BHO

Charles II: June 1670

Pages 248-309

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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June 1670

June 1.
Court at Dover.
Petition of Mary, daughter of Rob. Southey, late of Canterbury, cordwainer, for a letter to the Mayor, &c., of Sandwich, to admit her to the next vacant sister's place in St. Bartholomew's Hospital there, in consideration of her late father's services and sufferings for his loyalty. With commendation thereof to the Mayor and jurats of Sandwich. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 61.]
June 1.
Cadiz.
Certificate by Ben. Price, that John Charnell, mariner, was apprehended by the Common Justice of this city, on suspicion of being accessory to the killing of a Spaniard, and that he has been kept prisoner there for nearly six months, without anything proved against him. [Ibid. No. 62.]
June 1.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. Our glorious Artillery Company was no pleasing sight to the fanatics, who are much down in the mouth since the vigilant looking after them by the Militia forces. Their great heights is turned to great cowardice, so that a man may tumble one of the biggest of them with a straw, and their only hope is that his Majesty will dispense with his laws when he comes to town. The City and parts adjacent may now be easily cleared of the rogues about it; we had thoughts of a general search, but I believe it is known abroad, though the time was never resolved upon; so as we are quiet, we shall leave it to his Majesty on his return. Care is taken for treating persons civilly, and all moderation is used, so as to see how far that will work. We keep two companies on guard at the Exchange every night; the Lord Mayor, justices, Sir Joseph Sheldon, and others are very courageous in the City, and the Militia and Guards are ready to go upon any action. [Ibid. No. 63.]
June 1.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoff. Shakerley to Williamson. The enclosure was the cover to a seditious pamphlet, and was delivered by a carrier. Thos. Cholmondely and I have been advised to give you notice of one John Travers who, being often disturbed in keeping conventicles, has sold his estate and gone to Mr. Hercules Commander's house in Ivy Lane, London. He is a very dangerous person, and a great speaker amongst the fanatics. I want information as to the pro ceedings adopted in London and Westminster for suppressing conventicles, so that I may know how to steer in these parts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 64.] Enclosing,
Dialogue in verse, commencing, "Come hither, Topham, come," being a political, anti-Catholic burlesque in 17 verses. [Ibid. No. 64i.]
June 1.
Hull.
Chas. W[hittington] to Williamson. Some colliers have arrived. The Nonconformists still continue their meetings, but privately. Ald. Crowle, the eminent merchant who fetched the Nonconformist minister out of the pulpit, has been much derided and abused by them, and by Alderman Acklam and 3 or 4 disaffected and dangerous fellows; if some course is not taken, they will soon affect the whole bench; as most of the aldermen are Presbyterians, the meetings find much favour. [Ibid. No. 65.]
June 1.
Chester.
Ma. [Anderton] to Perrott. The fanatics threaten to continue their meetings, although some have been taken up at every meeting, and distrained upon for the fine. A conventicle was broken up at Whitchurch in Shropshire, and the fines levied, and the same has been done by the justices at Chester and Middlewich, so that if they are as active in London, there will be less cause to fear a disturbance. Lady Ossory is expected from Dublin. [Ibid. No. 66.]
June 1.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I received the bill of imprest for 30l., and hope you will imprest the remaining 550l. in Gregory's hands, so that the stores may be supplied with elm timber, and that the things delivered by your order on promise of ready money may be paid for; otherwise I shall not be able to carry on the service, or keep the workmen employed, and our credit will be wholly lost.
Mason was so importunate for payment of his bill that I was forced to make use of 30l. of the money in Gregory's hands to settle it. I have agreed for 120 loads more of elm timber at 35s. a load, but I shall lose it if you do not order the money, and I have not a piece of elm in the yard. I have also an offer to choose what I want from 800 loads more at reasonable rates, and if you will assure ready money, I will treat for it. You will see by a paper enclosed from the master shipwright, that we have none of Sir Roger Twysden's timber to spare. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 56.] Enclosing,
Ph. Pett to [Commissioner John Cox]. I have viewed the timber in the stores at Chatham, and find there is not any compass or straight timber fit for the new ship building at Woolwich, or fit for other needful things mentioned.—1 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 56i.]
June 1.
Resolution.
Sir Thos. Allin to M. Wren. I got out of Port Mahon with the Nonsuch, Victory, and the ketch, on the 26th, and on the 28th anchored before Majorca to buy bread, having only sufficient for 12 days; but the Viceroy would allow no pratique unless I saluted the place with 5 guns, and would be content with 3 in return. The officers of health there were satisfied that we were in health, and came from no infected place, which the Viceroy also acknowledged in his letter, to which I answered that I thought it a breach of articles on his part, and contrary to the Queen Regent's orders, to deny us the freedom of that port, when he knew we came from no infected place.
I hope that his Royal Highness will acquaint his Majesty with it, and that the King will resent it as a matter of very troublesome consequences to us, if we must be forced to humour governors contrary to our instructions, or be shut out like pirates, from the ports and commerce of those who have so great advantages from his Majesty's alliance. I will write to Sir Wm. Godolphin about it, and I doubt not but he will have his Majesty's commands to prosecute the Viceroy so warmly, that his fellow governors may learn of him the difference between points of ceremony, and things essential to a treaty.
Admitting that it had been customary, or my duty, to be content with an unequal return of salutes, and that I had refused it, I yet cannot understand how the Viceroy could refuse us the freedom of buying and selling on that pretence, having nothing to allege on the matter of contagion; but happily, putting to sea that evening, the next morning I met Captains Beach and Holmes, who had left the victualler and the King David prize at Malaga, with the Mary and 3 other ships named, all which joined me at Formentera, where I was wooding.
I find that fish, butter, and cheese are wanting for 9 weeks, which must be supplied with rice and oil, until we can get them. I have received a letter from Sir Denis Gauden mentioning a credit for that purpose, but it was not enclosed, nor any notice given in what part of the world I might find it. So by advice of the commanders, I have been forced to send the Hampshire, Pearl, and Deptford ketch to Sir Thos. Clutterbuck at Leghorn, for rice, oil, and beer. I am going with the rest of the ships to Port Mahon, where I intend to unload the victualler and King David, and clean such ships as are foul. I have distributed the soldiers in the ships; Mr. Churchill and his servant are with me, Mr. Daniell with Capt. [John] Holmes, Mr. Barkman with Capt. Helling, and the two serjeants with Captains Hayward and Coleman.
I know nothing of the powder entrusted to commanders; the Ordnance officers should make better provision for us, not only of powder, but of match, canvas, paper, bullets, and other small stores. I hear from Sir Jno. Harman that an English ship which went with him to Tunis was forbidden by the French to enter that port, which is more than I durst have done by a French ship at Algiers; I beg directions as to doing the like with them, being warranted by their example. Let me know what proportion of the value of ships and goods of his Majesty's subjects, retaken from the enemy, I am to retain for salvage; meantime I will take ⅓ of the King David's, leaving the parties to recover the rest if it is found too much. I have great reason to fear the badness of the victuals sent, but I refer you to a letter enclosed (missing), directed to the Navy Commissioners on that subject, which I have left unsealed that you may read it. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 57.] Enclosing,
Same to the Same. There being a small vessel bound from Port Mahon to Genoa, I take the opportunity to acquaint you of my great extremity for want of victuals. I have with me the Portsmouth, Nonsuch, Victory fireship, and Deptford ketch, and they have neither bread nor flesh, nor any other provisions to go to sea with, although they are all cleaned and rigged, except the Portsmouth. I have made shift hitherto with my own money to keep the men alive, but that being almost expended, and the small plenty of the place growing less, I daily expect downright want of all things, if it pleases God to keep the victuallers much longer from us.
The other ships of my division are all abroad, and I am sure by this time that they are reduced to a starving condition, if they have not met with the provisions from England, or found credit in those parts of Spain where they have been. The Portsmouth has not been cleaned for want of a mainmast, which cannot be got until the King David prize arrives; and if there is not one for her in that prize, she must be sent home, or to Leghorn, with a jury mast. I fear the Mary and Foresight, sent to Malaga to bring the King David to Port Mahon, have been forced to go to Cadiz for victuals. I am sure that the Bristol and Pearl, sent from Mahon a fortnight ago, are in no better condition, unless they have met with the victuallers, or found credit in Spain; I shall find no victuals at Port Mahon when my money fails, which will be suddenly, if God is not merciful in speedily sending the ships from England.
I hope his Royal Highness will be bountiful to us, and order the victualler to be more careful for the future to furnish early supplies, before we fall into such hopeless necessities as we are now in; for although we may escape some great disaster, yet our many and great wants have been hurtful to the service.—Port Mahon, 15 May 1670. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 57i.]
Same to the Same. I send this letter at a venture, under cover to Lord Ambassador Montague, by a French vessel bound for Toulon. I have resolved to go to sea with the Nonsuch, Victory, and Deptford; having made up a month's provisions in Port Mahon, and the ships being clean, I cannot think of staying until they grow foul again. I have left the Portsmouth in harbour for want of a mast, and if she is not supplied when the King David arrives, I must send her home or to Leghorn. The victuallers from England and the rest of my squadron have not been able to get here as yet.—Port Mahon, 23 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 57ii.]
June 2.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Several loads of timber, as detailed, have been sent to Woolwich and Chatham, and there is some 3 and 4-inch plank left, if any more is required there. The London's main and fore mast will be finished this week; 4 Gottenburg masts are required for her yards, and from 6 to 8 loads of timber for her main gun deck. [Edw.] Halbord has 30 or 40 loads of plank lying on the stone wharf at Deptford, fit for the service, of which Mr. Mayors, the purveyor, can give particulars. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 58.]
June 2. Statement by Surveyor Middleton and J. Tippetts of the number and sizes of Gottenburg and New England masts and spars needed for the stores at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, and Portsmouth, for the year 1670. [Ibid. No. 59.]
June 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The convoy has not yet arrived to attend the merchant ships. No news to send. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 67.]
June 2.
Court at Dover.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet to prepare a bill for presentation of Dr. [Thos. ?] Hill to the rectory of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, Middlesex, void by the death of Dr. [Nath. ?] Hardy. [Ibid. No. 68.]
June 2 ? Petition of Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, to the King, to confirm to her the right granted to her late husband, to hold a market at Ratcliffe or elsewhere, within the manor of Stepney. Had a warrant to hold it on Tuesday, but delayed passing it under the Great Seal, on account of the expense of an ad quod damnum, and meanwhile [Thos.] Neale, a tenant of the manor, tries to set up a market at Shadwell near, which would deprive her of all advantage therefrom. Prays that it may not be granted him. [Ibid. No. 69.] Annexing,
Breviate of Lady Wentworth's case, showing that it will greatly damage herself and her child, if Mr. Neale, tenant of a year's standing of 16 acres at Shadwell, should be allowed to hold a market there, in preference to the Wentworths, who have held the manor of 2,000 acres more than 100 years. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 69i.]
June 2 ? Petition of Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, to the King, that a market, authorised by his Majesty's proclamation after the fire to be held at Ratcliffe on Wednesday, as well as the former one on Saturday granted to Lord Wentworth, may be granted to her, and not to Mr. Neale. Had the warrant for it, but delayed passing it, because of the expense, the market house and other conveniences not being ready; but meanwhile Mr. Neale tries to set up a Wednesday market at Shadwell, near Ratcliffe, which would much injure hers. [Ibid. No. 70.] Annexing,
Proposed warrant for a grant to Sir Wm. Smyth, Bart., in trust for Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, of licence to hold 2 weekly markets and a yearly fair in the manor of Stepney; also to hold a weekly court for settlement of disputes under 5l., with the same extension of powers as lately granted to the Court of Marshalsea, on surrender of a similar grant of one weekly market, fair, court, &c., made to him on behalf of the Earl of Cleveland and the late Lord Wentworth.—24 Aug. 1664. [2¾ sheets. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 70i.]
June 2. Caveat in favour of Lady Wentworth that no grant pass of a fair or market in or near Stepney till she be heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
June 2. Warrant from Sec. Trevor to Thos. Dixon, messenger, to search the house of Thos. Fenn, watchmaker, near Ivy Bridge [Westminster], for arms, and bring the arms and Thos. Fenn before him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 36.]
June 3.
Deptford Yard.
Humphrey Cadbury, mastmaker, to the Navy Commissioners. I viewed Wm. Wood's parcel of trees and masts, and chose 4 for making the main and fore yards of the Royal London. If in working them they should not prove good, he has agreed to change them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 60.]
June 4.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. Particulars of 44 loads of timber received from Deptford. I shall want 20 loads more of 3-inch plank, and 10 loads of 4-inch, for repair of the Milford. I wish Mayors success in the provisions for the new ship. [Ibid. No. 61.]
June 4.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Thos. Hayter. Let Burrowes be sent down to repair the fire engine, as the London is graving in dock; an engine ought to be at the ship's side so as to be ready, and we have no other in order in case of fire. [Ibid. No. 62.]
June 4.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury. We desire you to grant your dispensation to John Lake, D.D., to hold, with the rectory of Prestwich, co. Lancaster, that of Carlton in Lindrick, co. Notts, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 156.]
June 4. Warrant for naturalization of Anna Wolfenden. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 164.]
June 4.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a licence to Thos. Neale, lessee of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London, and afterwards to the said Dean and Chapter, to hold a market at Shadwell, parish of Stepney, Middlesex. [Ibid. f. 164.]
June 4. Warrant for a grant to Carolina, daughter of Sir Edmund Wyndham, Knight Marshal, of the estate of Rich. Sandford, outlawed for the murder of a base child. [Ibid. f. 165.]
June 4.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a bill to pass the Great Seal, appointing William, Duke of Newcastle, and Henry, Earl of Ogle, Lords Lieutenant of Newcastle and Northumberland, with power for each to act in the absence of the other. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 71.]
June 4. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 11.]
June 4. Like commission to [Richard], Earl of Dorset, and Charles, Lord Buckhurst, to be Lords Lieutenant of co. Sussex. Minute. [Ibid.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 30 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 199.]
June 4. Journal of warrants and orders issued to the Militia of London, and of other proceedings taken under the Act against conventicles, from 11 May to 4 June 1670, viz.:—
11 May.—A general order to all commissioned officers, to be diligent in attending to and discharging their duty.
16 and 25 May.—Orders and warrants to the Lord Mayor, authorising him to raise companies or regiments of the trained bands, for preservation of the peace.
28 May.—Letters and warrants from the King to the Commissioners, and also to the field officers of the several regiments, to search for and secure dangerous and suspected persons, with their arms, and in case of insurrection, to kill, slay, &c.; with note that James Hayes and John Jekell were committed thereon, and that warrants have been issued for apprehending several preachers, &c.
30 May.—Warrant to my Lord Mayor to raise the trained band, to preserve peace.
3 June.—Warrant for apprehension of dangerous persons.
4 June.—Gerrard Roberts and Thos. Rudyard committed to Newgate, as dangerous and disaffected persons.
Note, that there is an appeal made by Middleton, and a habeas corpus brought by Hayes and Jekell, and that proceedings are to be taken under the Oxford Act, as being deemed more effectual for suppressing and preventing conventicles. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 72.]
June 4.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson Coming from Dover yesterday, I called at Walmer Castle, and found that the firing of the guns to salute his Majesty was wholly in Sir Thos. Engham [Ingham ?], their halfdistracted commander, who was then present, and would not suffer Lieut.-Capt. Boyes, an old soldier, to order the affair, which was the reason a gun of thanks was not given. Sir Thomas saw his error by what Deal and Sandown did, and fearing his Majesty's displeasure, has solicited Col. Titus to beg for a pardon. Some ships have arrived from Virginia, France, Ireland, &c. [Ibid No. 73.]
June 4.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Lord Bryan [O'Brien], eldest son of the Earl of Inchiquin, has arrived from London, and agreed with the captain of the Mayflower of Chester, for his transportation to Ireland. Several ships have come in from Dublin, and report the peaceable condition of that place, and that all there are pleased with the present Governor, except some incorrigible fanatics. I do not hear of the arrival of Lady Ossory at Dublin from Kilkenny. [Ibid. No. 74.]
June 4.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. The Unicorn. Society, and Adventure have arrived from Virginia, the Bethesda from Barbadoes, and a ship from Cadiz, which touched at Ireland. The factions keep their conventicles as usual. The Mayor and magistrates are willing to put the Act in execution, but want informers, as such stratagems are used by the several sects, in having doors made to and from their places of meeting, that they cannot be convicted without there are many to act and attend. [Ibid. No. 75.]
June 5. Information of Edw. Cornelius and 2 others, before John Eyre, J.P. for Wilts, of 7 Presbyterian and 6 Anabaptist meetings held within the said county and borders of Somerset, from 5 June to 21 Aug., giving the names of the places where each meeting was held, and the estimated number of persons present, ranging from 200 to 2,000. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 76.]
June 5.
[Yarmouth.]
C. Felltham to Mr. Bowers, White Hart, Strand. There have been several meetings of the fanatics, who intimated that the King was ready to grant indulgences to the Nonconformists, and [Jas.] Puckle read letters openly to that effect, with great acclamations by the fanatic party. Capt. Clarke got a warrant from Mr. Woodroffe to suppress the conventicles, which he endeavoured to do, but with little effect, as they persisted in keeping them, saying they had begun their work, and would go on with it. The captain then gave notice to the bailiffs, who bound Nath. Carter, the speaker, over to the sessions. [Rich.] Huntington took the informations of Timothy Officer and 2 others, as being present at a meeting where there were 25 persons, they being there, as alleged, out of design; but the question has been argued amongst the justices whether these 3 were persons capable of taking the benefit as informers, they frequently meeting at conventicles, and being suspected of a design to get the ⅓, and distribute it among fanatics; upon this Mr. Huntington and Mr. Pell went to Mr. Baldocke, who thought they were capable informers, but considered that the money arising by their forfeitures should be given to the most diligent persons, as directed by the Act. It is believed, however, that Huntington will distribute it amongst the informers, so that in future if any person shall endeavour to suppress them, they know where to find a justice of the peace to do their business.
Huntington affirmed that the Island of Cobham, where they met, neither belonged to Suffolk nor Yarmouth, so that it is believed they will meet there without control, unless some other course is taken with them; they have grown so insolent by maintaining their conventicles, that they affront all that endeavour their suppression. I wish the people of Yarmouth were not so built up with private interest, but would mind that of the public. As you are acquainted with the disposition of the town, you will easily imagine how needful a bridle will be. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 77.]
June 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Advice came to Spithead as a convoy to the merchant ships. The Guernsey, with the Queen's ship, has left for Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 78.]
June 5.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. His Majesty's yacht from France, under the command of Capt. Gunman, has passed through the Downs, and it is said with Prince Robert [Rupert] and the Earl of Sandwich on board. She saluted every castle with 3 guns, which were answered by 5. Sir Thos. Engham has gone home from his command as lieutenant, and gave the usual thanks. Sir Thos. Allin is reported to be killed, but the seamen generally are afraid it is not true; he is much hated by them. Two ships have arrived, one from Smyrna, and report the Straits fleet of 30 sail to be in the Channel, making for the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 79.]
June 5.
The Fanfan, Dover.
Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. I have a man disabled of one hand by an accident; what am I to do with him ? His Royal Highness promised that care should be taken of all that came by any disaster, in any of his Majesty's vessels. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 63.]
June 5.
The Fanfan, Dover.
Same to the same. Having but 3 days' provisions on board, I desire your order where to re-victual. Noted that 2 months' for 15 men was ordered 7 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 64.]
June 6.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. Two vessels have arrived from Morlaix and 3 from Croisic, also a Frenchman laden with salt. They discourse much of the peace with the Turks, and say that their King is buying more of the Netherlands, to add to his new conquests. I enclose a copy of the articles with Algiers, which are now made public. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 80.]
June 6.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. [Luke Plunkett] Lord Fingall has arrived from Ireland and gone towards London. The fanatics met again yesterday, but were suppressed, and will be proceeded against according to law; we shall soon make them weary of their unlawful meetings. I wish you could suppress them as easily in London. [Ibid. No. 81.]
June 6. Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. Your commands, received by my son Chit, to have an eye upon the Nonconformists, second what I had from Lord Arlington, which I have to send to persons formerly employed in these parts. It is evident that the Dissenters are very angry at the new Act against conventicles, and speak big words. The justices of the peace for Westmoreland have had informations that the Quakers have numerously met, every Sunday since the Act has been in force, and that they threaten those who attempt to disturb them; after convicting some, I sent out distress warrants for the penalty. You will see what they do in other parts, by perusing an enclosure (missing), and will also perceive that the informer craves some supply, which I judge to be reasonable; but I have not disbursed anything on that account since my return from London, being unwilling to put the King to any charge without order.
I have written to Chit, to put you in mind of my discourse with Lord Arlington and Mr. Treasurer on Good Friday, about some change making in my course; I ask you as a friend to think of it, as I am getting old and unfit to struggle in a faction, and should be content with retirement—which I have not enjoyed for 40 years—even to a low condition, if the King should so think fit. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 82.]
June 6.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The London Arms of London, with marble and rice from Genoa, has come in to re victual. She came out of Cadiz in company of 32 English merchantmen, under convoy of the Falcon and Speedwell, who are gone for the Downs. The St. Jacob of London has put to sea with tobacco for Holland, and the Garden of Holland, that came for masts for the French King, has sailed for Brest with 3 or 4 small Bretons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 83.]
June 6.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. The Straits fleet of 30 merchantmen, under convoy of the Falcon and Speedwell, have passed by for the Downs. At their leaving the Straits in May, Sir Thos. Allin was in Alicant Road, as also Capt. Beach with the victuallers. Lord Howard is expected to return to England, as he and Taffaletta are not likely to do anything. The Dutch squadron under Van Ghent have arrived at Cadiz, and intend stopping near the Straits' mouth, to convoy in the galleons daily expected, and then to proceed up the Straits. Several small vessels have arrived here from France. [Ibid. No. 84.]
June 6.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Charles Perrott. The Arms of London has arrived from Cadiz with rice, lemons, and marble stones, bound for London. She came from thence with 40 sail, and 2 convoys, which she met in the Straits, with 10 or 12 Dutch men-of-war. Capt. Tyte, bound for Newfoundland, and then to the Straits, is still here, as also vessels from Sweden, St. Malo, Ireland, and other places, and are waiting a fair wind. The French ship with masts has sailed for Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 85.]
[June 6.] The King to [the trustees of lands, &c., assigned for debts]. Our late father,—to satisfy his own debts and those of King James contracted with divers aldermen and citizens of London,—conveyed to trustees divers lands, royalties, &c., of great value, of greater value than the debts. We wish that the debts should be paid with interest and charges; we are assured that the premises were granted to the trustees only for satisfaction of the lenders, and do not wish others to reap benefits therefrom; but when they are fully satisfied, the lands are to be reconveyed to us; therefore we desire you to give in speedy accounts thereof. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 86.]
June 6.
Court at Whitehall.
Draft of the above, altered into the form of a letter from a Secretary of State to the said trustees. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 87.]
June 6. Warrant for a grant to Edw. Progers, groom of the bedchamber, of the bonds, goods, and chattels, appraised at 93l. 2s. 9d., of Joseph Garrett of Kensington, steward to Robert, Earl of Holland, outlawed for refusing to be amenable to the laws. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 166.]
June 6. The King to the Attorney-General. Phil. Le Pein, an alien of Flanders, obtained letters patent of denization 15 years ago, now invalid, and thereupon took a lease of a house and garden at Stepney; he solicits fresh denization, and leave to transfer his said lease to the Crown, and to have it regranted to him, and bills are to be prepared accordingly. [Ibid. f. 168.]
June 6.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Kelynge, Lord Chief Justice, Sir Wm. Morton, Justice of King's Bench, and Sir John Howell, Recorder of London, to discharge on bail Fras. Stone, convicted of felony at the Old Bailey sessions, and insert him in the next transportation pardon, giving him leave to transport himself at his own charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 36.]
June 6. The King to the Mayor and Aldermen of Norwich. Rob. Wenman, alderman of the city,—being afflicted with a deafness which is likely to continue and increase,—has requested a dispensation from the public business of the city. We request a dispensation from his performance of public employment, on account of his constant loyalty and services to the late King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 51.]
June [6]. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 88.]
June 6. Caveat that no grant pass of the office of Prothonotary of counties Anglesey, Carnarvon, and Merioneth, North Wales. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
June 6. Grant to Sam. Speed of the prebend of Castor in Lincoln Cathedral, void by promotion of Dr. Rob. Creighton to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 5.]
[June 6.]
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Rob. Burton of Chester to the King, for the living of Waddingham St. Mary, co. Lincoln, void in law as being only held by the incumbent of Waddingham St. Peter adjoining, through a private order during the usurpation, although in the gift of the Crown; pleads the sufferings of his father for his loyalty. With reference thereon to the Archbishop of Canterbury. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 89.]
June 6. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 109.]
[June 6.] Copy of the above petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 90.]
June 6. Privy seal for 1,000l. to Charles, Lord Buckhurst—lately employed to compliment the French King at Dunkirk—for his equipage and charges. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 31.]
June 7. The petition of Capt. Edw. Talbot, for Rob. White's fine of 66l. 6s. 8d., referred to the Treasury Commissioners; the sum being small, the King is willing to gratify him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 109.]
June 7. The petition of the Mayor, bailiffs, &c., of Exeter, for leave to found and erect a hospital, to be called Hele's hospital, referred to the Attorney-General, to consider the powers and immunities, when the King will order the grant, being desirous to encourage a work of so much charity. [Ibid. p. 110.]
June 7. Warrant for a grant to William, Earl of Bedford, John Russell of Shingay, co. Cambridge, and Wm. Russell, the Earl's second son, in trust for George, Earl of Bristol, of a pension of 2,000l., and continuance to them of a pension of 1,000l. in trust for Anne, Countess of Bristol; also grant to them of 1,000l. pension for Francis, second son of the Earl of Bristol, after the death of the Countess, till he succeeds to Sir Rob. Long's place as writer of tallies in the Exchequer; with proviso that the Earl do not sell or transfer more than half his pension, and that it be in lieu of a debt of 10,000l. with interest for 5 years, and of 2,000l. a year from the Court of Wards, now abolished. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 31.]
[June 7.] Draft of the above. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 91.]
June. Docquet of the preceding, dated 30 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 198.]
[June 7.] Note that the words "the office of writer of tallies in the Exchequer" [which are omitted in the above draft] are to be inserted into the Earl of Bristol's warrant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 92.]
June 7.
Scotland Yard.
Order by the Commissioners for Highways, on a plot presented to them by Mr. Woodroffe of a passage from Chancery Lane to Lincoln's Inn Fields of 28 feet, that the parties concerned be summoned before the sheriffs of Middlesex, and a jury returned to inquire into the value of the houses and ground concerned. [Ibid. No. 93.]
June 7.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners to pay to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master of the Ordnance, "for his prudent circumspection and managery" in that office, 1,500l. a year, to be charged on the Ordnance quarter books. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 12.]
June 7. Memorandum by Dr. Henry Bridgeman, Dean of Chester, that Geo. Watts, almsman of the cathedral church of Christ and the Virgin Mary at Chester, is a very vicious and lewd person; has totally neglected his duty for some years, and run away with a woman into another kingdom and married her, although he has a wife living at Chester. With request that upon the redelivery of Watts's patent, a new one may be granted to Rich. Whitby. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 94.]
June 7.
Worcester.
Dr. Thos. Lamplugh to Williamson. Thanks for your favours, and more particularly for those about my concerns at Worcester. I have officiated there 3 Sundays together, and found the place very loyal and well affected, on the anniversary of his Majesty's Restoration. The Mayor is active and courageous in suppressing conventicles and seditious meetings, and has levied much on the offenders, and such as made shift to evade the Act, he met and imprisoned by another law which they transgressed. An anonymous letter was sent to him of the danger that he might fall into by continuing so strict, but it did not daunt him from proceeding with all vigour, until he has almost broke the knot of them. The bishop of this diocese is ill with an issue, but may linger some time, as nature is strong. [Ibid. No. 95.]
June 7.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I have solicited the AttorneyGeneral for the directions he was ordered to give at the Council, and this morning, on receiving them, the Lord Mayor and I, with the aid of several of the lieutenancy, proceeded against those persons who refused to give security, and have committed them to Newgate. The business being of so great a concern, and everybody being cautious and shy in acting, I want half an hour's discourse with you early in the morning; if I fail to-morrow, I will meet you at my brother Smith's on Thursday. [Ibid. No. 96.]
June 7.
Rye.
Ja. Welsh to Williamson. The Convertine of London from Virginia, commanded by Capt. Lightfoot, has put several persons on shore, who report the good condition of that place; they also relate that the Turkish men-of-war have captured 30 English ships. [Ibid. No. 97.]
June 7.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Mr. Kallender of London, master of a ship in the Downs bound for London from Leghorn, reports that the Sapphire fought an Algerine of 36 guns, and took her; a ship from Venice spoke the Sapphire in that gulf. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 98.]
June 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The convoy has arrived for the merchant ships, and they will sail with the first fair wind. [Ibid. No. 99.]
June 7.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Sir Jer. Smith. The large pieces of oak received from Deptford, and recommended by Mr. Shish, are defective and not fit for the purpose; a half-piece is an important piece, and must be of good timber. We have pulled out another decayed plank, 27 feet long, from the new ship; pray see to provisions for her, so that she may be in the water. Also move about [Chris.] Andrews' bringing in the timber from Burcot; he only employs one barge, and the water will be so low towards the end of summer that it cannot then be transported. As for my maladies about the new ship, I mean want of stuff. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 65.]
June 7.
Victualling Office.
Thos. Lewis to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. Thos. Langley, who commanded the Adam and Eve ketch, having attended me with a certificate of the victuals he is charged with, I have set down not only what the captain received, but what was delivered to his brother, John Langley, who succeeded him. As neither has given any account of the expending thereof, I ask that their wages and the freight may be stopped until they have done so. Also that Arthur Goodwin's wages may be stopped, until he has paid the balance due on his victualling account; he succeeded John Langley in command of the vessel. [Ibid. No. 66.] Encloses,
Account by Lewis of provisions supplied to Thomas and John Langley, commanders of the Adam and Eve ketch, between Jan. 1665 and June 1667, and of the balance due by Arthur Goodwin on his victualling account, between May and June 1668. [Ibid. No. 66i.]
June 7.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. As it is intended to launch the Assurance out of the dry into the wet dock on the 9th, I ask for an order to the master attendant to proceed; also to the purveyor to send down 4 loads of oak timber, required. [Ibid. No. 67.]
June 7. — to [the Navy Commissioners]. Particulars of things required in his Majesty's new kitchen, viz.: two fire hearths with 3 copper chimneys, an oven, 3 stewing plates, a leaden cistern, and some stones for paving the kitchen. [Ibid. No. 68.]
June 8.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The Mary Rose being ordered to Deptford, let the 500l. in Edw. Gregory's hands be imprested to him for payment of the bills for provisions delivered into the stores, and to buy more much wanted, especially the elm timber, which I contracted for provided I could have money to pay for it. The horse boat will soon be despatched for Deptford, and I hope she will return laden with plank, deals, and treenails. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 69.]
June 8. Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. We cannot launch the Assurance this spring [tide] and the London the next, unless the shipwrights work early and late, as there are several other works to be done to the Eaglet ketch, and the Ann, Monmouth, and Kitchen yachts, which draw the men from the works in launching the two ships. We want a warrant to the clerk of the cheque for extraordinary services, if the men are to work early and late; this would be beneficial to the service, and less charge to the King; also the 4 loads of timber formerly demanded should be speedily sent in. [Ibid. No. 70.]
June 8.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner, storekeeper, to Thos. Hayter. Pray send 10 blue ensigns to Mr. Young to be dyed; they were brought up by Welch, the master carpenter. [Ibid. No. 71.]
June 8.
Chatham. Ropeyard.
John Owen, clerk of the ropeyard, to the Navy Commissioners. We shall be out of provisions in 10 days; we have only great strands for cables, which should not be closed this hot weather; we want 5 lasts of tar to tar the hemp now in store. [Ibid. No. 72.]
June 8.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. To the same effect as his letter to Hickes of the 6th. Two or 3 vessels bound for Newfoundland are waiting a fair wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 100.]
June 8.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Williamson. It must rejoice every loyal and honest person to see the Act so vigorously executed; we continue to proceed against all the meetings, but the Act does not empower the officers to break open locks to distrain, so that people get time to remove the goods privately, and alienate them to others, and some of the officers will have fines levied upon them for the re-impress. Not having heard what method has been prescribed by his Majesty for the better execution of the Act, I beg further instructions. [Ibid. No. 101.]
June 8. Pass for 4 horses beyond seas, for the Sieur de L'Estrillay. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 165.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of pardon in the amplest form to Roger, Earl of Orrery, for all offences committed before 30 April last. [Ibid. f. 166.]
June 8. Warrant for a grant to Mich. Wharton of Beverley, of the advowson and perpetual patronage of Saxby rectory and church, co. Lincoln, in exchange for that of Rider, alias Ryther, co. York, which he now holds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 6.]
June 8. Royal assent to the election of Dr. Rob. Creighton, Dean of Bath and Wells, to be Bishop of that see, in the room of Dr. Wm. Pearse. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 184.]
June 8. Grants to Jacob Mendes Guterres and Joseph Da Costa Alvarenga, natives of Portugal, of denization on paying strangers' customs. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 184.]
June 9.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. Wishing to encourage Dr. Edw. Stillingfleet, who has done great service to the Church in defence of Christian truth, we recommend him for a prebend in your church; and as his laborious calling obliges him to constant residence, we request you to give him the first residentiary's place that falls void. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 17.]
[June 9.] Petition of Godwin Swift [uncle of Dean Swift] to the King, for a letter to the Dean and Chapter of Hereford, to permit him to renew his lease of the rectory of King's Caple, for which his father, Thos. Swift, paid a fine but never enjoyed it; which he renewed on a fine, but during his absence as Attorney-General to the Duke of Ormond in the Palatinate Court of Ireland, an attempt is made to disinherit him from his tenant-right. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 102.] Annexing,
Form of the letter to the Dean and Chapter as requested. [Ibid. No. 102i.]
June 9. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Hereford. Godwin Swift, son and heir of Thos. Swift, who was a great sufferer for his loyalty, complains that, during his absence as Attorney-General to the Duke of Ormond in Ireland, you have done something to deprive him of his tenant-right, in renewing the lease of the rectory of King's Caple, for which Thos. Swift paid a fine in 1645 yet, on account of the times, had little benefit from it; Godwin Swift paid another fine to renew it, so that they have paid in 386l., though the profit is only 40l. a year. We recommend him to favour, provided the case be found to be as he represents it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 51.]
June 9. John Musson to Lord Arlington. I enclose a paper touching my petition, and beg you to speak to the Duke of Ormond, who has known me well since 1655. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 103.] Encloses,
Same to the Same. Several lords may remember that I was twice put by my place on a false report. I may justly hope for relief having served the late and present King in the worst of times, to my utter undoing, the conspirators of England being assisted by strangers, and the conspiracy very strong, which was darkly foreshadowed in a strange and terrible manner in 163/67, by the knowledge and power of the Most High, and has proved to me a continual and sore affliction. [Ibid. No. 103i.]
Petition of John Musson to Lord Arlington, to intercede with the King for him; wishes a supply not only for his own occasion, but by the help of God's gift, to resist the disobedient. Longs to show how in 163/67 obedience and loyalty were justified by God in the spirit, to the comfort of the late King and other worthies who suffered for their country. [Ibid. No. 103ii.]
June 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The merchant ships and their convoy are still at Spithead, waiting for a fair wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 104.]
June 9.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A fleet of 16 sail, outward bound, have sailed; the 2 convoys for the Straits, 2 of his Majesty's ships to search for the North-West Passage, and 3 English merchantmen, bound for Holland and Dantzic, are in the Downs. A man in Canterbury, going out early to catch his horse, was seized by two mastiff dogs, and very much torn about the neck, body, and legs, but is yet alive. [Ibid. No. 104a.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Thos. Bond, haberdasher, Market Cross, Hereford. News-letter. It is reported that a vessel from London, not finding any trade at Jamaica, went to South Carns near Mantanella for trade; finding a Spanish man-of-war, the master sent his mate aboard to inform him that he had merely come to trade, and meant nothing hostile; but the Spanish commander kept the mate, and the next morning fell upon the English ship, and after a close fight, took her, killing the master and most of his men; the Spaniard had 36 killed, and 30 wounded; it is also reported that the King of Spain has granted letters of marque, and that no Spanish ships are to lie in the latitudes of Barbadoes.
There have been great earthquakes at Montserrat; the French have taken a Montserrat vessel, and also several from the Dutch, under pretence that they trade with the French plantations; they intend no restitution, and merely promise, with regard to the master of the sloop killed by the French pinnace, to prevent the like for the future.
Madame took leave of her Majesty and the Duchess of York on the 2nd instant, and went on board his Royal Highness's pleasure boat, which set sail for Calais, his Majesty and his Royal Highness accompanying her a great part of the way towards Calais, returning to the Thames and to Whitehall on the 3rd; but her Majesty did not leave Dover until the 3rd.
On 31 May, his Majesty's frigates, with their convoys, went for the Straits.
The Duke de Chaulnes writes that the French are not satisfied with the new Pope; that the Cardinal Patron, who has all the sway, is not inclined to the French interest, and has altered the recommendations of many principal officers whom the Duke had prevailed for; also they are much displeased at the making the Nuncio at Madrid Secretary of State.
Lord Cornbury has been restored to his office of Lord Chamberlain of her Majesty's Household, by the mediation of Madame at Dover. Dr. Mews, President of St. John's, and Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, has been appointed to the deanery of Rochester, void by death of Dr. [Nath.] Hardy. Mr. Godolphin, lately sent by his Majesty to the French Court, has been made a groom of the bedchamber.
They report from Rome that the Pope intends selling several offices, so as to raise money to take off a tax on bread. The French King has resolved to have a body of horse near Lorraine, to keep an eye on the Duke's actions.
The Princess Palatine being about to visit her son-in-law, the Duke of Hanover and Brunswick, some jealous people gave it out that there is some French negotiation in Germany, she being a lady much esteemed for her wisdom.
The body of Lord Northumberland, who died at Turin of fever caused by travelling in the great heat, was on the way from Blois, accompanied by his disconsolate lady; it is thought that the French King will seize his horses, and most of what he has left in France, "par droit d'aubaine." Lord Fauconberg had his last audience at Genoa on the 22nd, and took the right hand of the Duke.
They report from Germany that the Grand Seignior, so far from offering the Emperor any assistance against those rebels who have taken up arms, has given private orders to his Bashaws to join with them, if they shall not be able to maintain their design without it. The magistrates are suppressing conventicles, according to the Act. On the 1st the Earl of Chesterfield was married to the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon.
Count Sparre, Ambassador from Sweden, is daily expected, to determine with his Majesty the limits in Flanders that are in dispute between France and Spain.
Alderman Hayes and one Jekell, two eminent sticklers among the conventiclers, having been committed to the Counter, moved the King's Bench for an habeas corpus, and afterwards for an alias habeas, since which they have been removed to Newgate by a fresh warrant.
The negotiation of Herr Van Vonssenaer with the French King is a matter of much discourse with the Dutch, as although at his first audience the King appeared in a good humour, and thanked him for his harangue, it cannot but be noticed that the French King's affection is spurious. It is reported from Paris that the King intends demanding 14 millions of Parliament, and unless some fair advantage offers, he will rest quiet this summer. The French Admiral, having concluded a peace, has arrived from Tunis.
The Tripolites have broken with England, on account of there being no English Consul there. The Duke of Newburg is endeavouring to borrow 300,000 crowns of the Dutch, and has threatened to treat with the French about Juliers, if refused.
The Advice frigate has sailed from Portsmouth, with her convoy for the Straits, and will call at Plymouth, where the Guernsey and several merchantmen are ready to accompany them. A vessel from Weymouth reports that Lord Howard is returning to England, not being able to make a peace with Tafaletta. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 105.]
June 9.
The Advice, Spithead.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I have sent up 2 books, but could not rate them, as I have had but little trial of them, and do not know whom to make officers of. I am setting sail with the ships under my convoy. The Advice and Guernsey were to have received credit from Sir Denis Gauden for a month's beverage at Cadiz, but it has not arrived; we shall be badly off abroad without drink. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 73.]
June 9. Capt. John Tinker to Pepys. As it is intended to launch the London next spring tide, pray provide men and money for fitting and rigging her, so that she may be quickly despatched; she will get no good by lying in such shallow water. Men are very scarce, and not to be got without weekly pay; of the 25 I was to have had for rigging the hulk and other works, I could only get 7. [Ibid. No. 74.]
June 9. Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. Request for warrant to Woolwich for receipt of timber as detailed, required there for the new ship. [Ibid. No. 75.]
June 9.
Chatham Dock.
Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. If supplied with provisions mentioned in a list enclosed, and if 10 more joiners are entered, the Newcastle may be fitted for sea in two months. [Ibid. No. 76.]
June 9.
Deptford.
Certificate by Thos. Turner and Jonas Shish, that Rob. Manfeild, mason, has paved 500 yards of the dockyard with flint, and done some work to the dwelling houses there, for which he has had no bill made out. [Ibid. No. 77.]
June 9. The petition of T. Rustat for the estate of John Been, of Inglish Caton, for 3 lives, according to the custom of the manor, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 110.]
June 10. The petition of the day workmen and labourers at Greenwich, for payment of their arrears, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, who are to report how they may be relieved,—the King being graciously sensible of their condition,—and also how the rest of the work at Greenwich may be carried on. [Ibid.]
June 10.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Cooper to the King, for presentation to the vicarage of Cheddar, co. Somerset, void by promotion of Dr. Creighton to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. With reference thereon to the Archbishop of Canterbury, to inquire as to his ability and sobriety of life, and his report in favour of the petitioner, 11 June 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 106.]
June 10. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 111.]
June 10. The petition of James Wainwright, that he and all parties concerned in a debt of 1,000l. to Thos. Gerard, of Lancashire, may be left to legal proceedings according to the law, granted; but the Treasury Commissioners are to certify what the state of the whole case is, and what the King may fitly do as to the second part of the prayer. [Ibid.]
June 10.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Anthony, Viscount Falkland, to the King, for a yearly pension out of the tenths of the bishopric of Winchester, and for the first payment to be made out of those due last Christmas. Petitioner's father, Harry, Viscount Falkland, so far exhausted his estate in his Majesty's service, in the time of the usurpation, that when he died, he left the greater part of his lands, intended for the petitioner's subsistence, mortgaged, and they have since been seized and possessed by the mortgagee, whereby petitioner is so reduced that he has not sufficient to pay for his education. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, recommending the grant. Noted that the King, having been again moved in it, directed a pension of 200l. to be allowed, and petitioner is to apply to the Secretaries for a privy seal.—14 June 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 107.]
June 10. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, f. 110.]
[June 10.] Copy of the above petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 108. See 30 June, infra.]
June 10.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Hen. Robinson to the King, for the grant of a privy seal for the petitioner's use and the use of all those who shall be instrumental in making out and discovering what is due by the late Chas. Vaughan, receiver of public moneys in Devonshire in 1643 and 1644. After the Restoration, Vaughan was informed against, as accountable to his Majesty for the moneys he received, but by some indirect practices he was discharged, and has since died. Upon further discovery, another information touching Vaughan's accounts was exhibited against John and Hugh Vaughan, his sons, but such means have been used as have delayed the prosecution. Petitioner and his wife and family have been ruined through his loyalty to his Majesty and his late father. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 109.]
June 10. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 113.]
[June 10.] Draft [by Williamson] of the references on the petitions of the Greenwich labourers, Hen. Robinson, and Viscount Falkland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 110.]
June 10.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. Bodham to the Navy Commissioners. A strong cart is needed for the use of the yard, and to remove great cables; it may be had for 7l. or 8l., and will save its cost in half a year. Gossage, the teamer, complains of damage to his carts and wagons by carrying them, and alleges that it was not customary for him to do so until my coming, which is true; but I urged him to do it, as the loading, carting, and unloading 12 coils of 8-inch cable came to 24s., while to carry the same on men's shoulders cost about 51s. Remember our crane wharf, which is being ruined by the great guns still upon it; 4l. will scarce repair that damage; you once thought of paling it in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 78.]
June 10. Licence from the King, as patron, to Dr. Ralph Cooke, rector of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch Street, to grant a lease of 40 years to Ralph Cooke, jun., of all the ground whereon the parsonage house and two adjoining tenements stood, provided he rebuild the same according to the clause in the late Act for rebuilding London, empowering parsons and vicars to let glebe lands, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 167.]
June 10. Privy seal for 500l. to Sydney Godolphin, groom of the bedchamber, for his charges in 2 recent journeys to France and Flanders. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 32.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated June 20. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 192.]
June 10. Grant to Rob. Bird of Tong, co. Salop, of a pension of 30l. a year, for his services in assisting his Majesty's escape after the battle of Worcester, by corresponding with Geo. Pendrell, one of the 5 brothers instrumental in his escape. [Ibid.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 23 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 194.]
June 10. The King to the Master of the Ordnance. We hear that the late Lord General contracted for 400 new pikes and 600 bandoleer collars, to be made according to pattern, for the regiment of foot guards now under the Earl of Craven, but they were to be reserved for extra service; we therefore order you to deliver them to Major John Miller, major of the said regiment, for use as an additional supply in reserve. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 13.]
[June 10.] Grant to Charles, Earl of Derby, of 2 yearly fairs at Ormskirk, and one weekly market at Weeton-cum-Preeze, Lancashire, with courts of pie-powder, rolls, and other profits thereto belonging. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 30.]
June 10. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 185.]
June 10. Grant to Germane Hough, on surrender of Wm. Orton, of the office of waiter in the port of London. [Ibid. No. 186.]
June 10.
Court at Whitehall.
Proclamation ordering all the cashiered soldiers of the late usurped powers to depart from London, Westminster, and Southwark before 16 June, and not return before 16 Dec. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 111.]
June 10. Entry of the above. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 277.]
June 10.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Two ships left to search out the NorthWest passage, and the Falcon and Speedwell sailed for the river, leaving only 3 in the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 112.]
June 10.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. What I wrote you about the Nonconformists is true, but if you wish for affidavits, I would rather have the Governor put upon the business, he being as sensible of their doings as myself, for if I should do it, it would be much to my prejudice. They still meet, and are favoured by several round us, for till accounts are received of what is done at London, nobody will prosecute the rigour of the law. Geo. Empringham told Alderman Crowle's wife that the curse of God would light on her family for what her husband had done, and Alderman Acklam told Crowle openly that he would not have done so much for his hand, but several abuses were put upon him by the people. There have 100 sail of colliers passed Flamborough Head, and vessels are occasionally leaving Hull for Holland. [Ibid. No. 113.]
June 11.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I went to Mile End and saw 2 companies mustered. We had a lieutenancy in the City yesterday; 2 companies were ordered to be abroad to-night to take possession of the meeting-houses, and 4 companies are to relieve them to-morrow. Capt. Mead has been committed for refusing to give security for his good behaviour. I doubt not but all will be at an end shortly, as they are daily more discouraged, and most of the preachers in the Hamlets have consented to become silent, and to give no more trouble. We want authority to compel the owners of the meeting-houses to employ them to some other uses.
I told you how Sir Thos. Player was defeated in his expectation of being colonel of Sir Rich. Browne's regiment, but he is now more content since it is put upon the Lord Mayor; he is anxious to be authorised by the King to officiate under the Lord Mayor, besides the authority from the lieutenancy. He is an honest, brave gentleman, and ought to be encouraged. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 114.]
June 11.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Fellowship of Lyme has arrived from Maryland, and reports the good condition of the plantations; also that 5 other merchant ships of London sailed 3 days before her coming away. [Ibid. No. 115.]
June 11.
Cambridge.
Information of Simon Priest, barber, of St. Botolph's parish, Cambridge—before Sir Thos. Sclater, Bart., and Dr. [Jas.] Fleetwood, Provost of King's College, J.Ps.—that Thos. Salter, of Lombard Street, London, said that before 2 Sundays were over, there would be no King or no fanatics, and that there was an unhappy Act set out by the King, which caused there to be no trade in the City. [Ibid. No. 116.]
June 11. Presentation of Rob. Burton to the rectory of Waddingham St. Mary's, co. Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 5.]
June. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 190.]
June 11. Letter to the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Chester, to admit Rich. Whitby to an almsroom in place of Geo. Watts. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 6.]
June 11. Abra. Parker, muster master, to the Navy Commissioners. I send the check books of the Mary Rose, though I had no assistance or convenience for mustering, and was as bad off as those put to make bricks without straw; their author [Phin. Pett] muster master at Gravesend, lies in bed until 11 or 12 o'clock in the day, when he should be doing his duty; and when spoken to, threatens to fling the power up to those who gave it.
By this ship's books I told you much could not be expected to be saved by the mustering, but the King will not be charged more than his due, which was all that was undertaken or expected, and the demonstration of a penny saved, where no more could be, is as much satisfaction as 1,000l. I doubt not but by the ships now abroad, I could make such a sum, if encouraged and allowed the convenience.
I desire that these books may stand for justification on the King's behalf, against all others falsely charging me. I beg payment of my salary for services rendered in 1666, which his Royal Highness 2 years ago desired you to grant, and which you acknowledged to be due, I having had great sufferings through long waiting, and being damnified nearly 1,000l.; or at least give me some just cause for non-payment, that I may be heard as promised, to show cause why I should so suffer and not others. I beg this, being privately attacked and maligned, though it is well known to several persons of quality that I was always desirous to serve his Majesty, as well before as after the Restoration, and therefore I hope I and my accusers may be heard before the Board, unless my crime is known to be worse than theirs; which if it is, I ought not to be suffered to live in his Majesty's dominions; without such a hearing I cannot hope for any encouragement.
Noted by Pepys, 5 July 1670, that upon Parker being summoned to appear before the Board, where Mr. Pett had also attended 2 or 3 times to answer Parker's charges against him, Parker refused to own having charged him with anything, or having had any meaning in this letter; but afterwards owned that he meant Pett therein, but refused to discover the whole until he knew what Pett had written against him. It ended in Parker's alleging that Pett lay in bed daily as stated, and Pett denying it; as Parker could not prove it, or anything else suggested in his letter, they were both dismissed, Parker several times launching out, as usual with him, into expressions very unmannerly and injurious to the Board, with reference to their denying to grant him an allowance for his first year's service, contrary to the Duke's order. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 284, No. 79.]
June 11. Abra. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I send a muster book in a new form for the Mary Rose, as a precedent to be adopted; if a right use is made of such books by all the ships, they will be much more serviceable, and save the King as many pounds annually as there are men employed; but it must be done by the muster masters, who must be well versed in the business, as well as in making up the books.
By this book and another small instrument I have ready, any individual can in an hour check all the charge of the Navy, as to victuals, pay, and clothes, although the ships may be at sea. If I had continued in the employ, I intended to adopt it; I shall, if reemployed, send you one for each ship as it returns home, with the instrument referred to, which I conceive will give great satisfaction. [Ibid. No. 80.]
June 11.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to Col. Thos. Middleton. We will launch the Assurance out of the dry dock to-day, so that her rigging, &c., may be finished; 20 labourers are wanted to complete the works in hand; I want a warrant to the clerk of the cheque for their entry. The elm timber formerly demanded has not come down. [Ibid. No. 81.]
June 11.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to Pepys. The Mary Rose has come down to her moorings at Deptford, and the men may be paid on Tuesday. [Ibid. No. 82.]
June 12.
The Spy, Dover.
Capt. Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I have only 10 days' provisions on board, and must wait orders. I want an order to tallow, and will disburse the money for it. [Ibid. No. 83.]
June 12.
Hull.
Col. Ant. Gilby to Williamson. I have received some commands from Lord Belasyse concerning our garrison, and perceive they are to the same effect as my letter to his lordship, which Lord Arlington showed at the Council, who acted upon it. I have put the orders into execution by strengthening our guards, but it cannot be continued unless our companies are recruited, which Lord Belasyse hopes to get effected. Since my coming to Hull, I have prevented the meeting of the sectaries by placing spies in every street.
Thanks for your offers to serve me, but I cannot propose anything from this distance, as if anything falls in, it is gone before I hear of it; so that it is with me as with the man at the pool of Bethesda, one or other will step in before, unless someone puts me in, and I have no one to rely upon but Lord Arlington. I hear there are 2 regiments of foot to be raised for the Dukes of Monmouth and Richmond, and should be glad to have the command of the former. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 117.]
June 12.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I have received the proclamations. As neither constable, headborough, nor other officer will come near me, or the 3 justices in the Hamlets, with informations, I sent out persons to discover what meetings were held; they found 2, at one of which some of my soldiers were; the other at Dr. Anslow's, in Spitalfields, was disturbed by the High Constable and a justice of peace, who took the names of as many as they could.
Two Anabaptist preachers have been brought to the Tower, one being out of Whitechapel. I sent to my Lord Mayor and to the Guards on the Exchange, and hear that all goes on well in the City, after the proceedings taken last Sunday to keep the people out of the meeting-houses, in which my brother Sheldon with his company was present. I have received a letter from Lord Craven, by his Majesty's command, giving me notice of another meeting at Wapping, and have sent for an account, which I shall forward. [Ibid. No. 118.]
June 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The merchant ships with their convoy have sailed, with a favourable wind. [Ibid. No. 119.]
June 12.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. The Advice frigate, and several merchant ships bound for the Straits, have sailed to the Downs. [Ibid. No. 120.]
June 12.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. The Margaret and 3 others named, laden with salt, vinegar, brandy, and pitch, have arrived from Rochelle, Port Louis, &c. A vessel of Barnstaple with coals has been cast away on the bar. [Ibid. No. 121.]
June 12. Warrant to pay to Sir Allen Apsley, for the use of the Duke of York, 20,000l., in compensation of his loss by the late Act for raising 310,000l. by an imposition on wines and other liquors. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 190.]
June 12. The petition of—Bird for pardon of a felony for which he stands outlawed, referred to Justice [Sir Thos.] Tyrrell. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 111.]
June 12. Grant to Dr. Peter. Mews to be Dean of Rochester, in place of [Nath.] Harding, deceased. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 5.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 16 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 190.]
June 13. Presentation of John Cooper to the vicarage of Chedder, co. Somerset, void by promotion of Dr. Creighton, and in the King's gift pro hac vice. Minute. [Ibid.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 16 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 191.]
June 13. The King to all persons concerned. The Dean and Chapter of Winchester have represented to us that during the late rebellion, their houses were demolished, 3 only being left standing, which are much out of repair. Since the Restoration they have rebuilt the houses, and the new ones are much better than the old ones; but as the statutes of the Church require that each prebendary shall have the house held by his predecessor, the seniors have the meanest houses, and the new houses are sometimes built on new sites, which may breed controversy.
Therefore, at their request, we repeal the clauses relating to the succession of houses, and enact that on any vacancy, the senior prebendaries shall have the choice of vacant houses; also that the further repairs and additions needed shall be performed by the public stock, and the dean and prebendaries discharged from further suit thereon, as all suits are to be against the whole Chapter. Also confirmation of the allotment of sites. This order to be registered in the book of Chapter Acts, and subscribed by the present and all future deans and prebendaries. [2½ pages. SP. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 122.]
June 13. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 6.]
June 13. Order to Henry Howard and Sir Cecil Howard, Commissaries of Musters, to muster the recruits ordered [See May 10, supra] to the troops of the Queen, under Sir Phil. Howard, Duke of York, and Duke of Monmouth, but to pass only such as bring good horses, and are well armed [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 14.]
June 13.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Stephen Touchett of Paris, prisoner in Newgate, to the King, for a free pardon. Was committed for stealing 39s., tried, and sentenced to death, but reprieved until next assizes. With reference thereon to Sir John Howell, Recorder of London, who sat on the trial—the King inclining to show him mercy at interposition of the French Ambassador—and his report, 16 June, that there were other cases of picking pockets by the petitioner, at the Courts at Westminster and Guildhall, besides that of the prosecutor, Henry Pitt, of which Touchett was convicted, and that he was tried by a mixed jury of Frenchmen and strangers. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 276, No. 123.]
June 13. Copy of the above. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 124.]
June 13. Entry of the preceding reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 112.]
June 13. The petition of the Mayor and burgesses of Lyme Regis, for continuance of 100l. a year for repair of the pier, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, his Majesty compassionating their condition. [Ibid. p. 113.]
June ? Petition of John Doddington to the King. His late father had a place as Commissioner of Appeals in the Excise, but being unable to exercise it on account of his religion, held it in the name of Wm. Coward, who paid him the salary of 200l. a year, reserving 50l. for himself; begs that Coward may be similarly continued on his own behalf. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 125.]
June 13. Report by Lord Keeper Bridgeman, on the reference of the petition of Lady Doddington, relict of Sir Fras. Doddington. I have heard the several pretensions on behalf of the petitioner and her son James, and also those of Sir Rich. Temple, on behalf of John Doddington, son and heir of Sir Francis, touching a Commissioner's place in the Excise, value 200l. a year.
I find that your Majesty granted the office to Sir Fras. Doddington, but he being incapable, from his religion, of executing it in person, it was granted to Wm. Coward, his nephew, during pleasure; that Sir Francis had the profits during his life, save 50l. a year allowed to Coward for executing the duties; and that Sir Francis—stating that he held the place for Coward's life, whereas it was but during pleasure—by his will, gave his executors 150l. out of the profits, on trust to allow 20l. a year for his son James's maintenance, and to employ the surplus towards buying a farm for him, beseeching your Majesty to confirm such place in consideration of his great sufferings and losses. The lady alleges that there is no other provision for her son, and hopes that as long as Coward (who is but a trustee) holds the office, he should pay the profits as Sir Francis directed.
That a letter was produced from the Earl of Carberry on behalf of John Doddington, his secretary, stating that at the instance of Doddington, his lordship engaged the [late] Lord Treasurer to move his Majesty for Sir Fras. Doddington, and that Coward's name having to be made use of, Sir Francis declared that it was to be for the benefit of John Doddington, if he survived his father. I also find that the place was promised to him after his father's death, and Coward was to continue in it for his benefit, although at the death of Sir Francis, the Treasury Commissioners intended to have sunk such office for the King's advantage, his Majesty having previously declared that such places should cease as they fell void. [1¼ pages. Ibid., No. 125a.]
June 13. Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I have not been able to go to York, through an attack of the gout, but I frequently hear from thence, and if there be occasion, I will endeavour to get there. Remember me to Lord Arlington. I beg that my letters may be sent to Staveley in Derbyshire. [Ibid. No. 126.]
June 13.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Your man Osborn had a fine passage and has arrived at Whittsan, between Calais and Boulogne. Yesterday being the Sabbath, we sent out some officers, who found upwards of 200 persons at a conventicle of Anabaptists. The speaker is a tailor, who encouraged the people to stand fast, and not to be afraid of the wicked; one of the brethren having said he would sacrifice his life for what he asserted, and seal it with his blood, I sent him to prison, but the Mayor took bail, and released him until the sessions. Can bail be taken in such a case, it being treason or misprision of treason ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 127.]
June 13.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoff. Shakerley to Williamson. A company of Quakers in the town meet in the same house twice every Sunday, notwithstanding the industry and vigilance of my soldiers, in discovering and bringing them before the Mayor and magistrates, who have issued warrants for levying the fines imposed by the Act, and thus think they have performed their duty; but the goods being conveyed away, no considerable levy can be made, and they being resolved to persevere in their contempt of authority, the intention of the Act is wholly frustrated. Being consulted by the Mayor and justices, I advised them to take another course to hinder the seditious meetings, by tendering the oath of allegiance; and upon refusal, to commit the refusers to prison. This they did, but after consultation amongst themselves, they discharged them, with the advice not to meet any more; but these declared their intention to the contrary. Some of them have been sequestrators and soldiers in the late rebellion and usurpation, and as their proceedings manifestly tend to the disturbance of the peace, I beg you speedily to intimate to me the best and most approved course to be taken, for procuring obedience to the law. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 128.]
June 13.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
Wm. Bodham to Pepys. Having heard the low ebb they are at for hemp at Chatham Ropeyard, I can send 20 or 30 bundles, if ordered, which will be better, in these grumbling and censuring times, than letting the work stop for want of it. We have nearly 170 tons of tow in store, and also a sufficient proportion of tar; but being in barrels, it is unfit for transportation, as the staves are so thin, and there is a continual leakage; in future buy as little from this Calmer as you can. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 84.]
June 13.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. Did you receive a letter a month ago, containing a bill of exchange for 6l., and thanking you for your great charity to the poor woman [Alice Underwood] ? Can anything be done in obtaining his Majesty's leave to refine silver out of lead in North Wales ? others have a grant for South Wales. I mentioned it before in letters sent by my brother Richard, and the Dean of Chester. Sir Geoff. Shakerley and other friends join in returning you hearty thanks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 129.]
June 13. Memorandum that Nath. Vincent is the preacher at the meetinghouse in Farthing Alley, Southwark; Mr. Jenaway at the Great Barn in Bermondsey, near the Jamaica House; and Mr. Whitaker at the Long Walk, near Bermondsey Church. The Quakers' meeting-house adjoins the Martial Yard, Horsleydown, Southwark. Noted by Williamson, " Meeting-places in Southwark, received from Lord Hawley." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 130.]
[June 13.] Like notes of meetings in Cheshunt parish, Herts, and in Southwark, with the names of the preachers. [Ibid. No. 130a.]
June 13.
The Fanfan, Dover Road.
Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. I received your order to send my wounded man to London, but he is in such a bad condition that I have been forced to pass my word for his quarters and care here. His hand was shot to pieces in loading a gun in Calais Road when Madame landed, when several similar accidents happened. A man who fell from the yard, and broke his arm and his skull, was ordered to be taken on shore, so I hope you have provided for such emergencies; otherwise it will much discourage those that may receive hurt on board his Majesty's vessels which have no surgeons allowed them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 85.]
June 13.
Dover.
Same to Thos. Hayter. I desire you to send by Thos. Jones 6 blank tickets, having discharged some men from the Advice, by his Royal Highness's order. [Ibid. No. 86.]
June 13. Petition of Stephen Gaselee, surgeon of the Mary Rose, to the Navy Commissioners, for a bill for necessaries, and some allowance for extra expenses, for medicines, and for his care and pains with the wounded and supernumeraries. During the late expedition, provided all the necessaries for the sick and wounded at his own charge, as also for between 40 and 50 supernumerary men, the greater part of the voyage. Noted [by Pepys] that he received his 2d. for 140 men at the pay of the ship; also that a bill was passed for 18l. 7s. 6d., 28 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 87.] Annexing,
Certificate by Alex. Fettiplands that Mr. Gaselee's charge for sick and wounded men during the voyage has been at least equivalent to the allowance of necessary money, usual in such cases.—Mary Rose, 20 April 1670. [Ibid. No. 87i.]
Certificate by Sir John Kempthorne, that the allowance of necessary money for sick and wounded men was not granted to the Mary Rose, because a short and tranquil voyage was expected, but that she had many men continually sick and 30 wounded, who were constrained to remain on board until cured; as also between 40 and 50 supernumeraries, to the extraordinary charge of the surgeon, whose extra pains and expense might plead not only for the allowance, but also for some other consideration.—2 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 87ii.]
June 14.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I want an order to press 16 calkers and some joiners; also money for it, the master calker being 5l. out of pocket by pressing men. The carver and joiner's works are backward. Mr. Mayors promises fair, and I question not but he will perform. I sent a long boat up with him, which I expect back this tide laden with knees. We want some spruce deals for the Assistance and Milford. The Falcon is ready to sail. [Ibid. No. 88.]
June 14.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to Pepys. If the Mary Rose is to be docked after the London is launched, let some riggers be sent from Woolwich, as I cannot get any men to enter, although promised ready money; also move his Royal Highness that the men in the yachts in port may be had. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 89.]
June 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Proclamation requiring the immediate tenants of certain feefarm rents—named in a patent granted 13 June to Francis, Lord Hawley, and others for their sale—to proceed in their purchases within 6 months, during which time they are to have the preference before others, and to perfect their contracts within the time limited by the Act for the sale of fee-farm rents, or the same may be sold to others. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 278.]
June 14. Warrant for 130l. to John Hingiston, for repair of the organ in Whitehall Chapel, out of the privy seal dormant of 27 July last for 10,000l. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 33.]
June 14. Privy seal for 28,000l. to Baptist May for the use of the privy purse. Minute. [Ibid. f. 34.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 20 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 191.]
[June 14.]
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Swift Nix of pardon, in the same form as granted 25 Nov. 1667, excepting omission of the word "murder," and with a non-obstante of the late proclamations made for the apprehension of him and other notorious robbers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 131.]
June 14. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 34.]
June 14. Privy seal for 3,400l. to Fras. Bowman, stationer, for paper, books, &c., for Lord Arlington, from 4 Jan. 1664 to 9 Nov. 1669. Minute. [Ibid. f. 38.]
June 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No shipping has passed since the sailing of the convoy and merchantmen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 132.]
June 14.
Queen's College [Oxford].
Henry Smith or Sir Smith to [Williamson]. I do not send you this to show you my progress in French, but to obey your commands. I have written you several times about Mr. Clifford, but feared to disturb your important business by writing too often. His health is good. I am trying to teach him the general principles of geography, arithmetic, astronomy, and history, but he is most interested in making genealogical collections. Thanks for your goodness in making me companion of this noble gentleman. [French. Ibid. No. 133.]
June 14. Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I was far from being wellcontented after receiving Sir Rich. Browne's letter to appear at the Council. According to Lord Arlington's direction, I dined with the Lord Keeper, who satisfied me that the clerk of the Council was under a mistake, and ordered that neither I nor the Lord Mayor should appear. I acquainted the Lord Mayor with this at the Lieutenancy, when he desired a copy of Hayes and Jekell's petition and of Sir Rich. Browne's summons to be read, and then very hotly said that, notwithstanding the message from the Lord Keeper, he would attend the Council, make their petition a juggling petition, and give them a broadside. The Commissioners of Lieutenancy present thought themselves much concerned, and after we rose, I persuaded the Lord Mayor to go to my Lord Keeper, which he is resolved to do. I find nothing by the Lord Keeper but that the prisoners will be returned back to us to receive security, which will be sufficient satisfaction to us all. Let me beg you not to forget Sir Thos. Player's business. Send to Mr. Wren about the order in Council relating to meeting-houses, as I am not well enough to go out. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 134.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
[Henry Muddiman] to Sir Walter Moyle, St. Germans, Cornwall. News-letter, partly to the same effect as that of 9 June. Also, A fire broke out near the Savoy Gate on the 10th, about 1 a.m., which consumed several houses. His Majesty, on notice of it, immediately got up, and walked with only 4 or 5 after him to the place, where he gave such orders that, by blowing up some of the houses, the fire was stopped, but not until it had destroyed the pile of buildings between the two gates, towards the street; it afterwards caught the other side, but only burnt down a sign.
The Lieutenancy of Northumberland, vacant by the death of the Earl, has been conferred on the Duke of Newcastle and his son Lord Ogle, and that of Sussex on the Earl of Dorset and Lord Buckhurst.
The Dutch are not pleased either with the reception the French King gave their Ambassador, or with the letters he sent them, the language not being so kind as they expected; however, M. Pompone, the French Ambassador, assures them that his master is resolved not to attempt anything during the lifetime of the present King of Spain; but if he should miscarry, the world could not blame the French King if he looked to the concerns of his son.
It is reported from Brussels that the Constable [of Castile] is so indisposed that he cannot attend to any public business. The Queen of Spain is very impatient for a new Governor, and has told her Council that if they do not presently agree upon the election, she will send one of her own choosing.
They advise from Tangier that Taffaletta has beheaded his 3 nephews, and is gone to Fez, where he will go against his enemies with a strong army, they beginning again to appear powerful.
Lord Fauconberg has gone from Leghorn for Florence, one out of every English house attending him in the morning.
The Elector of Cologne threatens to make war on the Marquis of Westerlow, pretending that the lands of Petersheim are appended to his diocese, and the Marquis is fortifying the castle against a surprise.
A proclamation is issuing directing such as served in the time of the rebellion to depart for 6 months. Pursuant to an Order of Council, the Surveyor-General, with the assistance of the Lord Mayor, caused the seats in public meeting-places to be pulled down. The meetings are not so frequent as formerly, and those lately held were seized upon and dispersed. The Guards are to be augmented, the Duke of Monmouth's troop to 200, and the other two to 150 each. Sir Thos. Chicheley is sworn in as privy councillor. The Speedwell and Falcon have arrived in the Downs, as convoys to the Straits fleet, and the Advice and Guernsey passed by Weymouth, with several ships from the Straits. The Industry of North Yarmouth, bound for the West of Ireland, was chased off Cape Clear by 2 Turkish men-of-war, and forced to alter her course.
It is reported from Venice that the Prince Vizier informed Cavalier Molino, the Venetian Ambassador, that the Grand Seignior has at last ratified the peace, and that it will soon be sent to him. The Turkish Envoy is returning from France, with an officer of the King to conduct him to Toulon, and bear his charges by the way. M. D'Estrades, the ex-Ambassador, has arrived in Holland, under pretence of treating about a marriage with a rich widow of Zealand; he says the King of France will strictly observe the friendship existing, but any nearer alliance is not to be expected.
The Prince of Orange's visit to England has been deferred until next month. Capt. Gothem has arrived in Zealand, and has been in company of the galleons, who are believed to have reached home. The Imperial army has been reinforced by the loyal Hungarians with 5,000 horse and 3,000 foot, and is now supposed to be 30,000 strong. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 135.]
June 14.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. Mr. Dean, postmaster of Nantwich, has not been deprived of any of the time for which he was deputed. He made no overtures to be continued; and as he parted with his inn, wants horses, and is not much esteemed, another person—who has served in the King's army, is more competent, and has the best inn in the town—has, on the recommendation of Sir John Bennett, been appointed to succeed him. I return Lord Cholmondeley's letter. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 136.]
June 15. Petition of the Lord Mayor, &c., of London, to the King. A quo warranto has been issued against the City, at request of the Swedish Resident, in reference to their right to the dues called water balliage, which he pretends are innovations. It was insisted on that the testimony of freemen of London, who best understood such duties, should be taken at the trial, but the verdict in the Exchequer Court has been given against the City, because freemen were not allowed to witness, though foreigners, who pay the tax, were so allowed. Request a nolle prosequi on the quo warranto, till they can prove their right to the said dues. [Ibid. No. 137.] Annexing,
State of the ancient toll of water balliage paid to the City of London by aliens, not freemen, for goods brought in or conveyed out by water, to pay the expense of the conservation of the Thames, for which they pay a fee-farm rent of 300l. a year, but which balliage John Gold, Charles Moriscoe, and other turbulent persons now go about to disturb. [Ibid. No. 137i
June 15. Warrant to pay to Sir Denis Gauden, Victualler of the Navy, 45,176l. 11s. 3d. without account, for interest due on moneys raised by him for the service at 6 per cent., from March 1661 to March 1669. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 189.]
June 15. Licence from Sec. Trevor to Rob. King of Salisbury, formerly lieutenant of horse under the usurped powers, to remain in London and Westminster to follow his suit in Chancery, notwithstanding the late proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 41.]
June 15. Licence from Lord Arlington, according to the power given him by the proclamation of 10 June last, for Henry Sharpe, an officer in the late army, to reside in London and Westminster, as his occasions require. With note of a similar licence for John Silverwood. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 32.]
June 15. Request by Sir Godfrey Copley that Rob. Sherbrooke of Oxton, co. Notts, and his servant, may have licence to stay in town one month, and then to return home, Copley engaging that they shall do nothing prejudicial to his Majesty meantime. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 138.]
June 15.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Williamson. I send an advertisement for the Gazette. [Ibid. No. 139.] Enclosing,
Notice by the Treasury Commissioners, that the trustees for sale of fee-farm and other rents will attend at Auditor Philips' office, King's Bench Buildings, Inner Temple, on certain days mentioned, to contract for sale thereof, as by the Act directed. [Ibid. No. 139i.]
June 15.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Nieuport packet-boat has arrived in the Downs, with only 2 passengers. [Ibid. No. 140.]
June 15.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. I hear by a Dutch ship from Ross in Ireland, bound for Rotterdam, that on account of so much cattle dying there last summer, beef is sold there at 3d. a lb. and butter at 6d., and that she was glad to take in coals, by reason of victuals being so dear. Our Mayor and justices are very vigilant in putting the Act against conventiclers into execution. Several colliers have put to sea. [Ibid. No. 141.]
June 15. Same to Hickes. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 142.]
June 15.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The fanatics are very quiet, their eyes being upon the issue of the meetings of their brethren in London; but I doubt not they will be easily quelled, should they attempt a disturbance. Lord Aungier has arrived for Dublin; also Lady Ranelagh, who is waiting for Lady Ossory from Dublin. A conventicle was discovered 6 miles distant by Sir Geoffrey Shakerley, and 45 persons have been proceeded against. Thanks for your paper, which I receive each Monday, though Friday and Saturday's news are generally omitted therein. [Ibid. No. 143.]
June 15.
Chester.
Alex. Rigby to Williamson. I received the proclamation. Sir Geoffrey Shakerley has gone into the country to examine witnesses, and issue distress warrants against several taken at a conventicle. Little would be done here under the Act if it was not for him. They refused to commit 2 notorious Nonconformists, although declining to take the oath of allegiance. I hope, in kindness to Sir Geoffrey, that they may have a rebuke. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 144.]
June 15.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory to Pepys. Having, by command of the Duke of Richmond, discharged the master and 2 seamen belonging to the Richmond hoy, and engaged others in their place, I ask the Board's approbation, as although I am satisfied of the equity of it, still it is contrary to my practice to discharge or enter men without the Board's order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 90.]
June 15.
My Chamber, Whitehall.
Sir Rich. Browne to Pepys. Wm. Furlong having found the good effects of my recommendation, I am encouraged to make another, and desire your intercession, that he may participate in as much from the chest at Chatham as his pretensions can bear. [Ibid. No. 91.]
June 16. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I hope you will be satisfied by what I wrote you on the 11th, that money would be saved by my new way of mustering his Majesty's ships, and that he could not be charged with a penny more than is just. This I would undertake as long as I live, without additional charge. With note, 21 June, that Lord Brouncker found nothing in Mr. Parker's books extra, beyond what was usual to be done by the present muster master and clerks of the cheque. [Ibid. No. 92.]
June 16.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Col. Thos. Middleton. I need a supply of spruce deals, as those expected from Justice Wood have not arrived. For want of them, we shall load the horse boat with plank and tar and such deals as can be spared. Mr. Shish will send an estimate of the repairs required to the Mary Rose, Speedwell, and Falcon. [Ibid. No. 93.]
June 16. Wm. Harrington to Pepys. Being engaged to deliver into the stores a large quantity of East Indian plank, and finding not only the freights very dear, but an impossibility of procuring free English ships fit for the stowage of goods, I desired the Board either to aid me in procuring a licence to freight foreigners, or to acquit me of my contract, the latter of which was refused. By the aid of Sir Jeremy Smith and Col. Middleton, I sent a petition to the Duke of York, who promised to promote it to his Majesty and Council; but the King being absent, Council has not sat. Not being able to go abroad from infirmity, I was waited upon by Smith and Middleton, who advised that I might safely order my factors to freight and despatch 2 or 3 foreigners for the service, which I did, not doubting my petition would be granted; but I now understand it has met with difficulties.
Knowing your interest with his Majesty and his Royal Highness, I beg you to promote my petition, as it will be the best means to escape such great danger and loss as I shall be liable to, if my ships are seized on their arrival. Also to consider my weakness and infirmities, which render me useless; what I have done was by the encouragement of those who I thought could not be mistaken in what they advised. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 94.]
June 16. Navy Commissioners to the porter of the yard at Deptford. It has been the practice amongst the calkers, when their stages were taken down or removed, for them to break them up and carry them away for firing; and for labourers, sawyers, and smiths, when they found any whole or half deals about the yard, to break them up and carry them away, which practices are a great abuse to the service, a wasteful consumption of goods, and not fit to be suffered. You are not in future to suffer any workman to carry away deal or other chips as firewood; if any are found doing so after this warrant has been read to them, you are not only to take the chips away to heat the pitch kettle, but also to report the offenders to the clerk of the cheque, who is to prick those under cheque for 3 days' wages. Noted as brought to the Navy Board by the Surveyor, 16 June 1670. [1¼ pages. Draft. Ibid. No. 95.]
June 16.
Arundel House.
Thos. Corie to Williamson. I beg you to give the bearer a conference about the petition of the clerks of the peace, before the Treasury Commissioners, for their salary, which is allowed by Act of Parliament upon returns of the hearth money. I am suddenly leaving town, and am prevented from attending Lord Arlington about it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 145.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
[Lord Arlington] to the Bishop of Winchester. Several friends of Dr. [Thos.] Pierce, President of Magdalen College, Oxford, having, unknown to him, solicited the King for a dispensation for the doctor to reside out of the college on account of failing health, his Majesty is inclined to gratify such request; but you best knowing what may be the consequence of such an indulgence to the college, the University has directed me to enclose you a draft of the proposed dispensation, that you may insert conditions and cautions. [Draft by Williamson. Ibid. No. 146.]
June 16.
Drayton.
William, Lord Paget, to Williamson. Some years ago I petitioned the King, who referred my cause to Lord Chancellor Hyde, Lord Arlington, and 4 others named, and after 6 months' attendance on them—Lord Arlington assisting me nobly—I obtained a full and favourable report, but nothing more was done. All the papers I left in Lord Arlington's office. Having heard that the King has lately signed a commission for sale of the fee-farm rents, in pursuance of an Act passed last session, it behoves me to look about, and get another petition in readiness, in the framing of which the papers required will be an assistance; so please to deliver them to the bearer. [Ibid. No. 147.]
June 16.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant revoking the grant of 19 Jan. 1661, to Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, and Josceline, Lord Percy, his son, of the captaincy of Tynemouth Castle, fee 100 marks a year, and of the wages of a master gunner at 12d. a day, 8 gunners at 6d., and 11 other servants at 6l. 13s. 4d. a year; total, 231l. 5s., to be paid by the receivers of Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, and granting the said captaincy to Col. Edw. Villiers, present Governor of the castle, with the said salary and fees of officers and servants. [Draft. 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 148.]
June 16. Licence to—Harrison, heretofore Governor of Upnor Castle, Kent, to follow his business in town, without any time limited. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 41.]
June 16. Licence from Sec. Trevor for Rich. Beake, an officer in the army under the late usurped powers, to remain in London and Westminster for 12 days. [Ibid.]
June 16. Licence to Thos. Howard, ensign in the King's regiment of Guards, to embark and travel beyond seas for a year, with one servant, both receiving the usual pay during their absence. [Ibid. p. 42.]
June 16. Licence for Col. Nich. Shuttleworth and his servants to stay in town. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 32.]
June 16. Warrant for letters patent, authorising the payment of the ancient and just fees to the heralds, pursuivants-at-arms, gentlemen ushers, harbingers, and other servants, on the creation of peers, baronets, and knights, receptions of the homage of bishops, and solemn entrances of the King into any county, city, town, or cathedral; granted because some, pretending ignorance, have neglected the said payments, which they are now required to discharge, on pain of high displeasure. [Ibid. f. 33.]
June 16. Licence for Rob. Sherbrook, of Oxton, co. Notts, [at request of] Sir Godfrey Copley, to stay in town. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 17. Order for a warrant appointing Penryn in Truro, Cornwall, a coinage town for tin, and authorising Rob. Smaly, present Mayor, and 13 other gentlemen named, to build a coinage hall there, Truro being too distant from the stannary of Tywarnhaile, in which a great part of the tin has lately been taken, and the ways strait and deep in winter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 169.]
June 17.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council, on hearing of the affair of the Merchant Adventurers and the interlopers, that—as Mr. Kiffin offers, on behalf of the latter, that they will enter the company, if they may not be responsible for its debts,—the Attorney and Solicitor General devise some expedient for their admission, without such liability. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 149.] Annexing,
Report by Attorney-General Finch on the above order, that Mr. Kiffin professed submission for himself, but was unable to answer for others; that the interlopers of Exeter did not conceive themselves intended, as they were not named in the order, and that the referees ceased proceedings, as there is no chance of agreement if every particular interloper has to be treated with. [Ibid. No. 149i. See 6 May, p. 202, supra.]
June 17. Order, on the petition of Capt. Hartgill Baron, for a lease of lands in Berkhampstead, part of the duchy of Cornwall, that as the King promised him compensation for the command he resigned at request of Prince Rupert in Windsor Castle, the Treasury Commissioners are to report whether the allegations in the petition are true, and whether the grant does not exceed the equivalent promised, in which case it is to be despatched. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 113.]
June 18. Licence for Peter Parry of Taunton, merchant, late quartermaster of horse, to stay in town till 3 July. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 41.]
June 18. Warrant for a pardon to Capt. Thos. Welsh, for putting to death John Browne. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 34.]
June 18. Order to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master of Ordnance, to supply the several castles, forts, and garrisons with 40lbs. of powder, shot, and other stores proportionable, and to keep them so supplied, on accounts from the several governors of the expenditure thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 14.]
June 18. The King to the Duke of York. Finding that several particulars relating to the forces have been unregulated since the Lord General's death, many of which need speedy consideration, we require you, Prince Rupert, the Duke of Monmouth, Earls Oxford and Craven, and 4 others, to consider all matters relating to military service as we shall direct. [Ibid.]
June 18. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 150.]
June 18.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to [the Navy Commissioners]. Pray send victuals for the Falcon and Speedwell, as the men will not do any work in unrigging and bringing things on shore, so as to lay the vessels up, for want of victuals, which should be sent on board, unless you wish to pay them off, so as to ease the charge. I threatened to prick them out of pay, but it did not avail. The pursers are to blame for not coming near the ships. I beg you will write to the captains of the several yachts to send their men to work here, as it will have more force than my giving them notice, and leave them without excuse. As yet no men have come to be entered on the London and Assurance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 96.]
June 18. Certificate by the Earl of Carlisle and 3 others, that they have used Major Choke's incomparable drink for the gout, and received great ease and benefit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 151.]
June 18.
Chelsea.
George, Bishop of Winchester, to Lord Arlington. I thank you for your letter [See June 16, supra], and thank his Majesty for considering the rights of the visitor, as well as the accommodation of the President of Magdalen College; also for referring the papers to me, which I return. I have underlined as much of what the President's friends would have the King sign as I conceive would be prejudicial to the visitor, and of no advantage to the President, nor to the government of the college in his absence. As the rest of what is desired is favourable to the President, I am willing it should be granted, if he can accept it without perjury. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 152.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
[Lord Arlington] to Sir Thos. Player. His Majesty has taken particular notice that the Militia regiment in the City, whereof the late Sir Rob. Browne was colonel, and to which you as lieutenantcolonel might with good reason have pretended, has been disposed of to Sir Sam. Starling, the Lord Mayor; and being unwilling that any dissatisfaction you may have had in the disposition should prejudice the service by causing you to withdraw from it, he has ordered me to signify this to you, and to desire that you will continue to serve as lieutenant-colonel of that regiment, where his Majesty thinks you have done, and may yet do, very good service. [Draft by Williamson. Ibid. No. 153.]
June 19.
Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I went this morning to the Lord Mayor in the City, and visited the guards and soldiers there, consisting of 3 companies of my regiment, and Sir Andrew King with them. Only two ministers appointed by the Bishop of London, came to preach in the conventiclers' public places, one being at Doelittle's, and the other at Watson's at Devonshire House, where the Lord Mayor and Aldermen and I went, and both meetings were large and orderly. Four preachers have been brought to the Tower from the Hamlets. Do not forget Sir Thos. Player's business. There were no Quakers nor any other sect preaching in the City to-day. [Ibid. No. 154.]
June 19.
Everton.
Col. Ant. Gilby to Williamson I have just returned from Hull, upon some extraordinary affairs, but will be at Hull to-morrow, to execute Lord Arlington's commands, and then return the papers. It would have facilitated the business if I had been allowed to open the Hull bag as formerly, but this was stopped by Sir John Bennett, as being prejudicial to his Majesty's affairs; so my letter went to Hull and was sent back here. I beg a renewal of the favour when I am at my own house at Everton, as it is only a mile from the post house at Bawtry; I am but seldom there, and I will take care to affix my own seal on the bag when I have done with it. [Ibid. No. 155.]
June 19.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. I shall have little foreign news for 10 weeks, no ships coming in until Michaelmas. Two boys at Sandwich went to wash in the haven there, when one of them was carried out to sea, and has not yet been found. The fanatics have their ears open to hear what is to become of the 2 aldermen put into Newgate. [Ibid. No. 156.]
June 20. Pass for Rob. Smith to go to France with 2 servants, and to return. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 169.]
June 20. Licence to John and George Duncombe, of Shalford, to repair to London and Westminster, and to remain as long as necessary. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 43.]
June 20. Like licence to John Clark of Enfield. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 20. Licence to Sam. Price, of Frogmore, near Windsor, co. Berks, to repair to and continue in London and Westminster 21 days. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, f. 43.]
June 20.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Countess of Ossory, with her children and retinue, as also Lord and Lady Clancarty, and several other persons of quality, have arrived from Dublin in his Majesty's pleasure boat the Mary, and landed at Dawpool, from whence they were brought hither in her ladyship's coaches. They had a good passage, having been only 14 hours at sea, and intend setting forward to-day, so as to reach London by Saturday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 157.]
June 20.
Ugbrooke.
Sir Thos. Clifford to Williamson. I acknowledge the receipt of your two letters. I do not deserve so many thanks, but will endeavour to merit your friendship, and desire to hear from you as occasion offers. [Ibid. No. 158.]
June 20.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Two ships from Virginia have arrived; that colony is in good and peaceable condition, with a plentiful crop of tobacco; also another from Bilbao. [Ibid. No. 159.]
June 20.
The Revenge.
Sir Edw. Spragg to Williamson. The galleons have arrived at Cadiz, where I found 40 sail of English merchantmen homeward bound, which Sir John Harman brought from the Straits. Count d'Estrees, the French Vice-Admiral, with 2 men-of-war and a fireship, also arrived from Sally, where he could do no good. I hear by a vessel from Algiers, that the Turks are all in, and intend putting to sea about August, and that M. D'Almora, with his squadron, was set upon before Tunis by the Tripolese, who burnt 2 of his men-of-war and took another, so that he is drawn off from thence without bringing them to any accommodation. Van Ghent is cruising about the Straits' mouth, and has orders to return for Holland, so that another squadron may come in his place. Sir John De Liveda, Vice-Admiral of Rotterdam, with 2 men-of-war bound for the Straits, is at Cadiz. Remembrances to Lord Arlington and Sir John Trevor. [Ibid. No. 160.]
June 20. Note of tithes due from rectories and a vicarage, co. Hants, within the deanery of Winchester, taken from the records of the Remembrancer of first fruits and tithes. Endorsed, "Bishop of Winchester. Petition brought in 16 May 1670, and then considered. A report to be made to his Majesty that it will be for the good of the Church that these moneys be discharged by privy seal. Referred to Sir Charles Harbord to consider and report." Noted "to draw a warrant." [Ibid. No. 161.]
June 20. Warrant for payment to John, Lord Lovelace,—appointed lieutenant of the manor of Woodstock, in place of the Earl of Clarendon, —who is incapable of holding employment, and to whom no more money is to be paid,—of 40l. a year for the keeper's wages, and 40l. for hay for the deer, as granted by the late King to Philip, Earl of Montgomery, the then lieutenant, and also the expenses of repairs of lodges, making hay, &c., amounting to more than the rent of 114l. 1s. 10d., charged for the manor, and 20l. for the woods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 34.]
June 20. Draft of the above. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 162.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 25 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 195.]
June 20. The King to the Vice-Chancellor and heads of houses in Cambridge, and other electors of the Professor in Divinity. We recommend Dr. Joseph Beaumont, chaplain in ordinary and Master of St. Peter's College, Cambridge, for the said professorship, soon to become void by promotion of Dr. Peter Gunning to the bishopric of Chichester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 7.]
[June 20.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 163.]
June 20.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
Wm. Bodham to Col. Thos. Middleton. I send a list of stores required to complete the repair of the stove, and other works, also a man to undertake it, the one appointed being dead. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 97.]
June 20.
Leghorn.
Capt. Wm. Poole, commander of the Jersey, to the Navy Commissioners. I intend sailing to-morow. There are 9 merchant ships in port, some of which are inclined to go with a Dutch convoy bound home, rather than with me, as I have to call at several places for others waiting a convoy, and our countrymen have so little charity for each other that they grumble to stay a day, or go 3 or 4 leagues out of the way, for those who would be as glad of a convoy as themselves; so if any leave me on that account, and misfortune befalls them, I hope it will not reflect upon me.
Most of the Sapphire's men, and some others, going astray, have been trepanned by the privateers of Leghorn, and carried up the country; and as soon as the ships are gone, they are embarked into slavery—for I cannot give it a better expression—yet the men will not be persuaded to keep to their duty. I spent 2 days with Sir Thos. Clutterbuck, in waiting on the Governor for satisfaction, and for prevention of such practices, which if not removed will ruin our navigation amongst the merchant ships trading here. The Hampshire and 3 others have arrived from Sir Thos. Allin for provisions. They left him wooding at Formentara, from whence he will go to Minorca. [Ibid. No. 98.] Encloses,
Same to the Same. The careening of the ships is over, which has been long enough about, through the defects of the Jersey's sheathing. My mainmast is sprung, and the sails and boats are very crazy, for want of supplies to repair them; but I have so well recruited that they will now be serviceable through the winter. I hope to get in the provisions in 4 days. I designed to sail eastward, but as all the merchant ships except 2 have arrived for a convoy, I have resolved to go with them to Cadiz, rather than detain so many waiting for 2, or leave them to run the adventure of the seas without convoy. There are 8 bound home, one of which is the Olive Branch from Smyrna, richly laden.
Capt. Noble, of the Fame, has returned from Genoa to take in goods for Cadiz; but the 2 Dutch convoys which came from Smyrna got the start of him, on purpose to countenance 2 of their ships which are there, bound for Cadiz. I have written to assure our Consul and the English that the Fame shall have a better convoy than the Dutch, because strangers (through the pitiful and inconsiderable vessels that trade in these seas) decline lading on English bottoms, and the French are now the blades that bear away the belle in trading.
It would be impertinent to give you an account of our Lord Ambassador's noble reception by the new Grand Duke at Florence, it having been transmitted from better pens.—Leghorn, 13 June 1670. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 98i.]
[June 20.] Petition of — Sayers to the King. Some years since, I bought of the late Earl of Portland the buildings and site of his mansion at Berkhampstead, Herts, parcel of the Duchy of Cornwall, as a provision for myself and family; in the hope of getting the term renewed, I proceeded to lay out a greater part of the estate in building, planting, and improving. While I was contemplating to apply to your Majesty to increase the term from 23 to 31 years, Capt. Baron presented a petition for a lease in reversion over my head, and obtained a reference to the Treasury Commissioners, who recommended a grant to that effect, whereby I shall be completely undone unless your Majesty interposes on my behalf. I beg you to stop further proceedings on Captain Baron's petition, and to renew my lease for 31 years.
With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, who are ordered to put a stop to Baron's suit, and give an order for a grant to Sayers for filling up his term to 31 years, in consideration of his long and faithful services, his Majesty not having previously understood his right, which he by no means would have prejudiced. [Drafts by Williamson. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, Nos. 164, 165.]
June 20. Entry of the above order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 116.]
[June 20.] Petition of Wm. Whorwood, his Majesty's servant, to the King, for favour and protection, till some way is found of satisfying his debts, contracted in his Majesty's service and by his command. Had a warrant for 1,700l. arrears of an assessment collected for the rebels' forces in 1657, which he discovered to be detained in the chamber of London, but the warrant was recalled on petition of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, though he was promised satifaction; has received nothing, and is now prosecuted to extremity of law by Sir Wm. Underhill, who says he has his Majesty's leave therein. [Ibid. No. 166.]
June 20. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners, to consider some way of satisfying him according to his deserts, as the King wishes to favour him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 116.]
[June 20.] J. Nicholls to Lord Arlington. I hope my diligent zeal in the particulars named in my petition will be an inducement for your lordship to present it to the King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 167.]
June 20. Reference to the Treasury Commissioners of John Nicholls' petition, representing his services, and desiring a commemoration of the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 118.]
[June 20.] Draft of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 168.]
June 21. The petition of Capt. Baron for a lease of lands in Wiltshire, part of the Duchy of Cornwall, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 117.]
[June 21.] Petition of Lady Sanderson to the King, for a maintenance, being rendered most miserable in the loss of her gracious mistress, the late queen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 169.]
June 21. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 117.]
[June 21.] Note [to Williamson] of Sir John Monson's request for a letter to Dr. Thos. Pierce, President of Magdalen College [Oxford], for a demy's place in that college to John Curtois, now student in Lincoln College. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 170.]
June 21. The King to the President and Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford. We recommend John Curtois, a young scholar, for a demy's place in your college. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 53.]
June 21. Warrant for a nolle prosequi in the proceedings against the Lord Mayor and citizens of London, Rob. Carpenter, John Carpenter, and Thos. Andrews, for taking the toll of water balliage, although on the trial of the said cause, in the Court of Exchequer, a verdict was given against them, since in obtaining it there were some irregularities. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 35.]
June 21.
Sudbury.
Wm. Gillson, Mayor of Sudbury, to Thos. Covell, Furnivall's Inn, Holborn. I am much troubled by the people of All Saints parish, who get Nonconformist ministers to preach there; and as it is done in the church, I cannot tell how to suppress them. The church has been vacant 5 or 6 years, from there being little or no maintenance belonging to it; as neither the patron nor bishop presents, I suppose it has fallen into his Majesty's hands. Pray move in the matter, so that I may obtain an order for locking up the church doors. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 171.]
June 21.
[Dover.]
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. Fearing my last letter miscarried, I renew my application as to whether the sectary, arrested at the conventicle for asserting that he would sacrifice his life for what he asserted, is bailable. The Presbyterians and Anabaptists had their meetings last Sabbath, but were dispersed by the officers. Several ships from Virginia and the South have passed by. The Countess of Northumberland is supposed to be detained at Calais through the illness of her child, but is expected every tide. [Ibid. No. 172.]
June 21.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I send papers concerning Lord Hinchinbroke and the burgess-ship for Dover, which I and several others have endeavoured to secure for him; as we have above twothirds of the freemen in his interest, we are certain he will carry it. I must apologise for troubling you, but am sure the Earl of Sandwich will take it kindly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 173.]
June 21. Sir John Wolstenholme to Williamson. As business and distance prevent my attending in person with reference to my petition, I have solicited Sir Fras. Cobb to procure an answer to it, to the effect of a paper left by him with you. I will thankfully acknowledge your favour therein. [Ibid. No. 174.]
June 21.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to John, Bishop of Durham. We recommend Dr. Guy Carleton, Dean of Carlisle and chaplain in ordinary, for renewal for lives of the lease which he holds under you for years of Walsingham Park, Durham, on reasonable conditions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 18.]
June 21.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. I renew my request that you will write to the commanders of the yachts to send down their men to assist, as the men are very unwilling to do anything, and I am much straitened for want of help. None have entered on board the London or Assurance, although desired to do so upon riggers' wages, alleging they can have 15s. a week in merchants' employ. Pray consider how the London may be supplied with men, and send a warrant for entering them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 99.]
June 21.
Deptford.
Sir John Mennes and Col. Thos. Middleton to the Navy Commissioners. According to his Royal Highness's orders, we shall stop 150 men for the London; but as the provisions in the Mary Rose have been taken to the Victualling Office, there are no victuals for them; unless some are sent down to-morrow, it will be impossible to keep the men together. [Ibid. No. 100.]
June 21.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the Navy Commissioners. I assisted Mr. Culmer in getting all the old boats appraised, and they have since been sold to the parties named in Culmer's letter. [Ibid. No. 101.]
June 21.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. His Majesty intends being at the Treasury on Friday at 9 a.m., to consider the last business you were here about. [Ibid. No. 102.]
June 21.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. We intend to get the London to the dry dock next Thursday, but unless we have the help of the shipwrights and labourers from Woolwich, we shall be too weak for the work. We want a piece of elm timber for the cap of the foremast, and a knee for the boltsprit. [Ibid. No. 103.]
June 22.
Deptford.
Same to Col. Thos. Middleton. There are enough ready-cut sheathing boards in store, and if the horse boat is sent to fetch them, with a warrant to the storekeeper to deliver them, the ship may be sheathed in 2 days. Let some of the workmen be sent from Woolwich, to help to get the London down to the dock's mouth to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 104.]
June 22.
Deptford Yard.
Sir John Mennes to the Navy Commissioners. Pray send an order to the commanders of the yachts, to send all their seamen to Deptford Yard to-morrow, to assist in launching the London, as I fear there will be some want of men. I am the more importunate as they have refused to obey Capt. Tinker's summons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 105.]
June 22.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. I have not received the 5 lasts of tar promised, and fear there has been a mistake, as Mr. Wilson has had 4 directed to him from Deptford which he had not demanded, and which I believe were intended for the ropemakers; but Wilson will not deliver it for the ropeworks without your warrant. The men have been playing 2 days, and I shall not be able to employ them unless supplied with hemp and tar. [Ibid. No. 106.]
June 22. Release by John Powell, late surgeon of the Assistance, of all claims or demands for attending on George Young, seaman, for wounds received in his head in 1666. Having been satisfied by his Majesty, I abandon all actions commenced by me against Young. [Ibid. No. 107.]
June 22. The petition of Sir Wm. Boreman, for a privy seal for 439l. 10s. for planting 524 young chestnut trees at Greenwich Hill, and other work there, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 123.]
June 22.
Oxford.
Dr. P. Mews, Vice-Chancellor, to Williamson. The bearer attends you on behalf of her brother, a prisoner here for robbing on the highway, and I fear judgment will pass against him; I request you to procure a reprieve, to lie dormant, so that his transportation may afterwards be obtained if possible. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 175.]
June 22.
Hull.
Col. Ant. Gilby to Williamson. Though it is true that most of the magistracy here are too much disaffected to the government of the Church, and too backward in the prosecution of the law against conventicles, yet there is a mistake in the information given to his Majesty, concerning words spoken upon the occasion of putting the Act in execution. After the evening prayer, when the minister was gone out to bury a corpse, an unknown person stepped into the pulpit with the intention to preach, and commanded a psalm to be sung; but by the diligence of Alderman Crowle and of Capt. Bennett, who then commanded in chief, the fellow was forced out of the pulpit. It is apparent, however, that his coming was by consent of the Mayor, and with knowledge of most of the people, the Mayor and aldermen and most of the persons present continuing in their seats, after the minister was gone, in expectation of this sermon. I have here sent his lordship the examination on oath of two persons; we do not know how to proceed against Alderman Acklam, as Crowle, to whom the words were spoken, is from home; but on his return, I will send Lord Arlington a perfect account. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 176.]
June 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Ships arrived from Jamaica and Barbadoes report those places in a peaceable condition; also ships have come from Bilbao and Virginia, and Capt. John Day says that tobacco is very plentiful in Virginia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 177.]
June 22.
Stocden.
Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. Coming into Yorkshire to visit some friends, I heard many stories of the obstinacy of the Nonconformists, and had a paper enclosed given to me. I have desired the informer to procure me the libel therein mentioned, which shall be sent to London, when obtained. I shall not return home for 14 days, but if there are any commands, Chit knows where to send. [Ibid. No. 178.] Enclosing,
[W. Haggett to Sir Phil. Musgrave.] Mat. Sowerby has shown me a dangerous pamphlet entitled, "Serious queries against the late Act of Parliament relative to meetings, wherein it is endeavoured to make the late Act (against conventicles) appear as against the laws of God, of the nation, and of nature." It is the most dangerous piece of work I ever saw. "Mene Tekel " was a notable one, but this author frequently quotes scripture, Magna Charta, Judge Coke, and several others, to prove that the Act is contrary to all before expressed, and tells the people that it is high time for them to look about them. It also gives a relation of what became of Sir Rich. Empson and [Edmund] Dudley, Chief Justices of England, who, having acted contrary to Magna Charta, were tried, 1 Hen. VIII., condemned, and hanged. It also brings in several of the King's Council and the Lord Mayor of London, as having suffered for the like. The writing is catching to those that desire a change of government.
The pamphlet was given to Sowerby by Ma. Stodert, as he came out of church, and he was to have returned it, but instead of doing so, he went and read it to Rob. Markendale, who approved it, said it would work, and they would send some to Scotland. He then brought it to me, and asked me to go with him to Edw. Alwaine's, a Quaker, which I did, and Alwaine highly commended it as real truth. They say that Stodert had it from Rogers, and he from Mr. Barnes of Newcastle.
Last week Mr. Fisher, and Laton, late an officer in Col. Daniell's regiment, came to me, and reported that the meetings are kept in Newcastle as formerly, but not so publicly, and they spoke as if there would be mischief from the abundance of discontented people in every county, and the deadness of trade; they say that the Ipswich men have laid up their vessels, on account of the new impost on coals.
Laton is gone southward. [Mat.] Sowerby is so confident of a sudden change that he has a case of pistols, and wants a sword. I told him if there was an occasion, I would let him have as good a one as ever he or his father had, who was one of your small friends. Rob. Markendale and I are now friends, but he was very jealous of me 2 or 3 years since, from my having, at Towlert the bailiff's request, given entertain ment to Mr. Neale, the bishop's chief gentleman, upon which Will. Hutton, a Quaker of this town, made a great business of it, and had a meeting at Geo. Bailman's in Durham, where they spoke their thoughts of me; but Bailman, my great friend, told them they were all fools, for did they think, if I was employed by the bishop, I would appear in public with his gentleman ? and so convinced them. I heard it all from Bailman and Markendale, who also told me of Atkinson being with him at Gateside. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 178i.]
June 22.
Queen's College.
T. H[alton] to Williamson. I should be glad to assist Sir Smith about his degree, and waited about it on Dr. Fell, who drew up what was thought fit to be submitted. No doubt it is very feasible in the University. Mr. Provost must be courted, and if a letter is sent him, its contents must be to the effect of one enclosed, and must be from the Chancellor or Mr. Treasurer, and also another from my lord of Oxford. Speed must be used, as next week Mr. Clifford and he are going for Cambridge. (fn. 1) [Ibid. No. 179.]
June 22.
Ampton.
Sir Algernon May to Williamson. When in London in the winter, a warrant was brought to me from Lord Oxford, directed to Mr. Ryley, my deputy in the office of keeping the records in the Tower, commanding delivery of some of those records, about which he has now moved King and Council. I being sworn by the Master of the Rolls, asked his opinion; he said I could not deliver them but by an order under the King's own hand, or by one from the Privy Council, and I have since found that to be one of the ancient orders in the office; a late precedent is that in the case of Lord Holland's making use of some records; he was attended in his Iter by a sworn officer or clerk, who probably was Mr. Ryley's father.
I therefore directed Ryley not to obey Lord Oxford's warrant, and informed his lordship that I was ready either to obey an order from the King, or to appoint an officer to wait upon him with the records, with which he was satisfied. I therefore wonder that his lordship should move it in Council, as if he had been despised. I have since spoken to Sir John Shaw, clerk of the Iter, who knows nothing about it, and would not have sent a warrant which he knew must not be obeyed; and now Lord Arlington complains of Ryley's obstinacy. Pray acquaint him of these particulars, and if the order is not passed, get put into it that either a clerk is to attend Lord Oxford with the records he is to have the use of, or that they may be delivered by indenture, with orders to be returned. It has been a record rule in all ages, when any records are transmitted from any courts to the Tower, that they are more immediately in the King's hand, as the great repository of the people's rights, and are never to be removed from that sacred place but upon extraordinary occasions, and these over, are to be returned safely again.
I have come hither through the illness of my son, and cannot leave him, or I would have waited on Lord Arlington, as advised. I beg to be informed of what is done in the business, and to be remembered to all the ladies in the Strand. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 180.]
June 22. Licence for Col. Hen. Mildmay, of Graces in Essex, to come to town about his occasions, the late proclamation notwithstanding. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 43.]
June 22.
Court at Whitehall.
Declaration by the King that Sir Rob. Pye, now in his service and of assured loyalty and faithfulness, is to be exempt from all prohibitions and restraints, and remain in London and Westminster, the late proclamation notwithstanding; and that he and his servants may wear and use defensive arms, as well travelling in the way as for defence of his house. [Ibid. p. 44.]
June 22. The King to the Lord Mayor of London. The Act for rebuilding the City has set apart for certain uses 2s. a chaldron on coals brought into port from 1 May last to 29 Sept. 1687, to be collected by persons appointed by the Lord Mayor. We recommend Sam. Atkins, merchant of London, who promoted our restoration, as collector of the said rate, he giving good security; also as collector of a former rate of 12d. a chaldron imposed by a former Act for rebuilding the City, in case it be altered from the hands it is now in. These requests are to be communicated to the Court of Aldermen and Common Councilmen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 52.]
June 23. The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge. We wish you to create Wm. Lloyd, M.A., of St. John's College, chaplain in ordinary, D.D., although wanting 2 years of his full standing, he having taken great pains in the English factory at Lisbon, and being about to return to Portugal, where he may stay longer than 2 years, and thus be hindered taking his degree. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 18.]
June 23. Licence to Sir John Fagge, Bart., of Sussex, to come to town about his occasions, the late proclamation notwithstanding. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 43.]
June 23. Warrant to pay to Sir Edw. Turner 4,000l., as the King's free gift without account. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 194.]
June 23.
Oxford.
Dr. Peter Mews to Williamson. I have reason to promote your desires, and nothing shall be wanting on my part to effect them; but the Chancellor's letter is necessary, which if drawn up with the advantages mentioned by you, will I presume pass the Convocation, though we want not some who are too busy. Endorsed [by Williamson], "Smith's Degree." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 181.]
June 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Two small ships from Norway put into the Isle of Wight, to seek a market for their goods. [Ibid. No. 182.]
June 24.
The Spy, Dover.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I have received two months' provisions, and tallowed the vessel, and shall sail to my former station to-night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 108.]
June 24.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory and J. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. One freight of the broom bought of Thos. Dew, which was to be delivered at Stroud, and fetched from thence at the King's charge, has been brought down; although it may be agreeable to contract in point of size, it is in no way serviceable for his Majesty, according to our and the master shipwright's opinion, being only the tops of the broom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 109.]
June 24.
Charterhouse.
Order by the Governors of Sutton's Hospital. Divers persons recommended by his Majesty as pensioners have been this day examined, but not being found duly qualified, we have admitted Hen. Thompson, recommended by the late Queen Mother, and since by his Majesty, and he is to be registered in his Majesty's name; we desire Lord Arlington, as one of the Governors, to acquaint his Majesty thereof, and ascertain whom he will have admitted to the other place in his nomination. [Copy by Hen. Spelman, Registrar. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 183.]
June 24. Sir Thos. Gower to Williamson. Have you received a letter and some papers enclosed, which I sent you some weeks since ? Were not those who meddled in that affair nimium diligentes ? [Ibid. No. 184.]
June 24.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. It was reported last night that Canterbury Cathedral was on fire, and that about 40 feet, where the great library lies, has been burnt down. Also that the Duchess of Orleans has died suddenly, and as some whisper, by poison. A Straits victualler has arrived, but says nothing of Sir Thos. Allin, and those that do speak, speak hardly of him. The coaches and attendants are waiting at Dover, for the coming over of the corpse of the Earl of Northumberland. [Ibid. No. 185.]
June 24. James Hickes to Williamson. My wife attends to intercede on behalf of Sam. Daukes, her sister's son, who is 20 years old, and an orphan, and who five years since was bound an apprentice to Capt. Thos. Harvey, of the Brothers of London. In a voyage to Venice last year, they were taken by a Turkish man-of-war and carried to Tunis, and from thence to Algiers, where he is now a slave, and 80l. is demanded for his ransom. His friends being unable to raise such a sum, my wife and I beg you will procure Lord Arlington's letter to Sir Thos. Allin, to release him by the exchange of some Turks, and then to employ him in the service; otherwise he is likely to remain and perish there. [Ibid. No. 186.] Enclosing,
Sam. Daukes to his sister. On 31 Dec. last, we were taken near Sardinia by a Turks man-of-war, and carried to Algiers, where we were sold like horses, and very much abused, for they made us lie down on our backs, and two men with ropes beat us until the blood ran down our heels; for three months my diet was bread and vinegar, and that only once a day.
They are at me to turn Turk, and to deny my God, which I hope I shall not do, even if they kill me. They have threatened, if I do not turn, to beat me on the soles of my feet until the blood runs out of my nose. Pray do your endeavours to get me clear; I know you are not able of yourself, but if any merchant will advance the money which is for my ransom, I will be his servant, by sea or land, until it is repaid. If I am not redeemed, I must lie here and rot, as my master is undone, having lost both ship and goods. We fought as long as we could stand, and had two men shot and three wounded. The Turks abused the lady and her maid as no Christian would have used a dog, and their backs were blacker than my writing. Had I been seen writing this letter, I should have received at least 200 blows for it. I beg to be remembered to my Uncle and Aunt Hickes.—Algiers, 14 April 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 186i.]
Petition of Joane Mosley and 7 other women-named, on behalf of their husbands and relatives in Algiers, to the King, to consider of some effectual means for freeing the English prisoners there. Twenty-two merchant ships, besides others not yet discovered, in which there were 140 men from Stepney, have been taken by Turks of Algiers, amongst whom were the petitioners' husbands, sons, and relations, who are now in most miserable bondage and slavery, and have no other hope or means for their freedom, but to rely on his Majesty's grace and favour. [Ibid. No. 187.]
June 24. The King to the Treasury Commissioners. On 25 Jan. 1661., we granted to Sir Rob. Townshend, for 31 years, a lease of the mansion, park, close, &c., of Chilsmore in Coventry, belonging to the Duchy of Cornwall, on rent of 4l., and such other rent as should be thought fitting, when he had cleared the same from the pretence of others, not to exceed half the value. He having sustained great loss, by suits of law and tumultuous opposition in recovering the premises, we limited the said rent in 1666 to 16l. Sir Robert then had his choice of a new lease at 20l., or the increased rent to be settled on his own lease; he preferred the latter till the passing of an Act of Parliament, which Act being now passed, he is to have a new lease for 31 years from Lady Day last, at 20l. rent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 81.]
June 24.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Chief Justice Kelynge for the release of Edw. Maddox, the former warrants therefor not availing; his pardon has been examined and found valid in law, and he has given security for good behaviour, and is therefore to be set at liberty forthwith. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 36.]
June 24. Licence to Fras. Clinton, alias Fiennes, of Little Sturten, co. Lincoln, to abide in, or come to and go from London and Westminster as often as his occasions require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 43.]
June 24. Grant to Hugh May of the office of inspector of the French and English gardeners at Whitehall, St. James's, Greenwich and Hampton Court; salary 200l. a year. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 36.]
June 24. Warrant for delivery of the youngest lion in the Tower of London to the Sieur Guldenlew, Resident from the King of Denmark. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 36.]
June 24.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Dr. Thos. Lamplugh, chaplain in ordinary, to the King, for a dispensation to hold the rectory of Charlton, Oxford, with the vicarage of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, which has become void by the death of Dr. Hardy, and been conferred on the petitioner by the Bishop of London. With reference thereon to the Bishop of Oxford, and his report in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 188.]
June 24. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 119.]
June 24. Two drafts of the above petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, Nos. 189, 190.]
June [24]. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet to prepare a bill to pass the Great Seal, granting the above dispensation. [Ibid. No. 191.]
June 25.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Harding, rector of Boconock and Landulph, co. Cornwall, and chaplain to the King, to his Majesty, for a grant of the said rectory to his son Robert, petitioner being very aged and infirm, and not able to hold it much longer. Served the late King in the wars, and his Majesty also while in the West, in consideration whereof, on the death of the late incumbent, the rectory was bestowed upon him, which he has enjoyed for 5 years. With reference thereon to the Bishop of Oxford, and his report in favour of the petitioner, 11 July 1670. [Ibid No. 192.]
June 25. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 119.]
June 25. The petition of Lawrence Abraham and Matthias Halsted to be receivers of the customs in Jamaica, in consideration of money lent the King, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. p. 118.]
[June 25.] Petition of Sir Fras. Cobb, gentleman of the Privy Chamber, to the King, for certain leases in reversion, having served the late King from his coming to York in 1642, to the surrender of Oxford. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 193.] Annexing,
Particulars of the leases of lands in Twickenham, &c., belonging to the late Queen Dowager, which are petitioned for. [Ibid. No. 193i.]
June 25. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 119.]
June 25.
Court at Whitehall.
Confirmation of a composition made by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster with the Countess Dowager of Huntingdon, whereby she is to pay 65l. at once, and 50l. a year for 10 years, in lieu of an arrear of 565l. due by the late Earl of Huntingdon, Receiver-General of the Duchy; also grant to John Ashburnham of the sums to be so received, with writ of assistance for collecting the same, if not duly paid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 79.]
June 25. The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge. Dan. Wicherley, B.D., late of Queens' College, was disabled by his loyalty from taking his D.D. degree during the usurpation, but now having special reason to take it we, at his request, grant him our letters to take it with the same seniority as though it had been taken at the usual time. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 157.]
June 25. Grant to Anthony, Viscount Falkland, of a pension of 300l., to commence from Christmas last, payable from the tenths of the bishopric of Winchester. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 38.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 30 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 198.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Lord Arlington to the Treasury Commissioners. M. de Vantelet, being the first person in his rank in the late Queen's family, and being unwilling, from certain piques between him and Sir Thos. Bond, that his money should go into Sir Thomas' hands, has desired a separate warrant to Sir Hen. Wood, a draft of which is sent for your approval, I being unwilling to offer it otherwise to his Majesty. Sir Hen. Wood, for his security, has added to this warrant the sums appointed to Lord Arundel and Sir Leoline Jenkins.
In consideration of the kindness and partiality of his Majesty for the Count de Grammont, and to equal the value of the present to Lord Buckhurst, he is willing to gratify the Count with 1,000l. in ready money, instead of a jewel; as the Count will be gone next week, I beg you, if possible, to give him a bill of exchange for the amount, payable when convenient at Paris, if possible.
Noted that Lord Arlington is to be informed that Alderman Backwell has undertaken to pay the 1,000l. to M. Vantelet by bill of exchange; also, that the money to Madame Vantelet is not appointed to be paid to Sir Thos. Bond, but that the Queen's legacies are to be paid after her debts, and if the trustees invert the order, they will be liable to make it good. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 194.] Annexing,
The King to Sir Hen. Wood, treasurer and receiver of the late Queen Mother. On 10 June we directed the Earl of St. Albans, Sir Hen. Wood, and 4 other trustees for the jointure of our late dear mother, with Sir Geo. Downing and Sir Wm. Doyley, administrators of her goods, to engross a schedule of her debts, legacies, &c., amongst which was a legacy of 1,000l. to Henriette Vantelet, with 300l. given by us in consideration of her pretensions to the goods in our late mother's chamber; 400l. to Henry, Lord Arundel, and 200l. to Dr. Leoline Jenkins, for their journey and services at Paris about her funeral, &c. As these 4 sums, amounting to 1,900l., would only be issued after payment of other great debts, we hereby authorise you to pay them out of the first moneys that come to your hands.—Court at Whitehall, June 1670. [Ibid. No. 194i.]
June 25. Sir Rob. Vyner to his brother Williamson. I send my petition to his Majesty, and desire you to solicit Lord Arlington to further our suit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 195.] Annexing,
Petition of Sir Rob. Vyner to the King, for the bestowal of the prebend in the Chapel Royal, Windsor, void by death of Dr. [John] Heaver, upon his brother, Thos. Vyner. [Ibid. No. 195i.]
June 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Fras. Calvert and Thos. Wilkinson, of the holding of 5 new fairs at Borough-bridge, co. York, for 99 years; rent 6s. 8d. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 170.]
June 26. The King to Richard, Earl of Carberry, President of Wales and its Marches. We made Hen. Wynne, of the Inner Temple, London, secretary clerk of the Council, and clerk of the signet before the President and Council of Wales, in trust for Charles, Earl of Norwich, with liberty to appoint a deputy; but his present deputy having abused his office by illegal proceedings, we request you to admit Luke Clapham as deputy to Hen. Wynne in the said office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 53.]
June 26. Caveat in favour of Dr. Castle, that nothing pass for granting the rectory of Much Mundon, co. Hertford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
June 27.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Attorney-General. In 1663, we granted to James [sic John], Earl of Crawford and Lindsay, and Margaret, Lady Belhaven,—in satisfaction of debts to them by ourself and our late father, 13,000l. and other moneys due from Rich. Blackwall of Hackney, Middlesex, treasurer of prize goods, with benefit of all inquisitions thereon, and power to recover the same. In 1669, John, Lord Belhaven, and Margaret his wife, resigned their interest therein to the Earl of Crawford. Rich. Blackwall holds the reversion after William, Duke of Newcastle, of Blackwall manor, High Peak hundred, co. Derby, which reversion was seized to the Crown in 1669, for debts of R. Blackwall. The said manor is now to be granted to the Earl of Crawford without account, until the debts for which it is extended are paid; and for his charges in discovery of Blackwall's other lands, he is to be released from the payment of 1,500l. due from John Carlton, late cashier of prize goods, and granted to him, but not paid.
With note 29 June, that there was no mention in the report of the Treasury Commissioners about the release of the 1,500l., but that Lord Ashley, being present when the warrant was signed, satisfied his Majesty by word of mouth, and procured the clause of release. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 79.]
[June 27.] Petition of Sir Thos. Williamson, Bart., on behalf of the orphans of the late Lord Lexinton, himself, and others, to the King. The late lord and my father and others raised,—by command of the late King, and on pledge of his word,—14,680l. to maintain the garrison of Newark; but the money not being repaid, we were sued, and were obliged to discharge it; we sued Sir John Digby for his share, but his Majesty interposed to discharge him, promising to pay the whole debt. We long waited on the Lord Treasurer and Lord Ashley, and were obliged to reduce the debt to 10,000l., abating the interest for 20 years, when we got an order for its payment 18 June 1664, but we have still received nothing. I beg an order to the Treasury Commissioners for speedy payment.
With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, on whose report the King will declare his pleasure, "with a gracious regard to the loyalty and merit of the original creditors, and of these worthy petitioners." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 196.]
June 27. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 120.]
June 27. The petition of Geo. Benyon for payment, with interest or damages, of a debt of 688l. owing on his father's account, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, the King compassionating his hardships, and being satisfied with his loyalty and good affection. [Ibid.]
[June 27.] Draft [by Williamson] of the references on the two preceding petitions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 197.]
June 27. The petition of Sir John Wolstenholme—showing that he sold lands value 60,000l., and that this and other moneys were to be paid him out of the 200,000l. granted to the old Farmers [of Customs], and requesting an order to the old Farmers to say when and how they directed his payment—referred to the Treasury Commissioners to report thereon, and especially as to his share of the old debt on the Customs, the King retaining "a very gracious esteem of his long and faithful services." [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 121.]
[June 27.] Petition of Sir Rob. Long, his Majesty's servant, to the King, for another life in his lease for 2 lives, in reversion after the late Queen Mother, of Worcester Park, Surrey, in which the wood was all down, and the soil converted into tillage during the late times. Compounded with the Queen for her interest, bought out the keepers, and paid 2,500l. for repairs of the house, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 198.]
June 27. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 121.]
[June 27.] Draft [by Williamson] of the references on the two preceding petitions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 199.]
June 27. Petition of Rob. White of St. Martin's-in-the Fields, to the King and Council, that certain informations preferred against him may be referred to the Judges or the Council Board, as to whether the offence charged against him is not bailable, petitioner, as well as others of whose estates he has the management, being likely to be ruined by his imprisonment. Was drinking with the host and hostess and Ralph Powell, a soldier, at the Artichoke in Tothillfields, Westminster, and spent between 3s. and 4s. as his share; the next day was arrested, and sent to the Gatehouse, on informations made by them before Justices Bales and Philmor, that petitioner said that his Majesty would not reign a twelvemonth, but that the Presbyterian party would rule, and that if they did so, his Majesty would come to the same death as his father; all this he denied, and produced 20 witnesses to testify as to his character for the last 25 years, and they offered to become bail for him, but were refused. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 200.]
June 27. Licence from Lord Arlington for Thos. Blower of Reading, co. Berks, to be in London and Westminster when his business requires. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 32.]
June 27. Warrant for Sir Edmond Wyndham, knight marshal, to seize and bring to the Secretary of State a book of accounts, discovering frauds practised by persons trusted in letting part of the revenue, that such use may be made of it as seems fitting to Council. [Ibid. f. 38.]
June 27. Grant to Sam. Speed, M.A., of the prebend of Castor, in Lincoln Cathedral, void by promotion of Dr. Creighton to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 196.]
June 27. Warrant to pay to Wm. Chiffinch 5,000l. without account, for secret service. [Ibid. No. 197.]
June 27. Dispensation to Dr. Thos. Lamplugh to hold the rectory of Charleton; in Oxford, with the vicarage of St. Martin's-in-theFields. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 8.]
June 27. Grant to Thos. Vyner, B.D., to be prebendary of Windsor in place of Dr. Heaver. Minute. [Ibid.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 30 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 198.]
June 27. Restitution of temporalities of the bishopric of Bath and Wells to Dr. Creighton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 8.]
June. Docquet of the above, dated 30 June. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 198.]
June 27. Information of Thos. Neale of Sheere, Surrey, millwright, before Hen. Hildyard, justice of the peace. Went to the house of Rob. Street, a Quaker, to apprehend Rich. Chandler, one of his journeymen, when Street asked why he did a thing which he could not justify; adding that the law would not hold long, and that a change would shortly come which would lay heavy on some. Also,
Like information of Jno. Blasden of Sheere, joiner. Went to Street to inquire if a set of wheels ordered were ready, when Street replied that he could not do them, as Thos. Duncumb had taken away his man, and had threatened to take away his tools and himself also; offering to take back the materials for the wheels, Street requested they might remain 2 or 3 weeks longer, as he was sure the times would change, when he should be able to tell whether he could make them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 201.]
June 27.
Ugbrooke.
[Sir Thos. Clifford] to Williamson. Thanks for the express, which came before the ordinary packet. I have written to Lord Arlington about Sir Smith, and desired him to speak to you about it. [Ibid. No. 202.]
June 27.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. It is reported that the Lord Lieutenant, the Earl of Batb, has arrived at Plymouth, and intends visiting Falmouth, to raise the county troops in case of any disturbance upon the Act against conventicles. The Quakers continue their meetings, although they lose their goods. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 203.]
June 27.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Thanks for your sending for his lordship's letter, which was of some import. Mr. Rous, the postmaster, has cleared himself concerning Mr. Alexander's taking a post-horse here; he would not do that, but stayed until the mail went, so as to save the charges of a post guide, while the French courier took both horse and guide, and was gone an hour before Alexander landed. Alexander however had a mare that would have carried him to Canterbury in less than 2 hours, and he stayed longer at Dover than was needed. The Marshal of Bellefonds has arrived from the French King, to inform his Majesty of the death of Madame. The fanatic, having given security, has been released until the quarter sessions. Lord Teynham died last week at his house in Kent, as also Major Hugeson, son of Sir William. [Ibid. No. 204.]
June 27. [Sir John Robinson] to Williamson. Mr. Mead was committed for being pertinent, and declaring that he would neither trouble King, nor Council, nor the Courts at Westminster, and not on the same occasion as Hayes and Jekell, who are very high in their threats, and so had better remain where they are. Mead desired liberty to attend the lieutenancy of London, which was granted; when there with his brother he was very submissive, and upon stating that he had had no correspondence with Hayes or Jekell, and promising that he would do nothing against the Government, he was discharged. [Ibid. No. 205.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Gilbert Staplehill, Dartmouth. News-letter. The meeting houses which were supplied by ministers appointed by the Bishop of London were very full, and the conventicles fewer; there were some however who would be obstinate, and privately got together, but upon being discovered, their teachers were secured, and the hearers taken an account of, in order to being prosecuted according to the Act; they are nearly all suppressed in the country.
Neither his Majesty's cofferer, Mr. Ashburnham, nor the Archbishop of Canterbury are dead, but both are recovering. The Archbishop's disease is the measles, considered rare in one so old as 73.
The Prince of Orange was going to Amsterdam on private affairs, but hearing that the City had made great preparations for his reception, he abandoned his design.
Sieur Gaboret, commander of a French man-of-war, has taken 3 Dutch merchantmen, laden with negroes and horses, beyond the line.
On the 22nd, at 10 a.m., arrived an express from Paris, with tidings of the sudden death of Madame, his Majesty's sister, at St. Cloud, of the colic, after coming out of a bath; it had such an effect on his Majesty that he immediately took to his bed, and has not since appeared at Council. Madame had taken chicory water on leaving her bath, being in great pain, and was immediately taken with colic, and declared she was a lost woman. There being some suspicions, the French King caused her body to be opened, in the presence of the English Ambassador and some English doctors, who found her vitals so much wasted that they wondered she had lived so long; but her liver was sound, which would not have been had she been poisoned. The French King acquainted his Majesty and Lord Arlington of this through an express, and also that he was about sending over Marshal Bellefonds to condole and give a more particular account, under the oath and hands of those present.
A pleasure boat arrived at Spithead, and sailed for Cowes to carry Sir Thos. Morgan and others to Guernsey. A Dutch ship of Amsterdam has sailed from Portsmouth for the coast of Barbary, having been waiting half a year for men.
It is reported from Brussels that Don Francisco Alvelde, Governor of Nieuport, has sent a circular letter to the Governors of Omer, Ypres, and Dixmude, advising them that the French King would return to Lille, and that he persisted in his design of making himself master of Ypres, for which purpose he had provided himself with a quantity of palisades.
The Queen and Council of Spain have resolved on the return of the Constable [of Castile], but have ordered his stay until the receipt of an express. Meantime they have sent some propositions to Vienna(?) concerning a Governor there, who is said to be the Prince of Lorraine; upon the coming of the Constable, Count Marcine is to manage the military affairs, and Don Estevan de Gamarha the civil.
The Loyal London, which was burnt by the Dutch at Chatham, has been rebuilt so as to carry more guns, and was launched at Deptford on the 25th.
Their Royal Highnesses have sent Col. Villiers and his lady to France, to fetch their daughter, who was sent there under the care of Madame. Though the meeting-houses were again supplied by the Bishop of London on the 26th with pious and able ministers, and had a great auditory, including some that formerly frequented these places, yet a few were obstinate, and got together privately; they were discovered, their teachers secured, and account taken of the rest, in order to their prosecution under the Act.
The Danish minister in Holland, finding that the story in the Hague Gazette of the Earl of Essex's deportment towards the Governor of Cronenburg Castle, and the Governor's submission to him, tended to the disadvantage of that nation, and lessened the effect of his own printed relation, Sir Wm. Temple, his Majesty's Ambassador, has caused the Gazette to publicly acknowledge it as an error, by printing another declaration declaring the other to be false.
The Knights of Malta have, by their envoy, put in a memorial to the States concerning their pretensions. The Landgrave of Hussia [Hesse] was at the Hague, but has left for England.
The cargo of the galleons is valued at 24 millions, 7 or 8 whereof belong to the King.
They write from Poland that the Cossacks are willing to submit to Dorisensko, their general, but not to be subject to Poland, and that a German has arrived there from Tartary, about a design of the Turks and Tartars to invade Poland. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 206.]
June 27.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir Geo. Downing to the Navy Commissioners. His Majesty intending to be at the Treasury on Wednesday morning at 9 a.m. on Navy business, desires you will not fail to attend him there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 110.]
June 28.
Portsmouth.
Edw. Silvester to the Navy Commissioners. I have again come up to Portsmouth, in hopes of getting money to finish the chain, which will now be done for 700l. less than was agreed by the contract, the master attendant stating that one of lesser length will do. I sustain much loss through the chain lying so long on my hands, and it receives more damage where it is than it would in its proper place. Pray order me some money, or move his Royal Highness in it, as 700l. or 800l. more will be sufficient with what I have had; it will save the King its cost in moorings for the want of it in 2 years. Noted that money was wanted by the Board to enable them to comply. [Ibid. No. 111.]
June 28.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir Geo. Downing to Williamson. Pray remind Lord Arlington to move his Majesty, at the next sitting of the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to appoint a time to see the Treasury Commissioners on Lord Willoughby's accounts, and about certain allowances, one of which is for 3,000l. a year. I return Lord Arlington's letter and warrant about M. Vantelet; also a warrant for 20 tuns of wine for the Portuguese Envoy, and will see the Commissioners' decision on both, written on the back. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 207.]
June 28.
Oxford.
Dr. P. Mews Vice-Chancellor, to Williamson. The provost's forwardness to comply with your desires prevented my solicitation, for Mr. Smith had his grace before I could meet with him; one obstacle there is, which I am at a loss how to remove. Have the letter drawn up as advantageously as you can, and with all endearing circumstances possible, and nothing shall be wanting on my part. [Ibid. No. 208.]
June 28.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The fanatic report of the great damage done by the fire at Canterbury Cathedral is not what happened, but what is desired, for all can be made good for 40l. It is said that Lord Roper [Teynham] and Major Hugeson, both residing near Canterbury, accelerated their deaths by excess in drinking white wine; the former was not much wanted, but the latter was a good subject and commonwealth man. [Ibid. No. 209.]
June 28. Warrant abolishing the office of custodian and captain of Tynemouth Castle, Northumberland, but continuing to the present captain, Col. Elw. Villiers, the fees of 231l. 5s. a year, granted in 1661 to Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, and Josceline, Lord Percy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 37.]
June 29. Licence for Thos. Perry to stay in town, on the suggestions and certificates of the late Duke of Albemarle. Minute. [Ibid. f. 38.]
June 29. Grant of pardon to Arden Baggot for the death of Thos. Gleed of Ealing, Middlesex, with restitution of lands and goods. Minute. [Ibid. f. 39.]
June 29. Like grant of pardon to Edw. Nowell for the death of the same person. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Hen. Wood, Bart., to pay 775l. to Henry, Earl of St. Albans, chamberlain of the household to the late Queen Mother; 100l. to Henry, Lord Arundel, her master of the horse; 400l. to Walter Montague, her great almoner; and 100l. to Charles, son of Sir John Wintour, her secretary, all of whom were employed in France in October, November, and December last, to manage her affairs and funeral; also to Sir Hen. Wood, appointed to manage her jointure for 2 years after her decease, the same allowance as he had during her life, viz., 50l. a year salary, 153l. 6s. 8d. in lieu of 400 oz. of gilt plate for a New Year's gift, 40l. for riding wages, and 200l. as a trustee of the said Queen. [Ibid. f. 42.]
June 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Chris. Turner and Sir Tim. Littleton, Justices of Assize for Yorkshire, to forbear, during pleasure, the execution of the sentence of burning in the hand, if awarded against Adam Bland, who is to be tried at York assizes for killing Jas. Strangways at Medley, Yorkshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 37.]
June 29. Certificate by Thos. Milward, that the attendance of Thos. Pury, attorney of the Common Pleas, is required in that court, by reason of the many causes there that he is engaged in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 210.]
June 29. Lord Arlington to the Bishop of Norwich. The King being informed by the Mayor of Sudbury that the parish church of All Saints there, being meanly endowed, is left without a pastor, and thus lies open to be used by Nonconformists and other unlicensed preachers, wishes your lordship to inquire into it forthwith, prevent its being used by the fanatics, and try to provide a constant maintenance for a minister, either by joining it to the other church or otherwise. [S.P.Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 8.]
June 29. Walter, Bishop of Oxford, to Williamson. Upon the promotion of the Bishop of Bath and Wells, I solicited the rectory of Uploman, in his Majesty's gift, for a friend, which the King bestowed, and a warrant passed for it. The Bishop having since intimated that he designed it for his son, I have prevailed with my friend to relinquish his title to it, and desire you to assist his lordship in procuring it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 211.]
June 29. Advices, being notes by Williamson from letters, as follows:— Hague, 4 July.—The Rheingrave has sent a guard and demolished the works at Petersheim, but protects the Marquis de Westerlow against the Chapter of Liège. The States, by their deputies, are mediating in the affair, and the difference will be decided either by the Emperor or the Chamber of Spire.
Van Beuningen experiences great difficulties in the proposal for joining fleets against the pirates in the Mediterranean. The English Ambassador has brought the King his Majesty's ratification to all the articles about the triple alliance.
The States have written to the Queen Regent of Spain for payment of the second subsidy due to Sweden in 4 months, as also that due to Brussels upon the same subject; the payment will be made in due time.
It is believed in Brussels that Don Juan has accepted the government of the Netherlands, and that his confidant, Count de Servela, will be sent to command for a time.
Denmark is inclined to enter into the triple alliance, and De Witt, who is there, says he has had the same respects as the Earl of Essex.
The minister from the Dukes of Luneburg is upon his return home, after five years' continuance, and pretends to subsidies in time of peace, which may be an example for Sweden. Those Dukes demur to entering into the triple alliance; this minister protests that they do not intend to engage with France.
The Prince de Tarante talks of going to France in September; and the Landgrave of Hesse is gone to visit him.
The Prince of Orange has asked the advice of De Witt, the pensioner, upon his voyage to England, but finds him reserved; he expects the Assembly of the States will not oppose it.
In 8 days three things have happened of great importance, viz. (1) the arrival of the English East India ships, whose lading cost 4,300,000 livres, and will yield 11,200,000; of this 6 millions will furnish a fleet bound for the Indies, 1,500,000 go towards payment of debts, and 2,800,000 to pay interest, &c., besides which a considerable stock will remain.
(2) Our Guinea fleet safely arrived at Leghorn; and (3) the safe return of the galleons, in which the people of those provinces are as much concerned as the Spaniards. These three fleets will bring into England upwards of 40 millions in money and goods. The business of Surinam has been ordered as the King of England would have it. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 212.]
June 29.
Bradfield.
T. Bromley to Viscount Conway, Ragley. I have disposed of your charities to several poor families in London and the country for which they bless you, which is of more value than the acclamations of the rich. Mrs. Talbot, a good friend of mine, says her husband is willing to take charge of your lordship's nephew, and as he has been an old officer, has no child of his own, and has the repute of being very just and honest, I think he might do so. My health has much improved since coming here. I beg to be remembered to her ladyship, whose sad confinement often troubles me; also to the Lady Dowager and Mrs. Foxcroft. [Damaged. Ibid. No. 213.]
June 29.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. As the Sovereign is very leaky, if it is your intention she should be brought up from Gillingham and docked when the Newcastle is launched, which will be in 6 weeks, I shall require a warrant for impressing 8 more joiners, so as not to be forced to take those off from the new ship. The Greenwich is rigged, and if I had the sheathing boards, she would soon be ready, and the Newcastle could be sheathed and finished while in dock.
Since I ordered that an account should be taken of all drift boats, and of the ships they belonged to, and that the officer of the ship should pay the look-out for taking them, there have not been any gone adrift; but if ordered, I will employ a smack belonging to the Sovereign to go down the river once or twice a week, to bring up all the drifts, which will be less charge to the King than employing look-outs. I will send the cables and furnaces ordered for Deptford, on the arrival of the horse boat. I have received only 22 bundles of hemp from Woolwich, and the men were without work 2 days until it came. I now want tar; also some knee timber and spruce deals for the new ship, which if not sent, I must discharge 30 or 40 workmen next week. I send 3 contracts for timber and buckets, and hope the prices named may encourage you to order more money to stock the yard, which is very thin. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 112.]
June 29.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Pepys. I desire you to meet me at Sir Rob. Long's on Monday, to prepare a statement for the Treasury Commissioners of the Navy debts due on bills for goods delivered, and for the hire of ships; of what is yet unpaid, which is charged on the old tallies of the Royal Aid at Guildhall; also of what is unpaid of the orders charged on the Exchequer out of the Royal and Additional Aids. [Ibid. No. 113.]
June 29. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Request for a warrant to Deptford, for the receipt from Rob. Castell of 2 pieces of timber, for making a bowsprit and cap for the London. [Ibid. No. 114.]
June 30. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I want to know what you desire to confer with me upon, being informed that you wish to see me; knowing there are several things on my own and his Majesty's behalf before you, I am anxious to come prepared. [Ibid. No. 115.]
June 30. John Morehouse to [the Navy Commissioners]. Mr. Pocock, lord of the manor of Swerston, having felled 50 or 60 pollard oaks this year and a great many last, and sold them, if he so goes on, all his Majesty's oaks in Waltham Forest will soon be destroyed. [Ibid. No. 116.]
June 30. Certificate of Sir Rich. Ford and 7 other merchants of London trading to the Levant, in favour of John Geffery, merchant, residing at Zante, as Consul in that place, or in any other where his Majesty's honour and interest are concerned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 214.]
June 30.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Club, M.A., chaplain in ordinary, incumbent of Horsham and Athlington, Suffolk, to the King, for a licence to reside away from his rectory, the air being very prejudicial to him, and he being infirm and sickly. With reference thereon to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and his report in favour of the petitioner. —Lambeth House, 1 July 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 214a.]
June 30. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 122.]
June ? Petition of Henry Cooke, Master of the children of the Chapel Royal, to the King. The children not receiving their liveries as usual, are reduced to so bad a condition that they are unfit to attend his Majesty, or to walk the streets. Begs an order for their liveries, the charge not being great, and his Majesty having signified to the Bishop of Oxford that they should have their liveries continued. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 215.]
June 30. Order on the above petition, that the children of the chapel be for the future entertained and clothed, as they were before the late retrenchments. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 123.]
June 30. Warrant for denization of John Van Wyckewoort, jun. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 169.]
June 30. Letter to the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle, for admitting Wm. Carr into an almsroom there. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 54.]
June 30. Warrant to pay to Rich. Marriot, receiver of the rents, &c., of Windsor, 1,000l. on account, for the repairs of Windsor Castle. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 198.]
June 30. Presentation of Rob. Creighton to the rectory of Uplowman, co. Devon, void by promotion of Dr. Creighton to the bishopric of Bath and Wells, and in the King's gift pro hâc vice. [Ibid.]
June 30. Warrant to pay to Sir Rob. Vyner 9,485l. 18s. 5d. in full for advancing at several times 62,169l. 10s. 4d. for the garrison of Tangiers, and 6,445l. 14s. 2d. as interest and reward for 12,000l. advanced to the Treasurer of the Chamber, for payment of the King's servants' wages. [Ibid.]
June 30.
Oxford.
Dr. P. Mews to Williamson. I wish your letter on behalf of Sir Smith was come, as the time draws near. I enclose one for Lord Arlington concerning some young fellows prisoners here, who all desire a mandamus to Exeter College for settling their differences. I have acquainted our Chancellor with the business, which is the same as you and Mr. Treasurer interested yourselves about. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 216.]
June 30. The King to the Master of Exeter College, Oxford. A difference having arisen concerning an election of scholars to that college, we wish you, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding, to abide by the decree of the Chancellor for admission of 2 scholars, Edw. Burgh and Nich. Bunnington, as being the most proper expedient for composing these differences, and to apply yourselves to peace and unity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 54.]
June 30.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The great Bishop of Persia has arrived as Ambassador to his Majesty, and has gone for London, where he intends to remain incog. until his retinue, which is coming over in an East India ship, has arrived. He came by land, with only one attendant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 217.]
June.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Notes reporting all things quiet 16, 19, 25, 28, 30 June. [Ibid. Nos. 218–222.]
June.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind:—
Vol. 276. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind. Vol. 276. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind.
223 June 5 1 8 S.W. 232 June 20 1 8 S.W.
224 " 7 2 18 S.W. 233 " 21 1 11 N.E.
225 " 8 2 10 S.W. 234 " 22 1 6 N.W.
226 " 12 1 4 N. 235 " 24 1 3 N.E.
227 " 14 1 3 E. 236 " 26 1 4 N.N.W.
228 " 15 1 S.E. 237 " 27 1 3 W.S.W.
229 " 17 1 1 E. 238 " 28 1 4 N.W.
230 " 18 1 1 N. 239 " 29 1 5 N.W.
231 " 19 1 4 W. 240 " 30 1 5 N.W.
June ? Petition of Nich. Butler, M.D., to the King, for a licence under the sign manual, for practising physic throughout England, having had letters on 15 March 1670 to Cambridge for his doctor's degree, in consideration of his constant abode in London and services during the late plague. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 241.]
June? Petition of John Edwards to the King, for a pension. Was child of the kitchen to the late Queen Mother, and afterwards master cook to Madame, his Majesty's sister, till she died. [Ibid. No. 242.]
June? Petition of Wm. Hannum, Mayor, and 14 chief burgesses of Newport in the Isle of Wight, to the King, to summon Wm. Ridge, Ant. Maynard, and John Stallard to appear before King and Council, to show why they refuse to become of the Corporation, in place of several expunged for refusing the oaths and subscription, according to the Act for Regulating Corporations, as without more members the Corporations cannot well elect a member of Parliament, in place of Sir Wm. Oglander, Bart., deceased. [Ibid. No. 243.]
June ? Petition of Rob. Page of Wivenho, shipwright, to the King and Council, for payment of 405l. due to him for building the Wivenho ketch 4 years ago, and for 400l. more due for work and supplies for the Navy stores since, his Majesty being pleased on his late addresses to promise that he should be taken care of. [Ibid. No. 244.]
June? Petition of Henry Savage, D.D., chaplain in ordinary, to the King, for a dispensation to hold his present rectories of Bladen; co. Oxford, and Fillingham, co. Lincoln, held of Baliol College for 22l. a year— out of which he pays 8l. 13s. 4d. for maintenance of 3 lectures in the college—along with the church of Crowmarsh, co. Oxford. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 245.] Annexing,
Statement by Hen. Savage of the value of the said livings, and the tenure by which they are held: Fillingham he holds as Master of Baliol College. [Ibid. No. 245i.]
June.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for payment to James, Earl of Castlehaven, of 400l., any general orders disallowing such payments notwithstanding. [Ibid. No. 246.]
June? Case at the Council Table of Rob. Benson. He was employed by Henry, Lord Howard, in a suit at law against Sir Phil. Monckton, who, being angry thereat, exhibited an information against Benson. Monckton wished the trial to be in the country, but the King refused, because the judge of assize would have the disposal of Benson's place if he were turned out. Monckton refuses to answer in town, and has procured leave from Council to have the cause tried next assizes. Benson objects because Monckton, being sheriff [of Yorkshire], will have to return the jury, and the witnesses are men whom Benson has prosecuted for scandalous words against his Majesty, &c. [Ibid. No. 247.]
June ? Proposal that Mr. Benson be sent for, and made acquainted with certain articles agreed on by the King in Council. [Ibid. No. 248.]
[June.] State of the case of the clerks of the peace. A penny in the pound on hearth money was granted them by the first Act, and another penny by the second, at discretion of the Exchequer officers; but the Farmers of the money refused to allow them to make the returns into the Exchequer. They complained, and on reference it was found that the first penny belonged to them, and the second was reasonable to be granted. With question whether the allowance should be made when there is little work to do, and note that, during the Farmers' time, according to the Act, only the first penny is granted. [Ibid. No. 249.]
June? Information of Rich. Minshull, formerly under Lord Gerard's command, that Major Humes, this day committed to Southwark gaol for refusing the oath of allegiance, &c., is the same person whom, 4 years before, he apprehended in Moorfields, on hearing that a proclamation was out offering 400l. reward for his apprehension, and who was sent to the Tower, but made his escape. [Ibid. No. 250.]
June. Lists by Williamson of the names of members on 69 committees named, appointed by the Council. [19 pages.] Also,
Names of the members of four Standing Committees of Council, appointed by order of 12 Feb. 1668; with memorandum of the dates when members were added, how many should form a quorum, and note that the Duke of York was to be of all committees where he pleased. [2 pages.] Also,
List of the 41 members of the present Privy Council. [Ibid. No. 251.]
June? Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson. I was refused pratique at Majorca, because I would not salute with 5 guns, to be answered with only 3, and was also refused it at Cagliari in Sardinia because I had been in Tunis, though the Viceroy has confessed in a letter to me that they had no reason to suspect me; Sir Wm. Godolphin, to whom I sent a copy of the letter, has written that the Queen Regent had ordered all the Viceroys and Governors to give pratique, notwithstanding England's commerce with Barbary. The Governor of the Castle and Port of Mahon refuses to let more than 8 of my ships into the harbour at once, which is very prejudicial, and which I think he can hardly justify, seeing I demanded his leave for them to come in, and that is all that is required by the articles. I have complained of all this to Sir Wm. Godolphin, and intreated him to interpose for redress at Court, so that Spanish friendship may be rendered something better than nothing.
When at Tunis, on 22 June, I corroborated our peace with them, doubting it might begin to waver through the French blocking up the place. M. Le Marquis de Martel, commander of the French fleet, having hindered an English ship with contraband goods from entering that port, I questioned him upon it, and desired something under his hand, either that he had done it or would do it again; but he seemed ashamed, and declined, and promised not to repeat it, and I promised not to molest the French trade with Algiers, except ships carrying contraband goods, as without any such promise, I dare not break the articles and orders by which I am to let them go free. I am bound to Algiers, and if no considerable service can be done, I intend dividing my squadron into three parts, and sending one towards Sicily, another about Cape Palos and Cape de Gata, and myself about the Straits. I beg for a continuance of the news, and to be remembered to Will. Chiffinch and Luke Weeks. Noted as received 27 Aug. 1670. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 276, No. 252.]
June.
Northampton.
"Grand Jury's complaint against Mr. Moorhouse" for exactions in claiming the carriage of 400 loads of timber for the King from Whittlewood Forest to Burcot, whereas there were only 100 loads really carried, and there was no more wood to be carried. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 284, No. 117.]

Footnotes

  • 1. This Sir Smith is evidently Hen. Smith of Queen's College, who took his M.A. degree 9 July 1670.—Ed.