BHO

Charles II: August 1670

Pages 358-408

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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August 1670

Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Fulwar Skipwith, of Newbold Hall, co. Warwick, of the dignity of a baronet, with the usual discharge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 177.]
[Aug. 1.] Petition of Wm. Clarke, of Great Yarmouth, to the King. Being churchwarden, I acquainted Jno. Woodroffe, a justice of the peace, of the meeting of divers persons at a conventicle; he granted a warrant for dispersing of them. I took certain persons to assist, and found between 400 and 500 present, listening to the preaching of Fras. English. I desired the preacher to forbear, and the company to depart, and upon their refusing, took down the names of 50 of the chiefest, and went to the church and showed it to the bailiffs, and all the justices, and desired their assistance, but they refused. Justice Huntington, whose wife is a frequenter at such meetings, took the information of Timothy Officiall, and 2 others who were included in my lists as being present, on purpose to abuse me, and discourage me and others from being active in suppressing such conventicles. I pray an order that the fines may be levied, and disposed of according to the late Act of Parliament, and that Justice Huntington, who encourages conventicles, may be dealt with for not performing his duty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 165.]
Aug. 1. Rich. Bower to Williamson. Pray assist the bearer, who is one of the churchwardens. He has been very diligent in suppressing conventicles, but having met with some discouragement from the magistrates, is unwilling to put up with it; if he is baffled, the Act will signify nothing, as the number that dare appear for the King or the Church's interest are so few, and if things of this nature are let slip, there will scarce one be found. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Aug. 1.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. A ketch of Yarmouth, laden with linen and other rich goods from Rotterdam, was caught in a storm near Boors Island, when the mainmast was shivered to pieces, and the hold set on fire, which burned 2 hours, and could not be quenched until they had bored holes and sunk her. Several packs of linen and other goods were burnt to ashes, and the master's mate, who was taking in the jib, cannot be found.
There has been an assembly of the aldermen and common council, called together by the bailiffs, when it was proposed—to prevent any disputes at the election of bailiffs for the ensuing year—that all those who had received the sacrament should bring a certificate from the parson of the town at their next assembling; but that was not carried, so that you may see our condition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 167.]
Aug. 1.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to [Williamson]. Thanks for your punctuality in sending letters. I am so much pleased with my house, that I should be glad to be allowed to spend 15 days more in it. I got the Mayor and citizens of Thetford together as to the propositions for opening the river, and Mr. Forterye to view and consider of it, but Mr. Kendall did not look as if he would like any of our propositions, or expect his own, which need examination. Sir Samuel Moreland is with us, and will view the river also, and when I have his opinion, I will call the company together again, and try and agree upon something. If necessary, I will summon the commissioners on Wednesday, when my brother will arrive, and the French Ambassador leaves for London. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 168.]
Aug. 1.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Rose of Lyme has arrived from Rotterdam, and advises that they are fitting up ships there as convoys for their merchantmen to the Straits. The Lily Rose and Prosperous of Lyme report from Morlaix that a considerable number of seamen and soldiers passed through there for Brest, where 20 sail were being fitted to receive them, some of which came from Rochelle, and that they are designed for the Straits, although the soldiers say in bravado it is for England. Also that a vessel of Falmouth came in with some wool, but differing with the officers about payment of the customs, she was seized. There are 30,000 rebels in Languedoc. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Aug. 1.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The pleasure boat which is to carry the Duke of Buckingham to Dieppe has come in, also a Virginia ship, since gone for London, and another bound for Holland. A vessel is on the Goodwin, and although the sea is raging high, several Deal boats have ventured off, to try and save the men if not the ship. [Damaged. Ibid. No. 170.]
Aug. 1.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. The Pearl of Bristol from Barbadoes, with sugar and cotton for Amsterdam, has cleared and is ready to sail; also the Constance of London, with 40 passengers, 2 of Yarmouth, 2 bound for Virginia, and some others for Wales. Five or 6 more have also come in. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Aug. 1.
Carmarthen.
Tim. Halton to Williamson. Pray use your influence with the Treasurer on behalf of Rich. Jones, a great friend of mine, who has some business in the Exchequer, and has been exceedingly abused by an unworthy person in Carmarthen. I intend waiting upon you on our founder's day, and then shall return to Wales. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Aug. 2.
The Roebuck, Tangiers.
Capt. Geo. Liddell to the Navy Commissioners. I want provisions, also some oars; having lost my best bower anchor and cable last March off Tangiers, I have been hardly put to it, and need another. The ground is very bad at Tangiers; the rocks have cut and spoiled all my cables, and if I and my men had not laid a chain to ride at, I should not have had a cable left.
I have been at the charge of cleaning my frigate, which has been great, tallow being so scarce. My boatswain and 3 of the men being desirous to set the Moors' country and corn on fire, went ashore on 25 July in a small yawl, but were discovered and taken; I with my master and carpenter narrowly escaped, in making a like attempt the Saturday before. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 1.]
Aug. 2.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the Navy Commissioners. I mustered the John of Dover, and send the muster books. I conversed with Capt. Earle, whose answer to Mr. Baskerville's petition was that on going his last voyage to the Straits, in April 1670, while riding in Long Reach, he found they were short of water casks, and thereupon procured two petty warrant casks, and filled them for the voyage, which casks were subsequently left in the ship; but now the purser pretends there is 8l. due to him for petty warrant casks, when it appears by Mr. Sprigg, of the Victualling Office, that there were no others than those before mentioned. Capt. Earle knows not that anything is due to the purser; he is sorry he cannot come to London, Freeman, his major, being 100 miles away; but if he came, he could only give the same account. [Ibid. No. 2.] Enclosing,
Petition of Wm. Baskerville, purser of the Nightingale, to the Navy Commissioners. At the pay of the ship at Portsmouth, 8l. was stopped from Capt. John Earle's entertainment, towards satisfaction of what he is indebted to petitioner, but the sum cannot be obtained without further order. Begs a summons to Capt. John Earle, late commander of the Nightingale, and to himself, that on hearing both parties, they may give just relief. With order by Lord Brouncker and Sir Jer. Smith, that the parties are to appear at the next Board, unless the Captain makes the petitioner satisfaction in the meantime.—Navy Office, 30 Oct. 1669. [Ibid. No. 2i.]
Aug. 2.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I formerly demanded 8 Norway trees for completing the masts and yards of the new ship, but have only received 4; and if the others, as also some timber for making things named, are not supplied, the launching will be obstructed. I cannot judge when she will be ready, being so much behind with the calking, and carvers and joiners' works; her figurehead will not be carved for 3 weeks, until which time we cannot go on with the head. I ask an order to the joiners and house carpenters to reside here at this juncture. I desire your order that the lighter at Deptford may be trimmed, as she wants very little done but calking. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 3.]
Aug. 2. Capt. Ar. Herbert to Thos. Hayter. Pray furnish my purser with some blank tickets. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 4.]
Aug. 2.
Staveley.
Lord Frescheville to [Williamson]. Being much worse since I had the gout, I went to Derbyshire for the benefit of a bath there, but shall never be out of distance to do my duty as long as I can. I had information in the time of the York assizes, that there was a register book kept by a Quaker, prisoner in York Castle on account of some tithes; so I took Capt. Jeffries to the High Sheriff, and directed that a search might be made, when the book enclosed was found. I judge the discovery will be of service, as since there is order and regularity in their proceedings, more danger is to be apprehended.
I suppose the judges have given the Lord Keeper an account of the 3 prisoners in gaol upon a charge of treason, for being in the design of rising in arms about 7 years since, who then fled, but have been apprehended; as there was no new evidence, the judges did not think fit to try them upon the old evidence, and an outlawry which is against them. I do not understand the niceties of the law, but nevertheless I think the old score might have been sufficient, since 2 of them have presumed to enter his Majesty's service, one in a ship, and the other in his Royal Highness's regiment of foot. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 174.] Annexing,
Capt. Herbert Jeffreys to Lord Frescheville. I have got the register book of the Quakers, which contains the names of 500 of the heads and chief teachers throughout Yorkshire, and the towns and parishes of that county, divided into monthly and quarterly meetings, with a table for finding the names of either, as well as of those who have been imprisoned in York Castle, and by whom, and also their mittimus, from 1652 to the present time; it is well kept. The Quakers met again yesterday in the street, the constables being ordered to keep them out of the house. I sent Capt. Blakeston to Alderman Lamplough, who went and gave them a check for meeting, and pursuaded them to disperse; but they refusing, I sent some persons to take their names, and afterwards a guard, who carried some of them before Aldermen Tyreman and Richardson. Cornet Merry, an old rebel, was very high; if an order is sent, I will secure him, if he is again insolent.—1 Aug., York. [Ibid. No. 174i.]
Aug. 2.
Richmond Green.
James Harrison, late Gallery Keeper, to Williamson. I have sent another petition to the King, for wages due to myself and Mr. Pawlett, being informed by Sir Edmund Godfrey that the 2 former were lost. I have been 3 years without employment, and through lameness have no way of getting a penny. The arrears due have been owing 7 years, and amount to 325l.; if the Board of Greencloth had done as directed by warrant, it would have been paid long ago. Pray get Lord Arlington to move in it, that it may be paid either out of the fee-farm rents, or the new impost on wines. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Aug. 2.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I will wait on you in 14 days, and if Mr. Blayney can then justify detaining my money, a faithful subject has little encouragement to serve his Majesty as I did, both in exile and since his restoration, which is known by some about the Court; but I suppose I shall be heard before his Majesty at the Council Board, as well as Blayney. The Comte de Schomberg and his retinue of 23 persons have shipped for Calais, and the Duchess of Buckingham, Lady Salisbury, and their families, also bound for Calais, have put into Margate by contrary winds. As the Duchess does not like the sea, it is expected she will remain until the Duke's return. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 176.]
Aug. 2.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The vessel lost on the Goodwin was a Calais sloop from Newcastle, with coals and lead. Her side fell off, but the seamen saved themselves by that part which stuck fast, and were brought ashore by Deal boats which put off. The pleasure boat has sailed for Calais and Ostend. [Damaged. Ibid. No. 177.]
Aug. 2.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. It being assize time at Exeter, we have plenty of the Plymouth men. The Jacob of Middleburg and another have arrived with salt, and the Cat of Topsham with wool and iron from Bilbao. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Aug. 3.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Scipio of London has cleared for Venice, and will sail for Plymouth, to take a convoy to the Straits. The fanatics are pretty calm, but prick up their ears and are very inquisitive about the French rebellion; the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland has arrived at Dublin from Kildare, and distributed the army to their respective quarters. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Aug. 3.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Constance of London for Virginia, 2 ketches of Yarmouth for Milford, and the Pearl frigate from Barbadoes for Holland, have arrived, and the Constance and Pearl have put to sea again. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Aug. 3. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Aug. 3.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A ship arrived from the Straits reports that the Algerines are coming out, and have been about 10 weeks in harbour. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Aug. 3.
Euston Hall.
J. Richards to [Williamson]. I acknowledge receipt of your letter and its enclosures by Lord Arlington, who thinks of going to Norwich, and arriving in London next week. The French Ambassador has left, and Sir Rob. Carr with his lady and Mr. Baron have arrived. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Aug. 3. Warrant to Lord Ashley, Treasurer for Prizes, to pay to Edw. Rogers 400l., part of 500l. retained in his hands on account of prizes, until the King's further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 85.]
Aug. 3.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master of Ordnance. As many soldiers from the Admiral's regiment of foot under Sir Chas. Littleton served at sea in the late war, these changes make it specially difficult to keep their arms in good condition. Sir Charles has petitioned therefore for 200 collars of bandoleers, in lieu of the same number used in 6 years' service, and also 80 pikes, 6 firelocks, and 34 muskets. We order the delivery of the said arms, in proportions specified, to the 5 companies of the said regiment. Noted as sent from Lord Arlington's office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 48.]
Aug. 3.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The sails which belonged to the first Charles now belong to the present one, and lie at Chatham for her use; but those for the Royal James are in a spare heap, and are all the spare sails remaining of the great ships. The Oak's sails were sent to Portsmouth for the St. Michael, and the London has her own. I shall not despatch the horse boat until Friday, so that you may let me know your pleasure in the meantime. On receipt of the imprest bill, I will buy the articles mentioned in my last letter.
We shall not be able to launch the Newcastle this spring [tide] for want of sheathing nails; I have been fain to employ 3 men for 3 days to sort nails, to finish her sheathing. The knee timber from Portsmouth will be very acceptable, but more will be wanted. I send a tender of some Norway goods on board a hoy in the river, and believe I can buy them cheaper than they are offered, if permitted to treat for them. The London came to the Black Stakes yesterday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 5.] Encloses,
Tender of deals, spars, spears, and balks belonging to Thos. Streaton, at prices named. [Ibid. No. 5i.]
Aug. 3. Memorandum that the Thomas and Barbara and the John of Rochester, have been sent to Chatham with 39 tons of hemp, and the Thomas and William and the William and Peter to Portsmouth with 42 tons odd, making together about 81½ tons. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Aug. 4. Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I have been shown a survey by Wm. Shears, late purser of the Advice frigate, made on her in June 1666, by virtue of a warrant from the Generals, which was directed to three masters of ships who, with my agent on the place, were to survey some defective provisions on board, and return an account. But the surveyors have, without the privity of my agent, viewed and condemned 1,308 four-pound pieces of beef, and a firkin of butter, and thrown them overboard in the Downs, when they might have been easily returned to the next victualling port, and the butter could not have been so bad but it might have been useful if kept on board, or yielded a price if returned on shore. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Aug. 4. John Morehouse to the Navy Commissioners. I have bought the 50 loads of timber according to your order, the greater part of which are raking knees, and many are fit for the master builder's present use. I am offered 12 loads more under 40s. per load. I beg directions. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Aug. 4. Levant Company to Sir Clem. Harby. We have received intimation of a sentence obtained against the Morea Adventurers for 10,000 dollars, by Carab, a Jew, for a parcel of silk on board the Lady frigate, when she was captured by the Genoese on her way home with Morea currants. The currants were sold at Leghorn, but, after a long suit, were recovered by re-purchase; the company were only freighters, and knew nothing of nor meddled with anything but the currants. You are to endeavour to annul this unjust sentence, which may be easily done while the Ambassador is remaining. The owners of the ship were the persons liable. [Levant Papers, Vol. 5, p. 232.]
Aug. 4. Advices. Paris, July 29./Aug. 8. M. de Vardes went from the camp at the head of the vanguard of the army, together with M. de Castres, the Prince d'Harcourt, and several other persons of quality, and on the first day met nearly 300 rebels who, on their approach, threw away their arms and fled, but 60 were taken and 50 slain; the rest saved themselves in the mountains. The army has since marched further into the country, without meeting any but the Swiss, who were shut up in Aubenas, which was pillaged, and La Chapelle burnt to the ground. The inhabitants of Peivas, attacking a party of rebels as they passed, were defeated and their town pillaged. An express from M. de Castres to the King says that De Rovre's camp has been put to flight, 300 slain, and 200 taken prisoners. M. de Louvoy's journey to Pignerol was to confer with the Duke of Savoy concerning Genoa, with whom the Duke seems dissatisfied.
Bohemia is agitating a revolt against the Emperor; the Elector of Bavaria promised to second them with an army. This King is treating with the Princes of Saxony, Brandenburg, Luneburg, &c., so as to form an interest there, which may counterbalance that which hinders his design in the subjection of Flanders. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 184.]
Aug. 4. Peter Sambrooke to Viscount Conway, Ragley. I send your bill for physic, and those of Quartermaster Conway and Mr. Garrett; also an account of what your lordship's brother owes me, which you said should be paid from his annuity. I beg payment, as having spent 1,600l. in building houses that I cannot let, I am much necessitated for money to pay workmen. I was desired by Mr. Wayte to send Garrett's bill, as he had no money of his in hand. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Aug. 4. Rob. Scott to Viscount Conway. I am waiting for some books from France, as I could not procure all that were required in London; but if they do not soon arrive, I will send what I have. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Aug. 5.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Exeter is still visited with the smallpox, which is very mortal. A large quantity of pilchards have been taken, and are sold at 16 a penny. It is the trade with the West Indies which brings money into these parts. [Ibid. No. 187.] Enclosing,
List of 4 ships arrived, with the names of the masters. [Ibid. No. 187i.]
Aug. 5.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. A gentleman from Calais reports that the rebels at Vivaretz have obtained a great victory over the French King's forces, and that some towns at a distance have sent to assure them that the towns are at their command. A ship from Barbadoes reports the colony to be peaceable and quiet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 188.]
Aug. 5.
Court at Whitehall.
Order for a warrant to pay to John, Earl of Bath, groom of the stole and first gentleman of the bedchamber, 385l. 9s. 2d., for point lace and linen for the King's use, from 18 Feb. to 3 Dec. 1667. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 88.]
Aug. 5.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The London has come up and is unrigged, and will be paid to-morrow if the money arrives; what ordinary is to be allowed her ? The workmen being greatly dissatisfied for want of their money, I hope you will afford them timely relief. The Newcastle is launched and the St. George docked, being leaky, which will hinder the docking of the Sovereign this spring [tide]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 9.]
Aug. 5.
St. James's.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. His Majesty resolved in Council yesterday that 2 fourth-rate frigates should convoy the Irish ships to the Straits. His Royal Highness intends the Dragon to be one, and you are to appoint another and fit her with all speed, as they are to go within 6 weeks. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Aug. 6.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I sent the mastmaker to Sir Wm. Warren's, where he found some trees fit for our use, if you will give order for them. There is as much work to be done on the Assistance as if she were a new ship, but as her standing rigging is fixed, I could complete her in a month if the works on the new ship are allowed to stand still. I send a demand for provisions required. Capt. Hannam is very sick. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Aug. 6. Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I beg the despatch of the master who brought me 12 soldiers from Newcastle, according to contract, as they are now on board the Greenwich. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Aug. 6.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Committee of the Mercers' Company for Gresham Affairs. We recommend Dr. Wm. Howell, who has shown his historical learning by his published works, to the Professorship of Civil Law in Gresham College, void by death of Dr. Rich. Pearson. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 177.]
Aug. 6.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Oxfordshire, for reprieve of Isaac Watson, Thos. Woodfield, and Wm. Parker, condemned to death at the Oxford assizes for highway robbery and horse stealing, they being very young and this their first offence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 40.]
Aug. 6.
Portsmouth.
Josh. Hunt (?) to Viscount Conway. I have seen your horses at Lambley, which are in very good condition, as are your mares and foals here, which are as fine as ever I saw. The mare that was mine has a fine colt, which I am proud of, and the colts generally have improved; the one you had from Lord Dartmouth is a monster in size, which is his only fault. Mr. Mildmay had fears for Sparke, who has a rattling cold, and the old hay does not agree with him. The grey gelding at Lambley is like a soldier's horse, and as bold as any in the kingdom. I have also seen your bulls, cows, and calves, which are John Totnell's delight, and I doubt if there are any in the kingdom like them. I have just killed a b[uck], which we ran down with the help of the greyhound you had from John Bowder and the dog your lordship brought over. The old hound is the best; I hope before this my brother has sent you the hounds.
I delivered all your letters, as also Lady Rawdon's box with Mr. Arthur's letters. I bless God I found my wife alive, but much wasted by fretting over the diabolical game that was played in my house. If I had betrayed him while in London, I should have been well rewarded, but I thought of his wife and children. The whole design was to make mischief, and set the town by the ears. He has written many letters, which are as false as God is true; I shall copy some of them and send to his wife, so as to make him appear the greatest rogue that ever lived.
I gave you an account of my journey to Kilkenny with Lord Ossory, who promised to write to me. I suppose he has written to you, and shall be glad to receive commands. Present my service to her ladyship and her daughter, and the young squire. Ned Knight is at Lambley, but will come to Portsmouth on Monday, when John Totnell will employ him. Sir George [Rawdon ?] thinks your horse very dear at 40l. We have drunk your health in claret. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 189.]
Aug. 6.
Dichley.
Earl of Lindsey to Williamson. Pray move his Majesty for a reprieve for a young man named Watson, condemned at the Oxford assizes for highway robbery, until Justice Twysden or Morton, who were present at the trial, have certified whether he is a fit object for mercy. Watson is related to a servant of my wife; it is his first offence. If transported, he may do his Majesty better service abroad than by ending his days on the gallows. If you find it too difficult to attempt, you may engage Sec. Trevor, if Lord Arlington is out of the way, or what other persons you think fit, upon my account. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 190.]
Aug. 6.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Lord Holland and his lady arrived on the 2nd, on their way to France, but were detained two days, the lady being taken sick. They have since gone for Dieppe. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Aug. 6.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. The meetings are not so numerous as formerly, having no encouragement from London, and since the affidavits were taken before the Mayor about Billingsley—which were mitigated out of respect to the persons, and on account of their submission—they have much slackened. A vessel has sailed for Amsterdam, with lead, cloth, and rapeseed, and 5 of Dieppe, with lead and butter for Rouen; 2 have arrived from Holland, 2 Swedes from Stockholm with iron, and 2 from the East Indies with flax. Several others are going and coming. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Aug. 7.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Two ships have arrived from Barbadoes, and several others are expected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 193.]
Aug. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Hopewell and Laurel Tree from Barbadoes have arrived; they report that island in good condition. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Aug. 7.
Plymouth.
Jas. Blackborne to Hickes. I hear that all the ships which went to Newfoundland, in some of which I am concerned, have safely arrived there, and had good fishing, which is a seasonable mercy to thousands. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Aug. 8.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. The Kitchen has brought 18 soldiers from Hull, and an Ipswich vessel 12 from Tynemouth, and delivered them on board the Greenwich, lying in the Hope. As these 30 soldiers are to be borne on the ship, independent of the ordinary men allotted her, and as they claim to be entered from the day they were embarked, they being then discharged from their companies, I beg directions therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 13.]
Aug. 8.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. A vessel of Pendennis has arrived with boards from Norway; the King of Sweden with deals from Sweden; a Scotchman of Leith with wine and brandy from Nantes; two Frenchmen with salt and household goods for Ireland, and some others. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 196.]
Aug. 9. Charles, Earl of Norwich, to Lord [Arlington]. There was a meeting of the referees about Capt. Lynne's petition, before I knew of it, but they would not make any report until I had been heard; I doubt not but I gave full satisfaction to the Lord Keeper, as he declared that the Captain was cast by law, but that he had equity, if he paid money for it, provided he had committed no misdemeanour. There was nothing but Lynne's affirmation that he paid the money, while I proved by two witnesses that what he paid to Lord Vaughan was given to him by my father. Besides, that deputation fell with my father's death.
My Lord Keeper said if the affidavits were true, they would forfeit Capt. Lynne's equity. Capt. Lynne's drift is to keep possession, but I hope you will stand by me, since his Majesty's letter is both just and legal; and as Lynne is but a servant of Mr. Wynne, he may be put out at pleasure, and sue for his equity afterwards.
I am amazed that Lord Carberry is willing to have the King's letter laid aside, as I should never have thought of the mandamus, but for him and Sir Symon Degge. I hope you will see that it is not recalled, it being a confirmation of my right, and procured for me by the advice and direction of the Lord President.
I have no desire to ruin Capt. Lynne, as may be seen by my 4 years' forbearance, and am willing to give him a good sum to remove to other employment, and to pass over his misdemeanours; otherwise there will be great damages, and they will be challenged by my father's creditors, from which I shall not be able to excuse him. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 197.]
Aug. 9.
London.
Fred. Howpert to Viscount Conway and Killultagh, Ragley Lodge, near Alcester, co. Warwick. I hear by letters from my sister and cousin in Germany, that the Prince Elector Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria have issued proclamations, that all who have any debts owing to them by the Prince are to prove the same by next October, or they will thereafter be for ever debarred from doing so. I beseech you to assist me with 50l. to go to Germany, as my own and my sister's patrimony lie at stake, and without I have it, I shall lose all my parents left, and my sister will be forced to beggary. [2 pages. S.P. Dom. Car. II. 277, No. 198.]
[Aug. 9.] Petition of Lucretia, wife of Jno. Charvell, mariner, prisoner in Cadiz, to the King, for a recommendation to Count de Molina, Spanish Ambassador, to write a letter to the Spanish magistrates for her husband's release. He was in the Centurion, commanded by Capt. Bowen, and has served in all the engagements against the Dutch; going on shore at Cadiz, to buy necessaries, he was apprehended on suspicion of being accessory to the killing of a Spaniard, in a broil between some English and Spaniards, and has lain in prison there for 12 months, although nothing can be proved against him. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Sir Geo. Downing to Pepys. As the Treasury Commissioners have been promised a considerable sum from the bankers, for the carrying on the works of the Navy referred to in your calculation furnished them, Mr. Treasurer desires to confer with you thereon at his chambers in Whitehall, at 8 a.m. to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 14.]
Aug. 10.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the justices of peace for Herefordshire. We recommend Ant. Adams of Hereford—who served the late King, and lost all he had at the taking of the city, is poor and has a family to maintain—for a pension of 10l., according to the late Act for relief of poor and married soldiers. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 86.]
Aug. 10. Certificate by Dr. P. Mews, Vice-Chancellor, that Rich. Rowlandson, M.A., Senior Fellow of New College, Oxford, served his late Majesty in the wars, for which he was expelled the University, and that he has also served his present Majesty, and ran great hazards of life for his restoration. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 200.]
Aug. 10.
Ledston, Yorkshire.
Sir John Lewys to Williamson. I send the enclosed, that you may acquaint his Majesty with the contents, and that I may be furnished with directions before the return of the East India ships, and the sailing of the Dutch for Batavia. I may be mistaken, and if so, it must be attributed to my zeal for the King. [Ibid. No. 201.] Encloses,
Wm. Mainston to Sir John Lewys. Three or four years since, I received information at Jambie, that, amongst the jewels of Heer Van Wyek, deceased, late director in Persia for the Dutch, whose goods were brought to Batavia under process of the Fiscal, there was a diamond ring, with the Royal Arms, and an M and an R engraven upon it, and that it was reported from Van Wycks papers as being the ring that the late blessed King, on leaving the world, took from his finger and gave to Bishop Juxon, in trust for his present Majesty; but it was either delivered to or surreptitiously procured by one Rainsborough, and sold by him to Wyck for 500 rix dollars, Rainsborough being the person that was expelled from Ispahan by the Emperor of Persia, and well drubbed for his treachery to the late King. I solicited Heer Vernatti to buy it up, and offered myself to buy it at a fair price; or else to get it conveyed to the Dutch Company in Holland, so that his Majesty's agent might know where to seek for it; but I was told it was under confiscation. Pray obtain directions from his Majesty, as it would be a great pity that such a rarity should be deprived of its place in the Royal cabinet. I send you a small bundle, and 2 Japan boxes for your lady daughters.—Bantam, 10 Jan. 1669–70. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 201i.]
Aug. 10.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Amity of Falmouth from Rochelle, and the Jonas and a Frenchman from Croisic, have arrived with salt, and report that they make nothing at Croisic of the insurrection at Languedoc; that there are 55 men-of-war there ready to put to sea, and several others at Brest, but their design is not known. The Adventure of Ramsgate, bound for Cork, has also come in, and the John of Plymouth from Antigua, with tobacco and segars, has arrived at Helford. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Aug. 11.
Burningham.
Thos. Raymond to Williamson. Hearing by Sir Rob. Stewart that you have no thoughts of coming to Burningham this summer, I fear I may have done something to prejudice you against me. I trust you have not been offended with the boldness displayed in my petitions, for which I beg pardon. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Aug. 11.
West Chaldfield.
John Eyre to Sir John or Sir Gilbert Talbot. Since coming from London, I have been tired out with the great trouble occasioned by the meetings of the sectaries, whose numbers are far greater than before the Act, and there is hardly an officer that is not of their faction. I have threatened and fined some officers for their omissions and neglects, and recovered sums to the amount of 200l., but a tenth part has not yet been paid. I fined a farmer 20l. for suffering a meeting and conventicle in his farm; and hearing of another of 300 persons, I despatched my servants for some force, resolving, for their insolence after being fined, to take them all; but they having their spies out, all dispersed.
There are many other meetings of Anabaptists and Presbyterians, the latter numbering from 1,500 to 2,000 at a meeting; but their places being in by-corners, and in woods and edges of counties or hundreds, and their carriage higher and more resolute than before, it is difficult to do anything effectual, and if the informers are found in their meetings, those who are best known get encompassed about with strangers, and so protected.
Many of the richer sort, to avoid the fines, let their lands and houses, and dwell in cottages, so that when the officers go to distrain, they hardly find 5l. worth. Others pass their goods and personal estate, to secure their landlord's rent, and others for the use of their children, so that the officers are threatened with suits at law; if some course is not suddenly taken, both informers and officers will become disheartened. I believe with regard to the Act for the Royal aid and supply, that the tenant was chargeable, and that the landlord was to allow it in his rent. I long since desired that some of Lord Oxford's troop of horse should be quartered at Chaldfield, Warminster, Trowbridge, Bradford, and other places in Wilts, and also at Bath and Froome in Somerset, which was partly promised; if it had been performed, I should have had no occasion for this trouble, as there would be no meetings.
Endorsed with an order for delivery of this letter to the Bishop of Sarum, and note by him that he received it from his Majesty, and that he wrote to Mr. Eyre on his return to Sarum. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 204.] Annexing,
Information of Edw. Cornelius and 3 others, before Jno. Eyre, J.P. for Wilts. When they go to disturb those assembled at unlawful meetings, the strangers present place themselves on the outside of the company, and by holding up their staves, keep the informers from coming near the speaker, or those they know; so that the meetings much increase, and are more bold and insolent than at first, especially the Presbyterians.
On 10 July last, coming to a meeting of 1,200 Presbyterians. at Road Common, John Tanton and his wife, of Westbury, asked why they disturbed meetings which were according to God's law, while the informers' proceedings were those of the Devil, for which they would burn in hell fire.
On 14 Aug. Jno. Curle, clothier of Freshford, Somerset, returning from another meeting which they had disturbed, said they would rue it, and be caught in a net shortly. Nath. Barnard pulled a pistol out of his pocket and primed it, and another threatened to thrust his knife into their horses' guts. John Love of Stoford, and Tobias Hacker, an Anabaptist of Road, who has been twice convicted, called them vile and scurrilous names. On going to a meeting at John Selcock's house in South Wraxall, he called them informing rogues, and threatened to knock out their brains if they approached nearer. Edw. Love said that John Cooper of Clifford charged him for returning him as one who had meetings at his house, and said, " I make no question but we shall do well enough with him and the rest of them shortly." —Aug. 2, 1670. [Ibid. No. 204i.]
Aug. 11. Petition of the whole company of the Dragon to the Navy Commissioners, for an order to the victualler, or to the widow of George Alexander, their late purser, to pay what is due to them for beer, as during their last voyage to the Straits, they had to drink water for want of it, for 7 weeks before his death.
Noted that the purser's widow and Capt. Chillenden being present at the Navy Board when the petition was read, the captain undertook to make satisfaction as soon as the account was made out. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 15.] Annexing,
Aug. 11. Eliz. Alexander to the Navy Commissioners. I send, according to your order, an account of money due by Capt. Arthur Herbert, of the Dragon, to my late husband the purser, for beer, casks, provisions, short allowance, &c.; total, 79l. 17s. 8d. Pray consider the same, and do justice.—6 Aug. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 15i.]
Additional account by Eliz. Alexander of 10l. 9s. 10d. against the same, for forcing the steward to weigh both beef and pork for several boilings, without any allowance of 12 per cent. for salt, which was thereby lost. [Ibid. No. 15ii.]
Capt. Arthur Herbert to the Navy Commissioners. As to the accusations of Eliz. Alexander, I did dispose of the beer mentioned, but not so basely as alleged, which my officers can testify, knowing I am not inclined to such mean actions. I utterly deny the sale of any of it, but admit that I presented some to several persons to further our pratique, and often pressed the purser to come to some account respecting it, which he would have admitted if he had been living. Had I been guilty of what I am charged with, it must seem improbable that 15 pieces of 8/8 should be given for a butt of beer for which the victualler only allows 32s. a tun. As to detaining 22l. 1s. of short allowance, my accusers know that we were reduced to such great necessity, that had I not disposed of that and much more for victualling the ship, I should have been compelled to sell the King's stores to keep the men from starving; I am willing to pay what can be proved to have been laid out for my own use. I own to 10l. 16s. for the first part of the short allowance, but for that from Oct. to Dec. 1669, I can show by my book that it has been paid, which the steward knows, notwithstanding setting his hand to the contrary.
I had candles on extra occasions, but not so lavish'y as a pound a night beyond the King's allowance. It is possible that my cook used additional wood, but I admire how the steward can be so exact in the quantity.
Henry Roper was secretly entered by the steward, notwithstanding my order to the contrary; I leave it to you whether this was proper; I wonder he does not pretend to his pay as well as victuals. I know little about the peas or fish, and suppose the charge for them is forged simply to fill up the paper. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 15iii.]
Names of 24 men belonging to the Revenge and other ships, who, with a number of others not named, were victualled on board the Dragon at Lisbon, by Capt. Herbert's order. Noted by W. H[ewer] that the captain disowned all knowledge of any others, and that it was therefore left to Mrs. Alexander to prove it some other way. [Ibid. No. 15iv.]
Minute of the orders of the Navy Board, on the dispute between Capt. Herbert and Eliz. Alexander. That on reading Mrs. Alexander's charge against the captain, and his answer, he owned to disposal of the beer and casks provided by the purser, and agreed to pay his widow for them, as also 22l. 1s. for short allowance; the other matters were waived by the widow, on condition that they should be hereafter accounted for between her and the captain. He agreed to be bound by the Board's decision as to the excess in fire and candle. The Board thinks it reasonable that Henry Roper should be re-entered and borne on the muster. As to the peas, they were not insisted on by the widow, and the fish was disallowed. As to the percentage on the salting of beef and pork, the captain was asked to produce Sir Edw; Spragg's order for refusing the allowance of 12 per cent. on the King's flesh, he having ordered it on the Irish flesh, and it being the practice of the Navy. Upon his producing Spragg's order, the Board promised to allow it to the widow.— 11 Aug. 1670. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 15v.]
Aug. 11. List by Capt. John Tinker, of 19 officers and seamen to whom he proposes giving gratuities mentioned, for extra service in launching and carrying down the London to Chatham; total, 21l. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Aug. 11. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Request for a warrant to Deptford, for receipt from Edm. Rayner of 600 ft. of inch elm, and 600 ft. of three-quarter board. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Aug. 11.
Navy Office.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. The Spy is now employed in pressing men for the Greenwich. With note of a warrant for her victuals. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Aug. 11.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. I depend on your punctuality in meeting my bills for 821l. 6s., and hope that none of it will lie out at imprest against me. I send an account of 161l. 11s. 3d., disbursements for ships since my return, for which I have drawn a bill upon you, which I hope you will honour, as I have disbursed a far greater sum than I have put to account; I have not been remiss in promoting the service, which I shall advance to my utmost. Your remitting the 3,000l. to Chas. Longland of Leghorn has begot a plentiful discourse; many that were against me argued that it proceeeded from a diffidence you had of me. Noted that the accounts enclosed were delivered to the Comptroller and Surveyor. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 19.]
Aug. 11.
Deptford.
Col. Thos. Middleton to the Navy Commissioners. In obedience to his Royal Highness's commands, I have been to the sailmaker, and find the sails are almost finished, and you may depend upon it that what are ready will be shipped with the other things to be sent to the fleet to-morrow. Capt. Haddock cannot take them, but I believe Capt. Middleton will, if you send this to him. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Aug. 12.
Charleville.
Sir Frescheville Hollis to Pepys. I received at Dublin a letter from the Navy Office with some models, and have agreed for some timber which shall be cut to your own scantlings; only I wish a surveyor sent over to see to the goodness and squaring, so that no blame may lie at my door. I have written more fully to Mr. Wren. With note that the address of Sir Frescheville Hollis is Charleville, Ireland, and that the letters are to be left at Sir Ellis Leighton's, in Dublin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 21.]
Aug. 12. The King to the Attorney-General. In 1662, an Act was passed for repair of Dover Harbour, and the moneys to be raised by a rate on ships passing were to be paid to the harbour treasurer; but though great sums have been raised, and the master and wardens of Trinity House were to inspect the repairs and examine the accounts, yet nothing is done, and the House of Commons has requested a commission thereon. You are therefore to issue a commission to Sir Bernard de Gomme, Dr. Chris. Wren, Jonas Moore, Sir Arnold Breams, Sir Henry Palmer, Bart., Sir Henry Oxenden, and Sir Ant. Aucher, to take the said accounts, and examine into the state of the Dover harbour and pier, whether any sums have been misemployed, and what further sums are necessary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 46.]
Aug. [12.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 211.]
Aug. 12. E. Ashmole to Williamson. The precedent shown of proceedings in the time of Charles I. only referred to knights privy councillors, who are placed next before barons; but no sons of the nobility went in these proceedings, so that if the question is as to precedency between a baron's eldest son, and a privy councillor, they are nothing to the point. In all other proceedings, except those of 1588, where barons' eldest sons and privy councillors are mentioned, the former have precedency. The instances I send you today relating to the Treasurer and Comptroller are all I can find, as neither are taken notice of in the time of Charles I., nor at the passing of this King from the Tower to Whitehall, nor at his Coronation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 205.] Annexing,
Statement by Ashmole that at the Coronation of Henry VI.; barons' eldest sons came before the Treasurer and Comptroller, and that in the orders made for placing of the nobility, by John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester, and Constable of England, 6 Edw. IV., they came after the sons of the nobility and the Chief Secretary, and immediately before barons; also on Queen Elizabeth's proceeding to St. Paul's in 1588, and also to Parliament; also at the Coronation of King James, the procession through London, 15 March 1603, and the proceeding to Parliament on the 19th following. With note [by Williamson] of the precedency adopted in 1572 being precisely similar. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 205i.]
Aug. 12.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition and certificate of Wm. Clarke of Great Yarmouth, concerning a meeting of Nonconformists at the house of Major Burton, formerly an inhabitant there, that a copy of the petition and certificate be sent to Lord Townshend, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk, who is to examine into the truth of the same, and report; as also to furnish the names of such persons dwelling near Yarmouth as are fit to be made justices of the peace for Norfolk and Suffolk. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 206.]
Aug. 12.
Court at Whitehall.
Pass for Jaques de la Marre, Frenchman, who has served the King 10 years as arquebusser in ordinary, to return to France. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Aug. 12. The King to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master of Ordnance. We have considered the excessive rates of saltpetre, and therefore of gunpowder, during the late war with the Dutch, and the inconveniences to our subjects by the digging up of their vaults, cellars, stables, &c., to find saltpetre. Therefore that we may always have a standing magazine thereof, we authorise you to contract with the East India Company, for such a quantity of saltpetre as may augment our present store to 1,000 tons, when double refined and fit to make powder, the value to be secured to the company out of any money assigned to the Lieutenant of Ordnance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 15.]
Aug. 13.
The Revenge, off the North Cape.
Sir E. Spragg to Williamson. Since my last I have been to Lisbon, where I found the Guinea which brought our provisions, and the Suadades, the Queen's little ship. After cleaning, I came out with several merchantmen under my convoy, bound for England, but hearing guns to the westward, I made sail, and in an hour discovered two Turkish men-of-war attacking a Swede—three men of which they killed—to whose timely rescue I came up, as after the Turks made out who I was, they took to their heels. I pursued them some time, but finding I could do no good, I gave up the chase, and continued my course with my convoy. Standing in under Cape Montego, I espied a Turk lying becalmed; he did not move, having his boat ashore, which presently came off, leaving 12 of his men behind, three of which were knocked on the head by the Portuguese, and the rest taken. I chased the Turk with the Warwick and Garland, but wanted wind, and daylight; in the morning, we saw him from the topmasthead, and Van Ghent, with his squadron, being then under the Burlings, I suppose he took up the chase.
On the 5th, I came to an anchor off Oporto, to take such English merchantmen as were ready, and afterwards met the Lisbon Merchant from London, bound for Lisbon, who had been attacked by the Admiral of Algiers and his consort—supposed to be the same as I rescued the Swede from. The Admiral boarded the merchantman twice; the first time he killed the master, but the second time, meeting with such a warm entertainment, they stayed above three glasses, and the lieutenant of the Admiral—one Brown, an English renagado, who formerly ran away from Capt. Beach—called out that if they would help him to brace his yards, he would have nothing more to say to them; whereupon one of the Englishmen fired at him, and he leaped overboard and the English got clear.
I have this from a Turk, whom the English shot down out of their foretop, on the first boarding; he also says that his people at home are willing for peace, and daily looking for it, and that Sir Thos. Allin had not been there for 3 months, until 40 days since, when he came out with 8 sail; although Crofts, a factor belonging to Algiers,—who is at Lisbon gathering, as he says, free benevolence money for the release of poor captives out of slavery, but presumed to be on some other account,—told me when at Lisbon, that Sir Thomas could not or would not come out until the end of August or beginning of September; otherwise I should then have careened and done some service upon some of them.
Coming from Lisbon, I desired Mr. Parry and the Consul to secure Crofts, and hope it has been done, as I believe him to be a rogue, lurking up and down these parts to wait my motions and give them advice; for on coming from Cadiz, I left him there, and on arriving at Lisbon, found he had taken a trip thither, and had a free pass to go where and on what ships he pleased, without molestation. Let me know how the Irish business is going on, and remember me to Sir J. Trevor. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 208.]
Aug. 13.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. Length and width of 4 Gottenburg masts had from Sir Wm. Warren, with 2 loads of dram timber. One of the masts not being of the required proportions, I have abated one hand in each mast to make good the defect, but it is nevertheless fit for my purpose. I want directions about launching the Assistance, so as to make room to launch the new ship; I desire you would buy a piece of timber of Mr. Wood, to make a mainyard. I want some spruce deals for the two old ships. I will wait upon the Duke on Monday, but I fear Mr. Hannam will not be able. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 22.]
Aug. 13.
Court at Whitehall.
The King [to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge]. We are informed of the learning and merits of Edw. Stisted, who has taken his M.A. degree in Aberdeen University, Scotland; wishing to encourage him in his further progress, with consent of the Earl of Manchester, we require you to admit him to his M.A. degree at Cambridge, on paying the fees and performing the exercises. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 158.]
Aug. 13. Caveat in favour of Col. Russell, that no grant pass of the rectory of North Church, co. Hertford, upon the next vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, p. 10.]
Aug. 13.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Susan and Mary of London have arrived from Maryland with tobacco; the Elizabeth of Lyme from Hamburg advises that the Earl of Essex was there on her coming away, and intended to embark for England in 3 days. Three other vessels of Lyme have come in from Croisic with salt, and report that the French King is fitting a great fleet at Brest for the Straits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 209.]
Aug. 14.
Plymouth.
Jas. Blackborne to Jas. Hickes. Has no news. With note by Hickes to Perrott. Mr. Williamson promised to order the correspondence with Capt. Taylor of Harwich to be continued, and did not know why it was omitted; Capt. Taylor has written about it, and I cannot give him any answer. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Aug. 14. Information of Walter Johns and Valentine Stephens, of the tything of South Wraxall, before John Eyre, J.P. for Wilts. On 9 Aug., going to Monkton Farleigh, they stopped at a beerhouse, when Henry Keynes, and others, without any provocation, called them informing rogues, who deserved to have their brains beaten out, and then fell upon them and beat them out of the house, and would have killed them but for the company present. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 211.]
Aug. 14.
Torrellshall.
Sir Rich. Wiseman to Williamson. Thanks for your acceptance of my services, also for the reports relating to the firing of London, and the promise of the weekly news. I know not when I am coming to London, the meeting of Parliament being uncertain, but when I do, I will call upon you. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Aug. 15.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to be issued, according to an Act of Parliament for that purpose, to John, Earl of Lauderdale, High Commissioner of Scotland; James, Archbishop of St. Andrews; John, Earl Rothes, Lord Chancellor; William, Earl Marshal, Lord Privy Seal; 6 other earls, 2 bishops, and 13 knights and gentlemen, to confer with Commissioners appointed by the English Parliament at Westminster, on 14 Sept., on the proposed union between the kingdoms. With memorandum that the Archbishop of St. Andrews and Bishop of Dumblane were authorised to stay at home. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 1.]
Aug. 15. Speech by T. Dixon at the Commemoration Feast, Queen's College, Oxford. Laudation of the benefactors of the college: Rob. Eglesfield, who founded the college in the midst of the AngloFrench war; Queen Philippa, and her husband Edward III.; the Black Prince, a student of the college (with an allusion to his victory at Poitiers, and to the combined arms of England and France in the window of the hall); Henry V., also a student of the college, under the chancellorship of his uncle Beaufort, afterwards Cardinal; Edward IV., who gave the college valuable lands; and Charles I., who at last obtained that peace in heaven which he had sought in vain on earth. Allusion to the recent death of Henrietta Maria, who lived to see the restoration to his throne of her son, the heir alike of his father's kingdoms and his virtues; also to Grindal, Robinson, Fettiplace, and their other benefactors, especially Williamson. If he were silent, the silver trumpet, lately given by Williamson, would make his praises ring; notes of other presents of plate given by him, and also a painted window recently put up, with the figures of the King and Queen; encomium on the Provost [Dr. Thos. Barlow], "a very Hercules of orthodoxy, and a mighty devourer of books." [Latin. 6 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 277, No. 213.]
Aug. 16.
London.
Edm. Chillenden to the Navy Commissioners. Thanks on behalf of the widow Alexander and myself, for giving us a fair hearing. The widow agrees to pay the seamen of the Dragon their 19 days beer money as ordered, as soon as Capt. Herbert, who was the cause of the men drinking water, pays her. I beg you to order the captain to clear up the accounts as directed; also that 18 officers and men named, belonging to the Dragon, may be summoned before you, to give evidence, as well on the captain's as on the widow's behalf. With order that Thos. Marlow, messenger of the Chamber attending the Navy, summon the persons named to appear before the Navy Board on Thursday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 23.]
Aug. 16. Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Shish has fitted the Fanfan lying at Deptford, and wants an order for tallowing of her. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Chief Justice Kelynge and the recorder of London. Charles Corfield, Margaret Corfield, Charles Legree, and Tobias Wright have informed us by petition that, though reprieved and ordered to be inserted in the next pardon, they are left out and still remain prisoners, most of them being very poor. The Recorder, who sat as one of the judges, having reported that the 4 named are fit to be inserted without the proviso for transportation, and the rest with the said proviso, a general pardon is to be prepared for them accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 40.]
Aug. 16. The King to [the Treasury Commissioners]. On 15 June 1666, our Ordnance Commissioners contracted with 11 persons named to make saltpetre in the time of the Dutch war, in counties allotted to them therefor, for 3 years, and 200l. was imprested to each of them, for erecting workhouses, buying coppers, furnaces, &c., to be repaid if the saltpetre works should cease, or at the end of the term. But as we hear from our said Commissioners that at the end of the war, the price of saltpetre fell 20 per cent., so that we could not continue the contract without great disadvantage, you are to order that the said sums of 200l. be remitted to each of the said persons. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 16.]
Aug. 16. Christopher Wase to Williamson. Hearing that Mr. Lamplugh is your deputy in the stewardship of Windsor, I beg a letter to him, recommending Hen. Wase, my cousin, for his clerk; his father agrees to be responsible for him, and the place requires a resident in Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 1.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Wm. Bridgeman to Williamson. I would have waited upon you before leaving, had you gone the day I expected; I beg you will give me the opportunity of manifesting the sincerity of my professions, if there is anything I can do for you in your absence. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Aug. 16.
Edinburgh.
Charles, Duke of Richmond and Lenox, to [Williamson]. The Lord Commissioner has passed a bill against conventicles, much severer than ours in England. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Aug. 16.
Epping.
Phil. Draycott to Wm. Ryley. I have spoken to many about their claims, but some have their old ones by them, others have not concluded what to do, and others I have orders to take out, so I want copies, as it will be an inducement to bring others on. Let me have my Lord Grey's this week, and a note of the charges, as I must go to Gosfield to consult him. I will be ready with a clerk to engross for you, and will provide you a good lodging. I will wait upon you myself before the Court, but do not know the time the Court will be kept. Endorsed, "Forest Claims." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 4.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Kirke, Cambridge. News-letter. The Loyal London has gone to Chatham to be paid off. The Newcastle has been repaired and launched out of dock, and the St. George put in.
Mr. Werden, Envoy Extraordinary to Sweden, has gone. A great part of the Earl of Essex's retinue have arrived from Denmark, so that his Excellency is daily expected. His Majesty, attended by Lord Buckhurst, went out at 3 a.m. for Tunbridge, and returned at night; on Monday he goes to Windsor, and the Queen to Hampton Court.
The Treaty of Commerce in the West Indies, concluded with the Spaniards by Sir Wm. Godolphin, provides for a general oblivion of all injuries; all prisoners to be set at liberty, and his Majesty to have sovereign right to Jamaica, and all places in possession of the English.
The French letters are very big with the entertainment to the Duke of Buckingham, to which nothing could be added, either of kindness or grandeur. He was conducted to St. Germains by MM. Colbert and Lionne, two of the chief ministers of state, and there treated by the King, and lodged in Madame's apartments, and his servants in those of one of the princes. The French letters and Gazette only mention the rebels as a lost people; the Dutch Gazette reports that after M. de Bezon, Intendent of Justice, had caused three of the principal rebels to be broken on the wheel, 15 to be hanged, 200 or 300 to be sent to the galleys, and a pardon guaranteed to the rest, who implored the King's mercy, some were sent to follow those who retired to the mountains, upon sight of whom several fled, and others were taken, but not without loss to the pursuers, occasioned by the shots from those sheltered in the woods. It also states that a process has been drawn up against Le Mothemire, a gentleman found among them, and that a proclamation has been issued exempting any place from the payment of subsidies and taxes for 20 years which shall deliver up dead or alive Rovre, the arch-rebel, and a large reward to any private person who shall do the like.
We are advised from Marseilles that the 2 English frigates who engaged the Turks have got to Carthagena, and the merchantmen and victuallers to Port Mahon, and that Sally has set out some pinks and square-sterned ships, and is building 3 more of 16 guns each.
The Lord Chamberlain has married Lady Elizabeth Leigh. Several places having been fitted up at Mile End and Horsleydown for the meeting of conventiclers, orders were issued to pull them down, which was done, and the materials brought to the Tower. The vigilance of the magistrates in ferreting them out, and securing a considerable number, has made them shift their places, and change their time of meeting to evening, so that there is now no interruption to the Church.
Several ships have arrived from Barbadoes, and report the quiet condition of that place, and that seas and coasts are clear. The troubles in Hungary are over, and messengers have been sent to the Emperor by the Bashaw, to congratulate him, and to desire that his forces may be drawn further from them so as to avoid jealousy. Fort Elchiell—where upwards of 600 gentlemen had got together, with a sufficient force and a good store of provisions—was the last place that held out, and Major-Gen. Heister having advice on the difficulty in taking it, the Emperor sent them a general pardon, when it was surrendered.
The Prince of Tuscany is sending ambassadors to several princes, and Marquis Puay to his Majesty. The Treaty of Commerce between England and Spain has been read and approved by Council, and will shortly be ratified. We are advised from Leghorn that Evertsen was displeased with the deportment of the French at Cadiz, as when he gave 11 guns, they only returned 9, contrary to the agreement. Conde de Solres, sent by the new Governor of Flanders, has had an audience with his Majesty and his Royal Highness. Notwithstanding the former resolution of the States for adjusting the limits between France and Spain, they have made declaration to the Spanish Minister that, although the French might make some difficulty, they will not make the least stay in so important an affair, there being no need for any jealousy between England and Sweden, whom they offered as arbitrators; upon which the Spanish Ambassador replied that the Queen of Spain could not assent to it, unless they answered her reasons before sent, that they, being of the guarantee, ought to be of the arbitration; and there being but two, it was necessary a third should be added, in case of difference; to this the States rejoined that being of the guarantee and arbitration were two several things, that they should continue of the former, though they were of the latter, and that there was no occasion for a third until some dispute arose, which was not very probable. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 5.]
Aug. 16.
Plymouth.
Note [by J. Blackborne] of 5 ships arrived with salt, &c., from places mentioned, with the names of their masters. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Aug. 17.
Lyme Regis.
Rich. Adams to Williamson. Thanks for your and Lord Arlington's kindness, while under oppression through evil report, by reason of my clemency towards an old enemy; she has lately petitioned his Majesty against me, and I am thus set upon by the dregs of the people. The late General might as well have been suspected of having been disloyal, as myself to have been guilty of treasonable speeches, having given signal testimonies of my loyalty by services at home and abroad, during the rebellion.
My sole enemy is Edw. Walcup, who is as wild in mind and fortune as any person that ever lived, and who would sacrifice his own father for gain and preferment. My crime towards him consisted in giving an opinion, as a lawyer, and preventing a cheat to be put upon Sir Thos. Clarges four years ago; since which he has been attempting my life and liberty. His first design was to get me out of my commissions in the militia, and the peace for Middlesex; then to fight with me, and afterwards he confederated with my maid servant and accuser that I saved from the gallows, and with other combinators, attended the Lord Chief Justice, and provoked him to commit me to prison for 13 weeks, without being ever examined, and although bail was offered. I am well assured that no person was ever committed upon the evidence of servants turned out of doors for high misdemeanors, without the cause of their discontent being inquired into. Pray make inquiries as to my loyalty and conversation. Were my old friend Tolson present, he would render you many thanks for your charity towards me and my disconsolate wife. Mr. Thorold, surveyor of this port, begs to be remembered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 7.]
Aug. 17.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to George, Viscount Grandison, for better preservation of the game of hare, pheasant, partridge, heron, &c., co. Herts, it being much destroyed by disorderly persons, with dogs, guns, trammels, tunnels, nets, &c., all which are to be seized and taken away, and the names of offenders reported, that they may be punished. [Parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case C, No. 15.]
Aug. 17.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Perrott. Pray deliver the enclosed, sent by Sec. Williamson's order to me when I was last at Whitehall, of which I beg an acknowledgment. I came home last Monday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 8.] Encloses,
Articles of complaint by Rich. Watts, late surveyor of Deal, against Barth. Marsh, present surveyor. When Geo. Hulk of Deal had some brandy from Dover, Marsh demanded the impost duty, or threatened to seize it; but on being dared to do it by Hulk, who charged him with smuggling and taking bribes, he let it pass. Hulk told me and others that he had often bribed Marsh, and did not care whether he saw him bring goods on shore or not, and did not intend paying any customs so long as Marsh was surveyor.
When the King Charles hoy of Haarlem was staved near Deal, and the Custom House officers were taking the salvage, Marsh consented to a private sharing of a box of silk stockings, and had 10 pairs for his own use, which were found by Mr. Lodge; he also bought 10l. worth of tape out of the same wreck. John Heaselwood, a brandy seller in Deal, invited Hulk to go with him on board a ship in the Downs, to buy brandy and bring it ashore, he having been promised by Marsh that no duty should be paid; and although Heaselwood confesses he had not two gallons of brandy when the first impost came in force, yet he has been selling much of it at his house and shop ever since, and entered little of it in the Customs' House book, and his house is the common one for Marsh to drink at. [Ibid. No. 8i.]
Aug. 17.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Lord Arlington. In the year 1666, I obtained through your favour the surveyor's place in this port to the then Farmers of Customs; but not long after, I was dismissed by the present Farmers, not having an article of complaint against me, and the present surveyor, who was a friend and favourite to the late usurping power, was appointed. Pray be my advocate to the present Farmers, that I may be re-employed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 9.]
Aug. 17. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 10.]
[Aug. 17.] Petition of Rich. Watts of Deal to Lord Arlington, to the same effect. His father suffered sequestration to his dying day, and four of his brothers were in actual service for the late King. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Aug. 18. Caveat in favour of Thos. Elliot, that nothing pass of a fine of 500l., imposed on Mr. Richardson at the late assizes at Leicester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 9.]
Aug. 18.
Woolwich.
Will. Hannam, master attendant, to the Navy Commissioners. Being ordered to attend at St. James's, I could not wait on the pay at Deptford, and in my absence, French, a clerk belonging to the office, received my servant's pay, contrary to my order. I desire you to summon him before you, as he is a man I never had anything to do with.
I have been at Woolwich 3 years, and on account of the severe winters and hard frosts, I have often been compelled to haul ships ashore; and as I could not use the King's boats, it has cost me between 4l. and 5l. to hire wherries, to transport men and materials. I also assisted several days and nights in launching the London, and getting her down to Deptford, for which I hope some allowance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 25.]
Aug. 18.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. As to the complaints of the pursers of the Greenwich and Assurance, that my agents sent 4-lb. pieces of beef on board, in lieu of pork, with directions to stop one day's flesh in 4, they deny it, but say they told the pursers they might deliver to every 8 men on pork days 3 4-lb. pieces of beef, with peas proportionable to the allowance with pork; this is agreeable with the contract, and much better for the men than to be tied to eat beef alone. I acknowledge that the contract forbids cutting 3-lb. pieces of beef, which I conceive was to prevent fraud upon the seamen, in delivering that, in lieu of 4-lb. pieces; but if you think this method not consistent with the service, I will alter it, and give them all beef, and no peas. The baker, on the request of many, delivered biscuit in lieu of loaf bread, the latter being apt to get mouldy this hot weather, but that was without my knowledge, and shall be altered. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Aug. 18.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Collier, for Hugh Salesbury, to Williamson. The Reserve is making all expedition for sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 12.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Rob. Yard to [Williamson]. I send letters which have arrived by the French post from Mr. Vernon and Mr. Perwich which have little news; also another from Ireland, which I hope will reach you at Billing. There was one from the Duke of Richmond, who is in Edinburgh, which I delivered to his lady. I am advised from Marseilles that Sir Thos. Allin has gone after the two Turkish men-of-war that encountered the English frigates; if he does not find them, he intends for Cadiz to meet Sir Edw. Spragg and Sir Jno. Harman, and then proceed to Algiers. Lord Arlington has been indisposed for two days, having taken physic, and been let blood, so I cannot say whether he will go with the King to Windsor. I leave Mr. Ball to give the ordinary occurrences, but there has been little business in the office. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 13.]
Aug. 19.
Plymouth.
[J. Blackborne] to Hickes. Notes that the Constant of Plymouth, with merchant goods from Rotterdam, the Plymouth with deals from Dram bound for Falmouth, and the St. Stephen of Riga, also with deals, have arrived. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Aug. 19. Sir Chas. Scarborough to Lord Arlington. There is an account between my brother, Edm. Scarborough of Virginia, and Farracks of London, respecting some merchandise; Farvacks, on pretence that my brother was greatly indebted to him, made complaint to his Majesty and the Privy Council, and has obtained letters to Sir Wm. Berkeley, Governor of Virginia, and the Council there, to investigate the matter. Farvacks so managed his business that none of Scarburgh's correspondents knew of his application, so they could not make any defence; and I being at Richmond, attending on his Royal Highness, missed being informed of it, otherwise I could have shown that his claims were very unreasonable. It is my humble wish that Farracks shall not prejudice the justice and equity of my brother's cause, who, as his Royal Highness can testify, not only lost a ship in the Dutch war, but also the Ann Clear and her lading on her return from Virginia, wherein were the goods which Farracks claims. Let my brother's case be recommended to Sir Wm. Berkeley and the Council there. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Aug. 19.
Wedgnock Park.
Robt. Chernock to Viscount Conway, Ragley. I was to have waited upon you to intimate that if you required venison, you may command what my lord's park will afford; but being prevented by a lame leg, I have deputed Mr. Grevile to do it. I send you a taste of the fruit of the park, which if approved, you may send for more. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Aug. 19.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Benj. Dumaresq of Jersey, for his good and faithful service, of 1,095l., to be paid by Sir Philip Carteret, of St. Ouen, Jersey, for the dignity of baronet, lately conferred on him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, p. 86.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Order for a warrant to pay to Gervase Price, chief underkeeper of St. James' Park, 60l. a year,—as formerly paid to the Duke of Albemarle, chief keeper, for the 2 under-keepers,—for himself, and such others as he shall employ in the said service. [Ibid. f. 87.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Chief Justice Kelynge to release on bail John Overton, convicted at Guildford assizes of felony, for stealing a gold ring value 18l. He was reprieved for transportation, but being a young man, and this his first offence, he is to be inserted in the next general pardon for Newgate convicts, without proviso of transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 41.]
Aug. 19. Names of 9 deputy-lieutenants for Northumberland, viz.: William Lord Widdrington, Sir Wm. Fenwick, Sir Ralph Delaval, Sir Cuthbert Heron, Sir Wm. Forster, Dan. Collingwood, Edw. Grey, William Strother, and Ralph Jenison; also of 6 for Newcastle-upon-Tyne, viz., the Mayor for the time being, Sir John Marley, Sir Fras. Anderson, Jno. Clarke, Hen. Brabant, and Ralph Carr. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 17.]
Aug. 19. Privy seal for 2,000l. to Mrs. Simona Cary, maid of honour to the Queen, as his Majesty's free gift, for her attendance on the Queen. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Aug. [19.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 219.]
Aug. 19.
The Greenwich, Hope.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to [Pepys]. I have been waiting several days for a fair wind. I have all my men and provisions, except 40 bags of bread, and as it must be stowed between decks, and it is not reasonable that the ship should be in the least pestered with bread and drink, which is so cheap where we shall go, I think Sir Denis Gauden might order money, or make some provision for us. I hope my bills for contingent and conduct money are passed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 27.]
Aug. 20.
Wapping.
Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. I received notice yesterday on the Exchange, to attend at the Fleece Tavern, Cornhill, on the 23rd, with the rest of the persons interested in the ships and goods taken and burnt in the river Elbe in 1666, to receive an account of what has been done as regards reparation, by Sir Rich. Ford, Mr. Eyte, and others, who have the management of that affair, and to resolve on further proceedings. As by my letter to you of 6 Sept. 1669, I resigned all my right in the claim which I had made for the said loss, and in certain policies of assurance therein mentioned to Sir Thos. Osborne and Sir Thos. Littleton, then appointed to execute the office of Treasurers of the Navy, for the use of his Majesty, I beg to refresh your memories therein, that you may appoint Mr. Pointer, or any other you please, to attend the meeting on behalf of the King. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Aug. 20. Thos. Baynham, purser, to Thos. Hayter. Being engaged at Whitehall, I have sent John Coughlan for 100 more blank passes; I received 40 from Mr. Edwards, but the captain entered 30 volunteers yesterday, and hopes by Monday to have 80, so he requires more. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Wm. Howard, of Lincoln's Inn, Middlesex, of 1,095l. due from Sir Fulwar Skipwith of Newbold Hall, co. Warwick, on his becoming a baronet. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 89.]
Aug. 20. Warrant for Dr. Astley, D.C.L., to be Dean of Norwich in the room of Dr. Crofts. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 9b.]
Aug. [20.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 224.]
Aug. 20. Letter to the Dean and chapter of Canterbury, for John Finch to have a beadsman's place in Canterbury. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 9.]
Aug. 20. Order in Council, referring to the Commissioners of Customs the petition of Isaac Stockman of London, praying discharge of several foreign-built ships, loaded with masts for the Navy, brought from Riga, as permitted by order of Council, but stayed by the officers of Customs, on pretext that they should not carry any filling-up goods between decks. With their report thereon, dated 17 Sept., that the petitioner has done nothing contrary to order, some smaller wood being needful to complete the freight. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 18.]
Aug. 20.
London.
Wm. Temple to Viscount Conway. I arrived late in London, being detained by the chapman, who bought 3 of the geldings for 54l., and has sent them to France. Robert fell sick, but I hope he will be able to travel next week. Mr. Scott will send the books when they are ready. The Duke [of Monmouth ?] has gone for St. Albans, and Coventry; the King goes to Windsor on Monday, the Queen to Hampton Court, and the Duke of York to Tunbridge. I hope your money will be ready at the day. The repairs to your house and stables are progressing. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Aug. 20.
London.
M. de Billieres to Williamson. I should be inexcusable if I did not write you on my arrival in London, to tell you my obligations to Queen's College and to [Henry] Smith, who have loaded me with civilities in your absence. I regard you as my only benefactor and prop, and beg a continuation of your generosity. M. de Breval sends respects. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Aug. 20.
Farming Woods.
Anne [lady] Robinson to Williamson. Thanks for inquiries and favours received; I must decline seeing you, having a servant sick with the small-pox, so that I would rather be deprived of the company of my brother. I beg to be remembered to my husband, and to the ladies at Billing. Endorsed by Williamson, "My sister Robinson." [Ibid. No. 21.]
Aug. 20.
Laycock.
Sharrington Talbot to [Williamson]. My brother, Sir Gilbert Talbot, being gone to the west, and my son to the north, the gentry all repair to me upon all occasions of unlawful meetings, although I am neither a deputy-lieutenant nor a justice of the peace. I have been informed by John Eyre, of Little Chaldfield, Henry Long, a captain of foot in Wiltshire, and Mr. Cornelius, each of whom are very active in suppressing conventicles, that the Quakers who were fined by Jas. Montague and George Johnson still despise all authority, and say that they will meet; also that there have been great meetings of Anabaptists and Presbyterians, of which Mr. Eyre will give Lord Arlington an account, after he has met Sir Edw. Hungerford at the sessions. What we desire is that a troop of Lord Oxford's regiment may be sent, and quartered in Wiltshire, so as to curb these insolent people; otherwise they will so increase that it will be impossible to bring them to obedience. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Aug. 20.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Perrott. The harbour has been filling with ships for nearly a fortnight, by reason of the badness of the weather; but the wind shifting, above 100 have sailed for Hull, Newcastle, and Norway. Some ladies and gentlemen who were passengers for Hamburg, by a frigate which has been wind-bound for 3 weeks, arrived in one of the Duke of Albemarle's coaches from Newhall incognito, and having hired a vessel, set sail for Holland, leaving a small retinue until their return. I have not had any news since the Dutch packet-boat has used Gravesend, but I cannot account for not receiving your intelligence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 23.]
Aug. 20.
11 p.m., Whitehall.
Rob. Yard to [Williamson]. I delivered your letters for Father Patrick and Mr. Bridgeman, and send a copy of the Lord Ambassador's memorial, and an extract from two letters arrived by the French post, of which I have also given his lordship a copy. The Lord Keeper has gone out of town, and the whole Court goes on Monday; Lord Arlington intends to follow the King on Tuesday. He has given orders to despatch Sir John Finch's letter of revocation; the ratified treaty for Spain goes to-night.
The chief business of the office consists in despatching the Irish letters for the total remission of quit-rents, which have all to pass through Mr. Bridgeman's hands. I am advised by a letter from Marseilles, that M. de Martel has arrived at Toulon with his fleet from Tunis, but it is not known whether he has brought them to any agreement; also that the French Ambassador would be ready to embark for Constantinople in a few days.
Last night there was an alarm of thieves at your house, but it was found to be at one of your neighbour's, where they were breaking open the windows, of which Thos. Williamson will give you an account. I am just returned from my lord's, where I have been since 3 o'clock; the post is staying for this. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 24.] Enclosing,
Memoranda from letters as follows, viz.:—
Genoa, 9 Aug.—Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Saville arrived, and have gone for Florence.
Leghorn, 11 Aug.—The French fleet still lie before Tunis and Goletta, and will not permit any vessel to go in or out. Sir Thos. Allin with his squadron was before Algiers.
Gaunt, 17/27 Aug.—His Excellency Conde de Monterry is at St. Omer; on his way to Ostend, he visited the fortification of Damme. By his affability, and strictness in punishing the insolence of soldiers, he gains daily upon the affections of the people, and has been everywhere treated with a deal of affection and splendour. Don Esteran de Gomorrha has gone to Brussels, and will return thence to Holland.
Warsaw, 30 July. — The difference between Generals Sobietsky and Demetrius Wisnowitsky is not yet composed, both striving to make their party in the army. The Ambassador from the Duke of Brandenburg is very much dissatisfied, by not receiving the least satisfaction in the business he came about. [Ibid. No. 24i.]
Aug. 21.
Malaga Road.
Sir Thos. Allin to Mr. Wren. I have had no means of writing since 28 July, when I dismissed the Portland and Pearl, and since then have been cruising about the Straits, looking for 7 Algiers ships reported to be to the westward. On the 12th, I met Van Ghent to the west of Cape Spartel, with 4 men-of-war on the same design; he with some of his commanders came on board my ship, to consider of the likeliest course to intercept the Turks upon their return home, when it was agreed that he should lie off Cape Spartel, where the Hampshire, Foresight, and Portsmouth were left, and that I should go and keep the mouth of the Straits, between Gibraltar and Ceuta, with the Bristol, Nonsuch, and Victory, and that notice should be given to each other by firing guns.
On the 13th, I went to Gibraltar, where I washed and tallowed my ship, and then to Tetuan Bay. I spoke with a Frenchman of St. Malo, going with letters to Cadiz, and as he alleged, with one to the French Consul at Tetuan Bay, which I found to be false; I suppose he went to trade, and he has falsely reported that we took his bread and some goods.
We chased the Gilt Rose and another upon the coasts of Barbary, but neither I nor Capt. Berry could do any good. We took one of 3 brigantines with 22 men, one of whom had his leg so much spoiled by a shot that it had to be cut off. Her patron, Bondale Alli, had been a captain of an Algiers man-of-war of 24 guns, which was lost in a storm; he told me that some English ships to the westward, a few days since, fought 5 Algerines, three of which were put ashore near Cape Spartel, and there burnt, which has since been confirmed by a Spanish ship from Sariffo. Capt. Beach has orders to join me in the Straits; as the wind has been favourable for him to do so, I presume he must have had some occasion to detain him, so I hope the report is true. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 25.]
Aug. 21.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. I have been in the West all last week settling the stages, but hope the enclosed is a true return of the ships arrived in port. Is Mr. Ellis's Christian name Abraham or Adam ? [Ibid. No. 26.] Encloses,
Names of 5 ships and their masters, which have arrived at Plymouth from places mentioned, with salt and merchants' goods. [Ibid. No. 26i.]
Aug. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Merlin pleasure-boat left the harbour for the Downs, to receive orders. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Aug. 21.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Greenwich and Assurance have arrived from the Hope, as convoy for the Straits fleet; also three great Virginia ships, outward bound. A homeward-bound vessel says that about Scilly they saw the after-part of a great ship, which they concluded to be an English wreck. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Aug. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Proclamation requiring the members of both Houses of Parliament to be in attendance at the time fixed by the adjournment, viz.: 24 Oct. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 279.]
Aug. Draft of the above; noted as read in Council 20 Aug. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 278, No. 29]
Aug. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant a dispensation to Wm. Wyat, B.D., domestic chaplain to the Bishop of London, to accept the rectory of Bennington, co. Northampton, along with that of Grafton Underwood in the same county, which he now holds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 20.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant in the same form for Dr. Dan. Wicherley to hold the rectory of Wem, co. Salop, with that of Whithrey, co. Hereford. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 21. Commission to Capt. Edw. Roscarrock to be captain of the late Fras. Godolphin's foot company in Scilly, and for — — to be lieutenant of Sir Wm. Godolphin's company there. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 16.]
Aug. 21.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will inquire concerning the brass sheaves received into the stores from Mr. Taylor, and if I find them bad, I will examine the master of attendance and clerk of the survey as to why they were received, and give you an account.
The Newcastle is launched, and the carpenters and joiners' work finished, and nothing has to be done but to ship the beer, guns, and stores. I will enter the men that have come down, but there is neither purser nor steward, which injures the service. The bottom of the Royal James is being broken up; if the plank is not disposed of, you might buy it for laying the ropeyard, which must be repaired, otherwise there will not be much cordage laid next winter, and there are some of the largest cables to lay.
I have ordered the docking of the Bonadventure; she is leaky, and requires sheathing, which might be done before the new ship is launched, and would employ the men, who otherwise will be idle. I hope that that the Sovereign will be docked to-morrow, and that the St. George may be got into the single dock, and have a good sheathing with inch and a half spruce deals, she being also very leaky. I beg a supply of stores, also instructions as to how many men are to be allowed the London in harbour, and as to breaking up the Defiance. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 30.]
Aug. 21.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I have safely arrived here, as has also the Assurance, and await further commands. I hope my purser may have money for the 40 bags of bread he could not stow away, so that we may buy it when wanted, and not be forced to lay out money to make up provisions, as I did the last voyage, my purser neglecting his business all the time. I want an extra supply of iron hoops. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Sir Rob. Southwell to Pepys. I send Mr. Chidleigh's petition about the Harp frigate at Kinsale, which was read at Council by his Royal Highness, although he thought it only proper for the Navy Board. I can add, in support of it, that I have received a letter from my father, stating that the ship will soon be a wreck if not disposed of. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Pass from Sec. Trevor for — Holmes, on his journey to Russia, bearing the King's letters to the Emperor. [Latin. S.P. Foreign, Entry Book 12, p. 337.]
Aug. 22. Warrant to the High Sheriff of Bucks, for reprieve of Ann Clarke for witchcraft. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f 47.]
Aug. 22. Warrant to the keeper of Southwark Prison, to deliver Nath. Vincent, prisoner there on the Act forbidding Nonconformists to inhabit corporations, to Thos. Mansfield, captain in Lord Craven's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 22. Warrant to Thos. Mansfield to receive Nath. Vincent, and convey him to the Gatehouse. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 22. Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse to receive and keep him close prisoner, during pleasure. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Ezerell Tonge, D.D., to the King, for a presentation to the rectory of Broadwater, Sussex, void by the simony of the late incumbent and the legal incapacity of the patron. Deserted all his interest in the country, out of a sense of duty and zeal, to serve his Majesty against the Dutch, and was afterwards presented to the rectory of St. Mary Stainings, London, which, together with his parsonage and glebe houses, were burnt in the great conflagration. With reference thereon to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and his report in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 30.]
Aug. 22. List of 43 transporters of wool, against whom 10 affidavits have been made, and annexed to a petitition to his Majesty; with the date of each affidavit and the number of packs of wool sworn to, as having been dealt with, amounting in the whole to 210. Endorsed by Williamson, "Wool stealers, &c." [Ibid. No. 31.]
Aug. 22.
Hull.
John Tripp, Mayor of Hull, and 11 others, to John, Lord Belasyse. We have been prevented from meeting earlier by the sickness of the Mayor, which also delayed our returning thanks for your acceptance of the office of High Steward, to which we elected you. We enclose our petition to his Majesty for your appointment, as directed by our charter, and leave the despatching of it to you. We wish it were in our power to make a suitable return for the favour you have conferred, but wherever we can be serviceable, you will always find us ready. [Ibid. No. 32.] Enclosing,
Petition of the Mayor and Burgesses of Kingston-upon-Hull to the King, to constitute and appoint John, Lord Belasyse, Baron of Worlaby, High Steward of Hull, in the room of the late Duke of Albemarle, according to a clause in their charter, which has lately been renewed, that the High Steward should be appointed according to their desire. [Ibid. No. 32i.]
Extract from the charter to Hull, granting the stewardship to George, Duke of Albemarle, with promise that on any vacancy, the office shall be filled according to the request of the Mayor and burgesses. [Latin. Ibid. No. 32ii.]
Aug. 22.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. There is a Holland man-ofwar of 30 guns at anchor at Bridlington, which has 300 sail of busses under her convoy, who are fishing in sight of Flamborough Head. The meetings at Hull are not so frequent as formerly, but there are still a few who are now and then prosecuted, as directed by the Act. The coasters are passing daily. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 33.]
Aug. 22.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Two vessels have arrived from Virginia, with tobacco for London, also the Rebecca and the Golden [Fortune] of London, and a vessel from Norway with deal boards. A Frenchman with salt, a Dutchman with household goods for Ireland, and some others have gone out. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Aug. 22.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. The Golden Fortune of London arrived from Maryland with tobacco, and the Rebecca of London from Virginia, and put to sea again with some others, bound for London, and other ports. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Sir Rob. Southwell to Williamson. I pushed Mr. Jolly's business all I could, but the result, on the Farmers' report, was only to have the hats out, leaving security to stand to the trial. We had 4 councils last week, and I guided nearly 30 of the quit renters, whose business is despatched to their content, into your shop. The commission about discoveries, brought over by Sir Ellis Leighton, has been read in Council and passed, and gives the knight great content in his voyage, and the prospect of his speedy return. My Lord (Arlington) has gone to Windsor; he said that Sir Jordan Crosland was dead, and that he was endeavouring to get Sir John Finch into the House. My father having gone home with his whole clan for the benefit of his health, I shall follow, and pass a week with him. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Rob. Yard to [Williamson]. I delivered the letters for Lord Arlington and the Treasurer. The Court parted yesterday, the King going to Windsor and the Queen to Hampton Court. Some say his Majesty intends staying only 10 days, but the Council is adjourned for a fortnight, and Whitehall is ordered to be cleaned, the mourning to be taken down, and other hangings to be put up; as this cannot be done in 14 days, I think his Majesty will stay longer. I waited on Mr. Treasurer as he was going to Windsor; also on Father Patrick who, meeting Alexander afterwards in the park, informed him that he had spoken to Lord Arlington about your letter, and that his lordship was satisfied. Father Patrick goes to Hampton Court to-morrow.
I received a letter for you from Mr. Shar. Talbot at Laycock, Wiltshire, complaining of the insolence of the Nonconformists, and desiring a troop of Lord Oxford's regiment; I gave it to Lord Arlington, who has since gone to Windsor with Mr. Bridgeman. He says there is no business that presses your return, and if there should be, he will let you know. The Holland post has not arrived, and the Flanders letters have little news. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 37.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to W. Symonds, Launceston, Cornwall. Newsletter. Myn Heer Boreel is daily expected in place of Beuningen, who will leave on or before his arrival. Lord Howard, who has arrived at Cadiz and is expected at Madrid, will come for England by way of France and Spain. A quarrel took place in the Plaza Mayer at Madrid, on the occasion of a bull fight, between the Conde de Melger and the Garmons Guards, when many of the quality ran out of their balconies and were much wounded, especially the Marquis of Guerrarra, who is likely to die, since which the Conde and 5 or 6 of his companions have been banished. Some soldiers of the new regiment, in endeavouring to rescue from 6 Alguacils [bailiffs] a thief who had robbed a woman, killed one of the officers of the guard, which so enraged the soldiers that they sought revenge for 3 days, without any regard to her Majesty or their superior officers, and killed 10; several Alguacils and soldiers are to be hanged.
Dr. Vaughan has been elected to the bishopric of Killalough(?), in Ireland, lately become void; and Dr. Herbert Astley has been appointed to the deanery of Norwich, void by the death of Dr. Crofts. The Lord Mayor and aldermen of London attended his Majesty in Council by appointment, when he desired them, while he was away, to continue their care for prevention of tumults, and to have a particular eye upon such as should presume to meet in conventicles, contrary to the Act; after which they were brought to the Wardrobe, and treated with wine. Several justices of the peace in and about Westminster also attended, and were directed to the same effect. His Majesty has given orders for the building of a frigate of 70 guns at Bristol, and 3 at Hull. The carriages of the King and Queen left on the 19th, and on Monday his Majesty, attended by his Royal Highness and a great number of the nobility and gentry, went for Windsor, and the Queen to Hampton Court.
The Commissioners nominated by his Majesty to treat for Scotland concerning the Union are the Lord Commissioner, the Archbishop of St. Andrews, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Privy Seal, the Earls of Athol, Hume, Dumfermline, Lothian, Tweedale, and Kincardine, the Bishop of Dumblane and Bishop of Galloway, the Lord Registrar, the Lord Advocate, and Lords Haltoun, Staires, and Newbyth, Sir Rob. Moray, and 7 others.
The Duke de Crequi has marched from Paris, at the head of an army of 15,000 men, towards Peronne, a French frontier upon Flanders, partly for want of forage, and partly to prevent the inconveniences that France lay under last year, when the troops spoiled the vintages in all places where they were quartered.
The Duke of Buckingham has been at Paris 4 days, and lodged at the Ambassador's. The French King has presented him with 4 of his best horses, and a sword is being prepared for him of the value of 20,000 crowns; he is also to have an extraordinary treat before leaving, which is expected to be in about 6 days; a yacht is waiting a wind to go to France to fetch him.
A proclamation has been issued, by order of Council, to the members of both Houses, requesting them to meet on 24 Oct. next. Also an order in Council to the Attorney-General, to prosecute all persons who shall coin or vend farthings or halfpence—especially corporations, stampers, and coiners—former orders by the Council not having had the desired effect; after which the Council adjourned until 9 Sept.
Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Saville, Envoys Extraordinary from his Majesty and his Royal Highness to Florence, have arrived, and stayed with Sir John Finch, his Majesty's Resident there; after which they were conducted to the palace, and entertained by the Duke for 6 days. We are advised from Venice that the Grand Seignior is at Adrianople, and that he sent for the Vizier of Candia to attend him; but the Vizier immediately left the place, having by his severity of impaling those that abused the Venetians, and his threats of the like usage to all that should commit the like offences, settled a fair correspondence amongst them. Several workmen have been sent there from Constantinople, to build places for those in the country who, not being of the Mahometan religion, have not the privilege of living in any city or garrison. Do not forget the black mare, and tell me, if you can, where a search may be made for a gelding. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 38.]
Aug. 23.
Elwick, in Durham.
Geo. Brereton to Williamson. I beg your assistance in procuring me the prebend of Durham which will be in his Majesty's gift, if the Dean of Lichfield succeeds to the chair of Worcester. You once sent me a good answer when I wrote about the government of Chester Castle for Sir Geoffry Shakerley, and I hope you will do so now. I enclose a letter for Dr. Lamplugh, whom I recommend for the [vacant] deanery. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Aug. 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Gloucester and Adventure have left the dry dock, after being refitted and built from the keel; the Princess and Tiger will take their place. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Aug. 23.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Particulars of the arrival of ships, viz., the Mary of Conquet, with salt; the Ann of Plymouth from Bayonne, with pitch; another of Yarmouth from Portego, with sugar and tobacco; and the Peter of Plymouth from St. Malo. The latter reports that the French King has removed all his forces from those parts, and is about marching towards Flanders with 40,000 men. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Aug. 23. Account by Sam. Sykes of bedsteads, bedding, carpets, and other articles purchased of him and his partner, amounting to 51l. 9s. 5d. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Aug. 23.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Pepys. I beg an order to have the King's ditch, which runs by the side of the plank yard here to the waterside, scoured out, as promised Sir Rich. Browne and Mr. Evelyn; the smells arising from dead dogs, cats, and soil, brought in by the tides, is very offensive. There is a bridge made by Sir Geo. Carteret for his cows to go over into some ground rented of Sir Richard, now useless, which he desires may be taken down, as it makes an inlet to the plank yard, and is used by strangers and workmen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 33.]
Aug. 23.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I desire an order for launching the Assistance, as she lies in the way, and prevents our fitting the cradle for the new ship. I want the copper furnaces, brass sheaves, and other materials formerly demanded. The mastmaker has found a tree at Sir Wm. Warren's fit for the mainyard. Mr. Mayors his performed his business with reference to the new ship, except supplying some pieces of compass and elm timber, which he has promised. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 34.]
Aug. 23.
Navy Office.
T. Hayter to Sir Wm. Warren. The Navy Commissioners request that you will meet Sir Rich. Ford at the time and place appointed for the Hamburg business, and will do therein in your own name, as if it were your own concern, giving them an account of your proceedings. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Aug. 24.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The Royal Sovereign has come into the single, and the Bonadventure into the double dock. The former will be ready to launch the next spring tide, but I cannot say anything about the latter; her sheathing is so eaten by worms that it drops off, and I doubt if her plank is not eaten also. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Aug. 24.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker and J. Uthwat to the Navy Commissioners. We have computed the tonnage of the stores on board the Bantam, bound for Port Mahon in the Straits, at 205 tons. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Aug. 24.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. A small Irish vessel with brandy and wine has arrived from Nantes; also some light colliers from Topsham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 43.]
Aug. 24.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. I hear by the Faro of Flushing, bound for Portugal, that Zealand is fitting out 12 men-of-war, with letters of marque, against Spain, for a great sum of money due from the Spanish merchants at Cadiz, and for negroes brought out of Guinea, for which they cannot receive any satisfaction. That letters of reprisal are to issue against Portugal, for moneys owing by their Prince to the States; and that the King of England has consented to remain neuter, considering it but just that they should be paid their due. French commodities are very plentiful in Holland, so that trade is very dead there, and many ships are lying by for want of employment. Their expectations are much upon what the ambassadors will do in France, in taking off some of their great taxes. The Golden Fortune and the Rebecca, both of London, from Maryland with tobacco, have come in. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Aug. 24.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. To the same effect as the above, and his letter to Williamson of 22 Aug. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Cole, Custom House, Southampton. To the same effect as that to Symonds of the 23rd. Also, The march of the French army towards Peronne, with orders to keep their rendezvous there, has strangely alarmed the Dutch; their conceiving that the French are as likely to fall upon them as Flanders, has caused some alteration in their East India actions, which have fallen 40, and the militia, which was ordered to be reduced, is not only to be continued, but increased.
The contemplated reform of the Spanish forces has also been put a stop to on the same account. The Dutch Gazette confesses that the Vivarais, or rebels, are wholly suppressed, and that there are none left in the mountains who dare appear as an enemy, but only such as hide themselves to escape justice. The French have declined to abate any of the impositions laid upon merchandize carried to Holland by the Dutch, upon which the States have sent fresh instructions to De Groot, that being the chief matter of his embassy. Van Beuningen has received fresh orders to continue his stay (in London), the States wishing to see what the French intend before his return. The Prince of Orange is expected in October. The Queen went to Windsor on the 24th, to dine with his Majesty. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 46.]
Aug. 25. Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. I am commanded by the City Artillery, of which I am President, to invite you to meet the Duke of York at their customary yearly entertainment at Grocers' Hall, on the 30th. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Aug. 25.
Kidlington.
Sir Wm. Morton to Williamson. I received similar letters to yours from Sir Philip Frowde and his son, who is one of the Secretaries to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland; but they came in a time of great affliction and sorrow, when my eldest and youngest daughter died of the fever that my son was sick with, but he, with the rest of my family, has recovered.
I wrote to Mr. Frowde in Ireland to apprehend some thieves named, because Mr. Wren came from the Duke of York for a warrant against Francis Martin, suspected of having robbed the Duke's closet; the warrant was granted, but he was never taken. I had employed Martin as a thief-catcher, and he, having committed several petty felonies with Connell, under colour of my warrant, was sent to Newgate; but as he confessed to several of his accomplices, who he suspected had robbed the Duke, and offered, if bailed and granted a warrant, to apprehend them, and also made such promises and showed such reasons for being faithful, I believed him, and did as desired; but he did as all rogues do, committed several other burglaries, and soon after, the King was robbed, and the plate stolen from Whitehall.
Suspecting Martin and his father, as also Connell—they being notable picklocks and cunning thieves—I inquired after them when I came to London, but they fled into Ireland, so I apprehended Martin's wench or wife, who confessed that old Martin, her husband's father, was in the robbery of the King's plate, part of which they sold to a goldsmith at Oxford, and the rest in St. James's; and that he and his wench, together with his son and Connell, who all had plenty of money, had left her and gone for Ireland. As she was near her confinement, and promised further information when requested, I did not commit her, out of pity, but she has since also gone to Ireland. Talbot, another old thief, went after them, but coming back, was apprehended and sent to Newgate for other robberies; he confessed to having seen the others in Dublin, whereupon I signified it to Frowde, which caused their apprehension. I conceive the best plan will be to keep them all apart until the rest are taken, and then to separately examine them; as Connell and Martin are both young, I doubt not but they will make a confession, to escape being hanged. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Aug. 25. Warrant for 100l. to Dame Mary Erwin, upon the privy seal dormant of 27 July. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Aug. 25. Warrant for 300l. to — Pendrill, from the privy seal dormant of the 22nd instant. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 25.
Victualling Office.
Account by Fras. Sprigg, for Sir Denis Gauden, of provisions named shipped on board the Bermudas Merchant, for supply of Sir Thos. Allin's fleet in the Straits; total 212 tons, value 745l. 7s. 1d., and the third part thereof 248l. 9s. 0d. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 38.]
Aug. 25.
Chatham.
John Brooke and Edw. Homewood to the Navy Commissioners. Besides the other things demanded for 12 months' service, we shall require 150 dozen small blocks, from 12 inches downwards, to supply the ships in harbour. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Aug. 26.
Kinsale.
Wm. Penn to the Navy Commissioners. The Boom broke loose and drifted to sea during the night; being missed in the morning, Capt. Rooth, Governor of the fort, went out with all the boats and men he could get, for which he paid, and brought her back and has secured her in the dock. I beg an order to the Lord President, who is now in Ireland, for demanding her back, as also the materials. We crave instructions as to the Harp frigate, which is spoiling by lying here. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Aug. 26. Inventory of the masts, sails, anchors, cables, and other materials belonging to the Barbabella ketch. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 41.]
Aug ? Account of the defeat of Algiers corsairs, burnt on the coast of Barbary by Lieut. Admiral Van Ghent and Vice-Admiral Allin, 18/28 Aug. 1670. [4 pages. French. Printed at Amsterdam, 9 Oct. 1670. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 49.]
Aug. 26.
Malaga Road.
Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson. The good news which I doubtingly wrote about has become certain, and much better than I hoped. After many unsuccessful chases and probabilities lost, I left Capt. Beach in the Hampshire, with the Portsmouth and Foresight, to cruise off Cape Spartel, and went myself to Gibraltar, to keep my station between that and Ceuta. M. Van Ghent, Admiral of the Dutch, cruising out of the Straits with 4 sail, saw 6 Algerines, whom he chased; but night coming on, we gave it up, and Capt. Beach returned to his station. On the 17th we met them again, and after a long and sharp fight, which was ill-managed by the enemy, the whole 6 were put ashore south of Cape Spartel, and in the morning 2 of them were fired by their own hands; but the other 4, being defended from them by the Christians, who remained on board and turned their guns against them, remained unburnt until our boats went and did that service for them.
Doubtless we are under some obligation to the Dutch for chasing them towards us, but I hope none of them will pretend that they were within 3 shots of the Turks, from 7 o'clock until they were all ashore, except one of their small frigates, which did not come in time enough to fire 6 guns within reach of them. I send a list of the ships burnt, which are those we should have made choice of to destroy, had it been left to us, and limited to the same number.
Aug. 26. They are 6 of the 7 that fought with our Newfoundland convoys last year, and that made an attempt on Rear-Admiral Kempthorne, and 4 of them put the Sapphire on shore at Sicily, and lately engaged with the Advice and Guernsey, both of whose commanders they killed. If their force is considered, they were doubtless the Hectors of Algiers, and well able to have fought and beaten all the remaining ships of that place; their loss, when all the sails, rigging, guns, and ammunition are considered, cannot be of smaller consequence than if 12 unrigged hulls had been burned in their Mole. Many of their men were killed in the fight and drowned in getting ashore, and the rest are in great danger of perishing before they get to Algiers, which is overland, and through a vast country, some part whereof is inhabited by a people who are very treacherous, covetous, and cruel. We saved upwards of 250 Christians, and a good number of English out of the Algiers ships; I am having a list of them made to enclose. We did not lose a man in the fight, which lasted 5 hours, nor were any of our ships disabled.
If the Turks had not been chased to our ships, they must have come, as they had but 5 days' provisions, on the shortest allowance that man can live on, and so were forced up the Straits, where they had been sufficiently waylaid. I was chasing 2 other men-of-war in the Straits the same hour, and should have taken them but for the wind shifting, and Capt. Beach had stopped a Leghornese bound from Sally to Algiers, whose goods I am taking out, and have directed the freight to be paid for them, the commander having confessed that they belong to Turks, Moors, and Jews of Barbary.
I have ordered the Jersey and Foresight to cruise about the Straits' mouth until September, or till they meet the Greenwich and Assurance, while I go along the Spanish shore to Alicant, with the Bristol, Nonsuch, and a fireship.
Mr. Blunden writes that he has a packet from you for me, and another for Sir Edw. Spragg. I have taken the Hampshire, Portsmouth, and Centurion into my division, and ordered them to the Barbary shore, to look out for vessels from Tetuan to Algiers with the remnant of the men of the burnt ships, and to meet me at Algiers, where I intend to carry the news of the disaster myself, so as to try what good effect my appearance there will produce.
I hope to receive letters at Alicant, and if I do not meet the Mary, Advice, Guernsey, and Deptford ketch on the way, they will find orders there to cruise about the Straits, in place of the Jersey and Foresight, who are to go eastward with convoys. I hope his Majesty and his Royal Highness will be pleased with our success, and although not solicitous to humour coffee-houses, I am sure the Spaniards hereabouts look upon it as a good fortune to them. I send a copy of this letter to Mr. Wren. I beg to be remembered to Lord Arlington. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 50.] Annexing,
List of 62 Englishmen who were slaves on board the Turks' ships, and were freed at the burning of the Algerines near Cape Spartel.—10 Aug. 1670. [Ibid. No. 50i.]
Aug. 26.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. The Booreta of Plymouth with tobacco from the Caribbee Islands, the Charles of Dartmouth and the Sparke of Plymouth with pilchards, both bound for the Straits, have arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 51.]
Aug. 27.
Rye.
Jas. Welsh to Williamson. Capt. Pierce, formerly commander of the Sapphire, has arrived from France, and is kept prisoner by his Majesty's order. The Mayor and jurats have made his Majesty's order public, as to prosecuting persons who shall coin and issue farthings and halfpence not made of silver. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Aug. 27.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Duchess of Buckingham has arrived here from Dover; she was saluted with 7 guns as she passed Deal Castle. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Aug. 27.
Deal.
Same to the Same. The Flanders packet-boat reports that the French King has issued a proclamation commanding the English and Dutch to depart from Dunkirk in a few days. The Greenwich and Assurance, and the Virginia and Straits' fleet are in the Downs. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Aug. 27.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Lord Power and some other gentlemen have arrived, and intend sailing from hence or Holyhead for Dublin. The Friendship of Boston, New England, has sailed for that place, with goods of English manufacture. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Wm. Scawen, Molenack, Plymouth. Newsletter. To the same effect as the one to Cole of the 25th; also,
The magistrates, in pursuance of his Majesty's charge to them before he left for Windsor, have been very vigilant in looking after the conventiclers, and those of Westminster have committed Mr. Vincent, a man eminent amongst them, to the Gatehouse.
The Dauphin of France is sick of a tertian fever, and the Princess is so ill that her physicians judge her to be in great danger. There is no news of the seizure of Nancy, and the disposal of the army is very uncertain, but it is believed it will be distributed in the several garrisons of the late conquest, though some think they are designed for Metz, to be in readiness to act something against the Duke of Lorraine, if he does not give the French King better satisfaction. The quarrel between them is that the Duke was to have assisted the Vivarais rebels, and Germany will be engaged in it, the Duke being one of their members. Several places in Germany have suffered by an earthquake, which shook down several buildings, and did other damage, amongst the rest a building at Augsburgh, where the arms of Charles V. were hanging, and the scabbards fell, leaving the swords naked, which has been taken as boding ill luck.
Some merchants have received letters stating that the French have landed 8,000 men at St. Domingo, but this wants confirmation. The lieutenant of the Sapphire, which was run aground in sight of 4 Turks, men-of-war, having come over, has been committed to prison for examination. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 56.]
Aug. 28. Geo. Body to the Navy Commissioners. I made a contract with you in Oct. 1669 for 700 loads of East-country plank, and engaged to bring all Crown plank, and to deliver it at Chatham, Woolwich, and Deptford in equal proportions. Soon after you contracted with Mr. Harrington for the same quantity and from the same place, and gave him 10s. a load more, so that my correspondent could not comply with the price he first agreed upon, and I was therefore forced to give him a great deal more a load, as Mr. Harrington could do so, who also had the privilege of bringing his plank in strangers' vessels, which was much to his advantage; he has only to deliver it at Woolwich and Deptford, while I am thrust to serve Chatham only. As I never made such a contract, and as there is little or no plank in Woolwich yard, I beg to be allowed to serve part in there, according to my contract. I hope you will lay my case before his Royal Highness, and obtain for me the same privileges as enjoyed by Mr. Harrington; otherwise I shall be totally ruined. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 42.]
Aug. 28.
St. James's.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Having received advice from Sir Thos. Allin that the Portland and Pearl are coming home on account of being leaky, I give you notice of it, so that the money may be got ready for paying them off when they arrive. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Aug. 28.
Sunday.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I received your letter at Lyme, and am glad to hear of your safe arrival, and will not fail to be at Aswarby the end of the month. The danger we were in going and coming I leave the women to relate, who will do it more to the life. I am going on some business to-morrow, and will return in the evening, after which I will not stir until I have received the kindness promised. My mother, wife, and niece desire to be remembered to you and the Hatcher family. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 58.]
Aug. 28.
Plymouth.
Sir John Skelton to Williamson. The Punny of Plymouth, which was taken and carried to Sally, and since retaken, has arrived from the Straits with several others from Smyrna and Gallipoli; 25 sail of Dutch and English came out of the Straits, with 2 Dutch men-of-war, which commanded the Smyrna fleet of Holland. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Aug. 28.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Several ships have arrived in the Channel, of which the Olive Branch and two others have come into port. They have been 5 weeks coming, and had a Dutch convoy, one of which, called by the Sally men the Norfolk man-ofwar, was formerly a merchant ship of Plymouth, and was taken by Capt. Kempthorne's ketch. My Lord Ambassador [Howard]'s goods and some of his gentlemen are aboard one of them; they left Capt. Allin at Cadiz. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Aug. 29.
Coventry.
R. H. [Ralph Hope] to Williamson. Serjeant [Thos.] Flynt, one of the Members in Parliament for Coventry, died yesterday at his house at Aldsey, a mile hence, of a fever and the stone, leaving a young wife near her confinement. It is an extraordinary sickly time about the country, arising from a kind of fever which is judged to be infectious; but the city continues healthy. Though there are not so many public meetings, out of seeming obedience to the Act against conventicles, yet the private ones are more numerous, and no care is taken to suppress them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 61.]
Aug. 29.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Above 20 sail have passed to the eastward, supposed to be the Straits' fleet. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Aug. 29.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. I have long waited for something against Mr. Marsh, Surveyor of Customs at Deal, who put me out of that employment without any complaint being made, and enclose several charges against him, (missing) which can be proved by the witnesses named in the margin. I beg instructions how to proceed. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Aug. 29.
Deal.
Same to the Same. The Earl of Essex, his Majesty's Ambassador to Denmark, has landed from the Katherine yacht. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Aug. 29.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Concord of Lyme has arrived in six weeks from Barbadoes, and reports that the place is in good condition, and that the new Bridgetown much exceeds the old. She came out with several other vessels of London, which she parted with at sea. The Little Rose of Lyme, from St. Malo, says that a breach was hotly reported there to have happened between the French and the Spaniards, Swedes, and Dutch, and that the Paris letters stated that a war had been proclaimed, which news was confirmed at places where she stopped on her way home. Wm. Cogan has been elected our Mayor for the year ensuing. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Aug. 29.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will finish the answer to your queries this week, and send it to the surveyor. There is not much timber to be had at Chatham, save that Mr. Arnott has 500 or 600 loads, which may be had under 50s. a load, and Mr. Mason 1,000 loads and upwards, but he will not sell it under 58s. a load; there are one or two other small parcels, but I will treat and use my best endeavours to get it as cheap as I can. The yard is very bare of timber and plank, and the new ship is delayed for want of it; if she is not suddenly finished, it will hinder the repairs of other ships, and we have not another we can dock astern of her, but what is too long. The purveyor has sent some knees to finish her gun deck, and I shall be glad of those coming from Portsmouth.
The Bonadventure is in hand, but I have found 2 great holes in her bows, which I suppose were made with the anchor. I wonder how she was safely brought home, as her sheathing and plank are also very much eaten by the worms. I will endeavour to find someone to break up the Defiance cheap; as I fear there will not be enough plank in her to complete the floor of the ropeyard, I desire that some of the Royal James's may be sent. I will order the clerk of the cheque to enter 20 men on board the London, and will give the imprest bill for supplying Capt. Langston with conduct money to Mr. Gregory when it comes, and see that Langston is supplied in the meantime. His men appear but slowly: you should let him know that when a ship is got ready to receive all provisions and stores, as this has been for more than a week, it is a hindrance to the service not to have men ready to do the work.
The porter of the yard well deserves his former allowance. I have put him to look after the watch at night, besides his duties by day; I shall not alter the watch without orders, but if the watch at the old dock is taken off from our charge, I conceive the porter at the Hill house must fall with it, as there will be no need of his ringing the bell, the porter of the yard being able to do it at the old dock every morning at 5 o'clock.
I will use my endeavours to supply the stores with what these parts afford, but you must supply plank and treenails. I have been expecting the shipload of masts you bought when I was last in London; there is not one in store fit to make a bowsprit for the Bonadventure. I hope in my next to be able to give an account of Mr. Yardley's business about the repair of the barn, and as to the brass sheaves. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 44.]
Aug. 29.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letters and advised with Capt. Wild as to the beef. I approve your directions about the bread, and desire the purser may receive his money at sea. The cooper's extra stores have arrived for both ships, but not the iron hoops, there being no example for it. If his Royal Highness has resolved that we shall have the 9-inch cables for barricadoes, I beg they may be sent before we leave the Downs, as also the money for a bill for 220l., which you gave me as contingent money for our company's short allowance. I left it with my friend Mr. Horneby, goldsmith, to be converted into pieces of 8/8. Capt. Wild is ready to sail, but we are waiting for the convoys, none of which have yet arrived. We should have 10 days' recruit of victuals from Dover, having spent 8 days' sea provisions already. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Aug. 29.
Chatham.
Edw. Byland to Col. Thos. Middleton. Pray move the Board concerning 3 boats, sizes mentioned, required for the new ship, and formerly demanded; also order the setting of our furnaces before we launch. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Aug. 29. Sir Rob. Southwell to Pepys. I have newly come from our friend Mr. Hill, and thought to have continued the pleasure of my journey to the city by seeing you, when I would have shown you the copy of my father [Sir Edw.] Dering's contract, had from Brooke House. Although the payments of the last 500l. be not exactly as I told you, yet you will find so many years of the appointed time to have elapsed, that I doubt not but you will range him in the favourable order mentioned by Lord Brouncker. The bargain was so advantageous to his Majesty that a little inquiry would make much to our advantage; if any other motive was needful, I am sure Lord Brouncker will allow all just favours, and I think Mr. Pepys will not be outdone. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Aug. 30.
Woolwich.
Will. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. Pray consider a supply of boats for the new ship againgst her launching, especially a longboat, for we have not one that will carry her great anchors. Let the foreman of the labourers at Deptford be sent here, as ours has run away, and the boatswain of the yard has fallen sick, also the boatswains of the Crown, Dover, and Ruby; the ships in ordinary here are dangerously sick, so that our assistance is like to be very small. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 48.]
Aug. 30. Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. As I intend launching the Dragon out of the dry dock on Saturday, I beg a warrant to the master attendant to get the ship ready that is to come in, and also directions to the purveyor to send the knees, standards and elm timber, formerly demanded. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Aug. 30. Robert Ashworth to the Navy Commissioners. I beg an interview, as I have attended according to your directions. Noted that he desires to be entered as a locksmith at Deptford. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Aug. 30. Capt. Jeffry Peirce to the Navy Commissioners. The Eaglet arrived safely in the Downs on the 29th, when I received your order to reduce my men to 16, which I have done, and [B. St.] Michel, the muster master, has mustered to that effect. I am detained by contrary winds. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Aug. 30.
Bishop's Waltham.
Fras. Moryson to Williamson, Lord Arlington's secretary, Windsor Castle. I am advised from Virginia that the auditor's place there— which became vacant by the death of Capt. Stegg, who had his Majesty's grant for it,—has been given to Edw. Diggs, who is in possession, and has written to his lordship to procure his Majesty's grant for it. As I am employed by that country as their agent, I ask that a caveat may be entered in the secretary's office, that I may be heard before the grant passes, and I will make a civil return for the favour. I will deliver his lordship's packet from the Governor of Virginia when it comes to hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 66.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Will. Symonds, Launceston, Cornwall. Newsletter, to the same effect as that of 27 Aug. Also,
Sir Edw. Carteret, one of the Gentlemen Ushers, has been sent to Whitehall, to give notice that his Majesty will return to town on Saturday, if the house can be fitted up so soon.
Letters from Cadiz report the arrival there of a French tertian from Tetuan, with Pedro Ruffana, Patrian of Aguvar in Bexet, who reports that Taffaletta, marching with an army of 140 millions (sic) of men towards Sus—that people having agreed to join with those of Santa Cruz—so terrified them that they presented him with their leader's head, and begged his pardon, upon which he marched with much confidence towards Santa Cruz; but the people there being dissatisfied with their new Governor, made a new agreement and attacked Taffaletta's army on both sides, while they went on the borders of Sus and utterly routed him. His brother, who led the van, was killed, and he himself escaped by night to Morocco, with 4 horse, from whence he sent to Fez, Tetuan, &c., for recruits, but was denied.
The Paris letters of 25 Aug./4 Sept. not only confirm the taking of Nancy, but also believe that Epinal sur Moselle Castle, and all places there may be lost, as the Duke of Lorraine was at the time wholly surprised, and his sister, [Margaret] the Duchess Dowager of Orleans, was accommodating the differences, and had sent a courier to him with propositions from France. The King told the Duchess he would no longer bear the injuries he daily received, and sent to the Princes of the line, to excuse the manner of it.
On 14 July, Sir Edw. Spragg put into Lisbon with 2 other frigates, not having discovered any Turks; Sir Jno. Harman, with the Dartmouth and a fireship, was in the bay on the 20th, having abandoned his design of battering the fort at Sally for want of an easterly wind, and intended for the Straits in convoy of some ships from England. On 6 Aug. Sir Thos. Allin left Cadiz with 6 frigates, having, in ranging the coasts of Barbary, only met with a brigantine belonging to the Duan, which he took; Lord Howard was then at Cadiz, but intended to leave for Madrid in a few days.
The Faro of Flushing, bound for Portugal, put into Falmouth, and reported that 12 sail of private men-of-war were fitting out, with letters of marque against Spain, for money due to them for negroes, &c., and that the Duke had ordered all the officers to their respective commands, on pain of being cashiered. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 67.]
Aug. 30.
London.
Anne Thomson to Viscount Conway. I would have answered your letter before, but have been ill through being so great with child. Thanks for your charity; I am ready to secure you from any trouble that may follow, but hope there will be none, as it cannot be known what you had from my husband, "whose dead ashes, if able, would pray for your lordship from the grave, for your kindness to his widow and the fatherless, who are in want." If you want any Bordeaux wine, I have a relation a merchant in Bordeaux, who will serve you as faithfully as any, and who has supplied your brother-in-law. Remember me to her ladyship. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Aug. 30.
Portsmouth.
Notes from Hugh Salesbury to Williamson that he has no news to send, all things being quiet, of 2, 4, 9, 25, 28, and 30 Aug. [Ibid. Nos. 69–74.]
Aug. 30.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. List of ships arrived, viz., the Rose and Elizabeth of Gottenburg, with salt from Gottenburg; the Foran of Dieppe with glass for Nantes, and the Ark of Plymouth from Antigua with sugar. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Aug. 30. Lord Frescheville to Lord Arlington. There being numerous conventicles on Sundays at Shadwell Chapel, near Leeds, and the officers' warrants being slighted, the justices requested the assistance of a party of horse from York; so on Sunday the 28th, I sent 20 to Capt. Jeffreys, whose letter and that of the corporals are enclosed. As the diligence of those officers and soldiers requires to be rewarded, I beg leave to apply the penalties to that purpose, and to the defraying of military charges generally, and will render an account.
There is constant occasion for a guard house, which has been raised, after great importunities, and at the charge of the city, but it is so inconvenient that the soldiers cannot do duty in it this winter. Hearing that a proclamation has been issued for hastening the meeting of Parliament, I desire you to obtain his Majesty's pleasure whether I am to come to London, or remain at York. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 76.] Enclosing,
R. Hodshon to Lord Freschevill, Governor of York. According to Mr. Hamond and Mr. Copley's request to Capt. Jeffreys, I was commanded by him to wait upon them with 20 horse; and coming to Shadwell, took the teacher and 300 more in a little chapel there. The teacher refusing to give his name, was sent to York Castle, but the congregation gave theirs, and are to be proceeded against according to the Act. Marching afterwards over Brommay Moor with my party towards Leeds, I met Mr. Skinner, who told me that 40 Quakers had met on the highway near Tadcaster; so we marched as fast as our horses would carry us—they being weary, and it being late—and had the luck to meet 29 of them, 3 of them being speakers, including one Sidle, a bold fellow, and one of Oliver's old captains, and brought them to Tadcaster, and then marched to York, where more of this sort of employment is expected. The Presbyterians are strong young fellows, but stubborn and surly.—York, 29 Aug. 1670. [Ibid. No. 76i.]
Aug. 31.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. Above 20 ships, supposed to be the Straits fleet, have passed by to the eastward, some of which shot several guns, supposed to be on account of some feasting going on on board, or for joy that they had safely arrived in the Channel. The Mary of Middleburg has come in, with some passengers bound for Surinam; also the Delight of Swansea from Plymouth, which has sprung a leak. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Aug. 31.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. The Katherine has arrived with French hats, iron pots, &c., for Dublin, and the Half Moon with deals for Bristol. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Aug. 31.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Sara has arrived from Morlaix, and a French vessel from Croisic, and the masters report that a war is discoursed of as likely to happen between them and Spain and Holland, but that it was not proclaimed; also that the fleet fitting at Brest is intended for the Straits and Persia, in the room of several others which have returned. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Aug. 31. Sir John Monson to Williamson. Pray present a petition enclosed to Lord Arlington, and second it, so that I may know his Majesty's intentions, as it is only to continue my claim to what in justice I may expect, if it produces no more. I desire that the result may be sent by Dr. Gardiner. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Aug. 31. Lord Belasyse to Wm. Bridgeman. His Majesty having conferred the government of Scarborough Castle on my nephew, Sir Thos. Slingsby, and continued Henry Crosland as deputy-governor and lieutenant to the company, and Peter Hawkins as his ensign,— both of whom well served the late King under me, as well as Sir Jordan [Crosland],—I beg that their commissions may be renewed, if it becomes necessary in regard of the change. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 81.]
Aug. 31.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will attend you with the answers to your queries on Monday, and will treat with Mr. Mason and others for treenails. Mr. Gould is the only one who will undertake the breaking up the Defiance, but as he wants 80l., I will endeavour to find some one to do it cheaper. I will also send a longboat, a pinnace, and 2 large furnaces to Woolwich, when the horse boat arrives; I hope you will send some 4-inch plank down in her. As to the badness of the brass sheaves received from Rich. Taylor, I find that none have been delivered by him, but that 14 were served in June 1668 by his wife, who was then a widow, and that all those in store are bad. Mr. Cockrell has supplied them since the King came in, save a parcel received from Harwich, which are as full of cracks and flaws as the others, and some of the cracks have been filled up with lead. It is true that those made here are weightier, but for the metal they seem to me as good as the others. I questioned the master attendant why such ill-conditioned goods were received; he replied that he was never called to view them or certify; Mrs. Taylor excuses herself by saying they were made so big according to the mould given to her; if this be so, it ought to be prevented for the future.
The clerk of the cheque and the storekeeper should be directed not to receive any provisions without calling the master attendant, master shipwright, and clerk of the survey, to view such goods as concern each, so that your Honours may know who is to blame. I send Mr. Yardley's letter, also a certificate and a demand for stores. I have done my best by seeing Mr. Yardley and Mr. Head's lease, and find that Head enjoys the great house, outhouses, barns, and stables, formerly used by the Navy Commissioners; and that in Yardley's lease, the north bay of the barn is reserved for the use of the Hill House. As the persons who have signed the certificate all agree that the north end of the barn was always repaired at the King's expense, I will inquire about the charge, and whether a brick wall is needed to support the garden wall from falling into the ground or yard where Mr. Owen, clerk of the ropeyard, lives. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 52.] Enclosing,
Rob. Yardley to the Navy Commissioners. I requested you on 6 Nov. last to repair the north bay of the barn next to the pay-house at Chatham Hill, which has always been used for the service of his Majesty and his royal father and grandfather, and always excepted out of the parsonage lease granted to me and my predecessors by the Dean and Chapter of Rochester, by their settlement, temp. Henry VIII. and long before, by the prior and convent of Leeds. I applied to the surveyor and Commissioner Cox about the repairs, when the surveyor endeavoured to prevail with me to take that part of the barn, and repair it; but as it was an appurtenance to the pay-house, I declined to do so. Pray peruse a certificate enclosed, and do what is right, so that the part which belongs to me may not be impaired by the ruinous condition of the other part. I beseech you to order the repair of the stables and coachhouse in the yard; also to have the rubbish which has been flung out by the officers' servants, against my barn wall without the gate, conveyed away, and their masters forbidden to lay any more there, it being a great wrong to me, and a great prejudice to my wall.—Chatham Parsonage, 5 Aug. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 52i.]
Certificate by John Baynard and 7 others, that the north bay of one of the great parsonage barns at Chatham Hill, next to the house of the late warden, and now his Majesty's payhouse, has been repaired at the King's expense for upwards of 50 years, and has continually been used by the clerks of the ropeyard, keepers of the pay-house, and divers other persons authorised by the Navy officers, to lay in provisions of hay, wood, &c.—14 July 1670. [Ibid. No. 52ii.]
Aug. 31.
Deptford.
F. Hosier to Col. Thos. Middleton. The speediest way of knowing what is in Deptford stores will be for the storekeeper and clerk of the survey to view, and give an estimate of them; if you prefer that I should draw up a balance-sheet, I will do so, although it will take considerable time, and hinder my present duty. Noted that the former proposal was agreed to by the Board. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Aug. 31. Certificate by Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners, that he has brought the Fanfan up to Deptford, she being very leaky, and her rudder defective. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Aug. 31. Note of a warrant proposed to be prepared by the Navy Commissioners—for the Duke to sign—to the officers of the several yards and docks, to save all such old ropes, cables, and other stuff as have been used for junk by his Majesty's gunners, and to deliver the same to the several storekeepers or other persons appointed, either to be used at sea or laid up, his Royal Highness being sensible of the great want there was of this commodity in the late war. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Aug. Petition of Rose, relict of John Braman, locksmith at Deptford and Woolwich, to the Navy Commissioners, to be continued in her husband's place, or paid 300l. due on bills signed by them. Her husband purchased the place at a dear rate, and was forced, in the time of the war, to sell many bills at a loss of 40 or 50 per cent., so as to raise money to carry on the service. For two years before his death, he supplied all demands to the yards, which she has done since, and the officers are ready to testify that the work was never done better than by the men she employs; nevertheless one Mr. Ashworth seeks to surmount her in that business. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Aug. Petition of Ralph Frary, master of the John's Advice of London, to the Navy Commissioners, that no demur may be made to the signing and passing of his bill, at the price of his contract. Has served in the deals contracted for, and received a bill, but objection has been raised against their thickness. Never undertook for their being more than from 1 inch to 1½ inch thick, so hopes he shall not suffer by it, particularly as many of them exceed his contract for length, breadth, and thickness, and are worth three times the price. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 57.]
Aug. Petition of Jno. Howting, porter of Chatham Yard, to the Navy Commissioners, for continuance of his usual allowance. Has served as porter, &c., for 29 years, and notwithstanding his Royal Highness's warrant allowing him the same pay and privileges as his predecessors, has been discouraged by 6l. a year being taken off, although his duties have been increased. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Aug. List of stores demanded by Sir Edw. Spragg, Sir Thos. Allin, and Capt. Amos Beare, from 15 May to 13 Aug. 1670. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 58a.]
Aug. ? Petition of Anne Laugharne to Lord Arlington, for relief for her poor husband, who has been ill 8 weeks, and in want of all things; has been obliged to pawn his cloak and sword, and has only 3s. in the world. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 82.]
Aug. ? Petition of Ralph Salkeld to the King, for a reprieve in case he shall be convicted of murder or manslaughter at the next assizes at Newcastle. Five years since, while at Newcastle, accidentally met with Rich. Ogle, of Eglingham, Northumberland, and being provoked and drawn upon by him, he in his own defence, wounded Ogle in the arm, by which, and through neglect, he bled to death. Petitioner has since served his Majesty throughout the Dutch war, and has lost an arm; notwithstanding that he is now maliciously and designedly prosecuted, hopes that the judges and the rest of the bench will be able to give an account agreeable to this statement. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Aug. ? Warrant to change the time of paying 2,000l., quarter of the salary of 8,000l., granted to Sec. Trevor, to October and November, instead of Michaelmas, 1670, he being willing to wait till then, and to pay him for the two intermediate months from the customs. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Aug. [20]
Court at Whitehall.
Orders to Lord Chief Justice John Kelynge, and to Sir Wm. Wilde, Justice of Common Pleas, to appear before Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, Lord Chief Justice in Eyre south of Trent, on 30 Sept. next, to advise him in the holding a justice seat for Waltham Forest, at Stratford Longthorne, Essex. [Ibid. Nos. 85, 86.]
Aug. [20]
Court at Whitehall.
Like orders to Sir John Vaughan, Chief Justice, and Sir Thos. Archer, Justice of Common Pleas, to attend the said Earl in holding a justice seat for the New Forest at Lyndhurst, Hants, on 15 Sept. next. [Ibid. Nos. 87, 88.]
Aug. Grant to the Earl of Bedford and John and William Russell, of pensions in trust for the Earl and Countess of Bristol, and Fras. Digby, the same as that of 30 June, only stating the first pension as 2,000l. instead of 200l. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 212.]
Aug. Warrant to imprest to the Duke of York 1,000l. for the maintenance of the forts and garrisons at New York. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to William Ashburnham, Cofferer of the Household, 100,000l., for the household expenses for a year, from Oct. 1670 to 1671, and 10,000l. for interest of money to be borrowed for the like service; also 9,925l., for money for several services, and 2,000l. for interest thereon while borrowed. [Ibid.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to William, Lord Crofts, 1,500l., in full satisfaction of all arrears of a pension of 1,000l. a year. [Ibid.]
Aug. Grant to the Bailiffs, &c., of Bridport, co. Dorset, of full power to repair their harbour walls, piers, and sluices, and erect a new harbour in or before the said port, together with the ground whereon such harbour has been or shall be erected. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to Lord Arlington, Principal Secretary of State, 4,000l. for secret service. [Ibid. No. 216.]
[Aug.] Grant to E[dw.] V[illiers] of the office of keeper and captain of Tynemouth Castle, void by death of Josceline, late Earl of Northumberland, with the salary of 231l. 5s. a year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 89. See p. 302 supra.]
Aug. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 217.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to Sir Thos. Osborne and Sir Thos. Littleton, Barts., Navy Treasurers, 200,000l. on account for the use of the Navy. [Ibid. No. 218.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to Sir Wm. Poultney 400l. without account, for purchase of the interest of a house at St. James's, adjoining Berkshire House. [Ibid.]
Aug. Grant to Edw. Progers, groom of the bedchamber, of the goods and chattels of Jos. Garrett, steward of the Earl of Holland, forfeited by his outlawry, viz., goods value 93l. 2s. 9d., two judgments for 3,000l. due from the Earl, a bill of 10l., and a bond of 80l. for payment of 40l. [Ibid. No. 220.]
Aug. Confirmation of a grant made by the trustees appointed by Parliament for sale of the lands, &c., of Sir John Prettyman, receiver of first fruits and tenths within the kingdom of England, to Thos. Waller, serjeant at law, and Nic. Smith, of 4,000l. forfeited to the King on Sir J. Prettyman's recognizance; 2,000l. on the recognizance of his son, Sir Geo. Prettyman, Bart.; and 1,600l. in arrear on Sir John's account; also grant to Alex. Stanhope and John Rudyard, in trust for the said Waller and Smith, of the manor of Loddington, seized into the King's hands for satisfaction of those debts. [Ibid. No. 221.]
Aug. Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners to order the woodward of New Forest, co. Hants, to pay to Philip Packer, paymaster of the works, 1,500l. raised by sale of tops and lops, to be employed in rebuilding the King's stables at Lyndhurst, co. Hants, and 1,500l. on account for the said service. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 222.]
Aug. Demise to Wm. Bucknall, and 6 others, in consideration for 35,000l. advanced, of all the duties of excise payable to his Majesty on beer, ale, or other excisable liquors, made, sold, or imported in London, Westminster, Southwark, and Middlesex, except the borough of South Mimms, for 3 years from Midsummer 1671, on rent of 14,000l. a year for 2½ years, and 35,000l. the last half-year, to be paid in equal monthly payments. [Ibid. No. 223.]
Aug. Warrant to levy tallies of assignment for 22,240l., charged upon Thos. Waller and Nic. Smith, payable to Baptist May for the use of the privy purse. [Ibid. No. 224.]
Aug. Warrant to pay to Edw. Backwell 2,900l. for jewels bought for the King. [Ibid. No. 226.]
Aug. Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners to issue 10,000l. to such persons as the King shall direct. [Ibid.]
Aug. Warrant to pay 2,000l. to Rich. Mason, for the equipage of the Duke of Buckingham, whom the King sent to the King of France; also 300l. to Wm. Stanley sent to the Duke of Orleans. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Aug. Grant to the Mayor and burgesses of the borough of Hertford of all fines, &c., arising from convictions on the Act for preventing and suppressing seditious conventicles within the borough and county of Hertford, before 29 July last. [Ibid. No. 228.]
Aug.
Windsor.
Letter to the High Sheriff of Leicestershire, or his deputy, to levy a fine of 500l. imposed upon —Richardson for forgery, and to pay the same to Thos. Elliott. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 55.]
Aug.
Windsor.
Presentation of Dr. Ezerel Tonge to the rectory of Broadwater, Sussex. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 9.]
Aug. Joseph Binckes to Lord Arlington. Notwithstanding the care taken and vigilance used every Lord's day by the justices and soldiery, the people still persist in their obstinate course of meeting, and persuade each other of the hope of some strange catastrophe or sudden change. What that change is I cannot determine, but I am sure of this, if they had the power, his Majesty should soon find and feel it.
The author of a pamphlet enclosed had his life spared by his Majesty some time since, yet in contempt, he frequents this city; your lordship may easily judge his business. I want a supply of money, having been much hindered in doing my duty, by getting into trouble for debt. Your predecessor, Sir Edw. Nicholas, allowed me 20s. a week, which was regularly paid me by Mr. Williamson, and when he discharged me of this duty, he gave me 10l.; so I hope to find an example of his goodness in your lordship, when I will write more, and submit myself to your disposal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 89a.]
Aug. ? Blank commission nominating Commissioners on the part of England to consult with those of Scotland on the Union, and draw up instruments tripartite for approval of his Majesty and the two Parliaments, and to meet on 14 Sept. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 90.] Enclosing,
List of 25 English Commissioners appointed to treat of the union between the two kingdoms; 13 to be a quorum. [Ibid. No. 90i.]
List of 25 Scottish Commissioners; 13 to be a quorum. [Ibid. No. 90ii.]
Aug. ? Draft of the above commission. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 91.]
Aug. ? Bond to be given by heritors and life renters to the [Scottish] Council, that neither they, their wives and bairns, nor their tenants and cotters will be present at conventicles or disorderly meetings, but live in obedience to the law, hold no intercourse with forfeited persons, ministers, or vagrant preachers, but try to apprehend and present them to the judge, to be fined and imprisoned. [Ibid. No. 91a.]
Aug.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind:—
Vol. 278. No. Date. King's. Merchants'. Wind. Remarks.
92 Aug. 1 1 1 S.W.
93 " 3 3 N.
94 " 4 4 N.E.
95 " 5 2 N.E.
96 " 6 1 N.E.
97 " 7 3 S.
98 " 9 3 N.
99 " 10 5 N.W.
100 " 16 2 N.E. Stormy weather.
101 " 18 1 S.E.
102 " 19 1 S.E.
103 " 20 4 S.S.W.
104 " 21 2 1 N.N.W.
105 " 23 2 6 W.
106 " 24 2 11 N.W.
107 " 27 2 11 S.S.W.
108 " 28 2 11 S.W.
109 " 29 2 12
110 " 30 3 15 W.S.W.
111 " 31 12 S.W. Stormy weather.