accomplished with much difficulty, the weather being so bad and violent.
I sent the Warwick and Dragon on 27 Dec. to convoy some ships bound for England, and on their return on 14 Jan., I went with my ketch and the Garland into a bay 4 miles off, to careen, during which I was often perplexed with the news of one or other of our men being killed or wounded at Lisbon, or drawn away and suborned by great promises to serve on board their ships bound for the Indies, which were then fitting. On my return to Lisbon, I had another message to forbear setting the watch by firing a gun, which I took no notice of, till at last the Queen sent, desiring that if I would not desist for the Prince's sake, I would for a lady's, as it frightened her in the morning. This I complied with, as it went against my conscience to frighten a lady in bed, especially a Queen. I received another message from the English Consul to salute their Admiral, which I agreed to do if they would answer gun for gun, but they refused, and desired I would also lower my flag; to this I consented if they would do the same, but as they denied it, I told the Consul to forbear bringing such frivolous messages for the future.
After being detained for some time in the Bay of Wares by contrary winds, I put to sea with 10 or 12 sail of merchantmen, homeward bound, which I saw part of the way, and then put into Lisbon again to re-victual, when I found their ships ready to sail for India, and thought it high time to demand the men they had enticed away; so I sent the Consul and others to the Chief Secretary with a memorial, stating that I had often given them warning that this proceeding disabled the King's ships by taking their men, and that it was a high affront to his Majesty to do so, and demanded their re-delivery. Thereupon they requested a list of the men and a return of the money received by them. I sent the former, and told them to look to their own people, who enticed the men, for the latter; in fine, I sent them such an answer that an immediate order was issued by the Prince to the commanders of the ships, to deliver up all English on pain of death, which they accordingly did, and their Great Minister and Chief Secretary sent me word that they were sorry for what had passed, and hoped a better understanding for the future; also that as their Viceroy was going away, and there were 22 sail of Turks in the Straits, the Prince would take it kindly if I would see them on their way. Having obtained my desires, and finding them begin to be civil, I stood off to sea with their Viceroy, and afterwards went into Cadiz to see what merchant ships were waiting a convoy home; but finding that RearAdmiral Kempthorne had gone with them, and hearing that Turks were upon the coast, I have again put to sea till my victuals are expended. I will then look after my victualler.
The Spanish galleons are expected. There are 4 Dutch men-ofwar plying about, who are very free and civil in their salutes. Before I left Lisbon, 4 French men-of-war came in there; also the Sherrantfireship of 60 guns, commanded by Count De Trea[d'Estrees], their Vice-Admiral. The castles answered them gun for gun, which they refused me, but the Hercule going up to haul ashore, saluted the Admiral of Portugal with 7 guns, which was answered but with one, which very much startled and troubled the Vice-Admiral. One of their captains came on board to see me, and said that as salutes gave rise to such differences, he was glad that both our masters had agreed that neither should salute wherever they met; to this I replied as modestly as I could—seeing the gentleman had come to me so kindly on board my own ship—that I supposed they would not dispute that with us in our own seas, and so broke off; but I can assure you that their orders are to all places generally without exception.
After those at Lisbon understood that I took exceptions at their castles answering the French gun for gun and denying it to me, I was told that the Governor had no such order, and that if I pleased he should be turned out of his place for so doing. I was unwilling to adhere to that, as the man would have been undone; notwithstanding I would have undone myself to ruin them, rather than they should have carried away my men, or acted anything that might abate my royal master's honour. Pray hint in your next how it would have been resented at Court if any such thing had happened, I having no express orders for it. Pray direct your letters to Cadiz. [4¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 131.]
April 10. Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Swallow sailed for the Downs; the Kent still remains at Spithead, ready for sailing. [Ibid. No. 132.]
April 11.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. The Countess of Lauderdale has gone for Calais in the Merlin yacht, and the Fanfan, the Spy frigate, and a vessel from Bordeaux with wine, have come in. A vessel from Paris reports that the Turks have taken some vessels with salt belonging to Dartmouth, bound for Newfoundland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 133.]
April 11.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Dauphin of Dunkirk has arrived from Martinique, with sugar and elephants' teeth. She has been trading on the coast of Guinea for 20 months, and is esteemed to be very rich, having much gold on board. She reports that the French have the greatest sway in the Caribbee Islands, and that they make prize of the Dutch that trade there. The skipper of one of the ships taken has come home a passenger in this vessel. We do not know of the Turks being upon the coast, or of their having captured any vessels. [Ibid. No. 134.]
April 11.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Rose from Rotterdam reports that the States have ordered 20 ships for the Straits, which were all ready at her coming away, to proceed against the Turks. She came out with a vessel of 40 guns bound for Holland, which was built at Rotterdam, and great skill was used to make her as fast a sailer as the Turks. All is quiet with the Bishop of Munster, and there are no apprehensions at present of the French. [Ibid. No. 135.]
April 11.
Burningham.
Thos. Raymond to Williamson. I hope you have received the MS. notes sent through Mr. Martyn, whom I saw at Thetford, to which place I never go but I hear of your fame. I want your assistance on behalf of my eldest son who, having lost the use of a leg, is unfit for any but sedentary employment. He excels in writing, and is a good grammarian. [Ibid. No. 136.]
April 11.
London.
Speech of Sir Edw. Turner, Speaker to the House of Commons, to the King, upon the adjournment of the Parliament; with his Majesty's reply, expressing thanks for the progress made towards the union between the kingdoms, and also for the supply voted, which he will make to go as far as he can towards satisfying his debts; also adjourning Parliament to 24 Oct. next. [9 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 137. Also printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., pp. 349–351.]
[April 11.] Act for advancing the sale of fee-farm rents and other rents, with instructions to be observed in their sale. [Printed. 17 pages.] Also,
[April 11.] Act to enable the King's Majesty to make leases, grants, and copies of offices, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, parcel of his Duchy of Cornwall, or annexed to the same. [Printed. 6 pages. Ibid. No. 138.]
[April 11.] Act for granting unto his Majesty an imposition upon all wines and vinegar imported between 24 June 1670 and 24 June 1678. [Printed. 13 pages.] Also,
[April 11.] Act for settling the imposition on brandy. [Printed. 3 pages.] Also,
[April 11.] Act for taking away the benefit of clergy from such as steal cloth from the rack, and from such as shall steal or embezzle his Majesty's ammunition and stores. [Printed. 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 139.]
[April 11.] Additional Act for rebuilding the city of London, uniting parishes, and rebuilding the cathedral and parochial churches. [70 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 139a. Also in Statutes of the Realm, Vol. V, pp. 665–682. See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 350, and p. 85, supra.]
[April 11.] Notes of proceedings in Parliament, 5 to 8 April. [Ibid. Nos. 140–142.]
April 11.
Ordnance Office.
Rich. March and Edw. Sherburne to the Navy Commissioners. We have ordered vessels to attend at Tower Wharf, to receive the hemp desired to be shipped off, and you may direct them to lay to as soon as you please. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 152.]
April 11.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. None of Sir Roger Twysden's timber having come in these 6 weeks, I have not any fit for the new ship; but the carriers promise some next week, and if enough is supplied, I will send what you want. I have sent the horse boat to Deptford, and hope that she will return loaded with 2 and 3 inch plank, and that meantime a good store of timber will have been brought in. I enclose a demand for provisions, &c., wanted; some spikes can be supplied at Chatham. [Ibid. No. 153.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. His Royal Highness having sent several young gentlemen on board the Kent and Swallow, and the commanders requiring cabins for their accommodation, I desire you will send them 4 score of deals, and also locks, hinges, nails, &c., to enable them to build what are needed. As the ships, after leaving Newfoundland, are to go to the Straits, they should be supplied with a sufficient quantity of oars. The Katherine yacht being ordered to carry Sir Wm. Swan to Hamburg, and the commander never having been there, you must take care that he has an able pilot. [Ibid. No. 154.]
April 11.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. One half of the carved works on board the London has been completed by John Leadman, who desires more money upon imprest to finish the work. [Ibid. No. 155.]
April 11.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and Wm. Fownes to the Navy Commissioners. The 254 deals sent to Portsmouth in John Hacker's hoy were had of George Body, and were received into Deptford stores in pursuance of your warrant, as were also 300 more had from Sir Wm. Warren. [Ibid. No. 156.]
April 12.
Deptford.
Same to the Same. We request you to write to the Ordnance officers, to return an engine lent to them by us in Sept. 1666, during the great fire of London, to prevent or quench fire in the Tower, so that it may be restored to its proper place in this yard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 157.]
April. 12.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I viewed the timber at Burket and marked a quantity to be brought away, but it will not complete the new ship. I treated for 20 loads of knees, and desired Mr. Andrews to bring them down, being much needed. There are also 4 batts of elm, 3½ loads in each, which would make our figure-head, trailboard, &c., which all require principal pieces; it is as good and cheap as any I ever saw, being 3l. 10s. a load. I hope you will buy it, so that the carver may have it to cut. I gave Col. Middleton an account yesterday, and will wait on you on Thursday. [Ibid. No. 158.]
April 12.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The engines sent were tried both at Chatham and in London by Mr. Burrowes, the maker, and proved very well. [Ibid. No. 159.]
April 12.
Brickhill.
Philip Frowde to Williamson. As the pass for the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland's horses could not be had before he went out of town, I am commanded to desire you to send it to Alderman Anderton's house at Chester; I hope it will be there as soon as his lordship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 143.]
April 12.
Brickhill.
Same to the Same, or in his absence to Mr. Swaddell. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 144.]
April 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Kent will sail for the Downs to day. [Ibid. No. 145.]
April 12.
All Souls, Oxford.
Dr. Thos. James [Warden of All Souls] to Williamson. Pray acquaint Lord Arlington that, in obedience to his Majesty's command, I have admitted Peter Prideaux as a Fellow of our Society, by administering the oath appointed by the founder, and that he is in possession of his chamber, and will take his commons in the hall this day. I was informed by his lordship that his Majesty's letters should be very sparingly sent, which gives hope that there will be no more to hinder our free elections for another year at least; his lordship and you must know, as members, of what great concern it will be to the advancement of learning, that the colleges should be left free to their choice. [Ibid. No. 146.]
April 12.
Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. I received your letter by M. Blundell, who has gone in the packet for Nieuport, without any molestation from the Custom House officers. There was a difference between him and Mr. Rowse, the Postmaster, about spoiling one of his horses, valued at 20l., by laming it; but I brought him off for two pistoles, and so all ended well. Lord Brereton has been here these 7 days, going from place to place, and then returning to his lodgings, but I do not know his business. No news from the French packet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 147.]
April 12. [H. Muddiman] to Jasper Mandit, Exeter. News-letter. On the 6th, the Commons passed a bill to prevent the delivery up of merchant ships to pirates and sea robbers, and also for the increase of serviceable shipping; the same day the bill passed for advancing the sale of fee-farm and other rents, and a conference was reported from the Lords concerning the highways.
The Turks men-of-war have fallen upon some English merchant ships called the Concord, the Merchant's Delight, and another commanded by a Quaker—which had adventured without convoy from Zante—by clapping 300 or 400 men on board, and so overpowering them; but the John and Thomas of 36 guns and 70 men escaped.
It is reported by some Dutch letters that the Prince of Orange will attend at the solemnizing of the Feast of St. George at Windsor, which will be kept on the 26th, 27th, and 28th instant. The Earl of Ailesbury went from Dover for Calais on the 1st instant, in one of his Majesty's pleasure boats, but the vessel with his horses and retinue could not get out of the harbour.
"The General's State was at the 5th instant at Somerset House exposed to public view."
The Commons have passed a bill for the sale of part of Sir John Prettyman's estate, for payment of a debt due to his Majesty; also a bill for the union of England and Scotland.
The merchants and farmers of ships at Chester and other ports have presented a petition, complaining of the illegal duties exacted from them, which has been referred to a Committee of Grievances. The Lords acquainted the Commons that they had returned the bill for settling the duty of excise upon brandy, and had agreed thereto, as well as to the bills regarding highways, and fee-farm rents; also a bill for rebuilding London, and for enabling the King to sell the lands of the Duchy of Cornwall.
The Dutch letters report that the main business there now is as to the admission of the Prince of Orange into the Council of State, and that the French intend to build a fort royal near Brisach, in the Duke of Winterborough's [Würtemberg's ?] territories, another near Phillysburg [Phalsbourg ?], and to make a bridge over the Rhine.
The minister at Madrid is in some suspense as to what answer to make to the French Ambassador on the business of the arbitration, that Court being inclined to join the Emperor and the Dutch, with his Majesty and the King of Sweden as the referees. The French soldiers are much pleased at the news brought by a courier, despatched from Vienna by Sieur de Gromersville, of a revolt in Hungary, as they have an idea that the Swedes' army may be diverted from assisting Flanders, by joining with the Imperial forces in this time of necessity.
The new Lord Lieutenant began his journey hence on the 11th, attended by a train of many of the nobility, and persons of quality suitable to so great an employment. The same day his Majesty expressed his satisfaction at the fair correspondence held between the two Houses and at the bills which they had passed, and gave his assent to several named. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 148.]
April 13.
Letter Office.
A. E[llis] to Williamson. Two country fellows being met in Moorfields with a corded trunk, were challenged by a land searcher of the Custom House, when they left the trunk and fled. It is supposed to have been stolen out of some cart going to Ware, and is full of gentleman's clothes. This advice may find the owner, and I can direct him to the constable who has the goods. [Ibid. No. 149.]
April 13.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Dauphin of Dunkirk sailed with cigars and elephants' teeth, and the John of Topsham with tobacco for Holland; 2 vessels from Plymouth have arrived, one bound for Guinea, and the other for New England. [Ibid. No. 150.]
April 13.
Falmouth.
Same to Williamson. To the same effect as his letters to Hickes of the 11th and 13th. A Dutch merchantman from Guinea, with negroes and horses, coming to Martinique to trade, was made prize by the Governor there, aided by 3 French men-of-war who came to that port. She had a French commission, which the Frenchmen said was naught; the skipper and some of her men have come home in the Dauphin of Dunkirk. [Ibid. No. 151.]
April 13.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Charles Perrott. Several vessels have come in from Plymouth, &c., outward bound, including a French ship of 10 mounted guns from Martinique. She has been at Guinea, is very richly laden, and is thought to be a pillager. After taking in some provisions, she sailed for Flushing. The Samuel and Mary continues here. [Ibid. No. 152.]
April 13. Warrant to pay to Wm. Young, keeper of Hampton Court. 1,120l. for repairs of the lodgings, and breaches about the park walls, and for the making of gates. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 166.]
April 13. Thos. Lewis to [Pepys]. I desire you to stop any bill that Capt. Sartan of the Eaglet ketch has to be signed at the Navy Office, until he has satisfied the King for 28 days' victuals he received at Weymouth, on 28 May 1666, for 40 men, for which he gave no allowance on passing his victualling account. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 160.]
April 14.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the [Navy Commissioners]. You will see, by papers and accounts enclosed, what I have disbursed in supplying ships with stores demanded by their commanders; the warrants received from his Royal Highness empowering me to act being registered in your office, you will also find that I have punctually observed them. I have drawn a bill upon you for 234l. 4s. 9d., for value received of Charles Longland and Company, at Leghorn, and hope it will be punctually met, and not allowed to lie as an imprest against me to my future damage.
The Orange fireship is being careened, and is to join Sir John Harman on his arrival, and the Sapphire, Jersey, and Centurion are hourly expected to careen here also, which I will see is better done than the St. David and Dartmouth were before my arrival. I presume you have heard what victuals I have delivered out; the remainder is ready to put on board Sir John Harman's squadron.
I believe his Majesty's interest would be best answered, and the poor merchant better provided for in the security of his shipping, if the port of Leghorn and Porta Fararoe were more frequented, Leghorn being the seat of trade and all supplies to be had upon reasonable terms, which will never be found at Port Mahon; I conceive you have seen the inconveniences of a fleet expecting supplies from England. I shall always be ready to the utmost of my life and fortune to promote his Majesty's service. Noted that the enclosures were given to Sir John Mennes. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 161.]
April 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Kent sailed yesterday for the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 153.]
April 14.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Lord Brereton, formerly MajorGeneral of the Rump Parliament, is here. He has been visiting the chief towns for the last ten days, and it is feared for some unknown design, as the Sectarians are much dissatisfied with the late Act against Nonconformists. Mr. Carlile being here yesterday, I acquainted him with it; he said the Major had been at Dover. The Kent has arrived in the Downs, and the Swallow has been here a week. We hear nothing of Algiers pirates in the Channel. [Ibid. No. 154.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
Thos. Williamson to [Williamson]. I delivered your letter to Lady Katherine, with your humble service to her, and the rest of the ladies, for which Lady Thomond and others returned thanks, and were glad that you had arrived safe at Newmarket. The sentinel is set every night at 10, and continues until 4 a.m. I will keep at home, as directed, during your absence, and see that others do so. We cannot get any speeches, but were forced to buy one, the Speaker having taken the King's speech from Mr. Newcombe, and had it printed with his own by his printer. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 155.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
H. Ball to Williamson, at the Court, Newmarket. I send some bills of mortality, Gazettes, and speeches. I found Mr. Newcombe ill when I went to the Savoy for the speeches, and he had been deprived of his dues by the Speaker having had the King's speech printed with his own. I had to buy the one sent, as also the Acts, they being all that are yet printed. I went to the Council Chamber to know what was done there yesterday, and I hear, by Sir Robert Southwell's clerk, that the King has desired notice to be given to the Earl of Anglesey, to take his place again at the Board. [Ibid. No. 156.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
C. Perrott to [Williamson]. I send a packet, designed to have come by Lord Arlington's servant, but Mr. Richards returned it, as his lordship did not intend going to Newmarket immediately. The French letters arrived last night, and after taking out some notes, I sent them to Goring House. M. Hinchley, who waits on my lord, promised to forward them, if he did not go to Newmarket immediately. Lord Arlington went out of town this morning, leaving his lady in good condition, but in fear of a return of the ague, against which she has taken a vomit. The Queen was entertained this day by the Duchess of York at Deptford, where she went on board her ship, gave it a Portuguese name, and fired a gun. I forwarded your letters, &c., to Lord Berkeley, under cover to Mr. Anderton. Mr. Richards has searched for the memorial given in by M. Guldenlew, respecting salutes at sea, which Lord Essex supposes will be necessary for him, when those things fall under dispute, but it cannot be found. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 157.] Annexing,
Notes relative to salutes when Lord Fauconberg was Ambassador at Genoa, the demands made, and the reply given thereto. [Draft by Williamson. Ibid. No. 157i.]
April 14. James Hickes to Williamson. I sent the letters for you to Whitehall, to be delivered to your cousin or Mr. Perrott, but there was no one there except the doorkeeper. [Ibid. No. 158.]
April 15.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. I enclose a letter from Falmouth. The Unity from Barbadoes has arrived here. [Ibid. No. 159.]
April 15. R. Baxter's recantation of his work entitled "The Holy Commonwealth, or Political Aphorisms," not only on account of some bypassages, but in respect of the secondary part; the first part, being the defence of God and reason, he recants not. He makes the revocation, subject to four provisoes mentioned. [2 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 160.]
April 15.
Corpus Christi College.
Dr. John Spencer to Lord Arlington. I assure you, in reply to your many arguments as to the reception of W[ormley] Martin into the college, that I have as little will as power to contest with your lordship, much less his Majesty. But I have several things of some moment to offer, and if what I offer be reason, I am sure your lordship will be concluded by it; but as it cannot be so well done by letter as a personal attendance, and as I have other business crowding upon me, I beg a respite of this business for another week, when I suppose you will have returned to London with the King. [Ibid. No. 161.]
April 15.
Boulogne.
Charles, Duke "Dudley de Notta" [Northumberland], to Lord Carington [Arlington]. I am encouraged by the King's goodness towards me, shown to Count Maffei, Envoy of the Duke of Savoy, to enclose a paper for his Majesty and the Council. I hope the King will re-establish my house, which could easily be done by some considerable marriage for my son. I beg your influence therein. Endorsed, "Duke of Northumberland." [French. Ibid. No. 162.]
April 15. Certificate by B. Gauden, of the tonnage due or paid for 139 tons 2 puncheons of provisions named, shipped in the Guinea frigate for Sir Edw. Spragg's squadron at Lisbon, which, at 39s. 6d. a ton, amounts to 275l. 16s. 10d. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 162.]
April 16.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I viewed Major Bourne's timber, which is very good and will average 75 feet. Mr. Coles has 2 hoys laden with knee and compass timber and treenails, which I am anxious to have, there being urgent occasion for it. If I cannot get the 4 gun deck beams required for the new ship, I propose to scarf them, although I wish otherwise. [Ibid. No. 163.]
April 16.
The Spy, Dover.
Capt. Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. Having taken 2 months' provisions on board, I shall return to my former station. [Ibid. No. 164.]
April 16.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I could not answer earlier, from wanting the document enclosed; pardon the clerkship of it, as the writers would not be beholden to me. I believe the 2 first sums therein mentioned may by good management be split in halves, though there are great defects in the tiling, &c., the house not having been repaired for 20 years. Rob. Last has advised double planking the new storehouse, as another way of securing it, and dispensing with the great charge of removing it, or having a new wharf; my own experience about the wharves convinces me of its benefit. Commissioner Tippetts saw the dangerous state of the chimneys, and the other matters mentioned in Last's note. I want 300 or 400 deals, and a last of tar for repair of the old wharves, storehouse, and crane. [Ibid. No. 165.] Enclosing,
Certificate by John Bateman, on survey, that the houses in the yard at Harwich are much out of repair, and that the plumber and glaziers' work will amount to 20l. Also by Henry Baetson that the bricklayers' work will amount to 30l. Also by Rob. Last, that the carpenters' work will amount to 14l. 10s. [Ibid. No. 165i.]
April 16.
Kendal.
Dan. Fleming to Williamson. A true bill having been found against 20 of the conventiclers who were indicted at the quarter sessions for a riotous and unlawful assembly, and it being demanded whether they would submit or traverse, after a little discourse they adopted the former, and were fined from 20s. to 5s. each. We should not have run so low had we not heard that the Conventicle Act is very moderate, and I hope this general submission will do good in this country, where there are so many fanatics. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 163.]
April 16.
Hull.
Luke Bourne to Williamson. Four vessels with lead, cloth, and rape seed, have sailed for Rotterdam; also a billander for Ostend, and 3 for Norway. A ship of Hull has arrived from the East with flax, 3 from Norway with deals, and 3 from Holland with various goods. These report that the Hollanders have had many ships come in, laden with brandy, oil, and wine. [Ibid. No. 164.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
Sec. J. Trevor to Williamson. Will you take the trouble to deliver the enclosed to Lord Arlington ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 165.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
Charles Perrott to [Williamson]. I send packets of letters from the Lord Mayor and others, and hope former ones arrived safe. I made extracts from some of them, and sent one to the Lord Lieutenant by Mr. Anderton. Sec. Trevor begs to be excused writing to Lord Arlington until Tuesday. I delivered the letter to the Duchess at the door of her bedchamber, and that to Lady Castlemaine into her own hand, having had the honour to be admitted to her bedchamber for that purpose. I waited at the Queen and Duchess's side until late. The Queen is likely to be abroad late to night, and the Duchess will take some other opportunity of writing. [Ibid. No. 166.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
H. M[uddiman] to Wm Coward, Recorder of Wells. News-letter. The Ministers at Madrid are in suspense what answer to make to the French Ambassador about arbitration, that Court being inclined to join the Emperor and the Dutch with his Majesty and the King of Sweden in the reference.
The French letters, dated Paris, April 6/16 tell us that the news of the revolt in Hungary is brought to them by a courier despatched from Vienna by the Sieur de Grenville, at which the French soldiery are not a little pleased, as having a prospect that the Swedish King may be diverted from assisting Flanders, by joining with the Imperial forces at this time of necessity.
On the 11th the new Lord Lieutenant began his journey hence, attended by many of the nobility and persons of quality. The same day the King—having expressed his great satisfaction at the fair correspondence between the two Houses, and his thanks for the supply, which he promised should be employed in payment of his debts, and having given his assent to numerous public bills specified, and some private ones—adjourned Parliament to 24 Oct. The Earl of Essex, having his despatch altered on the death of the late King of Denmark, resolved to begin his voyage on Monday.
It is not determined whether the General's funeral solemnity shall be performed on St. George's Day or not, but the solemnity of the Garter at Windsor is put off till 3, 4, and 5 May.
The Emperor's Ministers are not so hot in their desire of admission into the triple alliance as of late, and the Emperor is about entering into a particular alliance with the Swede who, being nearer, may yield him more sudden assistance. The ratification of the triple alliance, being signed in Sweden, is daily expected in Holland, where Count Koningsmark has arrived on behalf of that Crown, with order to receive the subsidy money upon the exchange of it.
The French King keeps his resolution of going to visit his conquest on the 30th, with the Queen and Dauphin, and a train of 15,000 men. Meantime the troops march daily out of France towards the frontiers, for the purpose of embodying in 2 several places, one being near Lille, under the command of Marshall Turenne, where the King intends staying, and the other between the Sambre and the Mouse, where the men are under the Prince of Condé, which gives strong apprehensions to Flanders that he may fall upon Ypres or Mons, though the Baron of Bergerac, who has lately come from Lille to Brussels, seems to give assurances that there are no further preparations made than only for the King's reception. However, the Constable of Castile, to prevent the worst, fails not in his endeavours to render all places as strong as may be, and has received an account from Count Marcine that Dixmude and Ypres are in a good posture of defence, and that 40 pieces of cannon will be mounted on the Fort Royal of Ypras by the end of this month.
The Kent sailed from Spithead to the Downs on the 14th. A ship was brought into Cowes, taken from the Turks by an English frigate which had formerly been taken from the Portuguese, and was setting sail for London.
Two English merchantmen, arriving at Marseilles, reported that, having sailed with Sir Thos. Allin to Malaga, and thence to Altea Road, he sent the Bristol to convoy them beyond Cape St. Martin; and that in their passage, they met 3 Turks men-of war, who made up to them for 4 hours, but did not attempt them, being at the lee of their convoy.
The Spanish letters are ignorant as to the choice of a new Governor for the Spanish Netherlands, though the Prince of Lorraine has the greatest probability of carrying it. The Duke de Veraguas, Duke de Ossuna, and the Marquis de Retz (?) have been proposed, and until it can be agreed upon, the Constable of Castile has received orders to continue in his Government.
The Bishop of Cologne begins now to act more publicly against that city, and has issued declarations containing the justice of his pretensions to it, and given orders that none of his subjects shall carry anything to market thither, under the severest penalty, which proceedings are judged to have arisen from the encouragement he received of French assistance. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 167.]
April 17.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. I sent your letters which arrived by the French mail with all speed, so that you might have them from Whitehall by this night's ordinary. I enclose a ballad from Ireland, which must be returned for the archives of Parnassus. [Ibid. No. 168.]
April 18.
Hull.
John Harrison to the Navy Commissioners. I will bring as much of Lord Byron's plank as I can take between decks, which will be about 25 loads, being full of timber in the hold. I have been to Stockwith to view the plank; there is not more than 30 loads good, the rest being outsides, and much shaken. Mr. Russell's want of your order for sending down the timber caused a great hindrance; Lord Byron has not written a word about freight, but I question not you will see me paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 166.]
April 18.
Emsworth sloop, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. I have proceeded pressing men for the Swallow, Kent, and Guernsey, and delivered them to the Eaglet ketch, and also to Captains Loyd and Alington, as ordered by the Hon. Mr. Matthew Wren. I want pro visions, having been at extraordinary charge with the pressed men, by which we have grown short, and have now only sufficient for 5 or 6 days on board. A ketch from Dieppe with goods was stopped for ten days, but having received order from his Majesty's Consul, have let her pass for London; but I have no order to let those pass which come from Flanders. Captain Pierce has taken in the sick men pressed, according to Mr. Wren's order, and has gone for the Downs; I have delivered in all 30 men, and have a receipt for them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 167.]
April 18.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. I understand [Thos.] Lister has complained of not having received satisfaction for wharfage and water-carriage; but it is not so, as what timber I sent down to Stockwith by water I paid Mr. Phillips for, and [Thos.] Corbyn did the same; there is nothing due but for the timber that has been swum down this winter. I asked Mr. Suley to make up his bill, and I would pay him, but he could not do so until he had spoken to Lister, who demanded 4s. a ton for towing down the timber, when I can have it done for 1s. 6d.; he has augmented his prices from 1s. 6d. to 4s., but 1s. 6d. is the common price.
The contract made with him in Jan. 1667 for carrying down timber was that he should do it in his chiches, and be at all charge until it was delivered, from which time I have troubled Mr. Lister very little; but I have been forced to do so lately, by the bad state of the ways, arising from a great land flood, which covered all the marshes. The timber sent to Stockwith saves his Majesty 3s. a load. I desired Lister several times to send it down, but he refusing, I got another man and a boat, and went to Bawtry and swam down 20 or 30 pieces at a time; upon which Lister, seeing that I could get it done without his boats, offered to do it, and told his men to tow it down with their loaded chiches, and gave them 8d. a piece; but when it arrived, they cared nothing what became of it, so that some of it went adrift, and some sank, and I had it to look after. [John] Harrison of Hull will be loaded this week with Lord Byron's plank, his lordship having sent an order for him to take it; I want money to defray the land carriage. [1¾ pages. Ibid. No. 168.]
April 18.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. The Bonadventure of Weymouth, which left Cadiz with the rest of the Straits fleet of 64 sail of Hamburghers, Dutch, and English, has arrived, having left the others at sea. The Hamburghers had a man-of-war of 56 guns for their convoy, the Dutch 4 men-of-war, and the English the Mary Rose, commanded by Rear-Admiral Kempthorne. There are 7 sail of Zante men among them, commanded by captains named. Sir Thos. Allin is reported to have gone with his fleet to the Straits. I have not received the King and Lord Keeper's speech as formerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 169.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Jo. Cooke to [Williamson]. As it is commonly believed at Whitehall that his Majesty will not return there until the end of next week, Secretary Trevor takes you at your promise, and desires you to procure his Majesty's hand to the bill I enclose, granting a pardon to a person well known to the King, who has been accused of a pretended robbery in Surrey. Mr. Paulett is joined with others in this pardon, and as it has to be pleaded in the King's Bench the beginning of term, you will do a kindness to prevail with his Majesty to pass it by immediate warrant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 170.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Chas Perrott to [Williamson]. I send, through Mr. Ellis, some letters which have been delayed by the abundance of rain. Lord Arlington's French and other letters made a distinct packet from that sent by Saturday's post. Lady Arlington has had another fit, the more unwelcome because unlooked for. [Ibid. No. 171.]
April 18.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The violent storms have done no hurt to the ships in the Downs, and one has come in there from Virginia. A vessel from the Straits reports that one of his Majesty's ships has taken an Algiers pirate of 16 guns. [Ibid. No. 172.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Thos. Williamson to Williamson. There is a flying report that our groom has been killed. I ask on behalf of the ladies whether there is any truth in it. [Ibid. No. 173.]
April 18.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. I will deliver the packet sent to Secretary Frowde. Lord Berkeley is expected here to-day, as he lay last night at Nantwich, and I am hastening to meet him. The assizes were held at the castle last week, when Sir Job Charleton sat as Chief Justice; George Newton, an alderman of Stopford [Stockport], in this county, was found guilty of barratry and fined 100l. [Ibid. No. 174.]
April 18.
Hurley [Berks].
Lord Lovelace to Williamson. I send [John] Pilkington to explain the business concerning a grant made by the King to Lords Cleveland and Wentworth and to their heirs, in trust to Sir Wm. Smith, who now says in Chancery that he was only entrusted for Lord Wentworth, and that now Lady Wentworth and her heirs ought to have the benefit thereof. As this will exclude the heirs of Lords Cleveland and Wentworth, I may be much concerned, if Lady Wentworth's daughter should happen to die; for then my wife is next heir, and the thing is of consideration. Pray get the King's intentions made known in Chancery, as I am advised that this must be done. [Ibid. No. 175.]
April 18.
Alicant Road.
Sir Thos. Allin to [Williamson]. Thanks for letters and news, but I would like to have them oftener and better. I am glad to hear that honest Mr. Weeks and Mr. Chiffinch are well. God be thanked for the smooth and dutiful carriage of the Parliament; I hope it may continue many years after we are gone. [Ibid. No. 176.] Enclosing,
Journal of proceedings of Sir Thos. Allin and his squadron, from 12 March to 16 April 1670. Went from Alicant, watered at Altea, wooded at Formentera, and sailed from the coast of Barbary to Algiers.
21 March.—Chased several Algiers ships, but they outsailed us.
April 18. 25 March.—Standing in near to Monte, where the Moors have built a new fort to protect their ships, as they fired about a dozen mounted guns at us, we fell to battering of them for two hours, but night approaching, we stood for Algiers.
27 March.—We sent a boat ashore at Algiers with some Turkish letters, and wrote to the Consul about the exchange of some captains; he sent back word that they were enraged at our battering their new fort, and threatened if we shot at their castles, to hang him and all the English they have, amounting to about 250.
28 March.—I sent another letter to the Consul, to see if he could get off some of the prisoners. He replied that they would not give way to the exchange, because I made no proposals towards a peace; whereupon I wrote that I had formerly proposed the conditions upon which they might have it, and that if they would agree, I was ready to treat, but could not do so upon any other terms. Next day I stood into the bay, and sent for an answer; when the Consul again wrote that they had a good mind to a peace, but that the Duan's stomach was too high to submit, and that the Bashaw had sent to him that he intended using his interest with some leading men, to bring them to desire a treaty, and to send off to us for that end; this the Consul judged to proceed from his fears of losing a new ship of his own then abroad.
29 March.—We continued another day in the bay, but heard nothing from shore, except their firing three guns, which did not reach us; after this the weather became stormy.
1 April.—Espying 4 men-of-war at sea, we gave chase, and endeavoured to prevent their coming into Algiers. Particulars of the encounter, in which they escaped, owing to the weather. I had a man killed, and several shots sent through my sails, and lost one of my water-jars from the deck, upon which I was leaning but a little while before. The weather continued stormy till 4 April, when I lay off Cercelli, and called the commanders together to advise as to preventing the 4 ships getting into Algiers, and agreed to stand towards Cape Caxines, when we saw the 4 ships, but they got away.
5 April.—The Pearl becoming leaky, I ordered her to Port Mahon.
12 April.—A violent storm, and the Foresight sprung her mainmast.
13 April.—The commanders complaining of the want of canvas, water, and other things, I stood for Alicant, where we found 16 laden merchant ships bound westward, so I resolved to send the Mary and Foresight to convoy them as far as Malaga, and bring back from thence to Port Mahon a prize laden with masts and boards, whereof we have need. I intend going thither myself to careen. [3¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 176i.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Norman. News-letter. Copy of the latter part of the news-letter of 16 April, adding the following:—
An English pink bound for Tangiers arrived at Cadiz, and reported that 21 Turks men-of-war had gone out to sea, and that since the English squadron went out against them, they had taken 30 sail of English, and 400 men as captives.
The Spanish Ambassador at Holland has given in a memorial concerning the marching of the French armies, insisting on the leagues formed near Charleroy, under the Prince of Condé, and desiring that provision might be made for receiving assistance upon the first occasion; this the States are no way negligent of, yet they seem to think the designs of the French are at present on the Rhine, by their lending forces to the Elector of Cologne, especially at this time, when the Emperor of Germany may receive a powerful diversion from the Turks.
The French King's voyage is deferred until 4 May, Madame Montespan being lately brought to bed.
The Rhinegrave, Governor of Maestricht, apprehending a siege, is raising some new batteries, equal in height to the neighbouring eminences; as whilst the town was under the Spanish power, during the siege of the Hollander, the want of them was the cause of a too early surrender. Those of Cologne are reported to be busy in raising men to hinder the French from obtaining a footing in the Rhine, and the French King has sent to the Duke of Newburg that Juliers may be delivered up to him, by virtue of a treaty between them.
A ship has arrived at Scarborough from Havre de Grace, and reports that they have cut the rocks there, and made 13 feet of water in the neap, and are making a place to receive 100 of the King's ships, whenever he requires it. Sir Thos. Allin has returned with 9 sail to Algiers.
His Majesty is not expected to return to Whitehall before Friday week, it being said he will first see Norwich, Yarmouth, &c. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 177.]
April 19.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir G. Downing to Williamson. I send a warrant by order of the Treasury Commissioners; they desire you to move Lord Arlington to get the King's hand to it, (the Commissioners being such a distance from his Majesty); the settling of the receivers of the chimney money requires expedition, they having to be nominated by the King. The Commissioners are also pressed on behalf of his Royal Highness, for the despatch of another warrant enclosed, relating to Mr. Best, to which they also require the King's hand. [Ibid. No. 178.]
April 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Several ships have arrived from the West, where all things are quiet, and they bring no news of the Turks being about the Lizard as reported. [Ibid. No. 179.]
April 19.
Burningham [Norfolk].
Thos. Raymond to Williamson. Hearing you are in these parts, I wish to wait upon you, and beg to tender my services. Will the King dine at Euston to day ? and is my old acquaintance Mr. Rustat alive and his attendant ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 180.]
April 19.
London.
D. Breval to Williamson, Newmarket. As you are not returning to town soon, I must send you some news. Our man is always civil, but he let loose against me in a visit to the Bishop of London, who is much discontented with him, but will not judge him without a power under the Great Seal, because the patents that give him some jurisdiction over the Savoy Church are not addressed directly to him. Could you get him a power to settle such differences, and establish me on the election of me made by the people ? Things of this sort should be expedited quickly, and my enemy is intriguing to do me ill offices at Court; but he is in depair, because the holiest bishops and best men are in my favour. I am at Mr. Cook's in Chandos Street. [French. 1½ pages. Ibid. No. 181.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Sir Gilb. Talbot to [Williamson]. His Majesty having bestowed a baronet upon me before going to Newmarket, I have done all that belongs to the Signet Office, and my friend is ready to pay the full sum of 1,195l. into the Exchequer; so that on the title of discharge, I may pass the Privy and Great Seal, but I dare not let him pay the money in, because Mr. Young says that Lady Castlemaine has a grant from the King of the first money that shall arise on a baronet's patent. I would not willingly have any contest with so great a person, and especially a lady whom I so much honour, nor would I lose the pains I have taken, nor have my great occasions for money disappointed. Pray solicit his Majesty that, as he bestowed this money upon me, he will add to the favour by sending a non obstante that the privy seal may pass without paying the money into the Exchequer, which will save me some charges, and carry the grant with greater secrecy, and is the only means of securing the money to me. I would not have troubled you but I hear by Cornet Whitly that Lord Arlington is not at Newmarket. I was told at the Signet Office that his Majesty has done the like favour frequently. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 182.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Wm. Bridgeman to Williamson. I enclose letters for Lord Arlington to you, according to his order. [Ibid. No. 183.]
April 19. Charles Perrott to [Williamson]. The Queen was very ill last night with a distemper, supposed to be a surfeit; she has since recovered, but is confined to her bedchamber.
The French Ambassador complains of the delay of his letters at the Post Office, and has applied in your absence to Sec. Trevor. Sir Philip Frowde has been for the pass for Lord Berkeley's horses, which was left with Hugh, the under-doorkeeper, who will see to the payment of the fees. With a postscript, 10 p.m.: I have received your letter, but too late to retrieve the pass out of Sir Philip Frowde's hands, he having sent it to his son. I enclose letters. [Ibid. No. 184.]
April 19. Post label for the Newmarket mail, leaving London at midnight on 18 April, and reaching Cambridge 11 a.m. 19 April. [Ibid. No. 185.]
April 19. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. I send a letter received from Capt. Strickland, and desire you will give such order therein as you judge to be best for the King's service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 169.] Enclosing,
Capt. Roger Strickland to Mat. Wren. But few ships having passed through the Downs since my last, I could not increase my number much, and now muster 150, but shall be forced to change most of the watermen. Pray write to the Navy Commissioners that I may be supplied with another pinnace, having lost my own, which was riding astern of the Swallow but broke her moorings, and went adrift in a gale; also let my long boat be changed, being too large. I hear the pleasure boats are ordered down to Dover; they could bring the boats required with them. I have borrowed a Deal yawl to send for pressing, and nothing shall be neglected by me, although losing my boat has much troubled me.
I hope the 12 soldiers received at Portsmouth will be allowed as supernumeraries, otherwise they will be disabling the ship, being in lieu of as many able seamen. The Kent has 4 more guns than the Swallow, and is bigger by 3 or 4 tons, so I wish. I were allowed 8 or 10 more men; but if it is not granted, then I hope I shall have an order for the supernumeraries.—Downs, 18 April 1670. [Ibid. No. 169i.]
April 19. Sir Geo. Downing to Sir Jeremy Smith. I hope you will not fail to meet me at Sir Rob. Long's house on Tuesday at 8 a.m., about your representation of Sir Denis Gauden's interest account. [Ibid. No. 170.]
April 19. Capt. Abra. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I am told by Mr. Wren that I must satisfy you as to my salary, that I may have no cause to repent for what I have already done, or discouraged from what I do or may do for his Majesty's service. I desire you to consider that you have already received sufficient satisfaction as to my salary being due, by its having been admitted under the hands of 5 of your Board. What more could I have done at sea to deserve payment of it ? I have done more duty than others who have received their salary, particularly in sending 3 or 4 books, and could not have done more to obtain it than by petitioning to this Board, and also to Whitehall. As the Duke desired it should be paid, I judge that is sufficient for you to grant it, or at least to inform me of your objections for not doing so, that I may answer them, which was never denied at any of his Majesty's public boards or places of justice. This is desired more for his Majesty's advantage than right to myself, as will hereafter appear.
I have not received any justice or encouragement for my services in 1666 and 1667, or for saving the King 8,244l. 1s. 3d., besides other matters yet to come, far more advantageous, so I hope you will make the case your own, and do to me as you would be done by. [Ibid. No. 171.]
April 20.
The Advice, Plymouth Sound.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I spent 10 days at sea, but could neither hear of nor see the Turks said to be in the mouth of the Channel, so I am now bound for Portsmouth. I send the slopseller's bill for clothes on board, which I cannot say are not worth the value set upon them, having no skill in such things; but they do not agree either in price or quality with my instructions, as you will see by comparing the bill with the rates set down in his Royal Highness's orders. We have had very bad weather, both for snow and rain, and I was forced to let my men take some bedding and other things of the slopseller, they being almost naked, and several being sick, and like to perish for want of clothes. I want an order to meet me at Portsmouth, where my stay will be short, and where I shall suffer the slops to be delivered out to the seamen, at the prices set down by the sellers, as the men are in great need. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 172.] Encloses,
Three bills of wearing apparel, bedding, &c., with the number and prices of each article, amounting respectively to31l. 5s. 9d., 37l. 5s. 3d., and 40l. 4s. 3d. [Ibid. No. 172i-iii.]
April 20.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Thos. Hayter. Pray inform the Navy Board that I have no lignum vitæ in store fit for Portsmouth, so cannot send the 5 tons ordered, but that Mr. Edhill has a parcel from 11 to 16 inches in diameter. [Ibid. No. 173.]
April 20.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Samuel and Mary, of Bristol, from Virginia, laden with tobacco for Holland, has put to sea. Two English ships with salt, from Concord Road, report that the French King has launched a great ship of 130 guns, called the Royal Sun, and that there is another at Brest upon the stocks. The Fortune of Falmouth has come in with wine and fruit from Malaga. She came out at Cadiz in company of 60 sail of merchantmen, 30 of which were English, under convoy of the Mary Rose, having taken in a large quantity of silver upon freight. The rest of the fleet were Dutch and Hamburghers, and passed Falmouth Harbour this day.
Sir Edw. Spragg is gone for Lisbon to clean, and Sir Thos. Allin for the Straits. It is reported at Cadiz that 25 English merchantmen have been taken since the war with Algiers. Twenty ships, supposed to be the Dutch fleet under the command of Van Gent, have passed by to the westward. Send me the Act against conventicles. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 187.]
April 20. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 188.]
April 20.
2 a.m. London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I received your letters of the 15th and 18th, from Ewston, for your cousin, &c. Mr. Ellis is much your servant. [Ibid. No. 189.]
April 20.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. About 12 merchant ships have sailed; only the Swallow and Kent are in the Downs. [Ibid. No. 190.]
April 20.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. I entreat your assistance in obtaining a reprieve for a woman convicted of child murder. The judge is inclined to believe her innocent of murder, and a man has come forward who can swear that she came to him the morning she was brought to bed in the wood, and desired house room, saying her brother had beaten her out of her house. She is an ignorant person of 50 years of age, and those who subscribed their names on her behalf were moved to it by mere charity. Endorsed, " Underwood's Reprieve." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 191.]
[April 20.] —to Lord [Arlington]. Pray call to Williamson for Philip Alden's petition, praying for a letter from the King to the Lord Lieutenant, to pay his pension of 100l. a year, and the arrears, until his Majesty shall reward him out of the lands of Dyke and Cuningham. [Ibid. No. 192.]
April 20.
The Advice, Plymouth Sound.
Ben. Young to Mr. Wren. We came this morning into Plymouth Sound, having been 15 days cruising in the mouth of the Channel, and spoken with vessels from several places, but heard nothing of any Turkish men-of-war being either in the Channel or the soundings, so we believe the report to be false. We shall sail for Portsmouth as soon as we have taken in water, and put 30 soldiers on shore. We require 16 men to complete our complement. [Ibid. No. 193.]
April 20.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Lord John Berkeley, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, arrived at Chester on Monday, with a very gallant train, and was met by many nobles and persons of quality, who attended him into the city, where he was received by the Mayor and aldermen in their formalities, and saluted from the castle. Yesterday he took shipping at Dawpool, on board the Monmouth, attended by the Mary yacht. He asks for a pass, promised him by Mr. Williamson, to transport his horses. [Ibid. No. 194.]
April 21.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to [Williamson]. I acknowledge the receipt of your letters, with the French papers. I will have an answer ready to one of them, being a memorial; but I beg the commands of Lord Arlington to transfer all postal matters to Mr. Perich rather than to Mr. Vernon, the air of whose letters gives little expectations from thence; Mr. Perich understands our disputes much better, and this will save time. I obeyed your commands, and put my note into your office, where I found Mr. Perrott. I believe they have much business there, as their letters have not yet arrived, though it is 2 a.m. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 195.]
April 21.
London.
Ben. Glanville to Williamson. Thanks for past kindness. I have been advised by our friends Chas. Porter, Capt. Cook, Jack Fenn, &c., to solicit your interest with Lord Arlington for some employment in the new commission for wines, coals, &c. I have faithfully served the King, and doubt not but your interest and willingness to serve me will prevail. [Ibid. No. 196.]
April 21.
London.
L. Osborne to Williamson. It is a great loss to me to have been so long without your commands. Truly it is better to be ill near you, than to be well in your absence. I wish you a long and happy life. Our transactions in London [in the plate lottery ?] between 11 and 16 April have been 24l. sterling. [French. Ibid. No. 197.]
April 21. Report to the King of Attorney-General Palmer and SolicitorGeneral Finch, on certain by-laws, proposed by the Surveyor of the Press to be adopted by the Stationers' Company, for regulating the printing of books or papers:—(1) Any member of the company printing books, &c., without licence shall lose for a time his interest in the stock; (2) no printer so transgressing shall be allowed the printing any books granted to the company by their charter. Every printer to be bound in 300l. to print nothing without licence. All persons free of other companies to be subject to the same bond, and all foreigners, in matters of book-selling and printing, to be subject to the rules of the Stationers' Company. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 198.]
April 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Nothing more has been heard of the Turkish men-of-war on the coast. Some from Virginia inform that last year there was great mortality, owing to the very hot summer and autumn and very cold winter. [Ibid. No. 199.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Chas. Perrott to [Williamson]. I enclose letters, &c., which have come by the Holland, French, and Flanders packets. I have sent extracts to Lord Berkeley. Secretary Trevor is out of town, but I will attend him with the advices on his return, which is expected to night. The Queen and Duchess have gone to Deptford, and will be late home. A considerable quantity of powder and ball have been discovered in the City, and some persons who could not give a satisfactory account of it have been secured. [Ibid. No. 200.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Hen. Ball to Williamson. I sent you the 2 books of printed Acts, and went for some more, but they were not ready; the long City Act will be finished to-morrow. The Earl of Anglesey attended on the last two Council days, but nothing except what necessity required was done until the King's return. I enclose 3 bills of mortality, and papers of occurrences at the Sessions House. [Ibid. No. 201.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Jo. Cooke to [Williamson]. I send letters and my thanks for your care of Mr. Paulett's bill. You have left a forlorn Court behind you, but the ladies pass their time without any great show of mourning; her Majesty gives life to all by frequent divertisements upon the river, in her new vessel the Sodalis. They undertake several long voyages, and falling short of provisions, victual sometimes at Vauxhall, and sometimes at Lambeth Palace. [Ibid. No. 202.]
April 21.
Midnight, London.
James Hickes to [Williamson]. I have yours of the 19th, advising of your return to Newmarket. The letters you sent for Thos. Williamson and others have been despatched. [Ibid. No. 203.]
April 21.
Tower.
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. I saw your letter to the Lord Mayor, and send you a copy of the informations, that you may better understand the business. I have shown them to the Lord Keeper and the Lord Chief Justice, and as they have promised to dine with the Lord Mayor, I shall give them a day to discourse on this and other affairs. All care is taken for the King's safety. I am not much troubled with Lord Craven, as I only see him once in 2 or 3 days. I cannot yet get out the commission for the militia, which the informations may satisfy anybody there is need of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 204.] Enclosing,
Papers respecting the tumultuous rising of the London apprentices in Moorfields, designed for 1st May 1670:—
Address to all gentlemen, apprentices, and journeymen inhabitants of London and the suburbs, " acquainting them that we are impoverished by foreign nations, especially by the French trading with England, and that we are also in fear of our lives," and calling upon them to procure arms, and meet in Moorfields between 8 and 9 p.m. of May-day, it being resolved to suffer it no longer; ending, " So God save the King and all the royal family. Procure what arms you can, for we are resolved to do it." [Ibid. No. 205.]
Copy of the preceding paper. Also, Information of Ann, wife of John Carter, tailor, of Bishop's Court, Little Old Bailey, before Sir Sam. Starling, Lord Mayor, and Sir John Robinson. Had a lodger named Plowman, and sent John Bullock, a boy lodging with Plowman, to fetch him home. The boy returned, stating that he saw Plowman and others at a public-house near, reading a written paper concerning the rising of apprentices. That Bullock's brother then advised the sending for the said paper, which was done, and it being shown to Mr. Stoddard, whose apprentice was one of the company, Stoddard delivered it to Mr. Reeve, one of the Lord Mayor's marshals. Also,
Information of John Bullock, tailor, aged 17, before the same, to the same effect, mentioning one Thoroughgood and Alex. Walker as being of the company at the tavern; also that Plowman said the apprentices and journeymen should have one handkerchief in their hats, and their officers two; and that Plowman would go and fire the first pistol at the French. Also,
Examination of Charles Goodwin, servant to his brother John Goodwin, tailor, of Bishop's Court, Little Old Bailey, before the same. Plowman took a lodging at Mrs. Carter's, and was employed by the examinant's brother, John Goodwin, as a tailor. Plowman, on being informed of the news that the French and Turks had taken English ships, wrote on a paper, and solicited the examinant, and also Thoroughgood, an apprentice to Goodwin, and one Walker and Nathaniel Spence to do the same, and then give them to other apprentices, but none would consent. John Bullock came to an ale-house called the Red Cow to fetch Plowman home, and having heard Plowman's writing read, obtained possession of it and gave it to Mrs. Carter. They agreed that private soldiers should wear one handkerchief in their hats and officers two, and that the soldiers should follow their commanders; they were all to meet on May-day between 8 and 9 p.m. in Moorfields, and then proceed to the Strand, Covent Garden, and about the City, to fight the French and beat them out. Also,
Examination of John Walker, apprentice to Mr. Birch, tailor, Aldersgate Street, to the like effect. Also,
Examination of Nathaniel Spence, apprentice to Rob. Stoddard, tailor, of Bishop's Court, to the like effect. Also,
Examination of Rob. Plowman, of Thurgarton-upon-Lee, co. Notts, tailor, before the same. Came to London 5 weeks since, and lodged at the thatched house in the middle of St. John Street, and afterwards in Bishop's Court. Worked for Esquire Cooper, an Exciseman, and his lady, living in King Street, Covent Garden, which Cooper is brother to Mr. Cooper, his Majesty's carver. The examinant has a wife and 6 children, and before he was married, was a soldier in Col. Read's regiment under Lord Monk, when he came out of Scotland, and is now churchwarden of Thurgarton aforesaid. Was advised by Cooper's lady, and Mrs. Baird their housekeeper, to come to London, to learn the fashions of a tailor's business. The contemplated rising arose from the number of French in London, and the talk about the joining together of the French and Turks, and their intention of coming to make war with England, which he related to his fellow workmen, who becoming excited, agreed to issue an address, which he wrote, to their fellow apprentices, to meet together, and to set up a copy of it at Whitehall. [3½ sheets. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 206.]
April 21. The King to the Attorney-General. On 4 Jan. 1657–8, the late usurper Cromwell granted to Rich. Best the duties of excise and new impost on beer, perry, cider, &c., in Exeter, Devon, and Cornwall, for half a year till 26 March 1658, on payment of 5,500l., and then for 3 years at 14,000l. yearly, and he was bound in 5,000l. for payment, which sum has been recovered from Best and his sureties, and an extent issued on his lands in Handsworth, co. Stafford, for 2,549l. 6s. arrears for the first half-year, and for 35,350l. arrears for the 3 years. You are to prepare a warrant granting the 5,000l. and the other arrears to John Haughton and John Bucannon of London, on behalf of the Duke of York, to whom 10,000l. has been granted from the excise, and also the benefit of the extended lands; the recognizance to be made void on payment of the moneys, and processes to be issued for their recovery. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 207.]
April 21.
Court at Newmarket.
The King to the Treasury Commissioners. By Act of Parliament of 16 March 1664, we are authorized to appoint, with advice of our Court of Exchequer, the collectors of hearth money, and therefore we appoint the persons named below, as collectors in the several towns and counties of England and Wales, and we authorize you to prepare their commissions accordingly, with the customary salaries and allowances, taking bonds with sufficient security for their due performance of their office. [7 pages. Ibid. No. 208.]
April 21.
Newmarket.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge. We recommend for the degree of D.D., without performance of exercises, [Thos.] Hill, M.A., late of your University, and now domestic chaplain to James, Duke of Ormond, to encourage his studies in service of the Church. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 3.]
April 21.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I could finish the shipwright's work on the London before launching, if the timber, &c., formerly demanded were supplied. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 174.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Sir T. Clifford and Sir J. Duncombe, Treasury Commissioners, to Williamson. We have sent a warrant for the Solicitor, to prepare a commission appointing John Birch, Francis Finch, and Edmond Waring Commissioners under the Acts for Imposition on Wines, and the part of the last Act which relates to the retrospection. We beg you to get the King's signature to it, and send it back on the first opportunity, as the business requires despatch. It is one of trouble and difficulty, rather than of profit or honour, and their continuance is only until 1 Oct.; we have presumed to name the persons to be appointed, which the King can alter as he thinks fit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 209.] Enclosing,
Names of the 3 persons mentioned, designed for Commissioners for the Wine Act. [Ibid. No. 209i.]
April 22. Lord Buckhurst to Williamson. I solicit an appointment for my friend George Crenit, as one of the Commissioners for the Wine Act. I have spoken to the King, and had a good answer. [Ibid. No. 210.]
April 22. Note of the expenses of the journey made by [Baptista] Duteil, by the King's order, between 30 Aug. 1669 and 22 April 1670, when he arrived at Newmarket, attended by his interpreter and a servant, including his equipage in London, mourning in Paris for the Queen Mother, and a journey by Leghorn to Tangiers and back by Cadiz; presents to the workmen of the arsenal at Genoa, and models, and documents supplied by order of the Senate of Genoa and of the Grand Duke of Tuscany; total, not including food, 276l. 10s., of which he received 200l. before starting, but 8l. was deducted at the Exchequer. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 211.]
April 22. Copy of the above, omitting the deduction of 8l. at the Exchequer. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 212.]
April 22.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Williamson. A vessel of Barnstaple has arrived, with tobacco from Virginia, and reports a great scarcity of servants there, by so many persons having died of the gripes. The Bideford Merchant, the Neptune, and another have sailed for Newfoundland, they being the last of 24 who have sailed for the same place. [Ibid. No. 213.]
April 22. Certificate by the Earl of Carberry, in favour of Edw. Lewis of the Vann, as deputy-lieutenant for co. Glamorgan, and Thos. Lane of Gwernevel, for co. Brecon. [Ibid. No. 214.]
April 22.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. No ships in port, and no news to send. [Ibid. No. 215.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Chas. Perrott to Williamson. I received your letters of the 20th and 21st. I could not personally deliver your letter to Lady Castlemaine until this afternoon, when I found Lord St. Albans with her, taking his leave for Newmarket. I have not missed any opportunity of sending Lord Berkeley the largest amount of news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 274, No. 216.]
April 22.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to [Williamson]. I send your letters and Lord Arlington's, which I beg may be delivered into his lordship's hands. The town is quite calm, and nothing moves but the train-band men, the archers, and women into the park. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 217.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to [Williamson]. The long City Act has deceived the printers, who thought it would have been ready before; I send the first copy unstitched. The Lords of the Treasury have ordered the new imprest on wines to be farmed out; the farmers are to deliver in their propositions on 17 May next. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 1.]
April 23.
London.
James Hickes to [Williamson]. I have sent your letters to the Lord Lieutenant, to Sir John Robinson, and to "that worthy knight that will promise much, and perform nothing." I believe the Lord Lieutenant arrived in Ireland on Wednesday night, as he went on board at Dawpool on Tuesday evening, and at night put to sea. [Ibid. No. 2.]
April 23.
St. George's Day. Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Windsor of Lyme has arrived from St. Malo, and the Prosperous from Morlaix; they report that a stop has been made on all French vessels in Holland: that the French King began his march towards his new conquest in the Netherlands on Thursday last, being the first day of their May, with 20,000 men, and that a greater number are to follow. I enclose a list of the French fleet, brought by a vessel from Brest, the captain of which went on board several of the ships, including the Sun, the Royal Duke, the Philip, and others, and says that the French King grows very potent in ships, men, and money. The report of the Turks men-of-war being in the Channel has entirely blown away. [Ibid. No. 3.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
C. Perrott to [Williamson]. The packets having come so late, I had much difficulty in making extracts for Lords Berkeley and Arlington, the latter of whom arrived at Whitehall this afternoon. I have taken a copy of the account of Lord Northumberland's business in Rome, and intend showing it to my lord to-morrow; I believe Lord Northumberland's relations would rather that it went no further. This morning's tumult at the Exchange creates much discourse, and some of the old officers are reported to be encouraging it. [Ibid. No. 4.]
April 23. Wormley Martin to Williamson. I am informed that Dr. [John] Spencer intends for Newmarket to-day, where he keeps court (on Suffolk side), and I presume he will do his best to keep me out, and trounce me as some of their Fellows threaten. I would have waited upon you if I could have procured a horse. [Ibid. No. 5.]
April 23.
Castle Cornet.
Sir Jonathan Atkins to Williamson. The bearer, who has served the King faithfully, has a pretence to the office of provost of this island, lately void by death. It is not a place in the Governor's disposal, but goes sometimes by popular election, sometimes by the King's warrant. I have written to Lord Arlington in his behalf, and beg your assistance.
P.S.—The French King has gone towards Flanders; he has lately drawn some of his army into Normandy, I think to make room on the frontiers of Flanders for those that march with him, for they come from Picardy. All the small frigates are ordered down to Havre de Grace, where many men are clearing the harbour, to make it safe for ships of burthen. They talk also of making a good harbour within 7 leagues of us at Cape de Hogue. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, Nos. 6, 7.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to Sir Philip Honeywood, Lieutenant-Governor of Portsmouth. News-letter.
Paris, April 16/26.—To-morrow Mustapha Aga, the Turkish Minister, goes hence. Oliver de Raintell is named Resident Ambassador at Constantinople, upon the revocation of Monsieur de la Hay, and the Count de Vivanne is to be sent on an Embassy Extraordinary. M. de Alibes, the principal interested in the Levant Company, has obtained a commission to send 6 youths of 14 years of age, under the direction of two Capuchins, to Constantinople, to learn the Turkish language, so that on their return, they may be employed in commerce.
The merchantmen under convoy of the Guernsey sailed out of the Downs on the 20th, leaving behind the Kent and Swallow.
The Constable of Castile has appointed his son, Francesco Velasco, to compliment the French King upon his arrival on the territories; he is to go with 30 reformed officers of the Guards, in blue velvet coats, and the Burgundian cross embroidered; 12 gentlemen and 6 pages are to attend him through the Spanish territories; but for all this the Spaniard is not without his jealousy. The Duke de Crocqui is to command 10,000 men on Luxemburg side; 30 pieces of cannon are to be carried into Philipoyle [Pfalzburg ?] and as many into Arras, and great forces are being drawn into parts where the French King is not likely to pass.
The Elector of Bavaria has sent to the Emperor, to assure him that he has not had any correspondence with the French, and that if the Emperor pleases, he will send 1,500 horse to suppress the insurrection in Hungary; the Duke of Brandenburg has also sent to the Emperor to know if he desires any assistance, so that matters are likely to be quieted.
The States have not yet agreed as to admitting the Prince of Orange, and while that is pending, he is not expected in England. The General's funeral is to be performed this day se'night, but the time for solemnizing the Garter at Windsor is not yet known. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 8.]
April 23.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I shall be glad to see the person proposed by Capt. Tippetts to survey; we have but one of his trade in the town, which makes them so dear; the sooner he comes the better, as I wish to come to London in May. If you will send the order for the deals, tar, and some rope, I will give it to a hoyman who is going loaded to London, and will bring them cheap.
The town ditch will not hold the 129 masts, &c., under my care, but they are free from the sun, and the course proposed by Commissioner Tippetts is being pursued. I have ordered 258 staples, as they will not lie unless bound at both ends; if each had 4 staples for their turning twice in the summer, it would quit the cost, as it would be done with less labour, and without drawing the staples, which would be also ultimately saved; but for this I shall want some twice-laid rope. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 175.]
April 23. Capt. Abra. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I beg an allowance for mustering other ships besides those of Sir Jeremy Smith's squadron, having had an order from Sir Wm. Coventry not to limit my duties to such squadron, but to muster all I came near, which I did. [Ibid. No. 176.]
April 23.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Thos. Hayter. Pray procure a bill for some timber delivered into the stores here which was procured by Mr. Shish, it having been demanded by Mr. Mayors. Mr. Fownes is in London, but I will hasten him to make out all your bills. Thrums are very much wanted. [Ibid. No. 177.]
April 23.
Dublin.
Phil. Frowde to Pepys. I ask, on behalf of the Lord Lieutenant, the cost of building a fifth and sixth rate frigate, leaving the hulls and rigging apart. [Ibid. No. 178.]
April 24. Receipt by John Roberts, postmaster, of an express from Jas. Pope, at 2 a.m., at the White Horse Inn, Barbican, which was sent away with all speed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 9.]
April 24.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. Report of the arrival of 4 ships named from Jamaica and Nantes. [Ibid. No. 10.]
April 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Capt. Kempthorne, in the Mary Rose, has passed the Isle of Wight with Lord Howard's retinue, and convoyed several English and Dutch merchant ships, one of which, laden with oranges and lemons from Seville, has put in here, having sprung a leak. [Ibid. No. 11.]
April 24.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. I want an answer to my letter soliciting a reprieve for a woman [Alice Underwood] convicted of child murder; also I beg you to draw a petition, affix my name to it, and present it to his Majesty, praying for liberty to refine all lead ore obtained in North Wales, to extract the silver, and return the bullion to the Mint, at the same rate they do it in South Wales, which will fill the kingdom with silver, and prevent foreigners extracting the silver from our lead; whatever advantage arises to me, you shall be a partner in. I have other things of advantage to propound on the same terms, if you will correspond with me. [Ibid. No. 12.]
April 25. William, Bishop of Lincoln, to Williamson. Pray use your influence in behalf of Mr. Speed, whom I might call Capt. Speed, as he fought as well as those that are so called. He has presented a petition for a vacant living in his Majesty's gift. [Ibid. No. 13.]
April 25.
Westminster.
Same to Lord Arlington. My servant went last night to Mr. Watson's conventicle in Fisher's Folly, having choice in that house of Presbyterian, Independent, or Quaking conventicles; but the door being shut, he went to another in Moorfields. The preacher prayed that the King's evil counsellors might be converted or destroyed, the land covered with blood, and the Lord's people defended against their enemies. The trumpet sounded thus before the late rebellion. God bless his Majesty. Dated erroneously 25 April 1667. Endorsed [by Williamson], " 25 April 1670. Received at Newmarket by express. Insolencies of the fanatics." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 14.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
C. Perrott to Williamson. I received your packet, and sent the enclosures to Lord Aungier, Lady Fox, and Thos. Williamson. I send all the letters of this day, and 2 Gazettes. [Ibid. No. 15.]
April 25.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. There are 30 ships in the harbour, mostly outward bound, 2 of which are Dutch and 4 French. A vessel of Pendennis has arrived from Malaga, with wine, fruit, and wool; she came from the Straits with 60 sail and 4 convoys— 3 being Dutch, and one English—and reports the Turks men-of-war to be numerous and strong, and to have done much mischief in the Straits. [Ibid. No. 16.]
April 25.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Lily Rose of Lyme has arrived from Morlaix, and reports that advice was received there from Rochelle, that 4 Turks men-of-war were in Belle Isle Road. [Ibid. No. 17.]
April 25. "The King's Commission of Lieutenancy for London" to Sir Sam. Starling, Lord Mayor; Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower; Sir John Howell, Recorder; and 36 others, knights and baronets and "armigeri," empowering them to summon, and arm, and lead the inhabitants, in case of insurrection, rebellion, or invasion. [Latin. Parchment. S.P. Dom., Case C, Car. II., No. 13.]
April 25. Two copies of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, Nos. 18, 18A.]
April 25. Advertisement [for the Gazette] that such of the nobility and others as are invited to attend the funeral of George, Duke of Albemarle, and have long mourning, and all who have given in their names at the Heralds' Office, are to be at Somerset House on Saturday next by 10 a.m. All other persons are to forbear coming into the house that morning, so that no disturbance or hindrance may take place. [Ibid. No. 19.]
April 25. Advertisement for the Gazette. All such of the nobility, clergy, and gentry (besides such as have been already invited, and have had mourning allowed them) who are willing to assist at the funeral of George, Duke of Albemarle, which is to proceed from Somerset House to Westminster, on Saturday, 30 April, are to send in their names and the names and number of their gentlemen and servants, to the Heralds' Office, kept in the Queen's Court at the end of the Court of Requests, Westminster Hall, by Thursday noon, so that they may be ranked in the proceedings according to their respective dignities, degrees, and qualities. His Majesty has been pleased to declare how acceptable it will be to him to see the funeral of this great subject attended with all the circumstances of honour which his high merits have deserved.—Corrected by Lord Arlington, and endorsed by him, " To be delivered to Mr. Perrott to be inserted in the Gazette on Monday, 25 May [mistake for April] 1670." [Ibid. No. 181.]
April 25.
Wilbraham Parva.
Thos. Whitehand to Dr. Spencer, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. After parting from you, I found the gentleman you wrote about at Newmarket, who gave the same account of Sir Martin as I gave you, that when he and two or three others of the same college were with Dr. Baldero, at his living at Snaylewell, the doctor desired this gentleman to persuade [Wormley] Martin and others to keep from the ale-house, protesting that he had not sufficient command over them to do it. He also desired them that, they being Jesus College men, and he formerly a member of the same society, they would sometimes give him a visit, but they went 3 times to the ale-house in his parish for once to his house; yet Dr. Baldero then, and often since, has said that he was a dunce and an idle lad. I told him I intended to meet you at Newmarket on Saturday, when we would discourse further of the business; but he conjured me, upon account of his interest in and relation to Jesus College, not to mention his name, nor make this discourse public, which I might have done from such a person as he is, and might have done you service. Excuse my writing more, having an attack of the ague. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 20.]
April 25.
The Advice, Spithead.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I came to an anchor yesterday. I am well satisfied with the order concerning the slops; we have expended a month of our sea provisions, and have 175 men on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 179.]
April 25.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I have not been to Sir Roger Twysden about the 20 trees he offered for sale, being hindered by the bad weather, and the bringing in of other timber purchased of Sir Roger. Mr. Bronsdon, the purveyor, believes there will be some large enough, and also reports that all the timber is hewed; according to the hewer's measurement it will be 388 loads, but I conceive it will be much more, as I have 163 ends, or 204 loads and 35 feet, of good sound timber already in store, which came marked from the woods for 196 loads and 12 feet; so that money has been saved, both in the land and water carriage and wharfage. The charge of bringing in the whole will be near 230l., and as you only imprested 200l. to Mr. Gregory on account of it, he must have the remaining 30l., or we shall be in want for the country people employed in the converting and carrying.
I do not know what the purveyor's travelling charges will come to. He knows of 130 or 140 loads containing some very large trees, which may be had for 36s. a load, ready money, and I expect an account from him of another lot of oak at 52s. a load; but as you only ordered 60 loads, I ask directions as to treating for it, as it is much wanted for the new ship and Newcastle; also as to purchasing 30 or 40 dozen buckets at 11s. a dozen, which are better made, and 3s. cheaper than those formerly supplied, until I brought Charles, the cooper, to abate 1s. in the dozen. I want money to buy such provisions as these parts afford, which I can obtain cheaper than ever if I have ready money, as it encourages the people to offer their goods.
The 300l. imprest to Mr. Gregory being paid away, let us have another 500l., which can be brought down with the quarter's pay for the yard.
I cannot find out who allowed the hour on Fridays to the pressed men, but it is of ancient standing. I think the men may be easily persuaded from it, as I have not heard anything more from them of late. We can only have down 8 of the 20 men pressed; I doubt if the marshal and his man do their duty, as their not being sent makes the rest surly, asking why they are more slaves than others; I hope some course will be taken with them, as it is strange they should have the press and conduct money so long, and not appear.
It is true that Houting the porter's duty is to keep the gate, and he cannot watch that and the waterside too, while the men are in the yard; if he had not left someone at it while he went to the waterside, two labourers would have carried away some old stuff in a boat belonging to the boatswain of the yard, which they alleged was given to them; so I leave it to you to judge whether he is deserving of any allowance. I think the 4 watchmen in the old dock might be taken off, and the expense saved, as there is nothing there belonging to the Navy but a few guns and anchors. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 180.] Encloses,
Contract with Thos. Dew of Stroud, for 10,000 or 15,000 broom of 30 inches, at 36s. a thousand.—21 April 1670. [Ibid. No. 180I.]
April 25.
Deptford.
Estimate by Jas. Mathews of the bricklayers' charges for repairing the house that Capt Tinker lives in, 5l. 8s. Noted that a warrant was issued for doing it 6 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 181.]
April 26. Jas. Carkass and 3 others to the Navy Commissioners. We cannot prosecute your order as to examining the slop accounts of the Navy, until we have your resolution on the several heads referred to you in our reports, as to allowing certain items mentioned connected with the accounts for the Crown, so as to give the slopseller a certificate by which he may pass his account with the paymaster and purser. [Ibid. No. 182.] Enclose,
Report of the Same to the Same, on the slop accounts of the Crown. Find that the clothes' bills delivered to Mr. Burroughs, between May 1664 and July 1666, amounted to 589l. 4s. 9d., and that certain articles were charged and allowed or disallowed as is mentioned.—31 March 1670. [Ibid. No. 182I.]
Second report of the Same to the Same. [Ibid. No. 182II.]
Particulars of amounts unduly charged for clothes to 13 seamen named, who had been discharged or had run; total, 22l. 7s. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 182III.]
April 26. Capt. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I propose mustering the Mary Rose just come home, and all other ships bound out, by which treasure will be saved. I shall expect no other reward than the satisfaction you will receive thereby. [Ibid. No. 183.]
April 26. Proposal by John Rudd, boatswain of the Loyal London, to defray all charges of rigging her, except setting the masts, provided they will allow him the help of the men in the [Deptford] yard, and 100l., 60l. of which is to be imprested to him, and the other 40l. paid when the work is finished. [Ibid. No. 184.]
April 26. John Morehouse to [the Navy Commissioners.] Geo. Goodman has sold the lops of the 920 oaks felled in 1669, and the bark of 500 trees stripped that year, with the outside slabs which came off 200 oaks felled in Whittlewood Forest, and has made no account. As there are 80 trees of the 1,000 yet to fell, and a deal of waste lying ready to be sold, I beg directions as to disposing of it, the time for felling drawing near. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 185.]
April 26. Grant to Rob. Bertie and other trustees, of an acre and a half of land, with a chapel and small house, and 50 acres more land in Waltham Forest, Essex, on rent of 5s. with liberty to enclose and improve the same for the maintenance of a curate, approved by the Bishop of London, the inhabitants being far removed from their parish church of Barking; also for making and keeping gates and ways for the King's hunting. [Docquet Vol. 24, No. 168.]
April 26. Post label of the mail from London to Newmarket; left 2½ p.m., received at Cambridge 1 a.m. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 21.]
April 26. Post label of the mail from London to Newmarket; left 1 a.m., arrived at 1 p.m. at Cambridge. [Ibid. No. 22.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to Wm. Ducket, M.P., at Lady Moore's at Maids Morton. News-letter. Before going to Newmarket, his Majesty looked so graciously on the Earl of Anglesey, that the next day after his departure, the Earl was re-admitted to the Privy Council.
Sir Wm. Swan, Consul at Hamburg, returned to his charge on the 20th, and the same day the Earl of Essex took leave of the ministers in town, in order to his voyage to the Crown of Denmark, his Majesty's yacht lying ready to receive him.
The officers of the works at Windsor went thither on the 20th, to see that all things are in readiness for his Majesty's reception at the solemnity of the Garter. On the 16th, the King was entertained at Lord Crofts', from whence he will go to Lord Arlington's, and then will pass his time in other parts, till his return to Newmarket, to see a race on the 27th, after which he will return to Whitehall.
The Kent, Swallow, and Guernsey were in the Downs ready to sail on the 17th. The Francis of Portsmouth arrived from Virginia on the 18th, and reported that the island is in a flourishing condition, and that Sir Thos. Allin had taken three Turks men-of-war.
They write from Brussels that Sieur de Charnilly has arrived there, as envoy from the French King to the Constable of Castile, and has declared in his Majesty's name his intentions of maintaining a good correspondence with them, and desired that nothing might be given out which might disgust the people, and that the Constable would signify this to the governors of the frontiers; also that the French King will not come within cannon shot of any of them, and that—to avoid all suspicion that he would make use of the permission the Queen had granted to him, to pass through the Spanish towns—he only desired liberty to build two bridges to march over; to this the Constable replied that he was satisfied, and that the Queen being willing to admit his Majesty's passage, he promised to give immediate order for the building of the bridges himself, and to see that the ways where his Majesty would pass were put in good repair.
News from France, Holland, and Germany, as in the letter of 23 April to Sir P. Honeywood. Vessels from St. Malo advise that the French King has sent orders to Brest for building 10 ships, of from 10 to 30 guns, and that his present fleet consists of 94 sail, who in their complement are to carry 4,790 guns and 32,880 men.
His Majesty has resolved to go to Windsor on the 11th of next month, where, when the Garter is over, he may meet Madame [the Duchess of Orleans], who it is believed will be here on the 18th, she intending to leave the French King at Lille, and go thence to Dunkirk, in order to her passage for England.
The English vessel that fought with the Turks was at Leghorn on the 14th. The commander is Capt. Browne, and he carries but 8 guns and 14 men (sic). An Algiers man-of-war, of 24 guns, lashed himself to her for half-an-hour, and left 60 Turks aboard, who finding their stay too hot, were forced either to jump overboard and so were drowned, or else to fall by the force of the seamen, who sallying out on them with half-pikes, left not one alive; the man-ofwar was judged to have been sunk, as after being unlashed, she was seen no more. The day following she fought with another of 34 guns, from morning till night, and in the night took the advantage of going off, without losing a man.
The French letters of the 30th speak of the arrival of a courier from Rome, who gives hope of a speedy election [of a Pope] by an agreement of several factions in [Cardinals?] Bona Bonelly and Franintelsi.
Don Juan has sent his manifestoes to France and several other places, particularising several designs and practices on his life.
By advices from Algiers of 16 March, we are informed that they have taken in all 32 English ships and 385 men, have 28 ships abroad, and are fitting out a new ship of 54 guns and 600 men. On 24 March 4 French ships of war under Count d'Estrées, ViceAdmiral of France, cast anchor near Sir Edw. Spragg's squadron at Lisbon, but no salute or other ceremony passed between them. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 23.]
April 26.
London.
James Hickes to Perrott. I beg the loan of a list of the French King's fleet, sent in Mr. Pocock's letter from Weymouth, which I sent you yesterday, as Mr. Ellis wishes to see it. [Ibid. No. 24.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Chas. Perrott to Williamson. I send letters, extracts from which have been sent to Lords Arlington and Berkeley. Mr. Hayes, Prince [Rupert's] secretary, inquires after a signed paper, settling a pension on the Prince. It has been long in the office, but I cannot find it. Adrian May went to bed last night, and was found dead this morning. [Ibid. No. 25.]
April 26.
Letter Office, 1 a.m.
A. Ellis to Williamson. As a packet sent for Lord Arlington has not been received, I must let you know of it. I send one by this night's express for you, and another for Mr. Jermyn. I wish you a good return. [Ibid. No. 26.]
April 26.
London, 11 p.m.
James Hickes to [Williamson]. The letters sent for Thos. Williamson were delivered. I hope the packet from Lady O'Brien, which was sent express by Mr. Ellis, will come safe. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 27.]
April 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The Dutch packet-boats having gone by to Gravesend, we are hindered of our news. Some passengers from Holland, who came in on Sunday, report that notwithstanding the intended visit of the King of France with 30,000 men, the Hollanders are very quiet, and not a drum is beat for soldiers. They met three of the pleasure boats bound for Holland, for the transportation of the Prince of Orange into England. [Ibid. No. 28.]
April 26.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Consent of Bristol has arrived from St. Malo, and reports that the coast is clear of Turks men-ofwar, and that the French King is making great preparations for the sea. [Ibid. No. 29.]
April 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Advice frigate has come in, having been cruising on our coast and the French coast, for Turks men-of-war. They sent their boat ashore in Conquet Road, to inquire if any men-of-war had been seen, and were assured by the inhabitants there had been none. [Ibid. No. 30.]
April 27.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The John and Sarah of London for Rochelle arrived, and put to sea again, with several others bound for France; also the Fortune of Falmouth, with wines from Malaga for Amsterdam, and the Jonas of Hamburg, with deals for Bordeaux. The Guernsey frigate has been before the harbour, and sent in her boat for orders, but there not being any, she has gone to cruise westward. [Ibid. No. 31.]
April 27. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 32.]
April 27.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Ships from the Straits report that the English fleet is very badly victualled, and the pursers make such hard beverage that the men are very sickly. Also that the captains are highly rewarded for convoy, and carry much goods themselves, but that the freighters are much out of purse; making such long stay for convoy, their fruit becomes candied, and their wine pricked. [Ibid. No. 33.]
April 27.
Thetford.
John Cock to Williamson. I am commanded by the Mayor, on behalf of the inhabitants, to ask that you will continue the advertisement in the Gazette, for apprehending the rogue who still goes about taking up briefs by a false deputation, and that you will add that 10l. reward will be paid for his apprehension, by any one of the persons mentioned in the letters patent to be a receiver of the money to be collected. He has been seen in Bedfordshire, endeavouring to take up briefs, but was happily prevented; no person will be forward in taking him, unless it be in hopes of a reward. [Ibid. No. 34.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Philip Packer to Williamson. I am desired by Mrs. Nun to enclose a letter for Mr. May, and to ask, if he is not at Newmarket, that you will send it by an express to him. [Ibid. No. 35.]
April 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. I have no news to send. All things quiet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 36.]
April 28. Earl of Manchester, Lord Chamberlain, to Lord Arlington. I ask you to prepare a warrant for the discharge of Mr. Cheeke from the Tower, the Earl of Dorset having been with his Majesty and solicited it, stating that he was satisfied, and acknowledging the favour of the House of Peers in committing Cheeke. [Ibid. No. 37.]
April 28.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council that whereas on 18 March 1668, a year's dispensation was granted from such parts of the Act of Navigation as restrained the import of timber, in order that materials for rebuilding London might be supplied at easy rates, his Majesty—being unwilling that the shipping of timber should fall into the hands of foreigners, who have lately much increased their shipping in that trade, there not being enough English ships of convenient burden and fabric—authorises his subjects, till 29 Sept. next, to buy 60 foreign ships of 150 tons, fit for the Norway timber trade, on oath of the owners that they are not aliens, and that no foreigners have any interest therein, 40 of which shall be allowed for the port of London, 10 for the western ports from Dover to Bristol, and 10 for the northern ports from Harwich to Newcastle. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 38.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to the Hon. Edw. Noell, M.P., Tichfield. Newsletter. Copy in part of those to Sir Phil. Honeywood of the 20th, and to Wm. Ducket of the 26th. Also,
The George of Hull from Dort advises that 6 or 7 ships of Amsterdam were taken by 2 Turks, in their passage from Bordeaux, and the Amsterdam French Gazette reports 7 ships as having been taken, and one burned by 7 Turk corsairs.
They write from Genoa on 16 April that Lord Fauconberg's arrival at Turin was much longed for, the people resolving to treat him very nobly, they not having had an Ambassador from any Crown for above 20 years. Cardinal Porto Carero arrived there from Spain on the 13th, and departed for Civita Vecchia on the 15th, at whose appearance in Rome 'tis thought they may despatch the election.
The States of Holland are sending Baron de Wassenaer to compliment the French King on his arrival in Flanders, and Van Beuningen, Ambassador Extraordinary for England.
The ways are being prepared for the funeral of the General which, by accounts given, will be accompanied by such a train as will show the just sense the kingdom still has for him. On the 28th his Majesty returned with his Royal Highness to Whitehall, and dined at St. James's. He was presented with 2 tankards at Newmarket, his horse having won 2 races, one from Mr. B. May, the other from Mr. Elliot, whose gelding till now had borne the belle there.
Herr Beverning was nominated Ambassador for Spain by the States, but seems not willing to accept the employment. They have deferred till their next meeting the determination of the Prince of Orange's business, the success of which none can judge; those of Holland do not appear kind to him.
With note by Muddiman, asking whether he is to continue writing as he does to others, which is 5l. a year. He desires the answer to be sent to him at the Peacock, near the New Exchange in the Strand. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 39.]
April 28.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. I send a copy of my letter of the 14th, and beg punctual discharge of the bills drawn upon you for the service. The Orange has finished careening, and it has been well done and good husbandry observed. I am waiting the arrival of Sir Jno. Harman with the Sapphire and Dartmouth. I hear by a bark from Messina that they are all there, and ready to sail with 14 merchantmen. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 186.]
April 28.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to Pepys. Seamen being very scarce on the rigging account, shall I pay them weekly ? otherwise they will hardly be persuaded to serve. [Ibid. No. 187.]
[April 29. The King to the Ordnance Commissioners. John, Lord Belasyse, Governor of Hull, reports that the drawbridge without Myton gate needs speedy repair, and a certificate has been produced by the Mayor and alderman that the charge thereof has been usually defrayed by us and our progenitors. You are to make full inquiry thereon, and if this be correct, you are to take needful orders for its repair, saving needless charges, and to pay it from the moneys assigned for repair of our forts and garrisons. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 11.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant with survivorship to Rob. Humphries and Thos. Vincent, both of the Inner Temple, London, in reversion after Hen. Wynne, of the offices of Prothonotary and Clerk of the Crown in the counties of Carnarvon, Anglesey, and Merioneth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 156.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York. We authorise you to grant licences to four foreign vessels to bring to England certain great masts, laden by English merchants at Riga for our service, the Act of Navigation or any Act to the contrary notwithstanding. [Ibid. f. 157.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a general grant of pardon to Chas. Walrond, for all robberies and felonies which he may have committed, whether indicted or not for the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 35.]
April 29. Warrant to the Lieutenant of the Tower, for release of Thos. Cheeke, committed by the House of Peers for misbehaviour toward Richard, Earl of Dorset, who has declared himself satisfied for what was done. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, p. 20.]
April 29. Grant to Prince Rupert for life of 2,000l. a year. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 169.]
April 30. Incorporation of the Company of the Mystery of Pattenmakers in London and Westminster, by the names of Master and Wardens of the company, with power to suppress abuses of intruders into the trade, &c. [Ibid. No. 170.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard, Earl of Carberry, Governor of the Council of the Marches of Wales, to swear in as members of the Council Hum. Cornwall, John Gibbs, and Edm. Jones. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 157.]
April 30. Warrant for a grant of approbation of a certain draft or model of the channel of Bridewell Dock, from the channel of the Thames to Holborn Bridge, as it has been ascertained by the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, and presented by the sheriffs, in pursuance of the Act of Parliament for rebuilding the city. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 21.]
April 30. Presentation of Dr. Gabriel Offley, King's chaplain, to the rectory of Worplesdon, co. Surrey. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 3.]
Docquet of the above, dated 2 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 175.]
April 30. Wormley Martin to Williamson. Hearing nothing from Bennet College, I went to see Dr. Spencer, but he was supposed to have gone to London, so I was advised by Dr. Boldero to acquaint you with it, that Lord Arlington may be satisfied of the neglect and contempt of his letters to Dr. Spencer. I wonder that the doctor, being accounted a wise man, should engage himself in a contest of such a nature, so much unbeseeming a discreet person, that men of common judgment and reason condemn him for it. All my friends are big with expectation as to the issue of the business, and I hope you will no longer suffer Dr. Spencer to make delays, and to look with such indifference on Lord Arlington's letters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 40.]
April 30. Alex. Rigby to Williamson. Please to be mindful of the petition to the King enclosed in Dr. Pennington's letter, on behalf of a poor condemned prisoner [Alice Underwood], who is generally thought a fit object for mercy; the evidence did not come so home but that the jury might have saved this trouble, and something has appeared since which mitigates her fault. I request you to certify your success speedily, as the time for her execution draws apace. [Ibid. No. 41.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to Jacob Layfeild, King's searcher at Harwich. News-letter. The visit of Madame, the Duchess of Orleans, to the King, is certain, and it is said the Duchess of Richmond, Lady Marshal, (fn. 1) Countess of Castlemaine, and the Lady Gerard, shall meet her at Calais. Some ladies who intended to have waited on her seem to have deserted, upon account of the tabouret.
On the 24th, Capt. Kempthorne was presented by his Royal Highness to his Majesty who, having entertained him with great kindness, knighted him, and seeing his son of about 15 years of age, willed him to bring him up to the sea, as he desired more of his breed.
Large rewards have been offered for the discovery of the author of the manifestoes of Don Juan, which were sent to the Queen of Spain. On the 29th, the Swedish Resident's house, the corner house next to it, and two of the Piazza houses in Covent Garden, fell down, but no one was hurt.
The Polish Diet broke up on the 10th, having done nothing, and the discontent is like to grow, by reason of a paper being found behind the altar in the principal church, which discovered a design of some grandee to depose the King, and set up a Frenchman, though some believe it to be a design to aggravate the misunderstanding already existing.
The funeral solemnity of the General was performed with great magnificence this day. [2¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 42.]
April 30./May 10.
Nieuport.
Baron de Vigne to Lord [Arlington]. Father Patrick finding the Nieuport boat ready, went in it rather than wait a day or two for the Calais boat. I waited on him as far as Dixmude, being pleased to see so good a friend. Thanks for your so kindly contributing to my going to England. I will embrace your interest on all occasions. Endorsed, "Ignatius White." [2 pages. Ibid. No. 42a.]
April 30.
Gravesend.
Phin. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I send the original muster book of the Mary Rose, not having had time to make copies, and Mr. Hayter being in haste for an account. The ship is ready to sail, and only waits for a pilot. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 283, No. 188.]
April 30.
The Advice, Spithead.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I shall not have time to complete our provisions, being under sail for the Downs, according to his Royal Highness's orders. [Ibid. No. 189.]
April 30.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker, and 2 others, to the Navy Commissioners. We compute there are 57 tons of stores on board the Summer Island merchant, bound for the fleet in the Straits, under Sir Thos. Allin. [Ibid. No. 190.] Annexing,
Certificate by Nich. Cholwell, master of the Summer Island merchant, and the two mates, that the ship was prevented from sailing earlier, solely on account of a contrary wind. —Portsmouth, 3 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 190i.]
Account by Thos. Turner and another, of naval stores and provisions delivered to Cholwell, for the fleet in the Straits under Sir Thos. Allin. [Ibid. Nos. 190ii, 190iii.]
Certificate by Capt. Amos Beare, that he received the naval stores named from Cholwell.—Port Mahon, 20 Aug. 1670. [Ibid. No. 190iv.]
Certificate by Ben. Gauden, that 178 tons of provisions named were shipped on board the Summer Island merchant, for the ships at Port Mahon, and that they were delivered there to Amos Beare.—18 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 190v.]
April. Addresses of four joiners pressed for Deptford Yard in March and April 1670, who would not appear. [Ibid. No. 191.]
April ? Notes of remarks by the Duke of York, that Capt. Moulton went lately into the Sound, but heard nothing of striking the flag, and that Sir George Carteret said he had been there several times, but was never ordered to strike, nor was Sir John Pennington in the Elbe. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 43.]
April ? Petition of Charles, Earl of Derby, to the King. I and my ancestors have long enjoyed an estate in fee farm in the county Palatine of Lancaster, rent 200l.; the Commissioners appointed to sell such rents now make me the first offer of the purchase; I am too impoverished by the late wars to be able to buy, but I beg confirmation of the estate, or remission of the purchase money. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 43a. The Act for sale of fee-farm rents passed 11 April 1670.]
April ? Petition of Sir Rob. Holmes to the Treasury Commissioners, that the payments to him of 160l. 5s. yearly towards payment of the garrisons in the Isle of Wight, and of 38l. or 40l. towards repair of Carisbrooke Castle, may be made from the rents of the Dean and Chapter of Winchester, the fee-farm rents from which he has hitherto received them being exposed to sale. [Ibid. No. 43B.]
April ? Petition of Marmaduke, Lord Langdale, to the King, for a grant of 2,500l. from the moneys arising by the sale of fee-farm rents, to enable him to purchase those of Holme and Molescroft rectories, held by him, but about to be sold. [Ibid. No. 43c.]
April ? Petition of Rich. Watts, Deal, to Lord Arlington, for appointment as a Farmer or Commissioner for Kent or the Cinque Ports, of the new imposition on wine and brandy [passed 11 April 1670]; is dismissed from the surveyorship of customs, obtained for him by his lordship, without any complaint. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 43d, 43e.]
April. Sec. J. Trevor to Williamson. Thanks for your procuring the signature to a bill sent to save my fellow Bowler from hanging. Pray deliver the enclosed. [Ibid. No. 44.]
April.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Sir Rob. Holmes, Governor of the Isle of Wight. We wish you to fortify the town of Yarmouth, paying reasonably for the ground to be broken for the fortifications; removing thither from Carisbrooke Castle such guns, ordnance, arms, &c., as can be spared, and following therein the directions of our Ordnance Commissioners. [Draft. Ibid. No. 44a.]
April.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Ordnance Commissioners, requiring their assistance to Sir Rob. Holmes in carrying out the above directions. [Ibid. No. 44b.]
April. Grant to Sir Edw. Sydenham of the yearly fee-farm rent of 260l. 18s. 4½d., with arrears since Michaelmas 1668, due from the manor and park of Aldington, Kent, held by him; to be held for 60 years, on rent of 10s. a year. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 172.]
April. Warrant to pay to Sir Rob. Southwell, Envoy to Portugal, 3,133l., in full of his disbursements, and to discharge him and Fras. Parry of 1,126l. 10s. received by them for the King in Portugal. [Ibid. No. 173.]
April. Warrant to pay to Wm. Ashburnham, Cofferer of the Household, 13,608l. 15s. 7¾d., for the officers' and servants' board wages, and provisions for the house and stables; and to discharge the said officers and servants of 14,927l. 12s. 0½d., which the said Cofferer stands charged for. [Ibid.]
April ? Grant to Rob. Bridges, on surrender of Andrew Mills, of the office of waiter in the port of London. [Ibid. No. 174.]
April.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge, to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind:—
Vol. 275. No. Date. King's. Merchants'. Wind. Remarks.
45 April 1 1 2 S.W.
46 " 4 1 6 S.W.
47 " 6 1 2 S.E.
48 " 7 1 1 S.
49 " 10 1 3 S.W.
50 " 11 1 4 E.
51 " 16 3 1 E.
52 " 17 3 3 S.W. Stormy; 4 inward-bound sail went through, and did not stop.
53 " 18 3 6 W.
54 " 19 2 9 S. The Panther has been cast away at Jamaica, but her men were saved. When she went out of England, her master's name was Pasker.
55 " 20 2 S.E.
56 " 22 2 S.S.E.
57 " 23 2 3 S.S.W.
58 " 24 2 5 S.W.
59 " 25 2 9 S.S.E.
60 " 26 2 6 S.
61 " 27 2 5 S.E.
62 " 28 2 N.E.
63 " 29 2 2 E.

Footnotes

  • 1. Mary, wife of George Keith, 8th Earl Marshal of Scotland.