BHO

Charles II: May 1670

Pages 193-248

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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May 1670

May 1.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. The Sun has arrived, bound for New England, and the Polly for Rochelle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 64.]
May 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Advice has received orders to sail for the Downs, to join the Swallow and Kent; it is not known for what design. [Ibid. No. 65.]
May 1.
Hull.
Luke Bourne to Williamson. Two ships have arrived from Holland, and 4 from Bordeaux, with wines and prunes; one ship sailed for Amsterdam with lead, and two large ships are loading with cloth for Hamburg. [Ibid. No. 66.]
May 1.
Guernsey.
A. Andros, bailiff of Guernsey, to Williamson. The office of King's provost here falling void by death, the country justly pretends a power, by virtue of their charters, to elect thereto, but is opposed by — Carey, who was elected and sworn in the times of troubles, but ousted on the Restoration. Carey pretends that by virtue of his former election, he may repossess himself of the place without more ado; but fearing opposition, he has gone secretly into England to endeavour his re-admission. He was never King's provost, but provost of the State of England.
We are confident Lord Arlington will not do anything to our prejudice. Carey has no right to the place. A letter to Lord Arlington will come shortly. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 67.]
May 2. Advices received, being extracts from letters calendared above, touching the arrival and departure of ships from Portsmouth and Falmouth. [Ibid. No. 68.]
[May 2.] Advertisement of a cattle market to be held at Battle, Sussex, Tuesday, 14 June, and the second Tuesday in each month, Battle being 50 miles from London, and the intermediate towns having good accommodation for man and beast. [See London Gazette. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 69.]
May 2.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of George, Bishop of Winchester, to the King, for an order to remit all arrears of tenths due to his Majesty, from churches already or hereafter to be united within the city of Winchester, until the admission of incumbents into them, who will thereafter pay the usual tenths. There are several small parishes in Winchester, some of the churches of which were demolished during the rebellion, and those standing are so much decayed and out of repair, and the yearly income of all of them is so inconsiderable, that no able minister will undertake the care of any, the maintenance not being a competent subsistence. To prevent such inconvenience, an Act was passed for uniting such small parishes, so as to encourage able ministers to undertake the cures. I have united some of the churches within the city, and intend doing more, but I find I shall not prevail with any able person to accept those united, unless the arrears of tenths due to the King, which are chargeable upon the next incumbents, are discharged.
With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, and their report that it will tend to the better payment of the tenths for the future, if the petitioner's request is complied with. Also note for the petition to be sent for from Sir Chas. Harbord, and the particular churches annexed to the report. [Ibid. Nos. 70, 71.]
May 2. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 106.]
May 2.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. [Abr.] Parker, a drunken blade, has come down with an order for the receipt of my muster book of the Mary Rose, which I could not give him, having sent it up by Mr. Hayter's order on Saturday; but the steward has given him a mess book. He complains that you have wronged him in wording your order contrary to his proposals, which I suppose are that he may muster by a better way. "He may do wonders, as well as speak miracles, but if God send me his honesty, I can muster a ship as well as he, with all the new fancies can be invented"; I am much troubled that he could find no one else to play his tricks upon but me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 1.]
May 2. Certificate by Rob. Urre, surgeon of Wapping, and 3 others, that John Wood, a calker at Wapping, is not able to follow his business, from an accident received to his leg. Noted that Rich. Lucas, who pressed him, was ordered to discharge him again. [Ibid. No. 2.]
May 2. Request by Rob. Mayors for a warrant to Deptford, for receipt of timber purchased of Augustine Kingsberry and Capt. [John] Shorter, for completing the new ship building there. Noted that the warrant was made 6 May. [Ibid. No. 3.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to the bailiffs and burgesses of Montgomery, of two new fairs to be held in the said town. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 158.]
May 2. Warrant for denization of John Clement, an alien. [Ibid.]
May 2. Like warrant for denization of Jacob Lukeson. [Ibid.]
May 2. Warrant from Sec. Trevor to John Bradley, messenger of the Chamber, to apprehend Nicholas Lockyer and bring him before him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 35.]
May 2. Warrant for a privy seal for 5,000l. to the Duchess of Orleans, from the moneys to be paid in part of the portion of the Queen Consort, as the King's free gift. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 22.]
May. Docquet of the above, dated 6 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 176.]
May 2. Privy seal for 1,095l. to Sir Gilbert Talbot, Master of the Jewel House, for secret services. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 22.]
May. Docquet of the above, dated 6 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 176.]
May 2. Pass for Lord Paulet, his servants and goods into France. Minute [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 22.]
May 2. Congé d'élire to [the Dean and Chapter of] Bath and Wells to elect Dr. Creighton to that see, void by the death of Dr. Pearse. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 3.]
May. Docquet of the above, dated 6 May, with a letter recommending Dr. Rob. Creighton. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 176.]
May 3. Privy seal for 3,000l. to Richard, Lord Arundel of Trerice, as the King's free gift for services and losses to his Majesty, and his late father. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 22.]
May 3. Warrant for a grant to Hugh May, in place of Adrian May, deceased, of the office of Clerk of Recognizances to be taken before the Chief Justices of the Courts of King's Bench and Common Pleas; or out of term time before the Mayor of the staple of Westminster, or the Recorder of London; fee 3s. 4d. for each recognizance. [Ibid.]
May. Docquet of the two preceding entries, dated 10 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 178.]
May 3. Warrant to Sir Job Charleton, Chief Justice of the County Palatine of Chester, for reprieve of Alice Underwood, condemned to death at the sessions held at Chester 11 April last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 23.]
May 3. Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners, to repair and cover with lead the tower in Windsor called Queen Elizabeth's tower, and the buildings between that and the King's Gate, and 12 feet eastward, to make it a storehouse for arms, and to remove thither the arms now in the keep; also to repair all platforms, batteries, and bridges in or near the said castle, under direction of Prince Rupert, Constable of Windsor Castle. [Ibid.]
May 3.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. The Swallow and Kent have arrived from the Downs, they say to convoy the Newfoundland ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 72.]
May 3.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Reports are constant that the French King has 50,000 horse and foot at St. John Bay, near Calais; the people here are in great dread, our coast being so open and out of repair, and only one company of soldiers in the country. [Ibid. No. 73.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to John Gauntlett, Sarum. News-letter. Lord Fauconberg is believed to have made his entry to the Court of Savoy on 21 April; they write from Genoa that Gio. Augostino Durazzo's palace is prepared for him. There is no account from Rome of an election [of a Pope], though it is speedily expected; but there is a report that Cardinal Chigi and Francesco Barbarino, the heads of the two factions, have met at a private conference.
The Earl of Northumberland, who is esteemed for his general deportment in all places, has gained much at Rome, especially with the French, who challenge to themselves a kind of mastership in the punctilios of honour. The Duchess of Mazarin gave him her picture, which Don Domingo Gusman, brother to the Duke of Medina de los Torres, by some means got out of the possession of the painter. The Earl, being satisfied it was not from any fault of the painter, sent the Don a challenge, by the Duke of Rohan. The Don coldly complied so far as to come into the field with only one of his servants, and not in a fighting posture, and when he alighted from his horse, embraced the Earl, thinking to droll it off; but finding the latter in earnest, the Don took him and the Duke into his coach, and carried them to the Spanish Ambassador's house, where the picture was restored, and they all became friends; after which, to give further satisfaction, he went with them to the Duchess of Mazarine's.
A ship from Tunis reports that Sir John Harman is still there, and that 18 French men-of-war are at Galata, who would have burnt their ships had not the Turks, for prevention, sunk them; and that they have agreed to a peace on procuring the French King's letter, for which a bark has been despatched, the French fleet staying until her return, when they may go to Tripoli.
His Majesty has postponed the Garter sine die. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland arrived in Dublin on the 21st, and having received the sword from Lord Robartes, took his place in the Council. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 74.]
May 3.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I could not obtain the parcel of elm timber, which might have been had for 33s. a ton, girt measure, for want of an assurance of the money, and the land and water carriage would not have come to above 4s. a load; it has since been sold for 34s. 6d. a ton. I hope I shall soon be helped to some timber, as also to hemp for the ropeyard, and money to supply the stores; otherwise I shall have to discharge many men as there is much ill husbandry, and it will be useless keeping so many men in pay without work.
[Thos.] Gould has begun breaking up the Marmaduke, and promises to clear the river of the wrecks he bought; [Rich.] Boyce, who bought the other wrecks, should be sent down to break them up.
The time promised to Mr. Deane for having knees from Portsmouth having expired, I desire to hear about them, as they are wanted for the new ship and the Newcastle. The ship at Portsmouth will be launched at Michaelmas, and as much might be done at Chatham, if the necessary stores were supplied. I have ordered up the horse boat, with the sails demanded by the surveyor, and hope she will not come back empty. The foundation of the great storehouse on the south side of the yard having slipped, I have ordered it to be repaired. Pray consider the condition of the poor men, who have not been paid for 5 months, and have now neither money nor credit; I hope some course will be found for their speedy relief. What shall I say to the pressed men, who claim their customary allowance of board wages, for want of pay ? [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 4.]
May 3.
Deptford.
James Mathews, bricklayer, to Thos. Hayter. My lath man having disappointed me day by day, I have been forced to let the new rigging-house lie by; I have now bargained with another man for 120 bundles of laths, and promised payment on their delivery. Being out of money, pray deposit 12l. in the hands of Edw. Lee, to pay the man for the goods, and I will send a bill for the amount. [Ibid. No. 5.]
May 3. Petition of Ben. Johnson, keeper of the stores at Portsmouth, to the Navy Commissioners. I pray for bills for my salary in arrear; that I may be borne on the quarter books, and have the allowances of servants, &c.; and that my clerks' wages may be made up to shipwright's pay, as formerly granted.
Upon the representation of the Board in 1664, of the increase of naval affairs at Portsmouth, and that the storekeeper deserved 100l. a year, his Royal Highness ordered the salary to be made up to that amount; but it having been previously declared that no storekeeper should be paid until he had balanced his accounts, it was so inserted in the order. The balancing was always to begin and end with a survey, and there not having been one for 4 years, the addition thus made to my salary has been withheld, although no other storekeeper has presented any such accounts before or since. The addition made to the salary and delayed is no more engaged to such balancing than the former is, which is paid by book; I never sued for an augmentation upon such terms, but that my wages might be advanced with my work, to a sufficient sum for an honest man, with such a charge, to live upon, and in proportion to the salaries of other storekeepers; mine is still short of most of theirs. His Royal Highness's orders were not intended to oblige me to any further task or duty than was performed by others in like employment.
Two years after such order, his Royal Highness ordered payment of what was then due of my entire salary, notwithstanding the declared impossibility of the storekeeper's keeping such an account, which has since become an office of itself. In consequence of the augmentation to my salary, the clerk of the cheque for Portsmouth Yard has also obtained an advance, but without any charge or trouble as to the payment of the entire, which is borne on the quarter books. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 6.]
May 3. Lieut. Thos. Kent to the Navy Commissioners. I beg you to issue an order for Wm. Barker, purser of the Milford, to appear before you to answer for cheating his Majesty, and to make satisfaction to those whom he has defrauded.
Barker having alleged that Ben. Atkinson, steward of the Milford from 1665 to 1668, had wasted hogsheads of beef and pork, he prevailed with the captain and purser of the Kent to make him out a ticket for Atkinson from Feb. to Dec. 1665, and received his wages, although no service was done by Atkinson for that time; and upon being questioned about it, alleged that he had kept it for payment of the beef and pork.
He caused the clothes of Wm. Bulley, a seaman of the Milford who was drowned, to be sold at the mart for 3l., and having taken out letters of administration, took that sum, and his wages amounting to 17l., cheating the parents; such doings make seamen unwilling to serve, and make them run. Barker has also detained the ticket of John Finch, another seaman, for 10l., and another belonging to Thos. Powell for 16l., and charged Thos. Robinson—who belonged to the privateer that was cast away, and was entered on board the Milford—2l. 8s. for clothes, when he never had a penny's worth, and was forced to leave the ship for want of them. Noted that Barker was summoned before the Navy Board. [Ibid. No. 7.]
May 4.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Pepys. Let me speak with you or hear from you in writing, as to drawing a warrant for 100l. odd, demanded by Sir Thos. Bond as charges for bringing over some goods belonging to the late Queen Mother, which Sir Thomas desires may be paid into the Navy Office. [Ibid. No. 8.]
May 4. Privy seal for 1,000l. to the Earl of Berkshire, without account, as the King's free gift. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 22.]
May 4. Privy seal for 13,200l. to the Duke of Monmouth, as the King's free gift. [Ibid.]
May 4. Grant to Dr. Ralph Bathurst to be Dean of [Bath and] Wells, in the room of Dr. Creighton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 3.]
May. Docquet of the three preceding entries, dated 10 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 178.]
May 4.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Greyhound has arrived from Croisic, and has heard nothing of the Turkish men-of-war on the coast. The French have sent 10 large ships to Persia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 75.]
May 4.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Marygold of London, bound for Rochelle to load salt, and from thence to Newfoundland for fish for the Straits, has put in by contrary winds. The Guernsey arrived from cruising westward, but has put to sea again. She met a Dutch man-of-war, bound for the Western Islands, with her flag in the main top; but she took it down, and struck her sail, upon the first shot fired at her. It is said that De Witt in Holland is like to lose his head. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 76.]
May 4. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 77.]
May 4.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. The Dorothy has arrived from Rochelle, laden with salt and wines. [Ibid. No. 78.]
May 5. Joseph Binckes to Lord Arlington. It is nine years since I and others discovered the bloody purposes of Venner and his crew, since which time I have made it my business to watch over some of the brood; but now it takes up a man's time, both day and night, to acquaint himself with their intents, it being their custom, when straitened, to meet more by night. I know not what others think touching the execution of the present Act, but I observe in some of them, first, that their resolution is to persist in their observations and worship, like the Egyptians who spared neither gold nor silver to make them an image; second, that a poor mercenary, red-coated soldier, as they call them, will for 8d. a day venture to the cannon's mouth to the risk of his life, which is much more than the loss of a little silver; last, that his Majesty is their enemy, whose cannons they will not fear. I hope his Majesty, being timely informed, will employ such as may prevent those dangers which, in time, may break forth. I gave an account of these things to Lord Carlisle, who commanded me to wait on you. I beg to know your pleasure. [Ibid. No. 79.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to [Thos.] Hill, prebendary of Salisbury. Newsletter to the same effect as those already calendared; also,
Lord Fauconberg is much satisfied with his reception at Turin, where he is treated at the Duke's charge. The French King and his troops were so much harassed between St. Quentin and Landrecies, that Madame and most of the ladies were forced to stay all night in the coaches, till a bridge was made for their better passage; the French King altered his gests by reason of the plague being at Aeth.
The Prince of Orange, having to attend to his own affairs, will not come over at the instalment. The ratification of Sweden is exchanged, so that the business is happily effected. The Crown of Sweden has nominated Count Sparre to act in a joint commission with the Swedish Resident in England, as to settling the limits between the French and Spaniards in Flanders, according to the references to them by the French King; but the concurrence of Spain is yet expected.
Five galleys and five men-of-war are going from Toulon to Tripoli, to strengthen the French fleet.
The Brussels letters maintain their jealousies of the French, and say those people will not be persuaded but that the French King had an intention of attacking Mons and Namur; but that finding them in a posture of defence, he has caused a great quantity of fagots to be made at Binche, since his arrival on the frontiers; also that they admire the altering of his gests, as the plague is not at Aeth, and he has sent 1,000 fresh men thither, though there were 4,000 there before.
The Bishop of Bath and Wells being dead, Dr. Creighton succeeds to that see, and Dr. Bathurst to the deanery. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 80.]
May 5.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Advice has arrived in the Downs from Concord Road. Great preparations are being made at Dover and Canterbury to entertain his Majesty. I hope he will take Deal on his way. [Ibid. No. 81.]
May 5.
Navy Office.
Sir John Mennes to the Navy Commissioners. I send an estimate of the charge for bringing timber out of the forests; I hope it will answer your desires. The surveyor can give the best account as to the goodness of the timber brought in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 9.]
May 5.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Most of the carved works on the London having been fastened in their places. I want to know whether any is to be gilt, so that the painter may proceed with the work. [Ibid. No. 10.]
May 5.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. I want a warrant for the bricklayer to repair my house, and send an estimate of the expense. [Ibid. No. 11.]
May 5.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I have not seen Mr. Wright of Ipswich. The masts would never be used at Harwich whilst they were good, even if I could secure them. If I could have supplied some of the vessels with them last winter, on condition of returning the same quantity to the yards on the river, it would not have taken more than 4 or 5. You desire to have them towed into some of the yards, but it cannot be done without hazard and loss, on account of the wind and weather; a good flyboat would take the whole, which if you will send, I will see it loaded and despatched. Consider the disposal of the two old ships, Blue Boar and White Rose; they lose by lying here. I have received 300 deals, and 6 barrels of Bergen tar. [Ibid. No. 12.]
May 5.
Ipswich.
John Wright to Commissioner John Tippetts. I have appointed the workmen to accompany me down next tide, unless bad weather and extreme rain obstruct. I shall not be wanting to serve you in his Majesty's affairs, and the readier as I have arranged for a journey to London next week, when I can give you a verbal account. Capt. Taylor knows of my coming, with whom I will confer.
When I have seen the quantity and quality of the masts, I shall be the better able to judge, but I conceive it will be as chargeable, and more difficult and hazardous, to tow them in floats than to embark them, unless you have some small vessels of his Majesty's to undertake it; our people both here and at Harwich will exact; of this I will give a particular account at sight. [Ibid. No. 13.]
May 5.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker and J. Uthwat to the Navy Commissioners. We have consulted as to the rigging of the Loyal London, and find certain portions mentioned completed, but about 4/5 ths has to be done; if the proposer will undertake to finish on your terms, the King will be a great gainer by it.
We wish you would treat for similar work to be done on the hulk, as also to lay out moorings for a ship to ride by, to render assistance on launching the London, by which the King would be at a certain charge, and save considerably by it.
We find that several bolts of Sir Wm. Hickman's canvas exceed the pattern in goodness, and if his workmen can be brought to keep to the best sort, it would be a service to the King, though there were some advance in the price, as the cloth is not much inferior to Holland duck, the breadth excepted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 14.]
May 6. Sir Denis Gauden to Pepys. I intreat you to represent to his Royal Highness my account of disbursements to persons employed during the war, so that I may have relief therein, having besides suffered very much by concerning myself in that action, which I was noways obliged to do by contract, but performed it in obedience to his Royal Highness's commands. I pray that you would certify concerning the letters from the Governors and others of the forts, which Sir George Downing sent to you and me, and to which I returned as full an answer as I was able. I beg despatch, as Auditor Beale is ordered to allow the same in my account, which is now upon the close. [Ibid. No. 15.] Encloses,
Account of money paid by the Navy victualler to Thos. Lewis and 9 others named, for their care and expenses in distributing provisions sent in victualling ships for supply of the fleet in Southwold, Ousley Bay, the Gunfleet, &c., during the war with the Dutch; total, 576l. 18s. 7d. [Ibid. No. 15i.]
May 6.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I have directed my son Benjamin, who is going for Ireland, to take care as to the disposal of the victuals provided last year at Kinsale; but for his more regular proceedings therein, I desire an order for some person to join him in taking an account of what is in store, as also the quality and whatever else you judge requisite. [Ibid. No. 16.]
May 6.
Harwich.
Capt. Thos. Langley to Pepys. Capt. Taylor deridingly told me, in the presence of several gentlemen, that he had received a letter from the Navy Office, stating that I had got myself a place, and was to be his assistant. I know nothing of it, nevertheless if I can be thought worthy to serve you in anything, I shall do so. [Ibid. No. 17.]
May 6. Levant Company to Consul Ricaut. Deputy Penning shipped 200 perpetuanoes for Russia, which, by reason of the war, were reshipped for Leghorn, whence they were sent to Smyrna, where he paid the broke. This is to be returned to him, as the goods were casually brought to Smyrna, and also because he has disbursed money on the company's account. Thanks for your diligence; we desire a continuance of it, so as to effectually prevent the irregular importation of goods by private ships, of which we fear some quantity has gone to Smyrna. [Levant Papers, Vol. 5, p. 230.]
[May 6.] Petition of the Merchant Adventurers to the King, for restoration of their suspended charter, under such conditions as may be deemed expedient, as if the trade remains open, they will be unable to continue the expense of its government, and the city of Dort—by removal to which in 1655 they obtained great privileges—will probably refuse to renew the treaty for their reception, which expires in November, the expense being great and the profit, owing to their reduced trade, very small. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 82.] Annexing,
Abstract of the articles, 58 in number, agreed upon between the Merchant Adventurers and the city of Dort, relative to their settlement there.—29 Nov. 1655. [8½ sheets. Ibid. No. 82i.]
Order in Council that the above business be heard in Council on the 20th instant, when the Merchant Adventurers are to bring their charter, and Mr. Kiffen and other interlopers to be summoned to attend. [Ibid. No. 82ii.]
May 6. Revocation of the powers and authorities granted to the Treasury Commissioners, and Chancellor and Barons of the Exchequer, by letters patent of 2 April last. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 176.]
May 6.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York. We wish you to fit out a small vessel for a voyage on our service to Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands, to be commanded by Capt. Jeffry Pierce. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 159.]
May [6].
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a bill to pass the Great Seal, granting a pardon to George Witherington, alias Withington, of the City of London, butcher, of all felonies and other misdemeanours mentioned, as well as of all outlawries, executions, penalties, &c. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 83.]
May 6. Grant of pardon accordingly to George Witherington, of all felonies he may stand charged with, up to the present date. [S.P. Dom., Charles II., Case C, No. 13.]
May 6. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 24.]
May 6. Declaration of the King's approbation of a plain cross, with 3 imperial crowns in chief, as the device of a seal to be used by the Justices of King's Bench and Common Pleas, and Barons of the Exchequer—appointed to determine the value of lands to be purchased for enlargement of the streets in London—to seal their warrants for summoning witnesses thereon. [Ibid.]
May [6].
Whitehall.
Warrant authorising the said Judges and Barons, as Commissioners employed to determine the value of ground to be purchased for enlargement of the streets and other places required for rebuilding the City of London, to adopt and use the said seal of office devised by them. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 83a.]
May 7.
Court at Whitehall.
Licence to John, Earl of Exeter, to hunt in Rockingham Forest the ensuing summer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 160.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of London. We approve your assigning a salary for Thos. Nevile, Comptroller of the Petty Customs, proportionable to his services as receiver of the last duty of 12d. a chaldron on coals; the salary shall be allowed out of your yearly accounts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 160.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir G. Carteret, Vice-Chamberlain of the Household, to pay to Phil. Howard, captain in the regiment of Guards, 304l. 19s. 6d., to be paid by him to the East India Company, being a balance remaining from 1,000l. assigned to them on the Additional Aid, for payment of interest on a loan for the Navy, of which both principal and interest are now repaid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 78.]
May 7. Earl of Carlingford to Williamson. The King having spoken to the Lord Lieutenant about paying my 2,000l., whereunto he consented, and signified this to Lord Aungier, who says he has been instructed not to pay any warrant until the martial and civil lists are satisfied, but he will satisfy me if the King requests him; I ask you to perform that part. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 83b.]
May 7.
Saturday.
Sir Rob. Carr to Perrott. I acknowledge your kindness, and beg you to continue it, news in these remote parts being most welcome. [Ibid. No. 84.]
May 7. Thos. Willis to the Navy Commissioners. Being sued in the Exchequer as security for Simon Dixon, late purser of the Spread Eagle and Unity, I endeavoured to bring Dixon to light, and hearing that his brother Thomas lived near King's Bridge, Canterbury, I sent after him, and received a letter, of which I enclose a copy, declaring that I am not the person who was security. As Dixon chiefly resides with his brother, or at Capt. Ed. Wharell's at Faversham, I hope you will send your messenger to fetch him up, and stay proceedings against me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 18.] Annexing,
Certificate by Simon Dixon, late of Rochester, purser of the Black Spread Eagle and Unity, that Thos. Willis was never his surety.—30 April 1670. [Ibid. No. 18i.]
Affidavit of Thos. Willis, fellmonger of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, that he never was security for Simon Dixon, and never signed any bond or other writing thereon.— 30 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 18ii.]
May 7.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. John Wright and Troth Norris having arrived from Ipswich, I went with them to view the masts, and Norris was to estimate the repairs required to the King's house and stores. [Ibid. No. 19.] Annexing,
Estimate by Troth Norris of the repairs required at the old storehouse and yard at Harwich; total, 195l. 5s.—6 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 19i.]
May 7.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker, master attendant, to Pepys. As to rigging the London and the hulk, and launching the former, I will take all care in saving money, but desire you will provide money to pay the men weekly, or I shall not get them to work, and shall be much hindered. There are but 6 men entered on board the hulk, and I could only persuade them to stay by promising weekly pay. I send the dimensions for the boats for the London; are they to be built in the yard or by contract ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 20.] Encloses,
Memorandum by Jonas Shish, of the dimensions of a longboat, a jolly boat, and a pinnace.—2 May 1670. [Ibid No. 20i.]
May 8.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. Bodham to the Navy Commissioners. John Clothier, who was employed upon the twice-laid stuff and lines, being dead, I recommend Thos. Lacy to succeed him. He was employed thereon before, and although poor, is honest and civil. Noted that a warrant was made for him to do it, 17 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 21].
May 8.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. Has no news to send. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 85.]
May 8.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. The Crown of Plymouth has arrived from Virginia, with tobacco. [Ibid. No. 86.]
May 8.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Yesterday the wife of Sir Rich. Sandys, who accidentally shot himself through the heart, was well delivered of 2 brave boys, who are like to live. There was a report here of some disturbance in London, but it appears to be only a quarrel with 2 or 3 Frenchmen. [Ibid. No. 87.]
May 8. Commission for Ant. Clifford to be ensign to Sir Rob. Holmes. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 10.]
May 9. Commission to Capt. [Herbert] Jeffreys or other officer commanding in chief at York, to command the militia there. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 9. The King to Lord Frescheville. We authorise you and the commander of our forces in York city, not only to command the forces in pay there, but the city militia and such parts of the Yorkshire militia as may be drawn towards York, and all the officers are required to observe your orders. You are also to march into any part of Yorkshire where you think needful, to secure the peace, paying for your quarters. You are also entrusted with the keeping of the keys of the gates and posterns of York as formerly, and you are to open and shut them at pleasure. [Ibid.]
May 9.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. If you have procured his Majesty's grant for refining silver in North Wales, the Dean of Chester [Hen. Bridgeman], and his son-in-law, Capt. Greenhalgh, are willing to join us as partners; but if you have not obtained the grant, they will join interest in the charge and advantage thereof. I have received a reprieve for the poor woman [A. Underwood], and will return a bill for the charge of the warrant, together with the thanks of the petitioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 88.]
May 9.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. Two ships have sailed by from Barbadoes, and another of Hull with wine from Sherrant, the master of which says that there are 6 Turkish men-of-war about the Bay of Biscay, who have taken 4 Holland merchantmen. Mr. Godolphin sailed this morning for Calais; I was there last week, and found great preparations made for the reception of the French King, who is expected 3 June, almost a thousand tents being built for the accommodation of 4,000 men and horse. I hope to see you here when his Majesty comes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 89.]
May 9.
Grimsthorpe.
Earl of Lindsey to Lord Arlington. I beg you to obtain his Majesty's approbation of Bennet Lord Sherard, and William Fitzwilliams as deputy-lieutenants [of co. York], so that I may send them deputations, Sir Martin Lister being disabled by age to act any more, and several other deputy-lieutenants being dead. [Ibid. No. 90.]
May 9.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Twenty ships are in the harbour, including three Dutchmen homeward bound, and a French man-ofwar, which has come to take in some masts that were cast away at the Lizard. A vessel of Pendennis has arrived from Virginia; the Marygold of London and some others outward bound put to sea, but were forced back by contrary winds. [Ibid. No. 91.]
May 9.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Arrival of 5 ships named from Brest, Virginia, Barbadoes, and the Western Islands. [Ibid. No. 92.]
May 9.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Providence of Lyme has arrived from Maryland. She came out with Capt. Eaton of London, and a vessel of Plymouth, and reports that they have had a good crop there this year, but a bad season for tobacco; and that the great mortality lately amongst them has nearly ceased. [Ibid. No. 93.]
May 9. Pass for Don Francesco Fernandez, esquire to the Constable of Castile, and 3 servants to Flanders. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 24.]
May 9. Pass for Sir George Shelley, 2 daughters, and servants to Flanders. Minute. [Ibid.]
May [9]. Order for a warrant for a grant to Dr. Peter Gunning, Bishop of Chichester, of instalment of 609l. 7s. 1½d., first fruits of his diocese, to be paid in 4 years. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 93a.]
May 9. Grant to Dr. Gunning accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 4.] Annexing,
Extract from the records of first fruits and tithes in Chichester diocese, that the value of the bishopric is 677l. 1s. 3d., and therefore the tithes are 67l. 14s. 1½d., leaving the clear value 609l. 7s. 1½d.—5 May 1670. [Parchment. Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 94.]
May. Docquet of the above warrant, dated 16 May. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 180.]
May 9. Account of the present state of the Navy, with reference to its want of money:—
£ s. d.
The debt of the Navy for services done, and goods delivered at and before the end of Dec. 1669, was for the year 1669 36,590l. 7s. 7½d.; and for preceding years 422,401l. 1s. 6¼d. making. 458,991 9
The estimated charge for works and services for 1670 are, ordinary, 80,000l.; charge of the fleet of 50 ships manned with 5,279 men, 265,920l. 4s.; and finishing the new ships building, 17,200l. 363,120 4 0
Extraordinary works, such as the repair of hulls of ships, wharves, docks, and storehouses in the several yards, 52,929l.; supplying the stores with materials necessary for 12 months, 31,132l. 84,061 0 0
Total sum to be supplied. £906,172 13
With note [by Pepys]. These calculations were made from papers enclosed, prepared by Lord Brouncker, Col. Middleton, and Wm. Ewers, and the paper was presented by me, and 5 of my fellow officers of the Navy Office, to the King in Council, on 11 May 1670, in presence of his Royal Highness and the Lords of the Treasury, and was committed by the King to the Treasury Commissioners, to be considered and answered by a suitable supply of money. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 22.] Annexed,
Account of the Navy debt, distinguishing how much was owing upon bills from 1664 to 1670, for the wages due at the yards, also to seamen and to their widows, as well as to the sick and wounded and the victualler, total 501,852l. 8s. 10¾d. Noted that this account differs from the weekly certificates, because the returns of payments made in Lord Anglesey's time are deficient of his payments of money, and clearing of imprests; by how much will not be evidenced until his accounts are completed, until which time the alterations of the weekly certificates are suspended. [Ibid. No. 22i.]
Computation of the charge his Majesty has been and may be at, for wages and victuals for 4,592 to 5,492 men, and the wear and tear of from 49 to 55 ships, employed between Jan. and May 1669 and 1670, amounting to 104,327l., the monthly charge after May being estimated at 20,455l. 8s.; also the monthly charge of keeping 35 ships, with 3,145 men, during the year, which, according to the proposition of 200,000 a year, amounts to 5,973l. 12s. [Ibid. No. 22ii.]
List of 47 ships in service on 6 May 1670, with their rates and number of men to each, which cost in wages and victuals, and wear and tear 254,137l. 6s. 8d., the Roebuck being overlooked, having gone to Tangiers. [Ibid. No. 22iii.]
May 9.
Navy Office.
Sir John Mennes to Col. Thos. Middleton. Having discoursed with John Moorhouse, purveyor, as to the state of Aliceholt and Whittlewood Forests, I send an abstract of his opinion. Pray lay it before his Royal Highness and the Treasury Commissioners, as I am prevented by illness from attending at Whitehall. I have already given the Board an account of the charge the King is at, for each load of timber converted in the forests and delivered into the yards. [Ibid. No. 24.] Annexing,
Notes that in Moorhouse's opinion, in Aliceholt there are 1,000 trees the greater part of which are fit for plank and compass timber, and if not taken down, the keepers will destroy them in a short time.
There are 7,000 oaks in Whittlewood Forest, also fit for plank, 1,000 of which are dying at the top; if the lieutenant and keepers are permitted to head and lop such great quantities every year as they have hitherto done, there will be few oaks left; they have already made 4,000 fit for nothing but logs, or to bear browse for deer. There are also 80 trees in this forest yet to fell, for which directions should be given. In every twelve loads of timber and plank carried into the stores from Whittlewood, there is 50 feet over measure, so that the land and water carriage is saved.
George Goodman has sold the lops of 920 trees felled in 1669, with the bark of 500 more, and the shells from 200 sawn into plank, and has made no account; the Treasury Commissioners ordered that Moorhouse should have 20l. for good services out of the first money made of the waste sold, but it has never been received. If Moorhouse was empowered to purchase knee and compass timber as he found it, and pay ready money, it would not only put a great stop to house carpenters spoiling it, but it would be served into the yards at cheaper rates than it can be bought of the timber merchants. When any timber is sent into the yards from the said forests, the storekeeper should be requested to give the bargemaster a receipt for the same. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 24i.]
May 9.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Thos. Hayter. Several sails have been brought in the horseboat from Chatham, to be sent to the St. Michael at Portsmouth; as it is not mentioned in the bill of lading from Mr. Wilson whether they are to be forwarded or not, pray move the Board about it. I had an order for sending some stores named in the Margate hoy, but Tindell, the master, never fetched them; if the sails are to be sent, a hoy must be taken up for the purpose as they are large, and 22 in number; the hoy can then also take the stores. [Ibid. No. 25.]
May 9.
Deptford.
Same to the Same. I have received a warrant to send some leather and leather scuppers to Woolwich, but I have none in store [Ibid. No. 26.]
May 10.
Ipswich.
John Wright to Commissioner John Tippetts. I went with Troth Norris to Harwich, and viewed the masts as well as I could, they being dispersed in the moats round the town, and mostly in the mud. I find them to be generally sappy and rotten, so I think you ought to send some men to hew them to their several scantlings, which will take away the waste, and save the freight, after which there will be enough to load two flyboats of 250 or 260 tons; this will be the cheapest and most secure way to transport them. There will be some old and refuse masts remaining, which you will have to dispose of. The carpenter has given his report of the repairs, which I will bring with me when I come to London. [Ibid. No. 27.]
May 10. Petition of Lewzy Allen, carver, to the Navy Commissioners, for a recommendation to his Royal Highness to be appointed master carver at Portsmouth, in the room of [John] Rogers, lately deceased. Has wrought upon the carved works in Chatham Yard for 10 years, and was recommended to them by [Thos.] Fletcher, the master carver, to whom he was apprenticed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 28.]
May 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Guernsey has sailed for the Downs; no other shipping has passed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 95.]
May 10. Sir John Wolstenholme to Williamson. I was to have waited upon you about a great business of mine, put into Lord Arlington's hands by his Majesty, but the Customs' business requiring the whole of my time, I desire you will admit Sir Fras. Cobb as my solicitor, and will give your help. I petitioned his Majesty for relief in the two years of the last farm, ending at Michaelmas 1667, pleading my services and sufferings in the late King's time, and the hazard I ran to serve his present Majesty during the plague. It was referred to Prince Rupert, and Lords Arlington and Ashley, to examine an account formerly referred to the Lord Chancellor and the late Lord Treasurer, but never determined, whereby I very much suffer, contrary to his Majesty's intention. I beg your aid in the matter of the two reports or references made on my petition, &c. [Ibid. No. 96.]
May 10. Orders to the Marquis of Blanquefort to entertain 50 gentlemen, horsed and armed, who are to be added to the Duke of York's troop under his command. With note of like orders to recruit the Duke of Monmouth's troop to 100, and the Queen's to 50. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a. f. 13.]
May 10. Order that the King's sister, the Duchess of Orleans, who is about to come into the kingdom, be received with all due respect, according to the directions of the Earl of St. Albans, who is to go beyond the sea to attend her in her passage. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 25.]
[May 10.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 97.]
May 10. Information to Lord Arlington by Sir Brian Broughton, that Simon Robson of Lambeth told Mr. French that a woman said, " If these gentlemen (meaning those of Whitehall) knew the danger they were in, they would not sleep so securely." Sir Brian, who brought this information, had been to Lambeth to inquire further into it. [In Lord Arlington's hand. Ibid. No. 98.]
May 11.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. To the same effect as his letter to Hickes of 9 May. [Ibid. No. 99.]
May 11.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. The Blessing of Salcomb has arrived with wines and brandy from Nantes. [Ibid. No. 100.]
May 11.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Advice has sailed; 'tis reported she has gone for the Duchess of Orleans; the Amity, now a merchantman, is bound for Jamaica. [Ibid. No. 101.]
May 11.
Rugeley, near Lichfield.
Wm. Chetwynd to Williamson. It was my misfortune not to have stayed in town to welcome your return from Newmarket, where I heard your health was so good, and your complexion so refined, that you came back not so yellow by twenty guineas. Without doubt you narrowly escaped the jaundice, and that pleasant cure of devouring your fellow creatures, who once ate up a member of the House of Commons. I rejoice that you have escaped the many-legged vermin, and hope you may be as well preserved from the two-legged ones; and may that modesty which has hitherto been your guard defend you from the treachery of full veins and a liquorish appetite. These wishes were to have been delivered by Capt. Musgrave, but doubting whether he performed the will of the departed, I shall walk and appear to you, but suddenly vanish. I hope I may hear your Parrott talk once a week. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 102.]
May 11.
Treasury Chambers.
Minute for Lord Aungier, that the orders are to be renewed to Lord Berkeley as was done to Lord Robartes, about bringing the money in on the Duke of Ormond's bargain, for which the Duke is to be paid on this establishment. [Ibid. No. 103.]
May 11. Joseph Binckes to Lord Arlington. The Nonconformists are in great trouble by reason of the late Act. There are 3 other meetings, beside the 7 I told you of, in one parish. In Old Street, one of 200 or 300; Mr. Partridge, chaplain to Chas. Fleetwood when deputy in Ireland, is their teacher; in Goswell Street, one of 400 or 500, Fras. Smith, bookseller at Temple Bar, teacher; in Mugwell Street one of 400 or 500, Mr. Doelittle teacher. If you wish me to attend and inform you of the behaviour of these people, please to order Mr. Williamson to allow me a reasonable subsistence, that I may not want daily bread. [Ibid. No, 104.]
May 11.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. I return mine and other gentlemen's thanks for the reprieve obtained for a poor woman [Alice Underwood] whose innocence has more clearly appeared to the Judge; I return a bill of exchange to defray the expense. When the Judge has certified, and a further collection has been made for her, we shall make application for a pardon. I hope you have received my letter by my brother Pennington; when you have done anything in it, pray let me know. [Ibid. No. 105.]
May 11. Dr. J. Durel to Williamson. I send certain briefs by order of Lord Arlington, who has copies, the contents of which are to be inserted in the order preparing for the admission of Mr. de Breval as one of the ministers of the French congregation in the Savoy. I desire you to insert the proviso; if you see any alteration requisite, let me be informed of it, and let the order be drawn with all speed. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 106.] Annexing,
Proviso in the admission of Sieur Breval as one of the ministers of the French congregation in the Savoy, that he shall not interfere with the salaries of De L'Angle and Dumaresque, the other ministers, nor share in the royal benevolence granted at their request. In case of the death of Dr. John Durel, De. L'Angle is to succeed him, and so the right of seniority to be kept as by law established. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 107.]
M. de Breval to Williamson. I preach at the French church to-morrow at 9. I hope to see you on Monday, and to hear good news on our business with Mr. F. I commend the bearer, M. Billiers, a man lately converted from the same errors as myself, whom Lord Arlington thinks of taking to discourse to him about curious things. Endorsed with notes of a letter [by Williamson] relative to Mr. Martin's pretensions on his Majesty's mandamus. [French. Ibid. No. 108.]
May 11. Declaration of the King's approbation of Francis Durand de Breval, elected in usual form by the French reformed church at the Savoy as one of their pastors, and order to the said congregation to give him due obedience, so that his admission do not prejudice Sieurs De L'Angle and Dumaresque, the present ministers, and that he receive no contribution until they are paid their stipends; also order that in case of John Durel's death, De L'Angle shall succeed him in the chief care of the church, both on account of his seniority in the ministry, and his known prudence and good parts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35 B, f. 4.]
[May 11.] Draft of the said declaration, omitting the proviso. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 109.]
May 11.
Court at Whitehall.
Pass for 2 horses into Holland, as a present to the Duke of Neuburg. [Ibid. No. 110.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of Exeter. We recommend Hugh Humphries, milliner, freeman of London, who has lived some time in Exeter, to be admitted to the freedom of your city, his father having suffered much in the royal cause. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 161.]
May 12.
Southampton.
Capt. Emondes Greene to Surveyor Middleton. What is to be done with the flyboat I seized at Portsmouth for having his Majesty's stores on board ? I seized the timber with the King's mark, which Mr. Cardonnel owned; you ordered it to be restored, but those in fault for marking the timber were to pay the charges, 40s. I seized on board a ship bound for Newfoundland a quantity of iron spikes of all sizes, sold to them by Thos. Faloe, who is a common dealer in these things. I keep them till your further order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 29.]
May 12.
London.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I send an account of provisions shipped in the Guinea frigate, for Sir Edw. Spragg's squadron. I have given a certificate of what was shipped but hear that she is detained by the officers at Gravesend, and unless speedily cleared, will lose the opportunity of sailing with the other victuallers. [Ibid. No. 30.]
May 12.
Custom House, London.
Sir John Wolstenholme and 3 other Farmers of Customs to Lord Brouncker. We have ordered the despatch of the Guinea frigate with the provisions, although the Navy victualler has not passed warrants and taken out a certificate. As advantage may be taken by merchants and others carrying the same for their own interest, under colour of its being for his Majesty's advantage, we desire that in future Sir Denis Gauden may have directions not to put any victuals on board, until notice has been given at the Custom House, and warrants have been passed according to law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 31.]
[May. 12.] Grant to Tim. Turner, serjeant-at-law, of the office of one of the King's serjeants-at-law. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 111.]
May 12.
The Revenge.
Certificate by Sir Edw. Spragg that Rich. Swanley, late master of the Revenge, was well conducted and diligent during his service, and was discharged at his own request. [Ibid. No. 112.]
May 12. Certificate that Jean Baptiste Damascene is admitted to be physician in ordinary to his Majesty, and writ of protection for him. [Ibid. No. 113.]
May ? Petition of George Ashwell to the King, for presentation to the rectory of Uploman, co. Devon, void by promotion of Dr. Creighton to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. With note by Walter, Bishop of Oxford, in favour of the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 113a.]
May 12. Presentation of George Ashwell to the said rectory. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 4.]
May 12. The petition of the Marquis of Worcester, for a discharge of all moneys due to his Majesty by his late father at the time of his death, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, who are to inquire into the several parts of the petition, and certify, the King wishing to show favour to the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 107.]
May 12.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of William, Lord Widdrington, to the King, for a patent empowering him to make a harbour and pier in Cammas River, or in the ground of North Seaton, Northumberland, and for a grant to him and his heirs of such harbour, and of all the ground he shall recover from the sea, between high and low water mark, for the building and safety of the harbour, together with all rights, royalties, and privileges within the river and ground of North Seaton; also that it may be annexed to the port of Berwick; also that a person may be appointed by the Customs officers to reside there, and grant docquets or clear ships as in other places.
If the harbour and pier were made, it would encourage the gentry of the country to set out busses and other small vessels for the fishing trade, and in a short time it might be made fit to export and import commodities, which would add considerably to the customs. The petitioner, being always ready to contribute to the King's service or the good of his country, has already felled timber and set on men for building ships and boats, and is willing to build a commodious harbour in the said river at his own cost.
With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners; their reference, 8 June, to Sir Chas, Harbord and the Farmers of Customs; Sir Charles' report, 21 June 1670, in favour of a grant to the petitioner of the marsh at or near the mouth of the river, not exceeding 20 acres, with power to erect a harbour and port fit for the reception of all shipping, with piers and other works requisite for keeping open the channel, reserving a rent of 4d. an acre on the land enclosed, with the customs and duties payable to his Majesty in other ports, provided such harbour and port be finished within 10 years, or else the grant to be void.
Report by Sir John Wolstenholme and 3 other Farmers of Customs, 28 June 1670, that the erecting of such harbour will be an advantage to the service, and that when finished, the same privileges granted to other member ports should be allowed to this, and his Majesty's officers have their deputies to reside there, as in other ports.
Final report by the Treasury Commissioners, 11 July 1670, in favour of the grant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275. Nos. 113b, 113c.]
May 12. Entry of the reference of the said petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 107.]
May 12. Like reference of the petition of Sir Ralph Delaval, that his sluice at Seaton may be annexed to the port of Newcastle. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Capt. Thos. Littleton, of Sandford, co. Somerset, to the King, for the grant of a licence for 7 years, to transport clay from Browne's Pit in the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset, it being fit to make a sort of earthenware called bastard china, which will not infringe on any law or statute in force.
Engaged with Charles I. at York, being then a lieutenant of foot in Sir Ralph Dutton's regiment, and was made captain of horse in Sir Hugh Wyndham's regiment, and so continued during the whole war. Was also engaged with the Duke of Buckingham and the Earl of Holland in Surrey, and was in that unfortunate charge at Nonsuch Heath with Lord Francis [Villiers], the Duke's brother; marched with the Duke to St. Neots and charged in the Inn Court, to his Grace's relief, and in the green, on the backside of the town, with his Grace, to endeavour the rescue of the Earl of Holland and [Col.] Dalbier; then went to Pomfret, and served the Governor, Col. [John] Morris, for which he was condemned to die by a council of war, had he not made his escape. Was instrumental in his Majesty's preservation at Trent, and was employed by Col. Fras. Wyndham in getting a ship for Lord Wilmot, which he performed, though it was not used, for which Lord Wilmot promised that if his Majesty was ever restored, petitioner should be rewarded. Was in divers eminent engagements, such as Edghill, Brentford, Covert, Lansdowne, Devizes, first Newbury fight, Aylesford, and last with the Duke of Buckingham, and has relieved and preserved many poor and suffering cavaliers, in time of the greatest danger and persecution, which all the loyal gentlemen of Somerset can testify, as also to his services and sufferings. With reference thereon to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 114.]
May 12. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 107.]
May 12.
Swansea.
John Man to Perrott. A vessel of Bideford has arrived with wine from Rochelle, the master of which affirms that there were several men-of-war there triple manned, and many other vessels, laden with ammunition and instruments of war; and that in Sherrant, and other ports, vessels were being prepared for their rendezvous at Rochelle, where 50 or 60 sail are to meet; their design is not known, but it is reported that the commanders are to open their orders at sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 115.]
May 12.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Advice has sailed for Dunkirk, and the Guernsey came in and went out again, both going to wait upon Madame. Two of his Majesty's pleasure boats have passed by, and are also supposed to have gone to Dunkirk. Twenty-two Dutch vessels have arrived, under convoy from Amsterdam; the skipper and steersman of one of them, mistaking the light of the North Foreland for that of his man-of-war, ran aground to the east of the Goodwin, but the ship has been brought into the Downs by the Deal men. [Ibid. No. 116.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to Fras. Buller, M.P., Isleham Hall. Newsletter. The triple alliance is completed, and the ratifications exchanged at the English Embassy's house at the Hague. The Swedish Minister had assignations for the money from the Council of State, on the bank of Amsterdam, so that nothing remains but to despatch what has been offered by the Emperor, and some German princes, in relation to their admittance to the alliance; in order that his Majesty may be satisfied about that, they are despatching Van Beuningen for England, who comes without the character of Ambassador, as Deputy of the Assembly of the States General. The Dutch are not without their apprehensions of the French, having advice that the King carries a great sum in louis d'or, and much more than will defray his expenses; that he is upon some great design, and that it is not improbable his aim is at Cologne.
A courier passing through Paris from Rome reported the election of Cardinal Altieri, a creature of Clement IX., and one of the last promoted Cardinals, as Pope; he is 82 years of age. There is a dismal account of the French King's passage, and a talk of his sudden return, his grandees being compelled to cast lots for barns to lie in.
Sir Geoffrey Palmer, Attorney-General, being dead, Sir Heneage Finch, Solicitor-General, succeeded him on the 6th, and kissed his Majesty's hand; Sir Edw. Turner, Speaker of the House of Commons and Attorney to the Duke of York, is made SolicitorGeneral, Sir Edw. Thurland, formerly the Duke's Solicitor, being his Attorney again.
The Quarter Sessions usually held at Taunton at Midsummer are, by an order in Council, to be in future held at the same time at Bridgewater, and those held at Bridgewater at Michaelmas are to be held at the same time at Bath.
The Guernsey frigate has returned from cruising westward, but can give no account of the Turks.
A vessel from Nieuport reports that they have cleared all their sluices there, and intend to let in the water at spring tide, and drown the country and parts adjacent, as a further security on the approach of the French army, and that the like has been done at Mons and Valenciennes.
The Jersey, Centurion, and Fame, on anchoring at Genoa on 26 April, were saluted by the merchantmen there, which the Centurion answered with 5 guns, and the city mistaking it for a salute to them, gave 3 from the castle, and sent to Capt. Poole, of the Jersey, to do the like; but he refusing, they desired him to go out into the road, which he said he would do, but then they must expect to fetch their money from Leghorn, since which he has heard no more of them.
There is a discourse among the Italians that the French would have searched the Tunisian, which went with Sir John Harman, for contraband or Jews' goods, but that Sir John having sent word they must first sink him, they gave him no further trouble.
We are advised from Vienna, that Count Starenberge, Governor of Tokay, in Upper Hungary, being invited to a feast by Prince Ragotzki, was then secured, and Tokay immediately besieged, but that the Imperial forces were marching to its relief; that upon further examination of Count Serini and Frangipani, they were more strictly confined, than before; that Prince Ragotzki, who was of the confederacy with Count Serini, and had married his daughter, was so far wrought upon by the letters sent to him by the Count, that he had resolved to lay down his arms, and submit to the Emperor's mercy; so that matter is now looked upon as settled. It appears that the Count should not have stirred till July, when the Turks would have been in a posture to assist him; but the Count's design being smelt before, he was forced to take resource to arms for his present security, and so gave the Emperor [Leopold I], who had prepared for him, the opportunity for an easy victory.
The Hague is a little emptied of her public ministers, the French and Swedish Ambassadors having gone to wait on the French King in Flanders. Don Francesco de Velasco, the son of the Constable of Castile, has sent for fresh orders, the King being now on the French, and not on the Spanish territories, and not having kept to the first course.
Some French gentlemen who were made prisoners in the King's Bench, on a charge of robbery, have been tried before the Lord Chief Justice at Westminster, and acquitted.
The time of the arrival of the Duchess of Orleans is not known, nor whether she will come to London, or only as far as Dover or Canterbury; but carriages are ordered to be in readiness on Saturday, in case she does not come beyond Canterbury. More is expected to be known on the return of [Sydney] Godolphin, who has been sent for that purpose. To-morrow the Earls of Sandwich and St. Albans are going over in the Mary Rose to meet her. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 117.]
May 13 ? Notes of the petition of John Huby, or Uby, against Sir Phil. Monckton, read at the Council table.
That John Browne spoke treason, viz.: the King is the son of a whore, and the veriest rogue that ever reigned, and has no more right to the crown than I have; one of the family, steward to a great man, went into a strange land and took the name of Stewart, &c. For such speeches he was sent to York Castle, but Monckton, being sheriff, let him go before his trial. At the trial he favoured Browne, and said the prosecution was malicious.
In the late times Browne was long a soldier against the King, yet the sheriff obtained his acquittance, becoming bail for him, and had a thanksgiving sermon preached in York Minster for his deliverance.
The sheriff has incited 60 suspected plotters to trouble those that caused them to be imprisoned, saying it was done without authority. He allows disaffected persons to ride armed. He behaved so badly last assizes that there was danger of a riot, and thus the King's government is slighted, his person reviled, and the fanatics much heightened. Endorsed [by Williamson], " Mr. Uby." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275. No. 118.]
[May 13.] Note of a petition which Sir Phil. Monckton intends to prefer against Lord Chief Justice Kelynge, for his proceedings against —Benson, whom he wished to enter into recognizances to appear to a charge which was not given him, nor the name of the informant, and detained him in town all the vacation; on which Benson prays that Sir Philip may be allowed to proceed at law. [Ibid. No. 119. Mentioned in Privy Council Book, 13 May 1670.]
May 13. Memorandum [corrected by Williamson], that Richard Lincoln had a cause heard before the Master of the Rolls last Michaelmas term, wherein Thos. Hunston was complainant, and Rich. Lincoln, and Frances his wife, and John Roberry, and Mary his wife, were defendants; when it was decreed that the plaintiff should pay the defendants several sums of money, which their necessitous occasions make them very pressing for. As the complainant has not obeyed the decree, it is suggested that he be enjoined by order of the court to make a speedy payment, or that the plaintiff's bill may be dismissed. [Ibid. No. 120.]
May 13. Advices received, being extracts from letters already calendared, and from the following:—
Dublin, May 7.—Three Turkish men-of-men were seen upon the coast near Cork, and it is feared that they have taken 3 ships belonging to that town and Kinsale, one being worth 20,000l. It was feared they would have come ashore, and so preparations have been made to prevent them.
Kinsale, May 3.—The Maryland merchant of Bristol has arrived from Virginia, and also a French ship; the latter reports that a ship of London of 10 guns met a Turk of 40 guns off Ushant, but that they did not engage, as 3 other sail were in sight, and stood after them. [Ibid. No. 121.]
May 13.
Hull.
Luke Bourne, for Chas. Whittington, to Williamson. The Merchant's Adventure and Exchange sailed for Hamburg, richly laden with cloth, also 2 vessels for Holland, with lead, cloth, and rapeseed; 2 ships have arrived from Holland and 2 from Norway with deals. [Ibid. No. 122.]
May 13.
Cockpit.
Dr. Thos. Gumble to Williamson. I send a history of the late Lord General's life, which I have written at the importunity of his friends, and because no other person attempted the business that understood his personal abilities and designs, they being much concealed by his natural temper. I am sure to be censured by men of another persuasion, but as a faithful servant, who saw him to his grave, I must embalm his memory with the remembrance of his services, which neither the King nor the kingdom have forgotten; it would have been a reflection upon his servants if not one of them could have given an account of him to the world. I have most unwillingly undertaken it, but I would not be imposed upon by the opinions of others, even his nearest relations, and have written for truth's sake, and without hope of anything but trouble and censure for my pains. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 123.]
May 13.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant from the King, as patron of the rectory of St. Bartholomew's, London, empowering Dr. Ralph Brideoke, Dean of Sarum and rector of St. Bartholomew's Church, to lease all the ground upon which the rector's house stood for 40 years to Henry Whistler, at the rent of 25l. a year, and also the land where 8 shops formerly stood, for 70l. a year, to be paid to the said rector. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 162.]
May 13.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to George, Duke of Buckingham, of the holding of 3 yearly fairs and a weekly market at Helmesley, co. York. [Ibid. f. 162.]
May 13.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. We have testimony to show that John Turner, B.A., scholar of your college, deserves encouragement in the prosecution of his studies. We therefore recommend him for election to the first vacant fellowship, of what county soever the said fellowship shall happen to be. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 156.]
May 13. The King to Col. John Russell. Having granted you one private soldier's pay out of each of the 24 companies in your regiment, you are to give orders for a soldier to be disbanded from each company, next muster, but the names are still to be continued, and the money stopped by the paymaster, and allowed to you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29. p. 37.] Annexing,
List of 24 soldiers to be dismissed from, the 24 companies in the regiment of Col. Russell. [Ibid. p. 38.]
May 13. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox, paymaster of the forces, to allow to Col. John Russell the pay of one soldier out of each of the 24 companies in his regiment, who is to be disbanded, but the names still kept on the muster roll. [Ibid. p. 39.]
May 13. Warrant to Henry Howard and Sir Cecil Howard, Commissaries General of Musters, to retain the names of the said 24 disbanded soldiers on the muster rolls, sending orders accordingly to the several deputies in the regiment whom it may concern. [Ibid. p. 40.]
May 13. Commission to John Mullins to be ensign to Capt. Henry FitzJames at Portsmouth. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 11.]
May 13. Like commission to John Arundel to be ensign to Lord Arundel at Pendennis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a. f. 11.]
May 13. The King to the Governors of Sutton's Hospital. We request that the promotion given to Dr. Tim. Thirscrosse in Eton College may not deprive him of the place of preacher in your hospital, which he will frequently attend to in person; we will request the Provost and Fellows of Eton to grant him convenient liberty to attend his duties at the Charterhouse. We desire that he may be allowed to recommend a pious and able man as his assistant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 49.]
[May 13.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 124.]
May 13. Warrant for a licence for John Thompson, High Sheriff co. Bucks, to pass beyond seas and remain for 6 months, for his better education. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 26.]
[May 13.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 125.]
May 13. Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners to deliver to Capt. Zachary Gillam certain pieces of ordnance, for the service of the Hudson's Bay Company. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book. 34, f. 26.]
May 13. Warrant for a grant to Thos. Boreman of the place of underkeeper of the palace at Greenwich, yearly fee 20l. for keeping the great house and galleries, 13l. 6s. 8d. for the White House and buildings annexed, and 18l. 5s. for keeping the gardens. [Ibid.]
May 13. The King to the Provost and Fellows of Eton. We recommend Philip Fell, B.D., Fellow of All Souls, Oxford, for the first vacant fellowship in your college. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b f. 5.]
May 14. Pass for the French Ambassador and his train, with 7 horses, to go to Calais, and repass without custom. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 27.]
May 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Pass for the Earl of St. Albans to transport 4 horses into France for his own use. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 126.]
May 14. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 27.]
May 14. Commission to John Birch, Edw. Wingate, and Edm. Waring to put in execution the Acts for granting his Majesty an imposition on wines and vinegar, and for raising 310,000l. on wine and other liquors, in and within 10 miles of London, Westminster, and Southwark. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 179.]
May 14.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker and J. Uthwat to Pepys. The charge of rigging and fitting for sea for 6 months a fifth and sixth rate frigate, which shall equal the Milford, Pearl, Francis, or Roebuck, will be 820l. for the former and 500l. for the latter, for rigging, tackle, and boatswain and carpenter's stores. [S.P. Dom., Car. II, 284, No. 32.]
May 14. Jonas Shish to Pepys. I estimate the charge of building the hulls of a fifth and sixth rate frigate, dimensions mentioned, which shall be equal to the Pearl and Francis, at 7l. a ton, or 1,977l. 10s., for the fifth-rate, and 6l. 10s. a ton, or 973l. 7s. 6d., for the sixthrate. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 33.]
May 14.
Chatham.
Isaac Walker to the Navy Commissioners. Several ships named, lying at Deptford, Woolwich, and Chatham, having to be painted, I beg the customary bill of imprest on account. Noted that 200l. was granted. [Ibid. No. 34.]
May 14.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I went, according to Col. Middleton's order, to Cobham Park, and viewed the timber, which is red and shaken, and not fit for my purpose. I used all possible means to get the men in the yard to work, but all have left save about 20; it is very hard with most of them. I wish I had wherewith to finish the new ship, which has another defective plank in her bilge, and we have shifted four already. [Ibid. No. 35.]
May 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of the Dean and Chapter of Holy Trinity Cathedral, Winton, to the King. The houses of the dean and 7 prebendaries were in the late rebellion totally demolished, the greater part of 2 more were pulled down, and only 3 were left standing on their old foundations, which are very ruinous. Since your Majesty's restoration, we have rebuilt and repaired all the houses, some small reparations and additions only excepted, but there is a great irregularity between the houses of the prebendaries, the new erections much exceeding the old in beauty and convenience.
There are clauses in our statutes requiring that the new prebendary, upon every vacancy, shall succeed to the same house which his predecessor enjoyed, and shall, stand charged to keep it in repair; whereby it often happens that the senior prebendary has the meanest house, and the junior, who commonly resides least upon the place, has the best in the close, to the great inconvenience of the society, and contrary to equity and good order. In rebuilding our houses, we have laid the foundations upon new sites, and made new allotments of ground, and houses different from those possessed by our predecessors before the wars; so that without your Majesty's interposition, many controversies may arise between future deans and prebendaries. Also some erections have been made by private persons upon some remote parts of the churchyard, in the time of the usurpation, which prove in no way indecent or inconvenient to the church; but if pulled down or demolished,—as required by a clause in our statutes,—those who have built or paid for them will be much prejudiced and impoverished.
We therefore pray you to repeal the clauses in our statutes concerning succession to vacant prebends, and reparation of the dean and prebendaries' houses, and to enact that upon the vacancy of any prebend, it shall be lawful for the remaining prebendaries according to seniority, to elect or refuse any house of prebendaries that happens to be vacant upon elections, without taking any new grant or collation; the junior prebendary to have such house only as shall remain void after such elections, according to the practice of the cathedrals of Westminster and Windsor.
We further request you to direct that the reparations and additions to the houses in the close may be done in future at the common charge of the church, and by such rules as shall be established by us, and approved by the visitor of the church, and that the dean and chapter only shall be liable to suits for dilapidations. Also that your Majesty will confirm the several interchanges and allotments made, in such way as may for ever conclude and oblige us and our successors. Lastly, that you will permit and order the erections built in the churchyard before your return, to be continued and disposed of by the church, anything in our statutes to the contrary notwithstanding.
With reference thereon to the Lord Keeper, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bishops of Winchester and Oxford; and their report that his Majesty may grant what is asked, save as to the clause touching the erections in the churchyard, with which they do not think fit to meddle; also that his Majesty should signify his pleasure to the dean and chapter, so that the same may be registered in the book of chapter acts of the church, and be subscribed by the present dean and prebendaries and their successors, before his or their instalment.—25 May 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 127. See p. 271, supra.]
May 14. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 109.]
May 14.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Limetree arrived in 5 weeks from Virginia. A good crop of tobacco is expected there this year. They have had much sickness amongst them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 128.]
May 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Chas. Perrott. About 100 sail of colliers have passed by, bound for London. [Ibid. No. 129.]
May 14.
London.
A. Ellis to [Williamson]. I will show Sir John Skelton's letter, about the postmastership of Plymouth, to Sir John Bennett. I have preserved the widow, for whom he writes, in the employment, as she was the wife of an extraordinary honest man. Understanding however that Sir Thos. Clifford was concerned for another person, whom Sir John Skelton was against, I thought it would not be good manners to further press in her behalf, as the matter would be settled so as to satisfy Sir Thos. Clifford. A packet from the Ambassador in Turkey to Sir Eliab Harvey has been forwarded to his house. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 130.]
May 14.
Chester Castle
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Williamson. Lord Robartes has landed at Holyhead, but I do not know his proceedings. I have received a most seditious pamphlet entitled, "Some seasonable and serious Queries upon the late Act against Conventicles," tending to discover how much it is against the express word of God, the positive law of the nation, the law and light of nature, and principles of prudence and policy, and therefore adjudged by the law of the land to be null and void; several extracts therefrom. The pamphlet tends to the stirring up of sedition and rebellion, and I heartily wish that both the author and printer may be known and punished. [Ibid. No. 131.]
May 14.
Bristol.
Jo. Fitzherbert to Williamson. The Katherine, the Richard and James the Submission and the Ann of Bristol have arrived with tobacco from Virginia, and advise that the tobacco crop has much decayed this year by the storms of rain. The Hope of Bristol and a ketch have come in from Barbadoes with sugar, the Experiment from Oporto with oil, and the Angel from Gottenburg with iron, pitch, and tar. The Quakers in Bristol have met more openly since the Act, and return from their assemblies in numbers of 6 or 10 together, as if they intended to outface the law and authority. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 132.]
May 15.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. Four ships named have arrived from Virginia, laden with tobacco. [Ibid. No. 133.]
May 15.
Serjeants' Inn.
Sir Wm. Morton to Williamson. I send the examinations of Poulter and Agard, and request you to communicate the paper subscribed by Cox to Lord Arlington, and desire his advice as to whether I shall arrest him. Poulter says he can do no more hereabouts, but could in the West, and wishes to have some money and be gone. I have already advanced him 35s.; is he to have any more ? I have sent John Hickes, alias Lloyd, a victualler in Newgate Market; Alexander Nowell, a soldier in Lord Oxford's Regiment; John Richardson, servant to Mr. Elliott of Cobblers' Hall, near St. James's Gate; and Wm. Norris, son of Dr. Norris, Chaplain to Col. Russell's regiment of the King's Guards, to Newgate. They are all of a new gang, and drawn in to commit robberies by Swift Nix, and [Humble] Ashenhurst, and had appointed to meet Ashenhurst in a house in St. Giles, where they were arrested; but Nix and Ashenhurst kept away from fear of discovery. I hope to have them shortly. [Ibid. No. 134.] Annexing,
Information of Dionise Agard, of St. Martin's, lodging with Wm. Harris, jacksmith in Long Acre, taken before Sir Wm. Morton, Justice of the King's Bench. Was present at the Bell in Bell Yard with John Poulter, when he heard Nich. Cox, an Anabaptist, of Cross Lane, Lukener's Lane, St. Giles, say that he would not submit to the new Act made against conventicles; that he would be hanged at his own door before he would change his religion, and that he usually went to meetings and conventicles; saw Cox write a note, and put his mark to it as a witness, in the presence of Cox and Poulter. Also,
Information of John Poulter before the same. Met Cox in Cross Lane, where they drank together, and Cox understanding that he was an Anabaptist, desired to speak with him privately, whereupon they went to the Bell in Bell Yard; in course of conversation as to the Act against conventicles, Cox said that the King had acted worse than Nebuchadnezzar, as he acted in ignorance, but the King had acted wilfully, to pull down violence upon his own head; and that if the informant was willing to stand for the Lord, he could recommend him to some friends, and thereupon wrote a note produced, to which the informant, as well as Agard and Wm. Woodall, set their marks, &c., as witnesses. —12 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 134i.]
Statement by Nich. Cox and 2 others that Cox is a Baptist, and came from Northamptonshire, and that since being in London, he had been with Brother Miles and others, in Gun Yard, Bishopsgate Street, and Charteris [Charterhouse ?] Yard, and that they, together with Fox, Fowell, and many more, will be true to King Jesus, the King of all Kings, in this cause of the Lord's battle in the gospel. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 134ii.]
May 15. Notes of persons convicted by Sir Sam. Starling, Lord Mayor of London, for preaching and assembling at conventicles 15 and 22 May within the City, viz., Seth Wood, residing near the Red Lion, Gray's Inn Lane, for preaching in Blackfriars; John Adams, weaver, of Brick Lane, Middlesex, for preaching in Dunning's Alley, Bishopsgate; David Bramley, clerk, of Moorfields, for teaching in a common yard in Petty France, London; Geo. Fox and Wm. Warwick, Quakers, for preaching in Whitehorse Yard, Gracechurch Street; John Burnett, Quaker, for preaching in Devonshire House, without Bishopsgate; Ant. Palmer, clerk, for preaching in Scalding Alley, Poultry; Nath. Grascombe, clerk at Rob. Carr's, St. Ann's Lane, Westminster, for preaching at Turner's house in New Street, between Shoe Lane and Fetter Lane. Fined 20l. each, being their first offence.
Nath. Overton, stationer, of West Ham, Essex; Hen. Overton, brewer's clerk, of Allhallowes, London Wall; Hen. Dorney, merchant, of Bell Alley; John Low, musician; Eucharist Batchelour, merchant, of Houndsditch; John Tudman, merchant, of Chiswell Street, and 9 other tradespeople and servants. Fined 5s. each for being present at such meetings, this being their first offence. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 135.]
May 16.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. Bodham to Pepys. The men gave over working on Friday and Saturday, as I supposed by persuasion of the dockmen, for want of pay. I hoped their faith and patience would have returned to them ere this, and they to their work, but the summons of the bell was slighted for the third time this morning; so I think it time to ask you to lay the matter before the Board, who will take as little pleasure in their perverseness as I do. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 36.]
May 16. Report by John Wright, of Gottenburg and other masts, &c., lying at Harwich. [Ibid. No. 37.]
May 16. Caveat in favour of Sir Thos. Clifford that no grant pass of the rectory of Northleu [Northleigh ?] without his lordship's consent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
May 16. Warrant to pay to Sir Thos. Osborne and Sir Thos. Littleton, baronets, Navy Treasurers, 200,000l. on account for Navy service. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 180.]
May 16. Warrant to release Paul Adams, late receiver of the revenue of fire hearths, co. Sussex, from 1,001l. 10s. 6d. arrears due at Michaelmas 1665, with 185l. 16s. interest charged thereon since, and to cancel the bonds of Lord Willoughby and Thos. Walsingham concerning the same. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 180.]
May 16. Grant to Geo. Lubbick, alien, to be a free denizen of England. [Ibid.]
May 16.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Ordnance officers to repair Queen Elizabeth's tower in Windsor Castle, and the buildings between it and the King's gate, to the same purport as that of May 3, [p. 195, supra], omitting the clause for the repairs to be under direction of Prince Rupert [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 136.]
May 16.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Two pleasure boats have passed through the Downs towards Dover. Madame landed there this morning. I write lest Mr. Carlile be too busy. [Ibid. No. 137.]
May 16.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Lord Robartes arrived at Holyhead from Ireland last week, reached Chester on Saturday, and this morning left for London. Some fanatics were taken in a conventicle yesterday, and the meeting dispersed, but they met again in the afternoon, with the like results, and will be prosecuted according to law. [Ibid. No. 138.]
May 16.
Chester.
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Williamson. In my last I gave you the title of a seditious pamphlet I had received, since which I have heard that more have been sent to other justices of the peace in this county. Thirteen Quakers were taken by my order at a conventicle in the City, but others met again in the afternoon in the same house, when 2 more were arrested. They have been convicted before the Mayor and justices, and will be proceeded against according to the Act. A printed paper was found upon one of them, entitled, "A Declaration from the people of God called Quakers, against all seditious Conventicles, and dangerous practices of any who, under colour or pretence of tender conscience, have or may contrive insurrections, the said people being clear from all such things in the sight of God, angels, and men"; this shall be sent you if wanted. Lord Robartes has left for London. [Ibid. No. 139.]
May 16. News-letter. Yesterday the Nonconformists met again in great numbers, in open affront to the laws, but were proceeded against by the Lord Mayor and other magistrates of the City, which has also been done by other magistrates in the suburbs.
We hear by a report from Genoa, that the Sapphire frigate being pressed by 4 Algiers men-of-war off Cape Passaro, in Sicily, the captain and company ran her ashore, and not being able to get her off again, to their no small infamy, sold her to the people of the place, and some of the brass guns at Messina.
Lord Robartes has landed at Holyhead. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland is setting up a Council of Trade, and Lord Ranelagh, Sir Edw. Massey, Sir Jas. Shaen, Sir Edw. Leighton, Sir Wm. Petty, Sir Alex. Bence, and 7 others have been named to attend him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 140.]
May 17.
Oxford.
Dr. H. Compton to Williamson. I have not had so much out of the profits of St. Cross as will defray the charge of the suit to Dr. [Rob.] Porey's executors, which has caused me to break my word, a thing I abhor. I importune you again on behalf of my cousin Gannock, as I could not speak to you while in London. [Ibid. No. 141.]
May 17.
Coffee House, Bury St. Edmunds.
J. Holland to Williamson. The bearer gives me no rest till I beg your assistance in getting a pardon for a reprieved person who has bribed her to solicit by a promise of marriage. So great is her necessity for a husband, that rather than live longer without, she will fetch one from the gallows. I know in such an exigency your charity will be great towards a female. [Ibid. No. 142.]
May 17. Rob. Leigh to Williamson, Keeper of Papers of State to his Majesty at Whitehall. I send a letter on behalf of a new company of bricklayers of this city [Dublin], given to me by the Solicitor-General [of Ireland, Sir John Temple], to whom Lord Arlington is much beholden in his affairs here; therefore I have written to his lordship about it, and to forgive his 5l. fee, as fees were paid before, and Mr. Solicitor never takes any from his lordship; I will be answerable for your fee and that for the Signet. I send a draft for the new letter to be signed, some of the persons named in the old one being dead and the tilers left out; the new letter must be directed to the new Lord Lieutenant. Pray forward an enclosure to Lord Ossory. [Ibid. No. 143.]
May 17. Col. Rich. Kirkby to Lord Arlington. I pray your protection for Col. Nich. Shuttleworth and his servant, who have come to town from Lancashire, the Colonel being subpœnaed as a witness in a trial at the Exchequer, and having an argument on at the Exchequer bar. He served under the late usurpation, but I will engage for his loyalty. [Ibid. No. 144.]
May 17.
Norwich.
Certificate by Thos. Brown that Rob. Wenman of Norwich has been afflicted with deafness for years, which it is feared will increase by age, and render him unfit for business or conversation. [Ibid. No. 145.]
May 17.
Court at Whitehall
Warrant [to the sheriff, &c., of Newcastle] to forbear to execute judgment in case Thos. Watson, mariner, shall be found guilty of the murder of John Wright, at the assizes to be held at Newcastle, where he has been removed from the King's Bench, and to reprieve him till further pleasure. [Ibid. No. 146.]
[May 17.] Warrant for a privy seal to the Treasury Commissioners, to pay to Col. Fras. Wyndham, from the receipts on sale of fee-farm rents, 10,800l. for his good service in his Majesty's preservation after the battle of Worcester. [Ibid. No. 147.]
May 17.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and W. Fownes to the Navy Commissioners. We ask a warrant for entering 10 more labourers, as there are not sufficient for carrying on works mentioned, and for launching the London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 38.]
May 17.
Hull.
Joseph Blaydes to the Navy Commissioners. I beg a settlement of some accounts for work done by myself and my father, and done as reasonably as if we had been paid ready money. [Ibid. No. 39.]
May 18/28.
Lisbon.
Thos. Maynard, Consul, to the Navy Commissioners. I gave an account of what I did relative to the delivery of the stores brought in the frigates from England, for the ships under Sir Edw. Spragg, and send the storekeeper's receipts. The frigates are all cleared, and great complaints are now made for want of sails, ropes, and other stores. Some Algiers men-of-war being reported to be on the coast, Sir Edw. Spragg is about going out with all his squadron, and I hope he will give a good account of them. I have 2 anchors and a mast still in my possession. [Ibid. No. 40.]
May 18.
Dover.
Warrant appointing Sir Thos. Chicheley to the office of Master of the Ordnance, vacant some years since by death of Sir Wm. Compton, revoking the patent of 21 Oct. 1664, whereby John, Lord Berkeley of Stratton, Sir John Duncombe, and Thomas, now Sir Thos. Chicheley, were appointed Commissioners for executing the said office; fee, 200 marks a year, and wages for 4 servants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 26.]
May 18.
Exeter.
Peter Hagedot, Mayor of Exeter, to Sir Thos. Clifford. Thos. Mall, a minister, being found within the Corporation, contrary to the statute of 17 Charles II., was brought before me, and committed to prison for 6 months; upon being admonished by me and Mr. Butler to leave off such strange courses, and become obedient to his Majesty and his laws, he replied that club law should not convert him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 148.]
May 18.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Marygold has sailed for Rochelle to load salt for Newfoundland, and the St. Jacob of London, from Virginia, is ready to sail for Holland. The Newfoundland fleet of 10 sail and 2 convoys has passed by from Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 149.]
May 18. Same to James Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 150.]
May 18.
Warwick.
Henry Stubbs to Lord Arlington. Had I known the time of the coming out of my book against [Jos.] Glanville and the comical wits of the Royal Society, I should have accompanied its presentation with a letter. I hope the quarrel between me and the society will not displease your lordship or any other English patriot, since it has no other design than to support the monarchy, the Protestant religion, and the peace and welfare of the nation; and to vindicate the two universities and my own family, I considered it necessary to protest against their 2 books, called "The History" and Mr. Glanville's "Plus Ultra."
May 18. The society has long been negligent and false in making and relating their experiments, and in usurping those of others, so that it was high time to disclaim them, or subject ourselves to ignominy from a foreign pen. But I have not attempted to eclipse their glory, already vanishing, nor to derogate the institution itself.
I think this age ought to pay a great degree of veneration for those that abetted the project, and encouraged it into an establish ment, and I am confident posterity will be just to their memories, and acquit of infamy and contempt those personages whose concurrence denominated the Society Royal and Illustrious. I do not complain of the nobility encouraging them, but of their non-performance, in that they have notoriously abused the favours conferred, to the endangering of the whole kingdom. I had observed that if the interest of our monarchy lay in preserving that education which was promoted in the universities, and that if the breeding of a succession of able statesmen, divines, and lawyers were a thing more than indifferent, my undertaking was generous and laudable. Ignorance is epidemical, and insensibly diffuses itself through the gentry and all professions, and common debauchery, atheism, and popery have grown more than usually through our virtuosi. They not only undermine the Church of England, but directly overthrow it, and it cannot be expected that its authority should subject the Nonconformists, when it is so vilified and rejected by its spurious and degenerate sons.
All antiquity has dealt more mildly with schismatics than heretics, and borne a greater respect for such as have been seduced into a separation from the Catholic Communion, than for those that deserted and opposed the Catholic faith. All monarchy is concerned more for those who plainly and openly avow their dissent, than for such as, professing amity and consent and subscribing thereto, notwithstanding overthrow their own subscriptions and confessions; so I doubt not but my intentions will meet with a benign construction generally, since they are so subservient to the Church, as legally established.
Had the Royal Society disowned those two books upon my importunity, the controversy would have peaceably ended at the beginning; yet, since a multiplicity of exasperations, I have offered to acquiesce, if they would but publish an address to both Universities and the College of Physicians, declaring their sense about those culpable passages in their "History" relating to religion, &c., which I pointed out; but they either did not apprehend, or would not acknowledge their mistakes.
When they saw me resolute not to desist, I was barbarously threatened; so I determined to write, invidiously and with much of fiction, the life of a person who drew no profit from the services he paid his patron, beyond the satisfaction of having served one who relieved his necessities, when a child and in great want. I penned a brief account of those transactions of my own life which I thought they might most invidiously traduce, adding a protestation, enforced with political arguments, against any design of embroiling the nation, or re-advancing democracy. Had they been as willing the world should understand my integrity as I was to manifest it, your lordship would have had assurances of it before now in print.
I beg a continuance of your patronage, as I retain no sentiments but what are for the general benefit of the monarchy and kingdom. Common charity and generosity entitle the absent, unfortunate, and helpless orphans to general commiseration, and all these circumstances I lie under, and one more also, that I am not permitted to speak, &c., &c. [2 pages, closely written. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 151.]
May 18.
Upton. [Warwick.]
T. Bromley to Viscountess Conway, Ragley. I thank you for your kindness. I am unable to visit you at present. I regret your illness, but hope you will be fitted thereby for the moment of quitting your terrestrial habitation. Religious exhortations. [Ibid. No. 151a.]
May 18.
Tower.
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. It was impossible to give an account of last Sunday's proceedings before, but from informations since taken, discourses had with the Lord Mayor, and from persons apprehended, it is obvious that there is a perfect combination to baffle the Act against conventicles, and that ill-minded people from all parts have resorted to the City to make a disturbance, well knowing that if conventicles may be prevented in London, they must of necessity lay down in the country. It cannot be imagined what artifices are used to menace the officers, soldiers, and other guards, and, though the private-house meetings have left off, the public ones have taken full resolution to go forward, notwithstanding many have been convicted. A book called "Queries against the Act" is plentifully thrown about at their meetings, to invalidate the law; Col. King, who was taken last Sunday, is the great advocate for the meeters, and was daily upon the Exchange, not merely to promote sedition, but rebellion and treason also.
The Lord Mayor shows great courage and resolution. Though the Act I so long solicited for the Militia came tardily, yet in a short time I have brought it into some equipage. I had 3 companies of my regiment upon the Exchange last Sunday, without which the Lord Mayor could have done nothing. The sessions commencing at the Old Bailey to-morrow, the Lord Mayor and I have invited Lord Craven and Col. Russell to meet us, the Lord Chief Justice, and the Judges, at the Lord Mayor's to dinner, when we shall confer together about the Act, and agree upon guards within and without the City.
All is quiet as yet, but as there is so great a resort of evil people within the City, I wish that all the officers of the old rebellious army were further from it, and that some dangerous persons were secured. I wish there was a command besides my Lord Mayor's, that all aldermen who are now justices of the peace should do their duty, by attending and keeping the peace, as occasion requires. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 152.]
May 19.
Windsor Castle.
Edw. Wiez [or Wise] to the Hon. Mr. Chichley, Queen Street, or Capt. Sherburn, at his house in the Tower. While securing the wall about the keep in the Round Tower, I found 20 feet of it so rotten that I was compelled to pull it down, or else it would have fallen and endangered the workmen. As there are many places in the inside wall, which is 9 feet high, quite as much decayed, if 3 feet were taken off, it would ease it, and add to its beauty and strength. Capt. Reves has been here, and has written about it to his Highness. I beg you to speak to his Highness about it, and send [Jonas] Moore to survey and give orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 153.]
May 19.
Coventry.
Ra. Hope to Williamson. Lord Robartes arrived yesterday from Ireland, accompanied by Lord Roscommon, and [Charles, Lord] Moore, son of the Earl of Drogheda, who married [Lady Letitia, Lord Robartes'] daughter. They are gone to the Countess of Southampton's, a mile hence, and from there to Northampton. Though the fanatics here appear highly dissatisfied, they forbear meeting publicly at Leather Hall as formerly, but give out that they will meet somewhere or the other. The 8th and 9th instant were observed with much devotion. A jay has built a nest and sits in the newly repaired cross, which, being a wild shy bird, is looked upon as very strange and ominous. [Ibid. No. 154.]
May 19. Roger 1'Estrange to Lord Arlington. You know upon what consideration I undertook the care of the Press, the state I found it in, and how I acquitted myself in clearing it, which involved great difficulty and expense, as well as much envy and clamour. Since your lordship withdrew your support, which enabled me to do what I did, it has returned to its former liberty, and become as foul and licentious as ever, and the people concerned have grown more peremptory, and become better instructed in the niceties of the case, and the failures of the Act for printing; but this shall be no discouragement to me, if his Majesty will bestow the necessary credit and supply.
The credit desired is that all warrants granted to booksellers and printers for searches may be recalled, and they requested to refer to me or my deputy. Also that the printer of the Gazette shall acquaint the Mercuries that they are no longer to be employed, nor are they to employ any hawkers but such as I shall allow. I suppose Mr. Richards has transmitted my proposals to his Majesty's counsel.
As to the supply, a sum in hand is requisite to begin with, as I shall have to be answerable for all incidental expenses—1st, of a deputy; 2nd, of intelligence for discoveries; 3rd, of a coach, without which it would be the work rather of a porter than a gentleman. I have nothing of value but my allowance, in lieu of the news-books, and the hopes of a grant of printing certain bills and papers, which the late Attorney and Solicitor General reported, on a reference, might be granted me: I am not in a condition to defray the charge of passing the patent, unless it may pass free.
I have made diligent inquiries concerning the "Queries upon the Act against Conventicles," and have traced some of them to the hand of a Nonconformist minister; I hope a further discovery. I have seized upwards of 300 seditious books of old date at Mr. Calvert's. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 155.] Annexing,
Proposals, or by-laws, tendered to, and approved by his Majesty's counsel at law, for the regulation of the Press: That if any member of the Stationers' Company, having an interest in the English stock, shall print or cause to be printed any book or paper without licence, he shall have his interest in such stock sequestered. That no printer so transgressing shall be allowed the privilege of printing any of the books granted to the company by their charter. That every printer shall become bound to his Majesty in 300l., not to print any book, picture, or paper, but what has been licensed by persons either authorised by the King or by an Act of Parliament. Also,
Proposed letter to the Court of Aldermen: Whereas there are several persons trading as booksellers, bookbinders, printers, and stationers, who, being free of other companies, are not subjected to the rules and orders of the Stationers' table, by virtue of which they evade the penalties imposed upon the printers and sellers of unlawful books and pamphlets, let the Court of Aldermen make such provision as will subject all such persons to such rules, although they may be free of other trades, as far as concerns the public peace. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275. No. 155i.]
May 19. Earl of Anglesey to Lord Brouncker and the Navy Commissioners. Understanding there are some tickets unpassed, which obstruct the finishing of my account, I have appointed Mr. Waith to attend you until they are all gone through. If anything else is required of me, let me know, as I am anxious to have an end of the business, before entering upon more work. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 41.]
May 19.
Dover.
Pass for 2 horses as a present from the King to the Duke of Neuburg. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 156.]
May 19.
Dover.
The King to the Readers and Benchers of Gray's Inn. Robert Harding of Gray's Inn, attorney of the Royal Forests north of the Trent, is unable now to perform his reading in the Inn on account of his health. We beg your favour that he may hereafter have liberty to read in a summer's course, as his health permits, in consideration of his many losses through his eminent loyalty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 163.]
May 19. The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Having appointed John Covell, M.A., Fellow of that college, to serve as chaplain with Sir Dan. Harvey, Ambassador with the Grand Seignior, we request you to dispense with the statute requiring his actual residence, and to allow him to enjoy the profits of his fellowship, as though resident, during the time he shall be thus employed, and to express your compliance with this order in some of your college books. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 50.]
[May 19.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 157.]
May 19. The King to John Covell. The Turkey Company having chosen you to serve as chaplain to Sir Dan. Harvey, Ambassador at Constantinople, we approve their choice, and dispense with your absence from the University of Cambridge, as long as you attend that business. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 51.]
May 20. Order to deliver to Edw. Wise, storekeeper at Windsor, 6 pieces of brass ordnance with appurtenances, 100 aprons of lead, 6,000 muskets, 1,000 pistols, 500 pairs of bandoleers, 3,000 long pikes, 3,000 swords and belts, 60 drums, and other armour named. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, p. 13.]
May 20. Order to Col. Legg, Master of the Armoury, to deliver to Edw. Wise 512 backs, breasts, and pots. [Ibid.]
May 20.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. Lord Craven, Col. Russell, and the Lord Mayor have met to-day, and debated everything I wrote you. They have taken excellent resolutions as to placing guards in and about the City on Sunday, and the holidays. The Lord Mayor and some of his brethren, with the watches and trained bands of the City, are resolved to rout all the public meetings, which is thought much more easy than when I last wrote. [Damaged. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 158.]
May 21.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoffry Shakerley to Williamson. Thanks for great favours, which I hope will be continued Yesterday morning one Atkinson and his man killed Baker in the street, opposite the inn they lodged in; they came from Ireland together, and fell out while taking horse for London. Atkinson and his man have escaped, but Atkinson sent the Mayor word last night that he would surrender; I do not hear if he has done so. [Ibid. No. 159.]
May 21.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes The bay has been full of vessels, and a fleet of above 20 sail seen plying eastward. [Ibid. No. 160.]
May 21.
Christ Church.
Dr. Rich. Allestree to Perrott. I beg conveyance of a letter to [Fras.] Vernon at Paris, and to be remembered to Mr. Williamson. [Ibid. No. 161.]
May 21.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. I must send you an account of my observations on the examining and convicting some of the factious last week, and more especially this day, for their meetings. The face of things here looks scurvily, and the factions all unite and speak very hard words, which I think to be treason in parables, though in strictness of law it is not so; the endeavours of Sir Rob. Yeamans and the magistracy to put the Act into execution are derided and scoffed at; the factions are almost impudent in owning a persecution against the ancient laws, and dare almost imply an assertion of the danger of disobliging so powerful a party as the fanatics. I have transcribed a letter to Lord Arlington, which will tell more; I wish some expedient was thought of to assist the magistracy. [Ibid. No. 162.]
May 21.
Bristol.
Sir Rob. Yeamans, Mayor, to Lord Arlington. I send a pamphlet I received in blank paper, the contents of which are of dangerous consequence, as it comes forth in this nick of time of putting the Act against conventicles in execution. I have convicted some, and imposed fines, &c., and shall use my utmost skill to prosecute the Act; but the numerous party of criminals of the several sects seem obstinate to tire out the magistracy, as well as affront them by mutterings and threats, so that the face of things has a bad aspect.
The factious party are more numerous than the loyal, and although of different persuasions, they unite in conversation, and seem so discontented that little less than rebellion is to be read in their faces and gestures. Some of my brethren, the aldermen, have absented themselves to-day from the place of judicature, so I fear they still retain some of the old leaven of the late bad times. I wish they were more vigorous in their duty, which I will faithfully perform. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 163.]
May 21.
Gloucester.
John Wagstaffe, Mayor, to Lord Arlington. I send a seditious pamphlet received in blank paper, considering it my duty to prevent all practices that may savour of violating the laws. I will do my utmost to suppress all unlawful conventicles in this city, and manifest myself a loyal subject to his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 164.]
May 22. Warrant to Sir Hen. Wood to pay, out of the jointure rents of the Queen Mother of 30,000l. a year, 1,400l. to Henry, Earl of St. Albans; 500l. being for interest on moneys advanced for her, and 900l. for the expenses of the Lords Commissioners sent from London to Colombe, they being delayed 9 days by the grounding of the ship off the sands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 29.]
[May 22.] Warrant to Sir Hen. Wood, treasurer of the rents of the Queen Mother, granted for her use for 2 years after her decease, to pay 300l. to Mdme. de Vantelet, first woman of her bedchamber, as a reward for delivering up sundry things of value belonging to her. [Ibid.]
May 22.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Capt. Tite of London, bound for Newfoundland, several French vessels with salt, and one belonging to the Grande Partie, also laden with salt for Havre-de-Grace, have come into the harbour. The French man-of-war which is to take in the masts, few or none of which are worth the portage, is still here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 165.]
May 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Golden Fleece and 6 others have arrived from the Downs, and are waiting for their convoy. [Ibid. No. 166.]
May 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Perrott]. All the news is at Dover, from whence I suppose Mr. Carlile writes daily. I have been there to pay my respects to Mr. Williamson. Thanks for the Gazettes, which now rarely miscarry. The ship Duke of York has arrived from Virginia, and reports the colony to be at peace and in a good condition. [Ibid. No. 167.]
May 22.
Stittenham.
Sir Thos. Gower to Williamson. I send a paper received from Capt. Fairfax, chief officer of the customs at Whitby; also a copy of the information of Mr. Ellis, which I have taken. I have sent a warrant to the head constable of Whitby-Strand, to apprehend the constable of Whitby, and I will give him his deserts. I have nothing to say as to my fellow justice, "inter pares non est potestas"; I will only tell what Capt. Fairfax glances at, which is that Whitby and the country adjacent are too much planted with all sorts of Dissenters and Quakers, who herd together, and that most of the neighbouring justices wink at it, if not favour their proceedings; they have had at least 8 meetings in 7 days, besides open conventicles, which are attended by many speakers, and by persons much esteemed among the several sects, from all parts of the country, even at 40 miles' distance. The man called Laten Firbank lives 30 miles from Whitby, and has great dependencies in this part of the country. I am confident you will be of opinion that the egg of the cockatrice must be broken betimes; if not, you shall be little troubled with the like advertisements from me. You will see by the enclosures what constables we have, for I directed a warrant to the head constables to levy the penalties. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 168.] Enclosing,
Capt. Chas. Fairfax to Sir Thos. Gower. There was a notable meeting of 140 Quakers last Sunday, in a house newly erected by them, as the bearer, Thos. Ellis, will be able to inform you, as well as what progress he made in putting the Act against conventicles in execution. The most knowing look upon this meeting, so suddenly after the Act, as being done in contempt of it; there was another on Wednesday, and they have threatened one on Sunday, so that now they are more frequent, and their speakers increase. The remissness of those empowered to put the Act in execution gives them more encouragement, and their dubious interpretations put upon the plain text is a great obstruction. Give Ellis your opinion and instructions—which will be an encouragement to him, and make him an oracle to go by—as well as another favour to me, in addition to the one shown to my son William.—Whitby, 20 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 168i.]
Information of Thos. Ellis of Whitby, gentleman, before Sir Thos. Gower, Bart., J.P. for the North Riding of Yorkshire. Having received notice on Sunday the 15th that there would be a conventicle in Whitby, at a house bought by the Quakers, I went to the constable, who declined to act, and referred me to John Metcalfe, deputy-constable. I then went to the meeting-house, where above 100 persons were assembled, who remained 4 hours; I set down the names of some of those present, as speakers, &c., consisting of John Ryder and Jane his wife, and 19 others named; Wm. Norrison, Laten Firbank, John Hall, and John Cock were that day the speakers. I rode to Justice Trotter, who granted a warrant directed to the constable, to levy the goods of the offenders, which I delivered, whereupon the constable went to the justice.
The day following, I told the constable that John Cock, the speaker informed against, and named in the warrant, had come into the town again, and advised the arresting of his horse, and the levying upon him, according to the warrant, as he would get 8l. or 10l. for his horse, and money was judged to be about him; the constable refused, as having had orders from the justice to the contrary. I rode to Justice Trotter again, and met him coursing with 2 greyhounds, when he said that he had respited the warrant, not thinking the information sufficient, and that he would consult his brother justices before the warrant was executed.
There was another meeting at the same place on Wednesday the 18th, when above 20 persons were present, amongst whom were many of the same persons as were present at the former meeting. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 168ii.]
May 23.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Thomas of Lyme has arrived from Croisic, and reports that the drum was beaten there for all seamen to give in their names, and that no French seamen, subjects of the French King, should sail with any foreign prince; also that several of their ships of war were being fitted for sea. [Ibid. No. 169.]
May 23.
Broxbourne Bury.
Sir John Monson to Williamson. Being detained from London by business for some days, I beg you to solicit Lord Arlington for a letter from the King, on behalf of a student in Lincoln College, Oxford, who doubts not of obtaining a demy's place in Magdalen College, if honoured with it. [Ibid. No. 170.]
May 23.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Thanks for favours while in London; I had your advice about erecting a lighthouse on the Spurn, in the Humber; as you told me I could not proceed without a certificate from the Trinity House in Hull, as to its conveniences, and what they would pay towards its maintenance, I applied for this, and advised you of their answer, when you said you thought Sir Philip Frowde had the patent; but I find that he has only entered a caveat for it in the Signet Office, and that he has been on the business some years, which only sticks with him for want of the certificate from Hull, which he will never get.
Having been put on to the business by several of the Trinity House, if you will assist me in getting the patent passed, I do not question procuring the certificate, as my interest is as great with the masters as any private person's, and my office makes me acquainted with them; they all desire a lighthouse, but would have the building and the profit of it themselves, which is the reason of their refusing Sir Philip Frowde.
The Spurn is 20 miles from Hull, and if the seamen should get the lighthouse, it would encourage them to defraud the Customs, by which the King would lose; whilst if I, who am a Customs' officer, had it, it would be an advantage, as I could carry it on with the same force I now have, and 50l. cheaper than anyone else. It will cost 500l. to build, and independent of preventing thefts, will save the King 100l. a year, which Sir John Wolstenholme knows is expended in keeping officers and boats in the Humber.
I suppose you know of my father's great sufferings and losses for his Majesty, and that he lent and expended 5,000l. in this service, as appears by the certificate of the late Lord Treasurer; he has left me 400l. in debt, which I am troubled to pay. I will engage to give you 100l. a year so long as the patent lasts; you shall be at no charge, as Sir Edw. Walker is a friend of mine, and will assist me. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 171.]
May 23.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. I sent a letter for you to your servant [Hen.] Ball. Journeying from London, I stayed in Derbyshire 10 days, and was sorry to hear and see the great discontent there, and wherever else I came; the Act for suppressing conventicles had so exasperated them, that nothing short of a sudden insurrection is threatened. They complain of the great misery and loss the nation has received by the Stuarts, ever since Elizabeth, and say that if some course is not taken, the nation will be ruined, as the great sins of the Court cannot go unpunished; they endeavour to render the King as odious as they can, being a most factious and discontented people.
It is the same here at Hull: they have their private meetings still, and there was a great disturbance yesterday in the chief church, occasioned by a Nonconformist who, through a cunning contrivance of the Mayor, got into the pulpit to preach, and was commanded down by Mr. Crowle, a justice of peace, which caused a great hubbub; had it not been for the soldiers from the garrison, it would not have so quietly ended, as they all went home grumbling. I hope the Lord will keep the King in safety, and be a counsellor to his counsellors; there is no question but the Presbyterians have some design in hand, it being impossible there should be so much smoke and no fire. A Virginia ship has arrived. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 172.]
May 23.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I heard of his Royal Highness's return, who sent to me to know how affairs went; yesterday I was with the Lord Mayor, who was very active, and had several persons brought before him; the greatest person amongst the meeters is Major Gen. Butler. All here perform their duty well, except the constables and headboroughs. Several preachers have been convicted before me, and amongst others Dr. Anslow, and warrants of distress issued. If we all consulted together to carry on the Act against conventicles, and there were good informers, it might be done without noise; although I have convicted many, I have as yet disturbed nobody in my quarters; I find that their preachers and other turbulent persons are coming to town from all parts. The Lord Mayor has been with his Royal Highness and returned. No care is wanting, and things are in good posture. [Ibid. No. 173.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Sec. J. Trevor to Lord Arlington. On my return hither, I was surprised to find his Royal Highness going post to London, but all things passed yesterday without tumult, though I judge the posture of things to be very dangerous, and worth his Majesty's consideration. The Lord Mayor has been to the Duke for directions, and informed him, in my hearing, that the civil authority of the City could not execute the Act; that the informers and constables were so frightened by the people that none would act; that the trained bands were as little inclined to suppress them by necessary force; and that, although the little meetings had been dispersed, there were 3 great Presbyterian meetings, where the doors were defended by 3,000 or 4,000 people, who refused to move but by violent force.
It has therefore now to be considered whether his Majesty will think it advisable to pursue the Act so far as to employ his Guards to break these bodies by force, when it is visible that the people will be universally engaged in the defence. I fear the consequence to the Government, if a tumult is begun, and blood drawn upon it, yet am concerned for the interest and honour of his Majesty's authority, that in the execution of a law, he should be brought to the necessity either of being affronted in the obedience due, or of visibly endangering the public peace. I consider the matter appears very melancholy on both parts, and am more confirmed in my opinion that it was very unhappily and unnecessarily brought to the trial.
I have offered to his Royal Highness to suspend the last attempt by the force of his Guards, till his Majesty is consulted; at least, that all extremity might be forborne in his absence, and until he had determined what counsel to follow, and by what force to support it; in the meantime, I have sent, by the Duke's order, to secure Major-Gen. Butler, and such others as are known to be dangerous, and likely to enflame, of which there are too many in the town.
I wish the enlargement of Madame's stay might persuade his Majesty to bring her to town, and take counsel upon the place. If you stay, I have thoughts of coming down to do my duty to the King, which, if you advise it, I will presently do. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 174.]
May 23.
Court.
Petition of James Halsall, his Majesty's servant, to the King, for the reprieve of Fras. Stone—sentenced to death at the Old Bailey with Rob. Childers, for robbing the petitioner of nearly 400l.—in order that he may be transported. Stone is not above 18 years of age, and has lately come from beyond sea, where he was apprenticed to a merchant, and it is believed that he was drawn into the action by Childers, who is an old thief.
With reference thereon to Sir Wm. Morton, and his report that although Stone is young, he has been convicted not only of a burglary and robbery of money and plate belonging to the petitioner of great value, but also of stealing plate belonging to Lord Newburgh, value 60l., and that it is not agreeable to the common rules of the judges' proceedings to afford transportation to such persons; but that, as his Majesty is the fountain of justice and mercy, and is not bound by such rules, he may, if he thinks fit, reprieve him for the present, and afterwards pardon him for transportation.—25 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 175.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trevor to the Farmers of Customs. I request you to suffer Monsieur Van Beuningen, Envoy of the States General, with his 11 horses, goods, &c., to be landed custom free. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 163.]
May 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The merchant ships are still waiting at Spithead, for a convoy to carry them to the Straits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 176.]
May 24.
Oxford.
Dr. P. Mews, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, to Williamson. Although only in London 2 days, I waited upon you more than twice, and also nearly an hour, while Judge Morton took the examination of John Poulter, who, from having mixed himself up with the fanatics, made some discoveries which it is hoped might have been improved upon. I have no doubt but that party is very angry with him, from a letter or libel sent me by post from London, a copy of which I sent to Judge Morton. I have furnished Poulter with money, as formerly, to carry him to you, and hope he will be brought before Lord Arlington, and be either employed or dismissed; here he cannot attempt anything, as the whole gang in Oxford have taken the alarm. I have several such instruments at work here, which are no small charge; you know how amply the Vice-Chancellor's office is endowed to defray such expenses, but I shall not neglect anything that may advance his Majesty's service. [Ibid. No. 177.]
May 24.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I have been with the Duke of York, who will give his Majesty an account of affairs here, and I question not but we shall all act more prudently and effectually than hitherto. Major-Gen. Butler is secured, and Col. King has been sought after; if his Majesty stays 10 days longer, the Lord Mayor and Militia will want orders for securing such persons as may disturb the peace. The holidays passed over quietly, save that the youths have been a little rude in Moorfields, where two companies have been placed to keep them in order, and there will be the same guards to-morrow. I have kept my station in the Tower, with my soldiers about me. [Ibid. No. 178.]
May 25.
Tower.
Same to the Same. Being President of the Artillery Company, I recommend the letter and copy of warrant enclosed, and if you will get his Majesty's signature to the latter, it will be a great kindness to me and the company, and I will see to the payment of the fees; the reputation of the company is much concerned in the affair. The whole society has made great preparation for a splendid appearance at the designed exercise, and his Royal Highness has given his consent, but the company dares not move in it without his Majesty's hand. [Ibid. No. 179.]
May 25. Same to the Same. Pray see to my application on behalf of the Artillery Company. Mr. Caron will give a good account of affairs in the City and suburbs. The [Lord Mayor,] Lieutenant of London has written for orders; I pray that I, as Lieutenant of the Hamlets, and Lord Craven for Middlesex and Southwark, and our deputies, may have the same orders, when we will set all things to rights. [Ibid. No. 180.]
May 25.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. His Royal Highness's going to London so suddenly gave rise to a false report that there was a rising in London; that the factious party had killed a great many people, and that the rebellion was increasing, which put the country at a stand. I pray God to defend us against insurrection and plots, as the factious party are high. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 182.]
May 25. Lord Cholmondeley to Williamson. Pray favour Mrs. Deane, the postmaster's wife of Nantwich, so that her husband may retain his employment, on giving good security, some of his neighbours having a design to thrust him out, and put one Caper in his place. I have been assured by Deane that there is no just cause of complaint, and that he never was in arrear, and I believe him to be an honest man. [Ibid. No. 183.]
May 25. Sir Sam. Starling, Lord Mayor of London, and 11 other Commissioners of Lieutenancy, to Lord Arlington. We send an abstract of a warrant or commission issued to the Commissioners of Lieutenancy for the City of London, upon the disturbance by the Fifth Monarchy men, and upon other occasions when disturbances have taken place, and ask you to move his Majesty to renew it, so that we may be the better enabled to preserve the peace and safety of the City. We apprehend, from the turbulency and difficulties that now arise in execution of the Act against conventicles, and from the resort of disaffected persons from all parts of the kingdom to the City and places adjacent, that a special warrant or commission is now necessary, to further empower us to act for preservation of the peace and safety of the city. [12 signatures. Ibid. No. 184.] Annexing,
Proposed clause that the Commissioners be empowered, until further order, to conduct and lead the Militia forces of the city against his Majesty's enemies, rebels, traitors, and offenders, as well within as without the City and its suburbs; and to resist, fight, kill, and execute such rebels, &c., according to their discretion. Also to seize and secure all dangerous and suspicious persons, with their arms, weapons, &c., and to detain them so long as his Majesty or the said Commissioners shall think fit; and to give to all commanding officers and soldiers of the Militia orders requisite for the accomplishment of the same. [Ibid. No. 184i.]
May 25.
Dover.
Grant of 200l. and a pension for life of 100l. a year, to Mary Carter, nurse to the Duchess of Orleans. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 30.]
Docquet of the above, dated 15 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 188.]
May 25. Estimate of sums required for completing the repairs of each ship named, lying at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, and Portsmouth; finishing those building there; and repairing the wharves, docks, storehouses, and other buildings in those yards; total, 70,129l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 42.]
May 25.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. As 580l. remained in Mr. Gregory's hands, after all the workmen and sawyers of the yard, and the fireship's companies, were paid up to Lady Day, I desire you will imprest 30l. to Mr. Gregory, for the carriage, &c., of Sir Roger Twysden's timber, and the remainder to him, towards buying such provisions as are wanted in the stores here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 43.]
May 26.
London.
John Harris to Col. Thos. Middleton I recommend Fras. Button as foreman for repairing sails at Chatham, in the room of Mr. Smith, lately dead. I have had many years' experience of his honesty and ability, and will be engaged for him, if you will appoint him. [Ibid. No. 44.]
May 26.
Dover.
Warrant to Alderman Wm. Bucknall, and the other farmers of the duty of 5s. a ton imposed on French vessels, to forbear to demand the said duty on a French vessel in which Sieur Kerguelin Thomas has come over, in order to take back the wreck of the Salvator, cast away on the Lizard, which is to be restored to the French King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 30.]
May 26.
Court at Dover.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Commissioners for the Lieutenancy of London. Though we doubt not your zeal and forwardness in your trust, yet there having been lately a great resort to the City of sectaries, and persons concerned in the late rebellion, we desire you to meet, make inquiries about anything likely to disturb the quiet of our government, and take effectual means for prevention. You are to make strict search in the city and precincts for dangerous and disaffected persons, seize and secure them and their arms, and detain them in custody till our further pleasure.
You are also by virtue of your commission to conduct the Militia force of the City against enemies, rebels, and traitors, in the city or suburbs, and to attack and suppress them, all Militia officers obeying your directions. With minutes of like letters to the Earl of Craven, as Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex and Southwark, and to Sir John Robinson, as Lieutenant of the Tower and the Hamlets. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 11.]
May 26.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Duke of York, in his pleasure boat, sailed through the Downs for Dover. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 185.]
May 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The merchant ships continue at Spithead, waiting for the Assistance; the Hope of London has arrived with 60 deer for the King. [Ibid. No. 186.]
May 26. Lord Bulkeley to Williamson. Not being so well acquainted with Lord Arlington as I should wish, I have prevailed with Lord Aungier to write a letter to him, and ask you to deliver it, together with a case enclosed, as it would be too troublesome to you for me to write the whole affair. I am so far from persuading my brother to put in for a new patent for the Prothonotary's office in North Wales, that all I desire is to keep his Majesty and the Council's orders inviolable, by having no reversions granted of the Prothonotary's office. It is now in possession of Henry Wynne, for life; by means of Secretary Trevor, the grant of the reversion to [Rob] Humphreys and [Thos.] Vincent is so far advanced that it is at the Signet, and without Lord Arlington's caveat to stop its further progress, it will pass the several offices before his Majesty's return; he is fully informed of the case. Send your answer to Mr. Owen's in Pall Mall, 3 doors above the Katherine Wheel. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 275, No. 187.] Enclosing,
Statement that Charles I. granted the office of Prothonotary of cos. Anglesey, Carnarvon, and Merioneth to Henry and Wm. Wynne and Wm. Jones, for their lives and the life of the survivor. Henry Wynne and Wm. Jones afterwards declared by deed that their names were merely used as trustees for Wm. Wynne and his heirs, and that the latter received the profits for his own use. After Jones's decease, Wm. Wynne, by will, devised the profits of the office for payment of his debts, and died, leaving Rich. Wynne, his eldest son and heir. Henry Wynne received the profits of the office, after the decease of William, on trust for payment of the debts; and when they were settled, the benefit of the office belonged, by virtue of deeds of trust, to William and Henry Wynne and Wm. Jones, and now, by the will of Wm. Wynne, to Rich. Wynne as eldest son and heir, to whom Henry, in order to have a new grant, is obliged to surrender, or do any other act to have a new grant of the office from his Majesty, which Richard forebore to prosecute, believing that no remainder of the office would be granted.
A warrant for a grant for two lives in remainder having been issued, though a caveat had been entered in Lord Arlington's office to prevent it, his Majesty, upon petition, directed a grant to be prepared to Mr. Glynne, in trust for Rich. Wynne, precedent to the said warrant, wherefore Henry and Rich. Wynne request that the latter may be superseded, and that a new patent may be granted to them for their lives, and the longest liver of them, for the benefit of Rich. Wynne; or that none at all may be granted, the right belonging to Richard by the old grant. [Ibid. No. 187i.]
May 27.
Chapter House, Wells.
Declaration by Thos. Holt, Chancellor, and the Chapter of Wells, of their election on 25 May of Rob. Creighton, their former dean, to the bishopric of Bath and Wells, void by death, on 30 April, of Dr. Wm. Pierce. [Latin, parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case C, No. 14.]
May 28. Wormley Martin to Williamson. I beg a line or two from you, with reference to the business in hand. I have not heard from Dr. Spencer since he came from London, which makes me fear all is not going on well. I do not mistrust your power or will in performing this, having already experienced your favour towards me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 188.]
May 28.
Dover.
Licence for Sir Thos. Dolman to export 5 horses into Holland, on payment of customs. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 164.]
May 28. Warrant from Sec. Trevor to Capt. Gilbert Thomas, Provost Marshal, to search for and take into custody Henry Danvers and Wm. Allen, alias Blood, and bring them before him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 35.]
May 28.
Court at Dover.
Petition of Claudius Devellette and 2 others to the King, to order the Attorney-General to stay all proceedings at law on breach of recognizances against them, that they may not be ruined by prosecutions at law on old statutes. Were born and bred in France, and served there as apprentices and journeymen, since which they have become servants of his Majesty; this notwithstanding, and although they neither live within the City of London, nor sell wares there, they have been proceeded against under old statutes of Ric. III. and 5 Eliz., and besides being put to great trouble and expense, have been obliged to remove the indictment by certiorari into the King's Bench.
With reference thereon to the Attorney-General, Sir Heneage Finch, to see that no further prosecution is made in his Majesty's name, as the petitioners belong to his Majesty's Robes; and note that he sent the petition and answer to the Crown Office, to prevent the recognizances being estreated, but that they have nevertheless been sent down, and will be estreated unless the King's Attorney has his Majesty's signature for his warrant. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 275, No. 189.]
May 28. Sir Thos. Player to Sir John Robinson. The Artillery Company are to march on Tuesday, as usual. They request you to procure a warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners, to supply their company with 8 brass guns and 4 wagons from the Tower. His Royal Highness has consented to their having them, but the Ordnance Commissioners say they cannot allow it without a special order. [Ibid. No. 190.]
May 29.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. The Artillery Company lie under a great hardship for want of the order asked, and cannot go without the guns. I dined to-day with the Lord Mayor and the Lord Keeper at Guildhall, when the latter said that he had heard the report of himself which is spread all over the kingdom, by the artifice and arts which were of old, in the beginning of the rebellion, but now, I am confident, dashed by my Lord Mayor and us.
Last night and this day's action have broken up all the large meetings in the City, and the King's late orders have very much encouraged us to proceed in it, so I dare be confident that peace will soon be restored. I visited the City guards, and took account of what was done, and the Militia meets again to-morrow.
I informed the Lord Keeper that the justices and aldermen absented themselves from duty, and asked him to rebuke them, which he promised to do; 3 or 4 gentlemen of quality went to Sir Wm. Turner, to acquaint him of a great meeting, and to desire him to go thither; but he refused, although persuaded by his brother, Serjeant Turner. All things are quiet, and we hope our instructions from the King will keep them so. The Lord Mayor has distrained on Mr. Middleton, the King's operator, for 10l., for allowing a preacher to escape. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 1.]
May 29.
London.
Jas. Hickes to Williamson. I sent my son with your letter, received at 11 p.m., to Sir J. Robinson, who promised an answer. The trained bands, consisting of 3 companies of the White and 2 of the Red, are in arms, and some were in arms at the Exchange all night. Search was made for Mr. Watson at Devonshire House, but he was not to be found; they broke down his pulpit and the seats, and nailed up the doors, so no meeting there. Some officers and soldiers repaired to Mr. Doelittle's meeting, but he was not preaching, only an old man; the officers not being able to get to him, the hearers closing fast together, they called to him to leave off and come down; to which he replied he would, so soon as he had done, and so he did, but had a way of conveyance, so that he was not to be seen afterwards.
A Quaker preaching near Devonshire House was seized, and carried to the guard at the Change; thousands stopped to hear another in Bishopsgate Street, where the trained bands drew up as close as the multitude would admit, and an officer got in and pulled him down, but his crowd was so great that they carried him away; this caused a shout or two, but no harm was done. There are strange looks and hints of dislike amongst spectators, some of whom say they love the Liturgy of the Church, but like not this way. God preserve his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 2.]
May 29.
Dover.
J. W. [Joseph Williamson] to Perrott. This day being the anniversary of his Majesty's birth and restoration, it was celebrated here with all the solemnity the place afforded, which consisted of bells, bonfires, and cannon from the castle and the men-of-war in the road, together with the Militia and trained bands being drawn up on the beach. Look well to the sending of the news-book, and get the portion of the Haarlem Gazette which relates to the Prince of Orange translated at large. [Ibid. No. 3.]
May 29.
Hull.
Col. Ant. Gilby to Williamson. There have been great disturbances in the garrison, by the seditious meetings in conventicles, during my 10 days' absence, and though Capt. Bennet endeavoured to prevent them, he was unable to do so, for want of help from the civil power. I have sent an account to Lord Belasyse, and hope he will inform Lord Arlington, as it concerns the safety of the place; I hope you will not be unmindful of my private concerns. [Ibid. No. 4.]
May 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The merchant ships are still waiting for their convoy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 5.]
May 29.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. The Orange Tree of this port has arrived with wool from Dublin. The Sea Flower with lead, &c., for Bilbao, and a new vessel bound for Boston, New England, are ready to sail with the first fair wind. [Ibid. No. 6.]
May 29.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Charity of Bristol has arrived with tobacco from Virginia, bound for London, the Thomas and Edward and the Elizabeth, both of London, with oils and sugar, and the Lucy of London and the David of Burnt Island, Scotland, from Rochelle, with wine and brandy. The latter report that the French King is making preparations both by sea and land; that there is one company containing eight score, mostly of gentlemen's sons, who are daily trained and exercised for sea and land service, and that although they are only paid 20 pence per day, they live after the rate of 10s. [Ibid. No. 7.]
May 29. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 8.]
[May 29.] Teague Power to the Duchess of York at Dover. Assurances of affection. I will drink the King's health and pray for him, as it is his birthday. The parks look very thin, the King and Duke not being there, and the Queen's chapel strange, when she is praying at Dover. I hope your sweet Highness will soon return to the little children. [Ibid. No. 9.]
May 29. Warrant from Sec. Trevor to Wm. Hart, messenger to the lieutenancy, to apprehend — Gobbat, a major in the army during the usurpation, and bring him before him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 35.]
May 29.
Deptford.
F. Hosier to the Navy Commissioners. I collected all the queries necessary to be answered by the officers of the yard for balancing my last ledger, and completing the accounts of receipts and issues to 21 Dec. 1669, and gave them to the storekeeper in April 1670; he took a copy, and sent the original to the clerk of the survey. I desired an answer from the latter, and he promised an account, but I have not received it, nor do I even hope for one, without your Honours send some new orders. I despair of ever doing my duty, when I meet with such delays, so opposite to the many orders you have already given to the contrary; it is the least of the officers' care to do their duty, and they hinder and obstruct me in my faithful and painful endeavours. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 45.]
May 30.
Leghorn.
Capt. Wm. Poole to the Navy Commissioners. I hoped by this time to have careened both ships, but upon heaving down the Jersey to view her bottom, I found much of her sheathing gone, and that left more fit to be stripped off than to remain; but the scarcity of sheathing boards, and their price, made me patch it up again; I am sure her hull will be more fit for a voyage afterwards than when I left England. It is 6 days since I hove down, but have been delayed by want of sheathing boards and the Whitsuntide; the world, which knows not the reason, will wonder to see only one ship a week upon the careen; but unless I stay for sheathing boards, I shall finish to-morrow. I am sorry that, after a survey was made on the Jersey, and the time she lay in the dock, she could not struggle 10 months with the seas without losing most of her sheathing; it could have been better, and much cheaper, done in Woolwich Dock than in Leghorn Mould.
The Centurion, being a single ship, will be despatched in 2 days, but she is so weak aloft that some standards must be placed on her deck to strengthen her; after this I intend sailing to Messina, to fetch merchant ships there and at Gallipoli, and convey them to Cadiz. Lord Fauconberg has arrived, but too late to have his reception from the Grand Duke; his successor, however, has invited him to Florence, and he intends commencing his journey thither in 3 days. [1frac 34; pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 46.]
May 30.
Eaglet ketch.
Capt. Jeffrey Peirce to the Navy Commissioners. Being suddenly commanded out of the river by Lord Sandwich, and my mate being taken from me, and put on board the Queen's pleasure boat—having some of the King's plate on board to a considerable value, besides other goods, and having no one to assist me to Dunkirk and back— I engaged Thos. Brothers in the Downs as pilot; I send you his certificate. Noted that this was given to Sir John Mennes, to make the pilot a bill by. [Ibid. No. 47.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General to prepare a bill for a grant of the office or place of Secretary of the Latin tongue, void by the death of Nicholas Oudart, to John Evelyn; salary 80l. a year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 10.]
May 30. Grant to Rich. Coleing, in reversion after Lancelot Thornton, of the office of clerk of the robes, &c., fee 6s. 8d. a day. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 181.]
May 30.
Spring Gardens.
Sir Rob. Southwell to Williamson. The principal portion of your reports are concerning the triple alliance; one day my Lord [Arlington] is reported to give ear to the French, and is to be made Lord Treasurer, and the next day we hear that he holds firm, and will die at the stake for it, and then that fall he must; but the latter case pleases his friends, and all will applaud him for it, whatever may be the event. Pray forward an enclosure to Mr. Bridgman, who is supposed to have gone to Paris. Your little nephew (for there is a boy laid to my charge) is well, and sends his service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 11.]
May 30. Sir E. Spragg to Williamson. Since writing from Lisbon, I have been cruising on my station, but have not met with any Turks. On returning from Tangiers, I touched at Cadiz, put Sir Hugh Cholmeley and his family ashore, and received your letter by Capt. Beach, who arrived there with Sir Thos. Allin's victuallers, bound for Tangiers. Lord Middleton's works there are progressing, and he hopes to make that garrison very considerable.
The Hampshire and her convoys having gone, I sailed from Cadiz for Lisbon on May-day morning, and met Count d'Estreés, the French Vice-Admiral, with his squadron, turning into Cadiz Bay, as also Admiral Van Ghent, who came to anchor there, Vice-Admiral Evertsen, with the St. Patrick bound for the Straits, having arrived before. I have had various reports of Sir Thos. Allin, and will send particulars when I have ascertained the truth; but Mr. Wren has an account by Sir Thomas from Alicant, of an engagement he had with a squadron of Turks, which gave rise to the report of his death.
Lord Oxenstirn, Envoy Extraordinary from the King of Sweden to the Court of Portugal, being much dissatisfied, has taken his leave, and is returning home on board a ship under my convoy, bound for Rotterdam. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 12.]
May 30.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Return of Weymouth has arrived from St. Malo, Jersey, and Guernsey, and reports that those islands are in a good posture; also that the seamen lately called to appear at St. Malo have been ordered on board the ships fitted for the East Indies. Yesterday being the anniversary of the King's birth and restoration, the Mayor and magistrates went to hear a suitable sermon preached, and then from the fort and the cliff guns were fired; and afterwards they went to the Mayor's house, to conclude the day with joy. [Ibid. No. 13.]
May 31. G. H. to Lord Arlington, Dover. I have received accounts of the prosecution of the Act against conventicles from Somerset, Bristol, and Wilts, and find that a great deal of moderation has been used, as upon the first Sunday all the constables in Bristol absented themselves. The greatest trouble has been in this City [London] and parts adjacent, where there was some disturbance last Sunday, in putting them down and carrying some of them before the magistrates, who took their names and addresses. Their assemblies would not have been so numerous but for a report that an order had been received by the Lord Keeper from the King, forbidding the prosecution of the Act until further notice. The goods of Edw. Billing, a Quaker in Westminster, have been distrained and put to sale, but no one bought them. I have communicated with the chiefs of several of the parties, such as Manton, Owen, Goodwin, Harrison, and Toomes, and find that they intend to continue their assemblies, and to submit to the penalties of the Act, if taken. [Ibid. No. 14.]
May 31.
London.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. Although we had not the great guns, we satisfactorily performed our exercise in the Artillery Ground, with such a number as have not been known for 30 years, and there is not one known fanatic amongst us. I am daily consulting and contriving how to confound the meetings; they have now a great terror upon them, and I am confident they will soon vanish. I have so ordered that we shall shortly have accounts both from Southwark and Middlesex, as well as London, as to what seditious persons are residing or lurking therein, and I, together with Lord Craven and the Lord Mayor, are as watchful as possible, and have ordered two companies to be out of a night in the city, until his Majesty returns; we intend shortly to make a general search, which will be done very privately; the King's presence in town will damp all this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 15.]
May 31.
9 p.m.
Earl of Craven to Williamson. I have just come from the military ground, where I have left faithful Sir John Robinson, with his artillery company. There is the utmost quiet imaginable, and I hope it may continue until his Majesty's return, which it may, if we do not overdo our work; that causes me more trouble to prevent than anything else that is expected of me by his Majesty, or his ministers. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 16.]
May 31. Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I would have given an account of myself to Lord Arlington from York, had I not been seized with the gout, as I reached my own house; but I hope to be there next week, the pain having ceased. I shall be glad to receive all commands, and to hear of Lady Arlington's recovery. Let your letter be sent to Staveley in Derbyshire. [Ibid. No. 17.]
May 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. There have arrived 60 stags in the Hope of London, as a present to his Majesty from the French King, which have gone for the New Forest. The merchant ships bound for the Straits are still waiting for their convoy. [Ibid. No. 18.]
May 31.
Rye.
Ja. Welsh to Williamson. I hear that some English ships have obtained a victory over the Turks in the Straits; that we have taken 2 of their men-of-war, sunk 2, and put 3 ashore, but that Sir Thos. Allin and Capt. Beach were slain. Three of his Majesty's frigates have passed through the bay, with their convoy to the Straits. [Ibid. No. 19.]
May 31.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to James Hickes. The Mary of London has arrived from Cadiz. [Ibid. No. 20.]
May 31. Petition of Thos. Steyne, plasterer in Chatham Yard, to the Navy Commissioners, for a bill of imprest on account of works to be done on the new ship at Chatham. Being indebted to Edw. Coak, a workman employed by him, in 47l., for plasterer's work done on his Majesty's ships at Harwich and Chatham, and not being able to pay him, Coak took out an attachment in the court at Rochester against his goods, whereupon a friend promised to give bail; but petitioner is unable to pay this debt, or preserve his goods, for want of the money long due to him upon bills, amounting to 1,100l. With order by the Navy Commissioners that a bill of imprest for 100l. be made out for his present relief, and to enable him to go on with his Majesty's works. Noted that the bill was passed the same day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 48.]
May 31.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I have received 20 loads of 4-inch plank from Deptford, and send an account of what more is required to complete the new ship, of which Col. Middleton and Mr. Mayors have had notice. Let some of the Deptford calkers be sent to calk the new ship and the Assistance, as there are but few calkers here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 49.]
May 31.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and 2 other officers to the Navy Commissioners. We have viewed the 4 anchors made by Mr. Loder, and estimate them at 230 cwt., very well wrought and fit for the service. [Ibid. No. 50.]
May. "John Giles's reasons why the Lincolnshire sail-cloth is not so fit for the Navy as the West-country's." It is so stiff and hard that it frets itself and breaks in stress of weather, and for want of proper manufacture, mildews and rots. In the manufacture of my sail-cloth we, in the first place, blanch and scour the thread, boil it in strong salt, and let it lie for 12 hours, and do our utmost to make the cloth close and soft, so as to hold the wind, and be the better handled by the sailors; this operation also preserves it from rotting. To give an instance, take a linen and a woollen thread of equal bigness; the linen will be found much stronger than the woollen, but if a linsey woolsey is made of these threads, the woollen will outwear the linen, because of its flexibility. To this may be added that by a statute made 1 Jac., no cloth ought to be made for sails before the stuff be well beaten, blanched, and scoured, so as to make it fine and fit for the service; this was doubtless dictated by the experience of our predecessors. [Ibid. No. 51.]
May. Petition of Thomas Chudleigh, master shipwright at Kinsale, to the Navy Commissioners, for a recommendation to the Treasury Commissioners to pay 1,800l., alleged by bills signed by the Navy Commissioners to be due to him, for repairing and fitting out ships at Kinsale, during the wars with the Dutch; the nonpayment not only renders him incapable of further service, but also liable to arrests and other troubles, to the utter ruin of himself and family. [Ibid. No. 52.]
May. Petition of Cuthbert Curwen, purser of the Henry, to the Navy Commissioners, that Phineas, brother of Sam. Pett, the petitioner's agent, may act as his deputy at Chatham, while petitioner is in London passing his victualling accounts, Sam. Pett having been lately appointed clerk to the Surveyor of the Navy. [Ibid. No. 53.]
May. Petition of the Same to the Same, to stop further proceedings in a suit in the Exchequer against him, for not passing his victualling account, having been hindered from doing so by sickness and other crosses; all his books and passes have been delivered into the Navy Office, and he makes it his daily business to attend for a despatch. [Ibid. No. 54.]
May ? Petition of Major Thos. Beckford, slopseller, to the Navy Commissioners, for an order for 2,000l. on account. Prompted by necessity, I asked you to imprest 2,000l. to me, which you refused [see p. 116 supra], though you are sensible that two years since, papers to the value of 10,000l. were transferred from Sir Geo. Carteret to the Earl of Anglesey, for payment to me of my chest and ministers' groats, and the twopences, no part of which I have yet received; you have signed bills for nearly 5,000l. due to me, of which I have received but 300l., and my present want of money cannot but be construed as a great foil to my hopes and credit.
Although the clerks were ordered to examine the books, so as to do the King and me right, yet so much remissness attends actions of that nature, that I fear the days of my life will find the first period, as you have been three months about one book; Mr. Waith has already credited me for over 3,000l. for those ships only in which I was concerned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 55.]
May.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Notes reporting all things quiet here. Dated 3, 5, 8, 12, 15, 17, and 19 May. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, Nos. 21–27.]
May. Petition of Robert [Creighton], Bishop of Bath and Wells, to the King, for a longer time than four months in which to pay in his first fruits of 479l. 15s. 1½d.; with proviso of no further claim in case of his decease, &c. [Ibid. No. 29.]
May ? Petition of Edw. Capell to the King, for permission to surrender his pension of 400l. a year, now 6 years in arrears, and to be allowed to purchase so much of the fee-farm rents as will be a reasonable composition therefor, with arrears. [Ibid. No. 30.]
May ? Petition of Thos. Combe to Lord Arlington, for recompense for a horse, value 12l., which his lordship's servants hired, when the King went last to Newmarket, and it died from overwork and ill usage; applied before, and was told to wait, which he has done, but will be ruined unless paid. [Ibid. No. 31.]
May ? Petition of George Herriott to Jos. Williamson, Lord Arlington's secretary, that the warrant to Attorney-General Palmer, to draw out his patent for the cold pressing of cloth, may be renewed to Attorney-General Sir Heneage Finch. [Ibid. No. 32.] Annexing,
Warrant for a grant to George Herriott of licence to exercise his invention of cold pressing of English wools, by an iron press made with an iron spindle in a box of copper. [Ibid. No. 32I.]
[May.] Petition of Lieut-Col. George Holmes to the King, for an order to George Scott to return to him a little tub of musk, brought by him from Moscow, whither he went to deliver his Majesty's letter, for reimbursement of his charges. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 33.]
May. Grant to Sir Thos. Strickland of the farm of the duties on Scotch and foreign salt imported into England, on rent at 1,800l. a year, on surrender of his former lease of the same at 1,800l. by reason of the continuance of the halfpenny a gallon on Scotch salt. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 182.]
May. Warrant to the Treasurer of the Chamber to pay to Humphrey Evans, his Majesty's moletaker in place of Henry Barry, 4d. a day, and 40s. a year for livery. [Ibid. No. 183.]
May. Grant of denization to Joseph Dacosta, a Portuguese. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 24.]
May. Grant of denization to — Alvarenga. Minute. [Ibid.]
May ? Pretensions of the Marquis de Montbrun, stating the money paid to him on the King's debt of 8,333l. 6s. 8d., with interest, and the sum which he claims as still due for principal and interest; total, 9,833l. 6s. 8d., with interest from May last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 36.]
[May.] Note that the late young Montbrun received the 2 first years' interest, of which 6 months are contested at the Exchequer; that since then, in 2½ years, the father received 5,000 pieces for 4 years' interest, but had to pay 200 pieces to get them, and 800 to get 2,000 more, and that he received 1,000 pieces last November. [French. Ibid. No. 37.]
[May.] Copy of the above, adding that at the end of the present month of May, there will be due to the elder Montbrun 11,083l. 6s. 8d. [French. Ibid. No. 38.]
[May.] Similar paper, with slight differences. [French. Ibid. No. 39.]
[May.] Propositions to pay the above sum by 5,000l. at once, and the rest in 3 half-yearly payments from the rents which the King has sold; or to pay 5,000l. at once, and a pension of 2,000l. for life, the Marquis being 81 years old, and troubled with gout. With request for acceptance of one of the proposals, as he has had to borrow 1,400 pieces, and his creditors are selling his house at Paris. [French. Ibid. No. 40.]
[May.] Order for a warrant to pay to Charles Henri de Bellegarde, Marquis of Montbrun, out of the Excise revenue, 3,000l. present money, and 1,000l. yearly for life, in lieu of 3,333l. 6s. 8d. lent by him to the King before his restoration, and of 5,000l. lent by the late Duke of Vendome, which debt the Marquis has taken upon himself. [Corrected draft. Ibid. No. 41.]
May.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind:—
Vol. 276. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind. Vol. 276. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind.
43 May 2 1 2 W. 52 May 12 9 W.N.W.
44 " 3 1 2 E. 53 " 13 1 12 N.E.
45 " 4 1 1 S.W. 54 " 14 1 8 N.N.W.
46 " 5 1 S.W. 55 " 15 1 5 E.
47 " 6 1 1 N.N.W. 56 " 17 1 6 S.E.
48 " 8 1 2 S.W. 57 " 18 1 2 E.
49 " 9 1 4 S.W. 58 " 22 2
50 " 10 1 11 W. 59 " 27 1 5 E.
51 " 11 1 5 S.W. 60 " 31 1 4 E.