BHO

Charles II: September 1670

Pages 408-465

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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September 1670

Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
Rob. Yard to [Williamson]. Going to Hampton Court to wait on Father Patrick, I met him 2 miles from Kingston with the Queen, on her way to Roehampton to dine with the Countess of Devonshire. I went with them, and he told me that the King and the whole Court would be at Hampton Court by Saturday, and intended staying there with the Queen until Monday, and then returning to Whitehall, and that you might go there on Sunday if you had then returned to town.
The Earl of Essex with his lady has come to town, and the Duke of Buckingham is hourly, and by some impatiently, expected. I sent extracts of the French and Flanders letters to my Lord and Mr. Treasurer, but they furnish little news. The Venetian Ambassador is preparing to return home. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 112.]
Sept. 1. Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I communicated your letter to Sir Thos. Bludworth, and would have done what you desired myself, had I not had to wait on the Lord Keeper in the country with Mr. Avery, the town clerk, about putting Mr. Kiffin from being sheriff, which we have performed; the other sheriff will be put to the test on Tuesday before the Lord Mayor and aldermen. We heartily wished for you at the Artillery feast on Tuesday. I hope to hear that you have been with your sister at Farming Woods, and suppose you will return shortly, as the King will be home on Monday. [Ibid. No. 113.] Enclosing,
Sir J. Robinson to Lord Arlington. His Majesty's advertisement at the Council to the Lord Mayor and aldermen has made them more circumspect in doing their duty than heretofore, and there has not been a public meeting in the Hamlets save those of the Quakers; if they do not rid my quarters of them, I will pull down their house.
I am sorry his Majesty has not been supplied with the 60,000l. promised by the City, but I was then sick, and afterwards went into the country. The Lord Mayor failed in methodising that business. Since my return, I have been in my own ward, and got so much lent that, if every other ward had done the like, the 60,000l. would have been trebled; but several who should have promoted the business have dissuaded their friends. I hear the Nonconformists are for persuading their friends to lend, and hope they will, as it will be the first good thing I have ever known that faction produce.
I have finished the muster of all the trained bands, and find the 6 City regiments contain 8,000 men, the 2 for the Hamlets 3,000, and the one for Southwark 1,500; but a general muster is desired, which would increase the arms, as they now borrow of one another. The Lord Mayor has summoned the 2 sheriffs-elect before a court of aldermen, so as to know whether they will perform what the law requires, —28 Aug. [Copy. Ibid. No. 113i.]
Sept. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news at present. [Ibid. No. 113a.
Sept. 1.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. One of Sir John Frederick's ships of London, which was reported to have been captured by some Sally men, and retaken by the Roe ketch, has arrived in the Downs. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Sept. 1. Licence for John James of Trippleton, co. Hereford, to remain in and about London and Westminster, though an officer in the army of the late usurped powers. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Sir Dan. Harvey, Ambassador. We approve your proceedings in obtaining the reimbursement of a present made by Mr. Carewes to the Capt. Bashaw, which the Consul repaid to Mr. Carewes, but it was returned by your lordship's means. Thanks for your determination to suppress the circulation of base coin; we hope the Turks have become sensible of the damage which will accrue to themselves by entertaining such money.
We notice your unexpected call to the audience, and your journey to Salonica, also your intentions to renew the capitulations; we are satisfied with what the factors wish inserted, provided the clause stating that the Cadi and not the Bashaw shall decide differences between the English and the Grand Seignior's subjects be no prejudice to the English right of appeal to Constantinople. Also provided that the Missiteriai and petty charges there be taken off or reduced.
Thanks for your supplying Sir Clement Harby with a commission and authority to act at the Morea, as also for information about the dragomen and giovanni di lingua. We agree to enlarge the salary of Signor Antonio Perone to 400 dollars a year. We also agree to Signor Nicolo Draperijs and Signor Demetrasco Timone being appointed dragomen, with 100 dollars apiece added to their allowance, making it 200 dollars a year, payable during pleasure, as Signor Zamback is superannuated, and Signor Georgio also well in years; but no other persons are to be chosen in their stead on their decease, as 3 dragomen and 3 giovanni di lingua are sufficient, although 4 of each, who are named, are now allowed. We doubt whether Georgio's son, the young dragoman at Smyrna, can be spared from there.
We are sensible of the disrespect shown by our treasurer at Smyrna by leaving his place without notice, but have sent Richard Hardy to succeed him. We have given him and Dudley North, who is elected Treasurer at Constantinople, instructions for the management of affairs; we beg you to administer the usual oath to the latter. We send John Colvill, Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, recommended by the Attorney-General, as chaplain for Constantinople.
We have received great complaints of an abuse in the over-lading of ships in Turkey—especially at Smyrna—by the commanders, for their own interest, whereby they scarcely leave room for a gun on deck, and so are exposed to the rapine of any ship they may encounter; we have ordered the Consul and others at Smyrna to visit each ship, and if any are found over-laden to protest against the commanders, and certify the same, when such commanders will be incapacitated from serving in future. We have ordered the same course to be taken at Scanderoon, and beg your encouragement.
We have been exposed for many years to great trouble, by the foul condition of the raw silk brought from Turkey; a remedy has often been attempted, but frustrated. We ask your endeavours with the Consul and the French and Dutch ministers at Smyrna, to effect a remedy, and gain a full allowance of tare, which may be done by enjoining the factors, out of each parcel they buy, to clean a portion, and according to that to estimate the tare of the whole parcel. It is a thing of great importance to be accomplished, not merely to the company, but also to the other Frank nations.
Your letter of 1 July gives abundant satisfaction of your care of our concerns, by using all means to discourage the importation of base money, and seconding our order as to auditing the treasurer's accounts at Smyrna, Constantinople, and Aleppo; and more especially by your active proceedings about the English cloth brought to Smyrna by the Dutch convoy, and the method you used for discovering the proprietors and recovering the books. Pray pursue the same course, and so give a check to such a secret and irregular way of trading, which unless prevented, will ruin our trade. [S.P. For., Levant 5, p. 233.]
Sept. 1. Levant Company to Consul Ricaut, Smyrna. Your inability to obtain the 3 or 4 years' arrears due from Mr. Edwards' house, for consulage of strangers' goods on strangers' vessels, has been communicated to a general court who,—taking notice of the unreasonableness of the refusal to pay, and seeing that the house gains considerable advantage and profit by their trade, wherein they have the company's protection, and the latter no kind of benefit, but a hazard of their privileges, and probable diminution of trade and of the English navigation—have resolved that you be instructed to use all means to enforce payment, or inflict the penalty in default.
We notice your attempts for regulating the value of money, although a stop has been put to them, and hope the false moneys imported have been suppressed; as to other coins allowed to pass current, we presume the factors will agree not to be deluded into taking any sort above its intrinsic value, and hope you will be still watchful and diligent in preventing the importation of false coin, which there is still some cause to fear, from its circulation in Marseilles, Genoa, and other places. We have a better opinion and confidence of your integrity than to think that you would be unfaithful as to the moneys imported by the Genoa merchants. We approve your method for redressing the abuses in raw silk, and are sorry it has been frustrated by the transgressions of particular individuals, which you ascribe to the French; we have been informed that none are more faulty than the English who, if they had persisted but a few weeks longer, would have effected the business. Pray resume the matter when favourable, and disperse the rumour in Persia; you are to oblige the factors either to comply, or else to stand liable to their principals for damage.
We repeat our directions as to examining and reporting ships overladen by the commanders for their own gain. We received the accounts of Richard Langley, the late treasurer, and enclose a list of exceptions to them; we were displeased at his deserting the charge without notice, but have sent Richard Hardy to succeed him, and have obliged him to furnish his accounts every 3 months. Upon the petition of Paulo Homero, we have appointed him and his brother Panarett of Smyrna young dragomen, at 100 dollars a year each. Ask whether Signor Georgio's son can be sent to the Ambassador at Constantinople.
We approve the broke taken on 2 bales of cloth brought by the Friendship, and urge you to take the same course in all similar cases, and discover if possible all cloth imported by private ships, particularly by the Dutch convoy; we hear that great quantities have been sent by the Alice and Francis and other ships; such private trading under colourable pretences is a huge disappointment and bane to the company's trade. We desire you to see that the various treasurers in their accounts state all the ordinary presents, and place the extraordinaries apart, having of late years had much trouble in passing those of Turkey, because of extraordinaries. We send, as the second gift from the Governor, Sir And. Riccard, a Lexicon Heptaglotton in 2 vols.; also Math. Poole's Synopsis Criticorum, to be added to the Polyglot Bible in the company's library, which you are to have chained as the former, and to furnish an inventory of the company's books to Philip Treherne, who is coming out as minister.
On the arrival of the general ships, you are to take and send an account of the number of men in each, so that it may be seen whether they perform their contract, whereof Mr. Hardy has a copy; and you are to be careful not to be imposed upon by their lending men to each other, to make up their numbers. The ships bring great quantities of cloth, which it is hoped belong to freemen or such as have liberty to trade, or else to apprentices going over with an adventure licensed by the company, of whom you are to take their oath that the same is for no other account than their own; and if you discover any interlopers, they are to pay the broke. To encourage you to do your duty, we have ordered you a gratuity of 1,000 dollars, and 200l. to the commander of the convoy. We judge it better for the present to allow protection to any ship bearing English colours and paying consulage. The extra consulage due by the Amity, because freighted higher than the prescribed rates, is to be remitted. [S.P. For., Levant 5, p. 237.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Rich. Langley. Your letters would have been answered, had you not resigned your place of treasurer; as the place was conferred upon you as a sign of our respect, we consider that that alone might have obliged you not to have deserted it so precipitately, and left our affairs in such confusion. We have sent out Richard Hardy as your successor. We have sent the Consul a list of exceptions taken to your account; we find there was no want of money, you having 4,000 dollars in cash, besides the errors in account. We expect your other account the first opportunity. [Ibid. p. 241.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Consul Lannoy. We have been much concerned in your fears and sufferings by the late dreadful visitation, and the death of so many; we congratulate you and others on your providential return to your habitations. We perceive that the mischief arising by the importation of false moneys is at last resented by the Turks on the French, who have been the chief importers, as at Sidon and Cyprus; we hope it will be the means of suppression of such coin; we are informed that other sorts are being prepared at Marseilles, Genoa, and other places, to be carried into Turkey. We hope you will use all endeavours to prevent it.
We expect further news about the French ship with Abokelps from Marseilles, which you write that those ministers intended to have seized had they been landed. We received the treasurer's accounts to Feb. 1670; we attribute it to your care that we have such a balance of cash; we have ordered the treasurer either to allow 10 per cent. upon it, or to lend it out in some secure way for the company's advantage. The refusal of the factors to peruse and certify the treasurers' accounts is a contempt we will not admit of; if any again refuse, their names are to be sent, when they will be debarred the liberty of trading on their own account.
We enclose a copy of articles entered into with the factor marine; his business has been managed in his absence by Francis Edwards, who has supplied manifests of ships laden.
We have not yet appointed a Consul at Cyprus; we have selected Thomas Hunt as treasurer for Aleppo; also Robert Huntington, Fellow of Merton College, Oxon, as minister, in the place of Mr. Frampton, whose dismissal is sent at his own request.
We approve your proceedings in levying the broke upon 5 bales of cloth belonging to Messrs. Crundall and Dafforn, and desire vigilance in discovering such private practices of interlopers, as they very much abound.
We are sorry you are destitute of a burying-place; if you find no other more convenient, you may agree for the one mentioned at 150 dollars; but we think the rule adopted at Smyrna, of taking a duty of 5 dollars for every person buried, ought to be carried out, and the same placed to the company's account, until the purchase money shall be reimbursed.
We approve your agreement to prevent foulness in raw silk and goats' wool, and hope it will be observed. The treasurer's accounts being overcharged, ask him to see that our instructions to Mr. Hunt are carried out. The Turkey Merchant and the Thomas and Francis are returning with the general ships for Scanderoon; if it is found they have any lading beyond what is mentioned in certain lists, you are to levy a broke upon it.
We have sent a new triangle, with a beam, scales, and brass weights, and 5 cwt. in lead; also a set of brass weights, to remain as a standard at Scanderoon, and have ordered the factor marine to dispose of the old one. We approve your proceedings touching 40 barrels of tin belonging to Lancelot Hobson, brought to London by the Zante frigate; but Mr. Hobson having given satisfaction with regard to a mistake made, and paid the duties, we have acquitted him of the fine.
We allow of your protecting foreign ships with English colours, supposing it to be in accordance with the capitulations, as well as the honour of the English nation, although there may be some danger in it; but only on condition that they pay the company's consulage and that if any avania be occasioned by such ships, the ship and persons may be liable, and pay it before departure. [3¼ pages S.P. For., Levant 5, p. 242.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Martin Loe. We hope you will see to the lading of the Turkey Merchant and the Thomas and Francis, on their arrival at Smyrna; we have sent the new triangle, scales, and weights required. Capt Bates, commander of the Mary and Martha, having refused to sign 4 bills of lading, alleging that 3 only were required, you are to let the tenour of bills of lading run for 4 instead of 3 for the future. Fras. Edwards has supplied the manifests of ships laden during your absence, but they shall for the future depend upon you; we request you to see that ships are not pestered or overladen with goods for the commanders' private interest, and that they carry their complement of men. [S.P. For., Levant 5, p. 245.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Ro. Frampton, minister. Although the factory are sensible of their loss in your departure from them as their minister, we have no reason, after your abode there so many years, but to comply with your desire of returning to your native country, and have appointed Robert Huntington, of Merton College, Oxford, as your successor. We will answer the other parts of your letter on your arrival in England. [Ibid. p. 247.]
Sept. 1.
London.
Levant Company to Dudley North. You having been elected treasurer at Constantinople, we hope you will discharge the duties of the office faithfully; whereto you are engaged by the oath which the Lord Ambassador there will administer to you, and by the security of your friends in London. [Ibid. p. 249.] Enclosing,
Instructions to Dudley North, treasurer at Constantinople, and assignee of Mr. Hedges, the late treasurer. You are to use all care and diligence in collecting and disbursing money, and render an account under the hands of 3 of the factors every 6 months; to avoid taking up money in Turkey; to pay the salary of the minister,—200 dollars a year, and 200 more by way of gratuity,—which is not to be exceeded, the minister having diet and lodging for himself and servant in his lordship's (Sir D. Harvey's) house. All payments are to be made in lion dollars or their value, and no person but the Ambassador is to be paid in weighty dollars. Repetition of their resolution as to the number and salary of the dragomen and giovanni di lingua. [Ibid. p. 247.]
Sept. 1. Instructions by the Levant Company to Rich. Hardy, on his appointment as treasurer for Smyrna. Upon your arrival you are to deliver our letters to the Consul, who is managing the treasurer's business, and demand the balance and accounts, and enter upon the employment; to use all diligence in collecting duties, and preventing the fraudulent practices of factors and masters of ships; to receive from each factor an account of all his consignments, and have them entered and signed in books to be kept by you, on penalty of double consulage to be levied on such goods as are not entered, or entered falsely; to send home copies of such entries, and give each factor a receipt for all duties paid, according to a form given, which receipt the factor is to send to his principal, and without which he is not to be entitled to any allowance for consulage or other duty.
To use all care in collecting and disbursing money, and not pay particular sums without order; to avoid taking up money in Turkey; we have made provision for 25,500 dollars for the supply of Smyrna and Constantinople, which our former treasurer had order to receive gradually as wanted, and to charge the same upon the treasurer in London, by bills of exchange at 4 months after the rate of 4s. 6d. the lion dollar; this method you are to observe, sending lists of bills, and observing certain directions. Orders as to the allowance made to the minister. You are to observe the regulations concerning the import of English cloth and woollen manufactures upon other than general ships, on penalty of 20 per cent., and to see that the company are not made liable for particular avanias.
Also to furnish an account, under the hands of 2 or 3 of the factory, every 3 months, and to pay the consul 1,000 dollars as a gratuity for his pains the year past. [S.P. For. Levant 5, p. 249.]
Sept. 1. Instructions by the Levant Company to Thos. Hunt on his appointment as treasurer at Aleppo. On arriving there, you are to deliver our letters to the Consul, take possession of the balance and accounts, and enter upon your duties. As you are 10,000 dollars cash in hand, you are to allow the company 10 per cent., or consult with the Consul and factors as to lending out the same to advantage; if ever necessitated to take up money for the company's service, you are to charge no more than I per cent. a month for interest. We shall expect your accounts, certified by some of the factors, every 6 months; you are to place extraordinary presents on a separate list. Also to prevent the irregular trading of interlopers; the secret importation of cloth on other than general ships; the importation of false money, avanias, &c.; and otherwise carefully observe the company's orders. We have ordered a gratuity to be given to the commander of his Majesty's ship that goes as convoy to Scanderoon, which you are to see paid. [Ibid. p. 252.]
Sept. 1.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish and J. Uthwat to the Navy Commissioners. We presume Major Bourne's deals might be pricked 2 inches, though they are not more than 1¾ inches thick, but those of the other merchants answer contract. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 59.]
Sept. 1.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. In my letter of 11 Aug. I sent my bill for 161l. 11s. 3d. I intreat that it may be punctually answered; I can say without vanity that my great zeal and diligence in serving his Majesty merit all good correspondence from his ministers. Thanks for your letter of 21 July, which found me at Florence, where I had several urgent occasions, some of which related to the service; also for the ready acceptance given to my bills amounting to 821l. 6s. I doubt not they will be answered at the time.
I am confident it will be found that his Majesty was served to the greatest advantage in the price of all things. I will observe your directions as to transmitting future accounts, and as to the time for making my bills payable, although it has been customary to make them so at sight, or in 10 days at most.
I observe what you write as to my delivering provisions at Port Mahon, free of charge, and will oblige myself to deliver any quantity at 9½d. per man per day, but shall desire two months to get things ready; also an order that one or more of his Majesty's frigates may convoy such ships as I shall despatch with provisions, so as to prevent any disappointment to the fleet, which would be very fatal and ruinous to their designs. I shall likewise desire an order to pass my bills for half their value, and to draw the remainder upon producing my receipts of the delivery at Port Mahon, where the storekeeper or some other person must receive the provisions and issue receipts. I will deliver the biscuit by weight, and the other things shall have their contents and quality marked upon the casks.
I am confident that my proposition will, for reasons mentioned, prove more advantageous to his Majesty than sending provisions from England, while they will be fresher and more wholesome'; and I shall demand no more than is made good to the victualler, although they are more chargeable at Port Mahon. For my better government I beg a speedy answer, as no time must be lost in the affair. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 60.]
Sept. 1.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to the Navy Commissioners. If the 2,000 iron hoops for the Straits' fleet had arrived earlier, they could have been shipped in a hoy bound to the Downs with provisions for the Greenwich. I am at a loss how to send them on board the Bantam. Pray send to one of the captains of the Turkey ships on the Exchange, to take and deliver them to the Bantam in the Downs, and advise me what ship will do so. They weigh 4 tons 7 cwt. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Sept. 1.
The Punny prize, Downs.
Capt. Thos. Foulis to the Navy Commissioners. I have arrived with the prize taken from Sally, with Lord Howard's goods in her, and will bring her into the river. I want an order to the victualler for a supply of provisions, having but sufficient for 4 days on board. I have the same crew I had in the ketch, as it was Lord Howard's pleasure that all should continue in the Punny. I have been 2 weeks and 4 days coming from Cadiz, and came out with 24 sail of English and Dutch ships, who were convoyed by 2 Dutch menof-war. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Sept. 1. Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. I send the names of 20 merchants whom I have invited to make tenders to you for supplying timber and other provisions for the Navy, distinguishing those "below the bridge." [Ibid. No. 63.]
Sept. 1. Anne Woodcock to Pepys. Pray move the Treasurers for payment of a ticket enclosed, belonging to Wm. Coe, boatswain of the Charles fireship, who is lying in Maidstone gaol in most miserable distress, and his wife is lying in child-bed, and ready to perish. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Sept. 2.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I received your order about 14 days' provisions for each frigate from Dover, and have employed the steward to see it despatched on board. The coopers hope they will have their extra stores, which may be obtained from some of the convoys, but the purser should have got them himself. As to the other things that Mr. Wren speaks about, I leave it to your judgment, and doubt not, if it is convenient, they will be despatched. Only 2 small vessels have yet come down, and the fifth day draws on apace. I send a letter received from the officer at Dover, and leave it to you to send the provisions some other way. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 65.] Encloses,
John Milford, victualling agent, to Capt. Rob. Robinson. I have not any biscuit, beef, or pork in store to answer your demand, but as I expect my master, Mr. Wivell, from London to-night, I suppose, as he is acquainted with the orders, he will be able to make further provision.—Dover, 1 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 65i.]
Sept. 2.
Eaglet ketch.
Capt. Jeffry Peirse to the Navy Commissioners. We sailed this day out of the Downs, and hope God will continue the fair wind, and send us a happy and successful voyage. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Sept. 2.
Chatham.
John Ruffhead to the Navy Commissioners. Let an allowance be made in my next bill for the advance of 1l. per ton in Spanish iron, as it was agreed to be given by my contract. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Sept. 2.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Has no news to send. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 115.]
Sept. 2.
West Chaldfield.
John Eyre to the Bishop of Salisbury. I send you the several informations relating to the great disorders committed in these parts, so that you might be the better assured of particulars suggested in a former letter. I wish you could give some probability of a conformity, but I am convinced, with many others, that there must be something more than these country officers to suppress them and their meetings, which will be found, by the informations, to increase.
I held a petty sessions with Sir Edw. Hungerford, our greatest design being to receive the constables' presentments, and information of persons who absented themselves from their parish churches. We found, as we have often done before, that the officers were more ready to perjure themselves than give true presentments, by which your lordship may judge that the tumultuous meetings will hardly be suppressed by neighbouring officers. Many distresses have been made against those convicted, and the things were offered for sale in the markets and fairs, yet not one penny has been bid, but by way of a sneer; as 6d. or 13½d. for a cow, and such like, save what I bought myself, without occasion, but chiefly to encourage others. Since this Capt. Hen. Long, of Rood Ashton, has bought, and has been very active in suppressing meetings, of which he will give you an account, and we will observe your lordship's commands. Endorsed, "Mr. Eyre's answer to the Bishop, concerning the grounds of his letter to Sir John Talbot." [Ibid. No. 116. See 11 Aug., p 369, supra.] Annexing,
Information of Henry Munnings of Culhorne, co. Wilts, victualler, before John Eyre. Having received a warrant from Eyre to distrain for 15s. on the goods of Jno. Hand, also of Culhorne, who was convicted for being present at a conventicle held 24 July at the house of Sara Clement, at Ditcheridge, went to Hand's house, and demanded the money; but he refusing, distrained his mare, and as he was going away with it, Hand's daughter remarked in a scoffing manner that it was a wise Parliament that made such a law, to which her father replied, it was their time now, but it would not hold long. Thos. Blanchard of St. Catherine, co. Gloucester, afterwards went to the informant's house, and told him he had undone himself by distraining Hand's mare, and that he would fetch her again, and would have no more to do with him, as he did not entertain such rogues and knaves as informers were.—28 Aug. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 116i.]
Sept. 2.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Welcome from Bantam has buried 50 out of 70 men which she carried out, and the survivors lay much blame to the master, because he would not stop at any. port, having been leaky for 7 months, and the pumps perpetually going the whole of that time. She is manned with Dutch and Mulattoes, and has above 400 tons of the East India Company's goods in her; 14 merchant ships outward bound have sailed, but the men-of-war and Virginia ships lie fast. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Sept. 2.
Malton.
Wm. Palmes to Williamson. I hope my cousin Mouldsworth has returned thanks for me for your last favour, which I will complete when I come to town. The bearer, Thos. Ellis, has been active in suppressing conventicles at Whitby, where he resides; I believe the contents of his petition to be true, and it is attested by several persons of quality in these parts; pray advise and assist him in it. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Sept. 3. Petition of Thos. Ellis, of Whitby, co. York, to the King for the gift of a meeting-house at Whitby, as a recompense for his trouble and charges in prosecuting delinquents, which will be a special means to prevent and suppress unlawful assemblies, and encourage him to proceed. Was the first in Whitby who endeavoured to put the Act against conventicles in execution, and has ridden many miles, and spent much time and money, in prosecuting offenders, who now, by shutting their doors, prevent a distress being made, and by alienating their goods, elude the law. Since the Act was passed, they have built a house at Whitby where they have had their meetings twice a week, and as the Act charges 20l. for every meeting permitted by the owners in their own houses, no person will own such house or challenge the ownership. [Ibid. No. 119.] Annexing,
Certificate by Sir Thos. Gower and 5 others, that the petitioner, has made several applications to be employed in expectation of the Act against conventiclers, at their own houses, and also at the general quarter sessions for the North Riding of York; also by Richard [Sterne], Archbishop of York, in favour of the petitioner.—3 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 119i.]
Sept. 3.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. The Mary of Weymouth, from Bordeaux, has sailed for London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 120.]
Sept. 3.
Weymouth.
Anth. Thorold to Hickes. The Jane of Weymouth, from St. Malo, Jersey, and Guernsey, has brought a French passenger of Dauphiné, adjoining Languedoc, who says there were 24,000 rebels there, commanded by Rocotelliat, a person in a rustic habit; he kept the river Rhone, running between Dauphiné and Languedoc. The Superintendent there commanded them to lay down their arms, which they did, keeping their order nevertheless, and addressed him through their commander, who declared himself to be a bastard, and knew not his name; they said that the cause of their rising was on account of the insupportable fines levied upon their provisions. They had several skirmishes with the royal forces, with loss on both sides, but the rebels kept their ground. There was not the number of Protestants among them reported to the King. The fleet at Brest, consisting of 17 sail, being fitted, was to sail to the coast of Portugal or elsewhere, but on what design is not known. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Sept. 3.
Whitehall.
Rob. Yard to Williamson. I received your letter from Careby, and hope you found mine on your return to Billing. Whitehall is ready for the King, the mourning taken away and other hangings put up; his Majesty is expected with Lord Arlington on Monday night, but it is thought he will not stay long. Nothing of importance has been done in the office since the King went to Windsor, save that Swaddell has written a treaty or agreement between Prince Rupert and his brother the Elector, on vellum, and returned it to Windsor. I send a letter from Ireland, whence it is reported that a Welsh pirate, with 2 small vessels, lay before their rivers, and hindered ships going in or out, has been taken. Sir Ellis Leighton intends for Ireland in 4 or 5 days. There is no news of the Duke of Buckingham's arrival from France. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 122.]
Sept. 3.
Kidl[ington].
Sir Wm. Morton to Williamson. Although indisposed through the death of my children, I must take a journey to Gloucester, to prevent a seditious faction growing up in that city. A Presbyterian party, headed by a discontented cavalier, are using their utmost to put by Dr. [Hen.] Fowler, physician and alderman, from being Mayor for the year ensuing, and to bring in one [Wm.] Bubb, who is unfit, lives out of town, and has declared that when he comes into power, he will crush the royal interest in Gloucester, while Dr Fowler is a very loyal person, and was wounded, imprisoned, and lost nearly all he had in fighting for Charles I.
Pray befriend the bearer, the present Mayor, who fought for the King, and has done all he can to prevent the growing faction, but cannot without help; get him access to Lord Arlington, so that he may procure a mandatory letter from the King to the Mayor, aldermen, and common council, to choose Dr. Fowler. I stay the Mayor's return, when I will go with him and the Bishop to Gloucester, and use my utmost to prevent the growing sedition. Poulter the Anabaptist, to whom I granted a warrant by Lord Arlington's instructions to pass up and down as a spy, has abused his office, and failed in bringing intelligence; there being many complaints against him, I beg you will take notice of it, and not let him have any more intelligence money until he has given satisfaction. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 123.]
Sept. 3.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Edw. Berkeley, Pill, Shaftesbury, Dorset. News-letter. To the same effect as those calendared in August. Also,
The Duke of Buckingham has gone to St. Germains to take his audience of congé. Mr. Stanley has had his, and been presented with a ring valued at between 250l. and 300l.
On the 20th, Sir John Harman, and the Dartmouth and a fireship, were in the bay, having been prevented by an easterly wind from their design of battering Sally.
Capt. Pierse, late of the Sapphire, arriving at Rye on 26 Aug., was taken prisoner by order of his Majesty, who, having on the 27th, ordered prosecution of all those who coined or vended farthings or halfpence, not silver, the Mayor and jurats of that place published an order restraining such abuses.
The Gloucester and Adventure, having been repaired and taken out of Portsmouth dock, the Dragon and Princess have been put in; the Reserve is fitted and rigged for a voyage.
The conventicles in Scotland have been very quiet since the passing of the Act, and his Grace [the Archbishop of St. Andrews] uses all fair means to bring their preachers to conformity, for which purpose meetings have been held between them and the Episcopal party, in presence of his Grace and the Council, which it is hoped may have some good effect.
Mr. Kiffin, who was very eminent in the late times, having been elected sheriff of London, has refused to serve.
A French patache has been employed by Sir Hugh Cholmeley at Genoa to fetch porcellano from Rome, for the mould at Tangiers. The galley building there for his Majesty will be ready in 2 months. Mr. Doddington is to continue his Majesty's Resident at Venice, as Viscount Fauconberg is coming to England.
The Duke of Lorraine is reported to be at Epinal Castle, and to have written a submissive letter to the French King, offering to surrender, which the soldiers are unwilling to believe, as it might ruin their great expectations from the invasion. After the Duke had made his escape to Epinal, the burghers of Nancy opened the gates to the French, when the Marquis de Floury and the intendants of the three bishoprics entered, and the day following seized upon Pont à Mousson, where Madame Lorraine was, whom they took. The Governor of Lombez expecting a siege in two days, resolved to give proofs of his fidelity to his Majesty. The Duke of Lorraine has escaped to Burgundy; it was feared that the French might march into the country, and spoil some forts not yet finished, under pretence of a pursuit, and that the country about Condé in Flanders was drowned, on the report of the marching of the French army to Peronne. Chevalier d'Harcourt has quitted the Duke's service because of his great benefices in France, and gone to Paris.
On 30 Aug. the Earl of Essex, having landed at Deal, came to London, and has gone to Windsor to wait on his Majesty. The King sent word to his officers of the works and wardrobe that he would be in town to-day, if the house could be ready for him.
Earl Middleton, Governor of Tangiers, having for greater security to the trade there caused two small brigantines to be armed and set out, a scuffle ensued between them and two ships of Genoa, who taking them for Turks, fought under a flag of defiance, until they having some men wounded, hoisted Genoa colours; they were forced by weather into Tarifa, where the Governor put some aboard the Genoese, to keep them from violence, but used the English very civilly.
Our envoys, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Saville, after receiving some extraordinary treats, left the Court of Florence, the former for Rome in the Great Duke's litter, and the other for Leghorn in his coach with 6 horses; as it was unusual for such persons to accept presents, the Duke presented them underhand, so as to avoid making a precedent.
The French would have obliged the Cantons in Switzerland to abstain from any alliance with any but themselves, but they asserted their freedom, and said as they would not break the league they made, so they would be bound to nothing beyond it. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 124.]
Sept. 3.
Malaga.
J. Colston to Williamson. Sir Thos. Allin came into Malaga with the Bristol, Nonsuch, and a fireship, and sailed again towards the Straits. He chased 2 Turkish men-of-war, and took a brigantine. A Frenchman from Giblatore [Gibraltar] reports that Capt. Beach took in there a Portugal prize, which he captured from the Turks; and also, with the assistance of the Hollanders, burnt and sunk 8 Turkish men-of-war. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 125.]
Sept. 3. Notes from the above. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Sept. 3.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to Col. Thos. Middleton. As the Dragon will be launched out of dry dock on Monday, pray send your warrant to the master attendant for docking some other ship in her room. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 68.]
Sept. 4.
The Portland, Downs.
Capt. John Hart to the Navy Commissioners. We have arrived from Cadiz with the Pearl, by Sir Thos. Allin's orders, and wait for further commands; our ship is so leaky that she makes a foot or more every glass, so that we are obliged to be continually pumping. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Sept. 4.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Earl of Bristol and his son, who bought the governorship of Deal Castle of Capt. Titus, have arrived, and were welcomed with 11 and 21 guns from the two castles; the Governor intends making that place his common residence. The fleet of merchant ships which sailed on Tuesday outward bound have been forced into the Downs, where there are 54 sail. The wind continues violent at S.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 127.]
Sept. 4.
Plymouth.
Jas. Blackborne to Hickes. The Earl of Bath is expected, having arrived in Exeter on Friday. [Ibid. No. 128.] Encloses,
List of 8 ships arrived at Plymouth from places named. [Ibid. No. 128i.]
Sept. 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Good Fame of New York has arrived for Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 129.]
Sept. 4.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. Nothing worth narrating has happened in this port. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Sept. 5.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. The Fountain and Forester, which convoyed the Iceland fishery, and several light colliers bound northwards, are at anchor in the roads. We had very tempestuous weather last week, when many colliers coming from the North were forced to heave part of their coals overboard. A book has been published, and is in great credit, called "Trap ad Crucem,' which contains the examinations of several persons before Sir Rich. Ford and others, concerning the late fires in the City. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Sept. 5.
Southampton.
J. Nicholls to Williamson. On calling to give you an account of the shallow result of my business depending before the Treasury Commissioners, I heard you were out of town, so hastened to Southampton, in order to my return to Jersey, but have not a fit wind. After many sufferings through the late troubles, I retired, and was employed in many voyages to and from France and Holland, until his Majesty's restoration, but have been confined in since, without a possibility of fastening on any durable station.
I thank you and Lord Arlington for obtaining his Majesty's reference on my petition, and attribute its failure to the prejudice existing against me by the ill management of Sir George Downing, who at last dismissed me by saying that it had been resolved I should have a place when one offered that I was fit for; this was not what I sued for, but the return of my money long since laid out for his Majesty's service. Sir George Downing refuses to return my papers. I beg protection from any harm he may attempt against me, and also assistance in getting back my petition and reference. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Sept. 5. "A true relation of the victory of his Majesty's fleet in the Mediterranean against the pirates of Algiers, extracted from letters of Sir Thos. Allin, Admiral in those seas, and from those of Sir Wm. Godolphin, Envoy Extraordinary to the Court of Spain, as also from a relation made by Herr Van Ghent, Admiral of the Dutch, and who assisted in the action," being to the same effect as the letter of Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson of 26 Aug.; also a list of the Algiers ships put on shore and burnt near Cape Spartel, viz.:
Flower Pot, Admiral, 44 guns and 400 men.
Tiger, Vice-Admiral, 44 guns and 400 men.
Leopard, Rear-Admiral, 44 guns and 380 men.
Date Tree, 40 guns and 360 men.
Shepherdess, 38 guns and 340 men.
Golden Rose, 38 guns and 330 men.
Printed by authority by T. Newcombe in the Savoy. [15 pages. Ibid. No. 133.]
Sept. 5.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to the Navy Commissioners. I have inquired of the most ancient officers in the yard touching the cleaning out of the ditch between the yard and the ground of Sir Rich. Browne, but cannot hear that it has been done these 30 years. The men in cleaning the wet dock raked out some weeds, and cleaned some part of the ditch on the King's side, and it is believed that Sir Richard then took it for granted that their doing some small matter to it was a precedent for the future. I beg pardon for my former mistake; I obtained my information from Sir Richard, who nevertheless is an honourable gentleman and a good neighbour, and willing to pay a moiety of the charge of cleaning the ditch; but he desires it may be done by the piece, and not by the day, as it will be cheaper and quicker. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 70.]
Sept. 5.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. Am I to send labourers aboard to unload the masts contracted to be delivered into the stores free of charge by Isaac Stockman ? Shall they be laid at Galley Creek, which belongs to a private person, but has been piled at the King's charge ? there are many old masts in store, which ought to be used up first. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Sept. 6.
Ordnance Office.
Edw. Sherburne and G. Wharton to the Navy Commissioners. We beg you, in pursuance of the Duke of York's order of 19 Aug. last, to send directions to the storekeepers of the yards at Deptford, Woolwich, and Chatham, to deliver to Mr. Cheltenham, our instrument at Chatham, and to Capt. Wm. Povey, our storekeeper at Woolwich, all the old ropes, cables, and other stuff fit to be made into junk, that we may have it in readiness to issue in parcels for the service, as occasion requires. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Sept. 6. Certificate by Capt. John Tinker, that Abel Wollard is a person of known loyalty and good affection to his Majesty; that he served as boatswain on board the Francis, is now on board the French Victory, and is anxious to remove into the Success, if her present boatswain leaves. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Sept. 6. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Request for a warrant directed to Deptford, for receipt of some knee and elm timber bought by him from Moses Helby, for use of the Dragon. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Sept. 6.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. We are in a military posture for the reception of the Earl of Bath, who arrives to-morrow, and lies to-night at Okehampton. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 134.]
Sept. 6. Caveat that no grant pass of the office of attorney for cos. Carnarvon, Anglesea, and Merioneth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 10.]
Sept. 7. Warrant to Thos. Dickson and Jo. Blundell, to apprehend Jeffry Millet and 4 others, for destroying game about Bagshot and Frimley, and bring them before Council. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Sept. 7.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Thomas and Elizabeth of London, with salmon, from Londonderry, has come in for pilchards, there being few of them in Ireland. The Plymouth has put to sea for France, and several others for the East. The French fleet is reported to be at sea; a vessel of Falmouth from France says she came through the Dutch fleet of 60 sail. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 135.]
Sept. 7. Thos. Holden to Hickes. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Sept. 7. Bishop of Salisbury to the justices of Warminster and Devizes, co. Wilts. His Majesty having been informed that, since the Act for the suppression and prevention of unlawful conventicles, divers great and outrageous meetings, upon pretence of religion, have been kept up within this diocese, and more particularly at Warminster and Devizes, to the hazard of the public peace and in open affront to the laws, has given me express commands to call upon the justices of this county, in his Majesty's name, to put the Act in execution; also to make particular inquiries concerning the grounds of the information which his Majesty has received, and what course has been taken for the due execution of the Act, and with what success, and give him an account.
I have inquired concerning the meetings, and find by the oaths of several persons, taken by John Eyre of Chaldfield, J.P., that they have been very frequent and numerous within the limits of your division; I therefore desire, by command of his Majesty, that you and the other justices be careful in putting the Act in execution, for the future, and that you render an account to me within 21 days, as to what has been done by you towards suppressing and preventing such unlawful meetings, so that I may be enabled to inform his Majesty thereof. Endorsed, "Sent upon the occasion of the informations transmitted to the Bishop by Mr. Eyre." [Copy. Ibid. No. 137.]
Sept. 7. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Let the Treasurers know that the Forester and Fountain have arrived in Yarmouth Roads, and have had orders to come to Deptford, so that they may provide money for paying them off, when his Royal Highness comes to town. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 75.]
Sept. 7.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. We have received the junk and the cooper's extra stores, and are hoisting in the recruit of provisions. The 6 Turkey ships are down, as also several for Portugal, Spain, and Italy, but Mr. Stacey lags with the ships of provisions and stores. When all is down, I will sail, and hope a fair wind and prosperous voyage, for the good of all concerned. [Ibid. No. 76.] Encloses,
List of 9 ships that have arrived, and of their commanders, together with the nature of their lading, and the places they are bound for. [Ibid. No. 76i.]
Sept 8.
Deptford.
Capt. Jno. Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. Let the Portland be sent to Chatham instead of to Deptford, as she is of great draught, will not go into the wet dock, and will ground if she lies out. The Forester and Fountain will fill up the dock when they arrive. I want an order to dock the Norfolk. Noted that it was nevertheless resolved by the Navy Board to send the Portland to Deptford, and that the surveyor undertook to direct it. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Sept. 8.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Copy of his letter of the 1st [See p. 415, supra]. Also:—I entreat you to be speedy and full in your reply, so that I may fall upon action, to prevent any inconvenience which a delay in a supply of provisions may be to the fleet, by which his Majesty hath too much suffered of late. There was a flying report at Leghorn that Sir Jno. Harman was gone to Genoa with several merchantmen, but it has been since contradicted, and we are advised from Alicant that he has gone for Carthagena, to take into his convoy the Smyrna factors, who are there, shearing of wools for Genoa, and that the Golden Fleece and the Italian and Leghorn merchantmen were with him. I am longing to hear some pleasing tidings from Sir Thos. Allin. [2 pages. S.P. Dom. Car. II. 285, No. 78.]
Sept. 8. Sir Jer. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. I received from Capt. Thos. Elliott of the Reserve a letter from his purser, complaining of the great want of provisions at Portsmouth, which he communicated to you the same day, since which I have received a further complaint from the lieutenant, and the purser having come up, also informs me that they are delivering beer in the harbour at the rate of 2 for 3, contrary to the contract and custom of the Navy, and much to the purser's injury, as the hold being open, the ship's company and other men at work on board drink what they please. With note of a promise of present remedy. [Ibid. No. 79.] Enclosing,
Thos. Baynham, purser of the Reserve, to Capt. Thos. Elliott, his commander. The victualler [at Portsmouth] has had 2 orders from Sir Denis Gauden for victualling our ship, but as Sir Denis owes him nearly 3,000l., he will not kill any more provision without the money for doing it; the brewer and baker have all their instruments fit for motion, but want money to set the wheels to work. I fear we must either have our 10 days' order lengthened, or victual elsewhere, as the season of the year requires despatch for the Canary fleet. I suppose the master will give an account of the condition of the ship; he and I intend going to the commissioner as to fitting her upper works.–1 Sept., Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 79i.]
Rob. Chambers, master of the Reserve, to Capt. Thos. Elliott. We shipped 27 of our guns yesterday, but it blew so hard they could only get 2 on board, and the shot; if fine, I hope to ship the remainder to-morrow, get the sails to the yards, and the ship ready to sail by the end of the week; but I am much hindered for want of men, and can get no provisions, unless Sir Denis Gauden or the Commissioner here sends some money. If we are not to victual at Portsmouth, I desire orders as to taking in some ballast, to enable us to sail.—4 Sept., the Reserve, Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 79ii.]
Sept. 8.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letter by Mr. Goodale, employed by Mr. Wood, and have spoken with the master of the flyboat, who will be ready to take the masts next week. I shall desire Mr. Wright of Ipswich to come once more, and set out what are fit to be transported, as he has the fame of having great skill in masts. I am induced to go to him by the paper enclosed, received from Capt. Deane, who sent the best away; so I think Wright will judge some of those left not worth the charge of transportation. I want a form of the bill of lading you desire me to take for their safe delivery at Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 285, No. 80.] Encloses,
Particulars of the condition of 89 Gottenburg and 40 other masts in the stores at Harwich.—8 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 80i.]
Sept. 8.
Lisbon.
Sir Edw. Spragg to Williamson. I went to Vigo, and cleaned my ship and the Warwick, and found a civil reception, by order from the "Governor-General of the country." On my way to Lisbon, where I sent the Garland to clean, I met the Phœnix of Apsom from Newfoundland, who saw a sloop off the Western Islands, that attended a French admiral man-of-war, which he reported had been lost by stress of weather. The Phoenix left the Kent and Swallow with their convoys at Newfoundland. I am going to Cadiz to join Sir Thos. Allin, and hear what news I can of the enemy; if I receive no commands, I shall return to guard my own station, and wait an opportunity of meeting the enemy, and doing what service I can with my small squadron, who are now clean enough to come up with the Turks if they appear. Mr. Parry is to have his audience to-day from the Court of Portugal. Remember me to Lord Arlington and Secretary Trevor, and ask Trevor to remember his promise to me for Parson Speed. [12/3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 138.]
Sept. 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Has no news to send, all things quiet. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Sept. 8.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Pearl and Portland have arrived in the Downs. The fleet of 80 merchant ships still continue here. [Ibid. No. 139a.]
Sept. 9.
Deal.
Same to the Same. The greater part of the fleet have been out of the Downs 2 or 3 times, but were forced in again; the Straits fleet has come down, and waits a fair wind. The Earl of Bristol is with the new Governor at Deal Castle; they say he keeps a very great house. I send a list of all the men-of-war of Algiers obtained from a merchant (missing). [Ibid. No. 140.]
Sept. 9.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for J. Blackborne] to Hickes. The Earl of Bath is at the Citadel. [Ibid. No. 141.] Enclosing,
Note of ships arrived, viz., the Lucretia of Foy with salt for Jamaica, and the Speedwell of London with wood. [Ibid. No. 141i.]
Sept. 9. Joseph Binckes to the King. I have furnished the Earl of Carlisle and Lord Arlington with divers informations of the proceedings of your Majesty's enemies, who only want an opportunity to show their treasonable conspiracies, which I trust I shall be able to prevent, by my diligent care and watchfulness over them. Having been entrusted and recommended by their lordships, I expect a suitable encouragement from them, otherwise I and my family must perish.
When Venner and his associates were working their design, I declared the same to your Majesty in the Park, when you asked me what opinion I owned, to which I replied that I owned no opinion, but faith and a good conscience, it being the manner of opinionists to destroy one another, and that my calling was that of a shoemaker. I am well remembered by the Duke of Ormond, though unhappily forgotten by your Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 142.]
Sept. 9. Sir Thos. Clarges to Williamson. I have been informed by the overseers of St. Martin's in the Fields, that a male child 4 years old was left desolate in the parish, and would have been starved to death, if a man had not taken him to his house, and relieved him; since which the overseers have provided for the child, and discovered the person that left him. I issued my warrant for a woman whose name they gave me, but all I could learn was that she found the child in Newgate Market, kept him a week, and had him cried, but failing to rid herself of him, she dropped him in the parish. I believe by the clothes that the child belongs to honest parents, who would be glad to hear of him, and that the wretch who stole him thought of getting a little money of his friends, or else she took him to steal some of his clothes. The overseers desire to have an inquiry made in the Gazette, and will pay the printer, by which means the parents may recover their child. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 143.]
Sept. 9. The King to [Christopher, 2nd Lord Hatton]. On 6 March 1665, we appointed Colonel, now Sir Jonathan Atkins, Commissary of Guernsey and Castle Cornet during the absence of Lord Hatton, whom we ordered to repair to our presence. Lord Hatton being since dead, and we having by patent of 2 May 1662 conveyed to you the reversion after him of the said government, we have ordered Atkins to deliver it up to you, in presence of Capt. Wm. Sheldon, Lieutenant-Governor there.
You are to acquaint the bailiffs, jurats, and magistrates, that we will preserve their privileges inviolably, and you are to observe the customs of the island, and the rules of your predecessor.
Atkins will also deliver up to you Col. John Lambert, whom you will dispose of according to further order. We are satisfied with Sir J. Atkins' government, and request you to treat him civilily.
With letters to like effect, mutatis mutandis, to the jurates of Guernsey, and to Col. Jonathan Atkins. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, pp. 55–57.]
Sept. 9. Caveat that no grant pass of the office of an auditor of the imprests in the Exchequer, the same being granted to Mr. Wilde in reversion. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 10.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant of assistance to Nicholas Orson of London, in his office of searcher to the Eastland Company, he having been much opposed of late, in searching and seizing goods imported contrary to the company's charter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 178.]
Sept. 9. Commission for Sir Edwin Sandys to be lieutenant to Sir Hen. Jones. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 17.]
Sept. 9. Commission for Fras. Rogers to be lieutenant to Major Windham. [Ibid.]
Sept. 9. Commission for Piercy Kirk to be cornet to the Earl of Oxford's own troop. [Ibid.]
Sept. 9. Commission for Edm. Wilson to be ensign to Capt. Thos. Bromley in the Admiral's regiment. [Ibid.]
Sept. 9.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thos. Chicheley. We hear that upon an order of 12 Aug. last [see p. 374, supra], we can be supplied with good powder at 7½d. a pound, or 3l. 2s. 6d. a barrel of 100 lbs., which is a lower rate than has been hitherto paid, in times of war or peace. We therefore authorise you to contract with the powder makers at that price, for 500 barrels a month, being 6,000 a year, and to supply more if required. The contract to be for such a number of years as you think fit. [Ibid.]
Sept. 9. The King to the Same. The Ordnance officers have lately sent us a list of defective brass ordnance in the Tower, at Woolwich, and in the founders' hands. As brass ordnance will be required to furnish the first-rate ships lately ordered to be built, we require you to deliver all the defective ordnance to George Browne, master founder, and to contract with him for their being made into new and serviceable guns. [Ibid. f. 18.]
Sept. 9.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council. The King hears that divers turbulent spirits disturb the peace of Gloucester, by casting indignities on persons of known integrity and loyalty, to disable them from serving his Majesty. They particularly endeavour to put by Ald. Fowler, a physician, next in course to be chosen Mayor, and to bring in Mr. Bubb, a junior alderman, who lives out of the city. Lord Arlington is therefore to prepare a letter from the King to the Mayor, aldermen, and common council, commanding them to elect Fowler Mayor next year, or if they refuse, to attend Council with their reasons to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 144.]
Sept. 9.
Plymouth.
Jas. Blackborne, deputy-postmaster, to the Navy Commissioners. I received your express, and will fulfill your commands when Capt. Robinson arrives, but we cannot expect him yet, as the wind continues at S.W. and blows fresh. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 81.]
Sept. 9.
The Spy, Dover.
Capt. Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I will embrace the first opportunity to transport the 24 seamen and the clothes to the Reserve at Portsmouth, but am still detained by contrary and stormy winds. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Sept. 9.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. I received your directions as to laying the 40 masts received from Mr. Stockman, with those in Mr. Pett's marsh, but that creek has already upwards of 200, and is crammed, and 26 were sent from Woolwich; it is also not a fit place, they being wet and dry every tide; but this might be prevented for 500l., and the masts kept always wet, and as secure as if under lock and key. I do not think them safe on the other side of the water, as that creek being so wide, and the wind westerly, it makes such a quick return of the tide that the masts soon rot or break; and if they were sound, they would be stolen. I fear a number of the anchors taken up in the river on the last survey are not much safer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 83.]
Sept. 9.
Limehouse.
Phineas Pett to Col. Thos. Middleton, Surveyor of the Navy. I have been absent from London 2 or 3 months upon extraordinary business, occasioned by my being so long out of the kingdom, so that I have been prevented from attending the Navy Commissioners, and pressing them to bring the affair under my care in Scotland to a settlement, and as to the disposal of the goods bought, and still remaining there. Pray endeavour to prevail with the Commissioners to hear and consider my case. As I have endeavoured to render the affair profitable to his Majesty, and contrived, upon the first glimmering of peace, to ease the King's charge therein, I hope I shall be thought fit for future employment, so that myself and family may not be rendered despicable. The matter was not my own seeking, and was a hazardous undertaking; as I put off all other employment, I hope a due measure may be given to all those accidents and contingencies which happened thereupon, by peace or war. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Sept. 9.
Limehouse.
Same to Sir John Mennes, Comptroller of the Navy, to the like effect. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Sept. 9. Same to Pepys. To similar effect. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Sept. 10.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I desire re-payment of 30s. paid by myself and the master calker, in pressing men to carry on the works of the new ship, as also conduct money and travelling charges; also that the furnaces, brass sheaves, boats, &c., many times demanded, may be supplied. I fear a great part of her carver and joiner's work will be left unfinished when she is launched, but earnestly desire to finish it. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Sept. 10.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I have staked out the dock at Greenhithe, 100 feet east from the west part of the King's land, 348 feet length from the river to the head of the dock, and 58 feet breadth, S.W. by W. and N.E. by E. I judge it will be convenient to lay the plank on the west side, and the timber on the east; 50 feet 6 inches is to be the breadth of the gates, from the inside of the wharves, and they are to be made with 2 wickets, so that a few men may shut them, or else placed on brass rollers, so as to shut in 2 leaves as the west dock gates do. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Sept. 10.
Deptford.
Same to Col. Middleton. I have viewed the ships which are to be repaired, and judge the Speedwell requires the least work done to her. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Sept. 10. Surveyor Thos. Middleton to the Navy Commissioners. I hoped the method I took to answer your queries would be satisfactory, as it was as you directed; I know no better way to be satisfied as to what provisions are in the stores, without a general survey, than by the clerks of the comptrol, whose duty it is to give a true account, and who were written to for it. What Commissioner Cox has done at Chatham is no guide, but is only a cursory view taken by the officers, while the clerk of the comptrol was in London; but if they cannot do it, and you expect it from me, I must have 10 or 14 days' time to consult the stores in the yards at Deptford and Woolwich. Noted that upon the Board observing to the surveyor wherein he was short of the exactness of Capt. Cox's papers, he undertook to rectify it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 90.]
Sept. 10.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the Navy Commissioners. The fleet being still in the Downs, I have despatched your letters and packets for Capt. Robinson and Mr. Gibson, but delivered Capt. Haddock's to himself, having met him on shore. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Sept. 10.
Deal.
Same to Pepys. I will deliver the letters enclosed to Mr. St. John, fulfil the other instructions, and send a further account by to-morrow's post. The extremity of weather prevents my going to-night. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Sept. 10. Minutes [by Williamson] of proceedings at the Foreign Committee. On reading the French Ambassador's memorial as to restraining foreign ships from navigating near the French islands and colonies in the Indies, a letter was ordered to be written to the Plantations, signifying the declaration of the French King made by his ministers, and recommending the several Governments to treat the French kindly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 145.]
Sept. 10. Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Keeper, to Lord [Arlington]. I perused the cases sent touching the election of the Mayor of Dover, and conceive the only question is whether the Common Council, which made void the last decree for a general election, were duly called; if it were, Carlile is well elected, but if otherwise, Barly. This is the matter on which the parties differ. I think the best course to pursue, to prevent further disturbance, will be to write a letter, by his Majesty's command, to forbid the swearing in of either, or for either to act as Mayor, until the matter is decided by the Council Board, to which both parties are to be summoned in a week, the old Mayor exercising the office in the meantime. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Sept. 10.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. The Duke of Buckingham has arrived from Boulogne, and a courier from France, and Lords Belasyse and Berkeley have sailed for Calais. I hinted in my last by Mr. Jemmet, jun., of the proceedings of the tumultuous people, and desired Jemmet to give an account, he being an eye-witness of their actions. The titular Mayor with a white staff, and 40 of his party with cudgels, came down to the pier as though intending a mutiny; but on the Mayor's speaking to the Duke of Buckingham, he gave him a severe check, and bid him go home and lay by his white staff, and be peaceable until the case was determined by the King and Council, since which neither he nor his crew have appeared. They have a Mayor and no Mayor, so that it is like an interregnum; they can make no processes in law until the difference is decided; your assistance is desired. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 147.]
Sept. 10.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Earl of Carlingford has arrived from London for Ireland, and has gone to Neston to take ship; the Countess of Roscommon has come from Ireland for London. The assizes have begun, and several out of 12 conventiclers have been convicted, 2 for speaking seditious words. A Quaker witness was committed for refusing to take the oath, and the King's attorney ordered to prepare a bill against him, which was done and found. I regret the non-arrival of the newspaper, which is much missed in assize time. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Sept. 10.
Bristol.
Sir Rob. Yeamans to Lord Arlington. Myself and the rest of the aldermen having issued several warrants of distress against those convicted under the Act for suppressing unlawful meetings, which remained unexecuted, we gave notice to the churchwardens, overseers, and constables, to appear at the sessions and give an account, and intimated that they would be convicted in case of any negligence. This so alarmed them, that at the sitting of the court, many distresses had been made and levied in all parts of the city, so that there is now a vigorous and diligent prosecution of the offenders. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Sept. 10. The King to John Matson, Mayor of Dover for last year. We have heard of the disorders in the town on the late election of a Mayor for the ensuing year, and approve your prudent care for the preservation of peace. To quiet these disturbances, we order that all persons concerned therein appear before Council on Friday next to determine the matter; meanwhile, to prevent tumults, no other person is to be sworn into the place of Mayor for the ensuing year, but you are to exercise it yourself, and the Common Council and other freemen and inhabitants of the town and port are to give obedience accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 58.]
[Sept. 10.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 150.]
Sept. 10. The King to the Mayor, aldermen, and common council of Gloucester. Several persons have endeavoured to disturb the good government of the city, by casting scorn on persons of loyalty, and rendering them insignificant to do service. They have endeavoured to put by Dr. Hen. Fowler, physician and alderman, a loyal person, next in course to be chosen Mayor, and to elect Wm. Bubb, a junior alderman not living within the city. We wish you either to elect Dr. Fowler, or appear before Council to give reasons for not doing so, that due order may be taken for the good government of the city. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 58.]
Sept. 10. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 151.]
Sept. 10. Demise to Sir Rob. Long, Bart., for 99 years, of Nonsuch Great Park, and a piece of meadow ground, with the mansion house called Worcester House, for 99 years or 3 lives, on rent of 100l. and fine of 400l., upon his surrender of a former grant for 99 years or 2 lives on rent of 100l. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 230.]
Sept. 11.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A French lord has arrived in one of his Majesty's pleasure boats, and since gone to Canterbury; his servants, who would not tell his name, have gone for London. The wind keeps the ships in the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 152.]
Sept. 11. Joseph Binckes to Lord Arlington. The King's enemies hide their wicked designs under a pretended religion, and their expositions of the Scriptures declare their inward intent. Mr. Partridge, some time chaplain to Chas. Fleetwood, lately (about the sitting of Parliament) expounded the 3rd, and 4th, and 6th, and 7th chapters of Judges, and compared himself and hearers to the children of Israel, and their adversaries to the present power. They are not content to rail against his Majesty's crown and dignity, but would gladly smite off his head, only they want the opportunity, which I trust I shall be able, by care and watchfulness, to prevent.
I have attended these people all the summer, which has caused me to get so far into debt that I am daily threatened with arrest; and as providence has once more brought me to his Majesty's knowledge, who bade me go to you for a supply, and you having promised it, I trust you will perform, otherwise I and my family must perish. I was allowed 20s. a week during your lordship's predecessor, Sir Edw. Nicholas's, time. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Sept. 11. Joseph Binckes to Williamson. Yesterday I gave his Majesty a letter, who asked where I had been, as he had not seen me so long, and promised that Lord Arlington should supply my necessity, to whom he commanded me to go. I waited on his lordship, who said he had received my letter from the King, and would do something for me in a day or two. My necessity being great, I beg the loan of 20s., and will render an account when his lordship performs his promise. Quotes the 3rd chapter of Proverbs, v. 28. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Sept. 11.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Gibson has arrived with the money, as also 6 Turkey ships, together with Mr. Morley, the victualler for Port Mahon, the Elizabeth victualler for Tangiers, and several others for Portugal, Spain, and Italy, so I suppose I need not expect any more than the Tangier Merchant and Mr. Stacey. I shall observe his Royal Highness's instructions, and sail the first opportunity. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 93.]
Sept. 11.
Sunday. The Bantam, Downs.
Capt. Rich. Haddock to Pepys. Thanks for the copy of the letter of credit from Ald. Backwell to Mr. Longland at Leghorn for my freight. The 6 Turkey ships have arrived, and the Pearl is hourly expected, so we shall be ready to sail with the first fair wind. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Sept. 11.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to Pepys. I understand from yours that the Navy Board have suspended their resolution of coming down to Greenhithe until Commissioner Tippets comes to town, by which time I will be ready to wait upon them. A hoy has arrived from Rye with part of Mr. Polhill's oak timber, another from Portsmouth with knees, and the shipload of masts is almost delivered. The Newcastle is still prevented from sailing by the high winds. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 95.]
Sept. 12.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Earl of Clanricard has arrived from London for Ireland, and the Earl of Thomond for London. Several passengers bound for Ireland are waiting an easterly wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 155.]
Sept. 12.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. I have sent Wm. Bridgeman, at his request, 3 copies of the book entitled "Trap ad Crucem" for Lord Arlington. The 2 convoy frigates are still in the Roads, and a Greenland ship came in and sailed again for London. Those she spoke with had not killed one whale during the voyage, but there was about 24 tons of oil made from white fish. A vessel of London has arrived from Rotterdam and put several passengers ashore; 100 West-country boats and 60 from the northward have come in for the herring fishery. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Sept. 12.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Providence of Apsom, bound for Ireland, and thence to the Madeiras, with several others bound for France, have sailed; the Mermaid and 2 others of Nantes from Rouen, bound home, have come in. They met 9 or 10 great Flemish vessels at sea, bound for the vintage at Bordeaux. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Sept. 12.
Bristol.
Jas. Baskerville to Williamson. The fines inflicted on the several Nonconformists were levied by distress, which caused great murmurings, and none would buy the goods distrained. The Quakers— who have met in silence in the street since their meeting-house was seized by order of Council for the use of the King, there being no known proprietor—broke open the doors of their house, for which 16 were sent by the Mayor and aldermen to Newgate common prison, where they are like to remain. Notwithstanding the endeavours of the magistracy, they cannot suppress them, and a troop of horse is much required. Several of the foresters and cottagers of Kingswood having been indicted, by reason of their many tricks and evasions, at the Gloucester sessions, and the sheriffs' officers coming to arrest them, 300 or 400 met at the sound of trumpet and drum in a tumultuous manner, and abused and beat the officers; the trained bands are to be raised to suppress them; I hope there is no great danger. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Sept. 12. Grant to Sydney Godolphin for life of a pension of 500l. a year, as groom of the bedchamber. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Sept. ? Petition of John Talbot, B.A., to the King, for a royal letter enabling him to take the degree of Master of Arts, having performed the necessary exercises but yet not taken it, and that those years may be reserved to him, in case he should take another degree. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 159.]
Sept. ? Docquet of the above, dated 15 Sept. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 232.]
Sept. 12. The King to the University of Cambridge. We recommend John Talbot, B.A., of Peterhouse, for the degree of M.A., without performance of the usual exercises, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 59.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to Richard, Archbishop of York. We recommend Thos. Wright, vicar of Ecclesfield, co. York, and King's chaplain, for the place of prebendary residentiary, void by decease of Dr. Ant. Elcock, subdean and prebendary residentiary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f 21.]
Sept. 13. Presentation of Rob. Harding to the rectory of Landulph, co. Cornwall, void by the resignation of John Harding. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 231.]
Sept. 13. Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I desire to know his Majesty's pleasure as to whether I am to attend Parliament or stay at York. I have written to Lord Arlington about it, and also on behalf of one [Thos.] Ellis, who I suppose has prosecuted his business to his lordship, in which I wish him success, because the fanatics would glory in his repulse. Pray send my letters to Staveley, Derbyshire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 160.]
Sept. 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. My news was forgotten last week, and I had to be beholden to Sir P. Honeywood for perusal of his. The Eagle ketch has arrived at Spithead, bound for the westward. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Sept. 13. List by Surveyor Thos. Middleton of 7 vessels at Deptford, one at Chatham, and one in Ireland, which ought to be sold, they not being worth the charge of repairing, and unserviceable in their present condition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 96.]
Sept. 14.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I have received his Royal Highness's commands to sail with the first fair wind, and not take any notice of the packets sent to me to Portsmouth and Plymouth; as Capt. Stacey has joined me, I have nothing to do but to wait for a wind, and then prosecute my voyage, calling at Plymouth for the convoys. The 14 days' provisions being spent, as well as the extra 14 which were supplied, I request a recruit for us and the Assurance, while detained by the wind. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Sept. 14.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker and 4 others to the Navy Commissioners. We recommend Thos. White, house carpenter, as successor to Isaac Welsh, deceased, he having been an inhabitant of Deptford for 30 years, and being well skilled in house carpentering and wharfing. With certificate by Rob. Breton that White is an honest, sober, and diligent person, and a constant frequenter of God's house. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Sept. 14.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. I beg a supply of hemp, as that in store will be all wrought up in 10 days. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Sept. 14.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to Pepys. I beg that Brunsdon the purveyor, may be excused from waiting upon you for 2 or 3 days, as I have sent him to mark 3 parcels of timber I have agreed to purchase. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 100.]
Sept. 14.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The Newcastle has sailed. I have sent the horse boat up to Woolwich, with a longboat, pinnace, and 2 furnaces for the new ship, and desire she may be sent back laden with 4-inch plank. I send copies of 3 contracts for timber, and ask you to imprest the money to Mr. Gregory to pay for it, as Mr. Amhurst is to have 500l. on the 29th in part payment; also to send down the 3,000l. promised to furnish the stores. Also to send a warrant to Rich. Manly and 2 other justices of the peace, to impress carts to bring the timber in.
I have other offers of timber, which I shall treat for, but hear nothing from Mr. Mason of Maidstone about his. That bought of Mr. Maplesden lies in Cobham Park, and some of the pieces are from 4 to 8 loads in a piece, which when split will supply breast hooks for the new ship. I have but 7 bundles left of the hemp last sent, which will not be above 8 or 10 days' work for the men; Mr. Stockman desires that the 4 bundles purchased of him may be taken up. Stockman's masts have been measured, and 2 being found defective, they were refused; he desired they might be split at his expense, and if then found useful, he might be allowed what they were considered to be worth; the others do not answer contract, but as an abatement has been made, his Majesty will not be a sufferer. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 101.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Lord Arlington to the Lords of the Treasury. His Majesty having directed a warrant to be prepared, authorising the trustees and administrators of the late Queen Mother to give order to Sir Hen. Wood to pay Madam Civitt 200l., La Varenne 50l., and Grey, a poor widow, 40l.,—all servants of the late Queen,—I leave it to you whether I or you shall prepare the warrant. I also send you 2 papers received from the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, one concerning farthings and small moneys in that kingdom, and the other about leases in Athlone, and desire your opinion before submitting them for his Majesty's signature. Noted by the Treasury Board, that Lord Arlington is to prepare the warrant, and that the other papers are to be brought before Council, to be referred to the Treasury, and whom his Majesty thinks fit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 162.]
Sept. 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council. On information that the Quakers in Bristol, whose meeting-house had been seized, broke open the doors, whereon the Mayor and aldermen have committed 16 to Newgate, and yet the magistrates cannot suppress them; also that the Kingswood foresters, numbering 300 or 400, attacked and beat the sheriff's officers, who indicted many of them at Gloucester sessions:—Order that a principal secretary write to Sir Rob. Atkins, K.B., recorder of the city, speedily to inquire into these tumultuous proceedings, and report thereon, that order may be taken for preservation of the public peace. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Sept. 14.
Bristol.
Ja. Baskerville to Williamson. The tumult of the coal-miners and cottagers in Kingswood is over, they having driven out Sir Baynham Throckmorton, the chief ranger, and his officers, and the sheriff's bailiffs. No person was killed, but many narrowly escaped. There has long been an ancient colliery in the forest, and many old cottages built there by reason of it, and his Majesty's interest, together with the deer therein, having been destroyed, the cottages increased, and the proprietors of the soil, for convenience of the coal works, granted leases to the tenants; they now consist of 800 families, who have no other means of subsistence. The discontented party in Bristol are very numerous, and more obstinate than ever, and other force is wanting there beside the Militia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 164.]
Sept. 14. Sir John Newton to Williamson. Sir Baynham Throckmorton, with several of the sheriff's bailiffs, some of whom were formerly in the rebellion, came down to the chase of Kingswood near Bristol, and by virtue of a pretended assize process, took several prisoners, most of whom gave bail for their appearance; but that not giving them satisfaction, they behaved in a riotous manner with their swords, pistols, and other weapons, pulled down several enclosures, broke open doors, and threatened to kill the commoners' cattle. I repaired thither and endeavoured to preserve the peace, and prevailed with the people to remain passive, and to agree to appeal to the law courts; but the violence of Sir Baynham and his followers continuing, I, doubting my own authority, left the constable of the hundred and others to act for the safety of the peace, and went to the Lord Lieutenant, who was away from home. During my absence, the people, who were numerous, stood up in defence of their habitations. If Sir Baynham's extraordinary proceedings are not controlled, and he attains his ends, many hundred families will be utterly ruined, his Majesty's revenue lessened some thousands in the year, and the city of Bristol infinitely prejudiced for want of coal, as most of the people are coal miners and coal drivers. Pray represent this to Lord Arlington and Sir Thos. Clifford, and I will send my son for instructions, which shall be punctually observed. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 165.]
Sept. 14.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Upwards of 80 sail of merchant ships, outward bound, are still in the Downs. After Mr. Broomhall had my resolve, Mr. Marsh, the surveyor who put me out of the surveyorship, struck in with him. He is still in the town, and some say he is going beyond sea. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Sept. 14. Statement [by Sir Roger L'Estrange, Surveyor of the Press]. There are several dealers in books and printing who exercise the trade as freemen of London, and not as members of the Company of Stationers, and cannot therefore be subject to the rules and government of that company, unless they are turned over and incorporated with them.
While these men are at liberty, there is no thought of reforming the Press, but the Lord Mayor and aldermen have power to redress it by ordering all dealers in books to be turned over to the Stationers' Company, and made liable to their rules, or to abandon that trade, which will be done on receipt of his Majesty's signification of his pleasure. There are other booksellers in and about Westminster Hall, who are more dangerous than the rest, and under no rule of government, who will also be brought in, if his Majesty will issue his commands to me or my deputy, demanding that they either give up the trade of bookselling, or become members of the Stationers' Company, and that the names of those refusing be rendered.
Haberdashers dealing in books ought to be suppressed, and private presses will then fall, as their profit arises from stolen copies, which the haberdashers take at low rates. The Stationers' Company ought to be directed to take the haberdashers' books at the price they paid for them, and thus prevent any objections.
Their right to deal in books is by virtue of a licence obtained from the bishops, under pretence that the country cannot be furnished with primers, psalters, and school books but by their means, for want of booksellers. This can be remedied by his Majesty's direction to the bishops to withdraw such licences, and only grant them to haberdashers in towns where there are no booksellers.
If this is done, it will be easy to find such rules for the company as may secure the Press, partly by by-laws, but chiefly by incorporating certain conditions in their grant if they renew their charter, or by supplying the defects of their old grant by additional obligations. His Majesty's signification to the court of aldermen about foreigners, his commands to the Surveyor of the Press to call upon the booksellers about Westminster Hall, and his directions to the bishops for suppressing the sale of books by haberdashers, are desired. [2 pages. See 24 Sept. infra. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 167.]
Sept. 14. Warrant to — Dawson to search for Fras. Smith, stationer, and bring him before Lord Arlington. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Sept. 14. Grant to Madame Henriette de Bordes d'Assigny, dresser to the Queen, of 400l., and a pension of 300l. a year for life. Minute. [Ibid. f. 48.]
Docquet of the above, dated Oct. 20. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 244.]
Sept. 14. Warrant to the Board of Greencloth to pay 60l. a year board wages to Madame de Bordes, dresser and woman of the chamber to the Queen, in place of Lady Silvius, deceased, the warrant for suspension of diet notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, p. 48.]
Sept ? Petition of Fras. Manley, counsellor to the King, for the place of King's Attorney for cos. Merioneth, Carnarvon, and Anglesea, void by death of Owen Griffith. Was severely wounded in the service of the late King, was bred in the law, and is a practiser in the said counties. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 107a.]
Sept. 14. Grant to Manley of the said office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 48.]
Docquet of the above, dated Oct. 22. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 245.]
Sept. 14. Commission to George Fitzjames to be ensign to Major [Ben.] Henshaw. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 18.]
Sept. 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to pass the Privy Seal of Scotland, to Hugh Paterson, writer to the Signet, to collect the rents and casualties of the archbishopric of Glasgow, during the vacancy of the see by the dismissal of Alexander [Burnet], late Archbishop, till Robert, Bishop of Dunblane, be invested therein, or till this commission is recalled, he paying the same to the said Bishop, with reservation of 300l. a year to the late Archbishop, as long as he shall have a right thereto. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 4.]
Sept. 15.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We recommend Wm. Lockhart jun., of Loe, for admission to the said Council. [Ibid. p. 5.]
[Sept. 15.] Grant to Sir Thos. Slingsby, Bart., of the office of constable and keeper of Scarborough Castle; fee, 16l. a year, with the same privileges as Sir Jordon Crosland had. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 47.]
Sept. 15. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 233.]
Sept. 15. Lord St. John to Williamson. I desire you to obtain an order from the King and Council as instructed, and send it to me at Winchester by Saturday's post. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 168.] Enclosing,
Notes that an order is required, authorising Lord St. John to attend a court to be holden at Winchester, for the New Forest, Hants, and to insist on the right of claims wherever privileges are claimed in the forest, and also to see that the country is not pressed with circumstantial matters and defects in pleading. [Ibid. No. 168i.]
Sept. 15.
London.
Thos. Banckes to Williamson. Pray send the money to pay the translator of some papers concerning Savoy, and any more papers that you wish to be translated. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Sept. 15.
Ordnance Office.
Edw. Sherburne and G. Wharton to the Navy Commissioners. We desire you to accommodate George Browne, his Majesty's gun founder, with an old ship's mast lying at Woolwich, to make gun patterns for brass cannon, he paying a reasonable price for it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 102.]
Sept. 15.
Tower.
Thos. Townsend to Thos. Hayter. I recommend Nich. Hudson, master of the Two Brothers of London, bound for Tangiers with stores from the Tower, for any freight you may be able to help him to; he may serve you more reasonably than any other bound there. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Sept. 15.
The Spy, Rye.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. We have been twice as far to the westward as Beachy, but cannot get to Portsmouth, and have put into Rye by contrary winds and bad weather. The Elizabeth hoy of London, with stores from Deptford for Portsmouth, is also here. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Sept. 15.
Chatham.
Jos. Laurence to the Navy Commissioners, I beg your recommendation to his Royal Highness, as fit for the office of master shipwright at the new yard about to be constituted at Greenhithe. I have been assistant to the master shipwright of Chatham for nearly 8 years, and all similar assistants have been preferred except myself. [Ibid No. 105.]
Sept. 15. Sir Geo. Downing to the Navy Commissioners. You are to send an estimate of the quantity of timber required to build two frigates, the Treasury Commissioners having received an order for felling as much as is necessary in Sherwood Forest. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 106.]
Sept. 16.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to Pepys. I fear the letter of credit, the receipt of which I obtained from Mr. St. John, has not come to hand; if not, and you will send me another, I will get it signed. Have 8 muster books of ships named, which I sent you, arrived ? The fleet is still in the Downs, and the wind at S.W. The Spanish Ambassador came on shore last night, and has since gone towards London in a hackney coach. Mr. Gibson is at my house, and gave hopes that you would honour us with your company, which would have been to us all the greatest joy and happiness in the world. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Sept. 16.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to Pepys. I will not fail to send Mr. Brunsdon to you on Monday. It is true the Act of Parliament does not empower the Navy Board to impress carts, but when the timber is actually the King's, I was fain to promise the merchant that if he could not get it down in a convenient time, I would procure a warrant for the country to bring it at the merchant's charge. This was granted to Mr. Mason in a like case, but the warrant shall not be put in execution without there is need for it. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Sept. 16.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett, muster master, to the Navy Commissioners. I beg an order for issuing warrants for the victuals of 63 soldiers on board the Newcastle in the Hope. There are several men sick and hurt on board, and no surgeon to look after them. The postmasters on the Kentish road are very negligent and careless of the King's letters, and I seldom or ever receive my books in time, though they are timely sent from Deal. Through their private quarrels, they cause the letters to be sent to London, before delivery at Gravesend, where they lie a day or two, when they are sent to Rochester again, or left at Blind House on the road, and there remain until they please to bring them. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Sept. 16.
Merlin yacht, Portsmouth.
Capt. Jacob Baker to the Navy Commissioners. We have been beating to windward 3 days, and came in this morning. Having only sufficient victuals for 3 weeks, and having to supply 20 soldiers, whom his Royal Highness has ordered us to carry to Guernsey, Plymouth, and back again to Portsmouth, I beg a supply, and that speedily, as Lord Hatton has arrived at Southampton, and we are to transport him to Guernsey. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Sept. 16. Propositions for securing the King's ships at Chatham. That the company in Sheerness have 40 men added to it, and that 1,000 spare arms be always kept ready in the fort, to arm the islanders whenever the Governor shall summon them, which he should have power to do, on the appearance of any fleet believed to have a design upon the fort or river.
A regiment of 1,000 foot to be always quartered in Stroud, Rochester, and Chatham, to man and secure the forts on the river, and all the train bands of the country, except those of the Isle of Sheppy, to repair to Rochester, on being sent for by the person commanding the regiment.
Two troops of horse to be always quartered at Gravesend, Maidstone, or Sittingbourne; a chain made at or below Upnor Castle, and 20 or 30 pinnaces, always ready fixed, to be manned by the officers and workmen of the yard.
At least 6 fireships to be always lying in the river. Endorsed by Williamson, "Offered by his Royal Highness at the Foreign Committee." [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 170.]
Sept. 16. Licence to Col. Wm. Ayres, officer in the late army, to stay in town. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 48.]
Sept. 16. Warrant for 200l. to Sir Wm. Jennings, out of the privy seal dormant of 22 Aug. last. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept. 16. Petition of Wm. Clarke, late churchwarden of Great Yarmouth, to the King and Council, for an order to the bailiffs and justices of Yarmouth, to issue their warrant for levying and collecting such moneys as are mentioned to be due by persons named in a list furnished by petitioner; also to levy certain sums due by other inhabitants of Yarmouth convicted before Mr. North, J.P., for being at a conventicle held at the house of Thos. Raven, alderman of Yarmouth, at Burgh Castle, Suffolk, which were not levied by the then constables from their not being able to find any goods, and their not being empowered to unlock any doors to make a distress. Also that the money so recovered may be disposed of to such persons as are most industrious in discovering and punishing conventiclers, and that Rich. Huntington, J.P., and a bailiff who countenanced and encouraged the Nonconformists, may be dealt with by Council.
Petitioner, being one of the churchwardens of Yarmouth, gave notice to the bailiffs and justices of a conventicle in the town, with a list of those most eminent amongst them; but Huntington, who was formerly an officer in the army against the King, and a known favourer of the Nonconformists, refused to take the information, but took those of 3 others of the party, on purpose to abuse and discourage him; that petitioner acquainted his Majesty and the Council, who sent an order to Lord Townshend, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk, to examine the truth of petitioner's allegations, and to report; but his lordship, being ill, referred it to Sir Wm. Doyley and others, who sent for petitioner to Norwich, where he satisfied the referees as to every particular objection. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 171.]
Sept. 16.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Another Greenland ship has sailed and a third come in, but neither has any oil. Sir Wm. Temple has landed, and gone to Norwich for London. Upwards of 3 score laden colliers have passed southward from Sunderland and Newcastle.
You befriended one of our churchwardens by delivering his petition to his Majesty, complaining of some abuse put upon him in endeavouring to disperse a conventicle, and you informed him that an order has been sent to Lord Townshend, and a letter to the bailiffs, neither of which we have heard of; if the order is stopped for want of any money due, it shall be paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 172.]
Sept. 16.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. A Spanish earl has arrived from Ostend, and left for Canterbury in a hired coach. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Sept. 16.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin, for J. Blackborne, to Hickes. I send by order of my master a list of ships in port. [Ibid. No. 174.] Encloses,
Names of 9 ships which have arrived from, or are bound for, places mentioned, with their lading. [Ibid. No. 174i.]
Sept. 16. Duke of Monmouth to [Williamson]. His Majesty having given order that 200 carbines should be supplied to the Ordnance Office for the use of my troop of Guards, I desire that he be moved for their delivery to Wm. Barber; also 200 belts, straps, and sockets, and a wagon to carry them. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Sept. 16.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council in reference to the election of a Mayor for Dover, jurats appearing on behalf of John Carlile and Rich. Barley, each of whom pleads election, Carlile by 39 votes on an order of Common Council of 7 Sept. 1578, disannulled in 1664, but reconfirmed in 1667; Barley by 113 votes, but his election was irregular. The last decree of Common Council is confirmed, so far as it does not contradict that of 1578, and a fresh election is to be ordered by Mr. Matson, still Mayor, Barley being one of the 4 jurats to be presented. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 176.]
Sept. 17.
Hull.
Luke Bourne, for Chas. Whittington, to Williamson. Some ships of Hull have sailed for Holland, France, Virginia, &c., and others are daily passing. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Sept. 17. Lady E. Carr to Williamson. Thanks for your letters. If Sir Rob. Carr does not acknowledge his, he is very ungrateful, which I am sure he never will be; but time will show. I hope to be in town shortly to acknowledge how kindly I take your visit. My lady sends kind love to Charles [Perrott ?], whom she much admires. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Sept. 17.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. The John and 2 other Newfoundland ships have arrived, and report the fishing to be very bad on account of the ice. There are 17 sail—English, Dutch, and French—here waiting a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Sept. 17.
Holyhead.
Rich. Carter to Williamson. I put to sea in one of the packetboats for Dublin, but was forced back, and am waiting, with several others, for a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Sept. 17.
Bristol.
Sir John Knight to Williamson. I have acquainted Lord Arlington with the proceedings of the Mayor for supplanting 3 loyal subjects in their right of succession to the mayoralty, and bringing in another who had no right to it. If his Majesty or Council give order for a new election, let it be sent down before the 29th, otherwise it cannot be received, and the party elected must stand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 181.]
Sept. 17.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Happy Entrance of Lyme has arrived from Morlaix, and the Mayflower from Croisic, and report that they talk of an expected war with the Dutch; that a great fleet is to be fitted with all expedition, and that drums were beating for volunteers; but it was given out they were intended for the Straits. Several vessels are going to sea, bound for the Plantations and various ports of France. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Sept. 17.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. Two French ships have arrived with salt; no other news. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Sept. 17.
Newcastle.
Sir John Marlay to Lord Arlington. I formerly wrote you concerning my own affairs, and my wife will let you know more if she can be heard. Our adversaries, Sir Chas. Alderley and Mr. Brooke, have been joined by Sir Fras. Cobb, and renewed their petition to build a ballast shore near South Shields; and having obtained a reference to the Lord Mayor, aldermen, and to the Trinity House, London, the latter have reported that the ballast shore will be useful, and given 5 reasons for it. I suppose the Mayor and aldermen will not delay their report longer than 18 Oct.; and as the town of Newcastle can show, if allowed further time, that the ballast shore is not so beneficial as is alleged, but quite the contrary, and that his Majesty and Council granted the first reference on wrong information, I beg you to use your interest that the time limited for Newcastle to make their defence may be extended 14 or 21 days, which will be an advantage to his Majesty's service, and will give no offence to anyone. I will fully inform myself in all particulars, so that I may be able to declare the truth to his Majesty without partiality or any self ends; wherein if I fail, I will consent to lose my credit and die in infamy, which I would not do to gain a world. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Sept. 17. Message from the King to the Commissioners for the Union of England and Scotland, stating his joy in the concurrence of both Parliaments for their nomination; his hope that the union may be perfected as the best means of strengthening and preserving the peace of the island, and rooting out jealousies and animosities; improving fishery and trade, &c. He sends them certain heads on which he wishes them to treat, but leaves them to their own debates. The heads are—1st, preservation of the laws of each kingdom; 2nd, consolidating the Parliaments; 3rd, uniting the kingdoms into one monarchy; 4th, stating all privileges of trade, &c.; 5th, securing the conditions of the Union. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Sept. 17. Two copies of the above heads of Union, one dated 16 Sept. [Ibid. Nos. 186, 187.]
Sept. 17. Warrant to the Master of the Great Wardrobe, to pay 6,398l. 13s. 11½d. to servants, tradesmen, &c., for the King and Queen's stables, from Michaelmas 1666 to Lady Day 1667. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 235.]
Sept. 17. Like warrant for payment of 8,734l. 15s. for the half-year ending Michaelmas 1667. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 235.]
Sept. 17. Like warrant for payment of 7,869l. 6s. 11¾d. for the year ending Michaelmas 1668. [Ibid.]
Sept. 17.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I am sending away the masts, but we could not work until yesterday because of the great neap; the tides did not lift them, nor had we any water within a yard or two of the foot of the sluice. When I proposed a view of those defective masts, I did not know that Mr. Wood had undertaken it, or I would have saved my journey to Ipswich; I have consulted with Wood's master and carpenter about them, but they cannot take in the biggest first, because of the stowage. They are now getting in 12 or 14 masts, and hope to have a lading this spring tide. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 111.]
Sept. 18.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to Pepys. Thanks for your well wishes to myself and family; I pray God to send us health, as we are very sickly. It is a very sickly time here, and there is not one family in the yard but has some one sick; Mr. Gregory is very ill, but I believe not dangerously. I am sorry to hear of the death of Sir Wm. Penn.
The Sovereign is to be launched next Wednesday, and I would not willingly be absent; I doubt if the tide will not fall out too soon for you to come down, as it will be high water at 5 a.m., but if you hold to your resolution, I will not fail to wait upon you and the rest of the company. I am glad Mr. Mason's timber is bought, but sorry the Board gave so great a price, as although good, I neverthought it worth more than 52s. a load; whatever Mason may pretend, we well know no one ever offered him above 54s., and that for no more than 200 loads of his largest timber.
I hope it may not prejudice me in bargaining for timber in future, but I have already been told the Board will give more than I will for it. I will however do my best to supply the stores if required. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Sept. 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Merlin yacht has arrived to take in 4 file of soldiers for Guernsey, there to receive Col. Lambert on board, and to land him at Plymouth, where he is to continue a prisoner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 188.]
Sept. 18.
Barrs-Court [co. Gloucester].
Sir Jo. Newton [Bart.] to Williamson. I succeeded in appeasing the colliers of Kingswood in defence of their livelihood, but their spirits are so agitated by the threats of the keepers, that I fear the consequences if their rage is again evoked. The terror under which they are kept has caused them to abandon their work in the coal mines, which will prove a general inconvenience to Bristol and the whole country, besides prejudicing his Majesty's revenue in the customs.
I am upon an inquiry into the riot, and find it to be the effect of oppression, and consider that the colliers ought to have a peaceable enjoyment of their dwellings, to which the ranger of Kingswood never before pretended any right, and which belong to the lord of the soil. I send my son for instructions how to act in case of another commotion, and trust some course will be taken to secure the peace of the country, and his Majesty's and other people's rights. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 189.]
Sept. 19.
The Greenwich, Downs.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to Pepys. I will advise Capt. Wilde about the provisions to be had at Dover, and we will employ our pursers in it, but I wish we had no occasion for it, and had a wind to carry us out of the channel. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 113.]
Sept. 19. John Ruff head to the Navy Commissioners. I beg a recommendation to his Royal Highness to be appointed anchorsmith at the yard to be erected at Greenhithe, not doubting but you have had good testimony of my ability and fidelity during the 5 years I have been in the same capacity at Chatham. I should have applied before, but have not been fit to travel. I hope to be in London on Thursday. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Sept. 19.
Marshalsea.
Capt. John Pearse of the Sapphire to the Navy Commissioners. It is my unhappy fate to fall under the sentence of death; but knowing his Majesty's clemency to be greater than my desert of it, I entertain a hope that my petition enclosed, backed with some powerful persuasions, may draw from him a pardon of my crime. I beseech you to present it, and to use your interest with his Majesty for his royal pardon; I have no friends who can aid me so much as you, nor any arguments greater than those you can draw from your own clemency, and the considerations in my petition. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Sept. 20.
Eaglet ketch, Portsmouth.
Capt. Jeffry Peirce to the Navy Commissioners, I have received 3 weeks' victuals, and intend sailing to-day for Cowes Road, where I will take the first opportunity to get to the northward. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Sept. 20. Commission appointing Sir Samuel Moreland, Bart., Sir John James, Rob. Huntington, Wm. Forth, and Rich. Kingdon, Commissioners and governors of the revenues of excise in England, Wales, and Berwick-upon-Tweed; fee 500l. a year each. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 236.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to John Matson, Mayor, and the jurats and common council of Dover. Lord Arlington had a letter of 8 Sept., signed by the Mayor and 7 jurats, signifying their election of John Carlile as Mayor, and Rich. Barley wrote a letter, signed by himself and 6 others, in behalf of the major part of the freemen, signifying Barley's election as Mayor. As the differences as to the right of the Mayor's election are carried on with much animosity, we wished John Matson to continue Mayor till further orders, and persons of each party to attend Council on both parts; these accordingly appeared on 16 Sept. Carlile's election was then shown to be by the jurats and freemen on nomination of the Mayor and jurats, according to an order of Common Council of 1578. The other election was according to a decree of Common Council of 1644, which gave the right of election to the freemen; but this time the Mayor, to avoid disturbance, reverted to the order of 1578, and the Mayor and 4 jurats chose Carlile; Barley pleads that this was done by surprise, he having only 39 voices, while Barley had 118. We confirm the decree of 1578 about elections, but order that both the present elections be void, and a new election be made, Barley being one of the persons nominated. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 59.]
Sept. 20.
Portsmouth.
[Hugh Salesbury] to Williamson. The Merlin frigate has taken some soldiers on board as a guard for Col. Lambert. Lord Hatton has sailed. The Reserve frigate is fitted, and the Canary ships are about sailing. [Damaged. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 190.]
Sept. 20.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Several ships are waiting for convoys. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Sept. 20.
Malaga Road.
Sir Edw. Spragg to Williamson. I have received my orders and commission for wearing the flag on my maintopmast head, and commanding the fleet. I am hastening to Sir Thos. Allin, who is gone to Algiers to make a peace. Thanks for the caravan of news; you challenge me for neglect in writing, but I have the most reason to complain, having advised you by every opportunity. I hear that Taffaletta has besieged Penon-de-Velez with 80,000 men, and intends taking in all the Christian garrisons this summer, and then reducing Algiers. How does the Irish business progress ? Remember me to Lord Arlington and Secretary Trevor. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Sept. 20.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. There are 120 sail of ships in the Downs outward bound. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Sept. 20.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. A vessel of Whitby with alum struck against the head at the pier, and the ship and goods were much damaged, but the men saved. Twenty ships have sailed from Dover, and about 140 from the Downs, bound southward. A dogger boat has come in from Leith. Thanks for your assistance rendered to my friends. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Sept. 20.
Gloucester.
Geo. Stanes to Williamson. I beg your assistance in procuring Mr. Rich a dispensation to hold 2 livings. I know the ordinary way is by faculty of the Lord Archbishop and the broad seal annexed, but as the Archbishop has a friend at Lambeth to serve, I hope Rich may have a regal dispensation, which his Majesty grants in cases of distance. He will be grateful, and he can have my lord of Gloucester's certificate for his loyalty and conformity. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Sept. 21.
Holyhead.
Rich. Carter to Williamson. I put to sea for Ireland, but was forced in again by foul weather. I am again going on board the packet-boat, and hope for a good voyage and a speedy return to England. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Sept. 21.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson The St. Peter of Dunkirk has come in, having sprung a leak. She was at sea upon some new discoveries, with a ketch and an admiral of 14 guns [see p. 454 infra], but was parted through a storm, and believes the ketch to be lost. The Amity of Falmouth from Cork advises Irish commodities to be very dear. The Scipio of London, a new ship of 32 guns, built at the Isle of Wight, is taking in 1,300 hogsheads of pilchards for the Straits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 197.]
Sept. 21. Thos. Holden to Hickes. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Sept. 21.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. His Majesty's two convoys, commanded by Captains Robinson and Wilde, have sailed with 126 English merchant ships, bound for France, Virginia, and the West Indies. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Sept. 21.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The fleet in the Downs has sailed. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Sept. 21.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The Sovereign was launched to-day, and I shall dock the St. George to-morrow, but want wherewith to sheathe her, for which I have sent the horse boat to Deptford. Mr. Gregory has been very ill, but there are hopes of his recovery. It is a very sickly time here, which goes very hard with the poor workmen and their families; I wish some way were devised to relieve their great wants, such as helping them to a quarter's pay of their old arrears, which would not only be a great relief, but would encourage them to go on with his Majesty's work here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 117.]
Sept. 22. Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. I attended Sir Rich. Ford, on his Majesty's behalf, about the Hamburg loss, as directed by Mr. Hayter's letter of 22 Aug. I send a copy of his Royal Highness's monition, which contains a full relation of what has passed and what is to be done, in order to receiving satisfaction from the city of Hamburg. As a considerable sum has been expended by Sir Rich. Ford and others, in bringing the matter to its present condition, many persons concerned have advanced 3 per cent. on what they lost, towards defraying the charge, and most of the rest have promised to contribute this; if you will do the same, let it be issued either to me or to Sir Rich. Ford. Would you have me to apply to the Admiralty Judges, and prove the quantum of the loss ? that must be done before letters of marque can be issued. His Majesty's loss amounts to 6,941l. 17s. 6d., so that the 3 per cent. amounts to 210l. [Ibid. No. 118.] Encloses,
James, Duke of York, &c., &c., to Wm. Joynes, marshal of the Admiralty Court. It was ordained 27 July 1670 by the King in Councilon complaint of English merchants interested in the Mary Bonadventure, and 5 other ships named, which were assailed, taken, and burnt by the Hollanders in the river Elbe, during the late Dutch war, that the Senate of Hamburg, contrary to the law of nations, refused to defend these ships, which were within their jurisdiction and within reach of the city guns—that having referred the case to two committees of Council, who have reported, and having heard the Hamburg agent and his counsel, his Majesty declared on 23 Dec. 1669, that he was fully convinced that as the Hamburghers had refused the reasonable aid requested by the English, reparation should be required from the Senate, and on 29 June last, he gave them 3 weeks longer to satisfy the petitioners; but this not being done, he ordered letters of marque and reprisal to be issued 30 July by Dr. Leoline Jenkins and others to the said ships, according to the form given.—London, 30 July 1670. [Latin and English, 5 sheets. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 118i.]
Sept. 22.
The Spy, Portsmouth.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. We put 20 of the 24 seamen on board the Reserve at Spithead; 2 ran away at Rye. We shall sail to-day towards Holehaven. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Sept. 22.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and Wm. Fownes to the Navy Commissioners. A cable warp of 96 fathoms having been stolen out of the yard on Sunday night, and having reasons to suspect 3 of the men on the watch, we have thought it our duty to send their names, viz., Nath. Mansfield, Wm. Davies, and Fras. Grymett. Noted that the Surveyor of the Navy was recommended to prosecute them. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Sept. 22.
Woolwich.
Capt. Will. Hannam and 2 other officers to the Navy Commissioners. We beg an order to the plumber to repair the pumps and pipes, and to keep them in good condition, as they cannot be used. We have been forced to send labourers to fetch water on their backs from the wharfside, which is no small charge. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Sept. 22.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. The new ship being almost completed, and the cradle and other things completed, we shall be ready to launch her on Tuesday or Wednesday. The Dover has been calked, the Crown is in hand, and shipwrights are at work upon the Milford. We want the aid of a plumber, brazier, and founder, as formerly demanded. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Sept. 22. Capt. Arthur Herbert to Thos. Hayter. Pray deliver 60 blank tickets to my purser, which I suppose will be enough for sea store, &c. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Sept. 22. Sir John Bennett to the Navy Commissioners. In order to a safe and speedy conveyance of muster books between the town and Gravesend, I am sending to settle that road, and will have a particular care of your commands; but as your correspondents vary, I desire you will let Mr. Ellis know where your packets will be received, and will also give some clearer information, so that there may be no failure on my part. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Sept. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council for grant of pardon to the Mayor, aldermen, &c., of Norwich, on their petition setting forth that—in spite of the late order in Council against the coining of halfpence or farthings—being put to great straits for acts of charity towards the poor and the convenience of traffic, they sent to London and had some farthings coined for them, to prevent the "great quantities of small pitiful farthings which would by particular persons have been thrown in amongst" them, and begging pardon, as it was done not for any private end, but for public convenience. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 201.]
Sept. 22.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. I gave your two packets for Lisbon to the master of the Brittannia; that for Sir Thos. Allin at Cadiz, to the master of the Amity, and the one for Tangiers to the master of the Maryport Merchant, all of whom have promised a safe conveyance. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Sept. 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Earl of Bristol and his son, the new Governor, left the castle in a yacht for London. They were saluted with 17 guns. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Sept. 22.
Kidl[ington].
Sir Wm. Morton to Williamson. I have been to Gloucester, where the Mayor, aldermen, and common council made a vote, complying with his Majesty's desires, as to the election of Dr. Fowler as Mayor. There were 37 votes for and 5 aldermen against it; I had much labour to bring them to it, the city having grown very factious, the 5 dissenting aldermen being the ringleaders, and having brought many of the common council into it. I spent two days in labouring to reconcile differences, but could not effect it; I am much afraid, if some course is not thought of to suppress animosities, or purge the corporation, that the city will fall into disorder, and be a great disturbance to the peace of the kingdom. Let Lord Arlington know this. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Sept. 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Reserve is at Spithead, waiting for sailing orders. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Sept. 22.
Corsham.
Sir Edw. Hungerford and 5 other J.P.s for Warminster and Devizes divisions, Wilts, to Seth, Bishop of Salisbury. We have met and made diligent inquiry into the grounds of the information you sent us, and cannot find that there have been any such great and outrageous meetings as represented. Proceedings have been taken against those complained of, distresses made, and many goods sold, and the rest deposited in safe hands; care shall be taken for the future to prevent similar complaints against Wiltshire. We hope that these parts will not lie under a worse character than any other country, as we are certain none will be found more ready than ourselves to serve his Majesty, to the advantage of the present government. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Sept. 22. Grant to Thos. Boreman of the office of underkeeper of Greenwich Palace, with the gardens, fee 20l. a year; keeper of the new house, fee 13l. 6s. 8d.; and keeper of the orchards and gardens, &c., fee 18l. 5s. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 237.]
Sept. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to [the clerk of the Signet]. There was a bill signed in April 1661, for confirmation of a decree made by the late Archbishop of Canterbury, touching the election of 5 Fellows from King's College, Cambridge, to be part of the 7 Fellows of the College of St. Mary the Virgin, at Eton; but the bill had not passed the Great Seal before the removal of the late Lord Chancellor, and the now Lord Keeper refuses to pass it, being of so old a date. We therefore, as there cannot be a privy seal without a signet also, require the clerk of the Signet who was then attending to pass a new signet, containing our confirmation of the said decree, in order that it may pass the Great Seal. Headed 'Dr. Fleetwood.' [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 180; Entry Book 27, f. 159.]
Sept. 22. Warrant for a grant to Sir John Clobery of fee-farm rents, value 662l. 8s. 10½d. a year, for 500 years, on surrender of a grant of 3 Aug. 1660, of a pension of 600l. a year, until lands of like value were settled on him; the additional 62l. 8s. 10½d. being granted because some of the said rents are now, and will be till Michaelmas 1671, in grant to the trustees of the late Queen Mother. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 49.]
Docquet of the above, dated 15 Oct. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 242.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment of 4,000l. to be placed to the account of the forces for this month. [Ibid. f. 49.]
Sept. 23. Warrant to the Earl of Bath to deliver [Major] Creed to— to be conveyed to Guernsey. Minute. [Ibid. f. 50.]
Sept. 23. Warrant to — to convey him to Guernsey. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept. 23. Warrant to Lord Hatton to receive and keep him close prisoner. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept. ? Note of justices of the peace in Stapleton (Sir Fras. Fane, K.B., and John Smith of Nibley) and in Bristol (the Mayor and 2 others) who are to examine Creed and others, especially on their being in those parts 6 and 7 Dec. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 207.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
Order for a pardon in the usual form of circuit pardons, to Fras. Crissman and John Stephenson, on petition of the gentlemen and inhabitants of Ely, and on certificate of Sir Edw. Turner, who passed sentence of death upon him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 42.]
Sept. 23. Sarah Young, with John Young, her son, to Pepys. Pray use your endeavours with the Navy Commissioners, that the employment of flagmaker, and the supplying of the stores, which was formerly enjoyed by my deceased husband, who has left his business to my son, may be continued to us, as there may be some who will endeavour to supplant us in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 125.]
Sept. 23.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I beg directions as to mustering the Newcastle's company, and the 40 soldiers, amounting in the whole to 200 men. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Sept. 23. Receipt by John Stanley for 47 muster books and 100 tickets from Thos. Melmoth, for the supply of the ships under the command of Sir Edw. Spragg. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Sept. 23.
The Greenwich, Plymouth.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. The wind favouring last Wednesday, we took the opportunity and have safely arrived here, and intend (God willing) to sail with the rest of the fleet to-morrow. Our purser went to Dover for provisions, but there were none provided, nor any orders for them. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Sept. 23.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Nath. Carter of this town—who was indicted for a misdemeanor and obstructing the churchwarden and constables when dispersing a conventicle, saying they would go on, come what would—has been tried at the sessions, and fined 5l., which he paid. Here is a Mr. Godfrey, nephew of Sir Thos. Meadows, who has been taken by a messenger, by order of the Duke of York, for arresting the purser of the Fountain, one of our Iceland convoy, for a debt of 9l. odd, lent him to furnish the frigate with necessaries when he had neither money nor credit. The purser having acknowledged the debt before our bailiffs, Mr. Godfrey offers to take 5l. for it; this act of the purser makes the people much exclaim against the captain of the frigate, who having been sent as a convoy to our fishery, has become a fisherman himself, and makes a fisher-boat of his frigate, to the prejudice of the trade; he has 30,000 cod-fish on board, which he undervalues, to the spoil of the market, he being at no charge either for freight or victualling. Sir Thos. Meadows, who is very ill, begs you for a line or two to Mr. Wren, for the release of his nephew. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 208.]
Sept. 23.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. The Eaglet ketch has sailed for the West Indies, and the Straits fleet of 100 sail, convoyed by the Greenwich and Assurance, will sail to-morrow. A Newfoundland ship of Poole gives a very indifferent account of the fishing, which is bad news for the Western parts. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Sept. 23.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council. His Majesty hears that Sir Rob. Yeamans, Mayor of Bristol for the past year, and others, on the 15th instant, procured the election as Mayor of John Knight, a common councilman, but no alderman, contrary to the custom of succession amongst the aldermen by seniority. This election was carried by only 2 voices, and was against the sense of the King's letter of 4 Sept. 1665, which they refused to have read at the election. The King and Council order that as Knight has not yet taken the oath of Mayor, another election of an alderman be made, and Lord Arlington is to prepare a letter for the King's signature accordingly [Ibid. No. 210.]
Sept. 24. The King to Sir Rob. Yeamans, Mayor, aldermen, and common council of Bristol, to the purport of the above order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 61.]
Sept. 24. Warrant for a pardon to the Mayor, aldermen, and commonality of Norwich, for coining and vending halfpence and farthings contrary to the late order in Council; they having sent to London for farthings of full value, to prevent the use of small pitiful farthings, being put to straits for acts of charity, and for the necessity of exchange in commerce. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 50.]
Docquet of the above, dated 22 Oct. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 245.]
Sept. 24. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to pay 600l. to Sir George Hamilton, the same to be placed to this month's account of the forces. [Ibid. f. 71.]
Sept. 24.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to Col. Thos. Middleton. I have received the Eastcountry plank on board the ship here, which is similar to that laid on the stone wharf by Mr. Body, and is not so good as the last country plank delivered by him and Mr. Harrington; so I desire you will hasten down the elm formerly demanded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 129.]
Sept. 24.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker and Thos. Turner to the Navy Commissioners. Thos. White and Sam. Curtis, who were recommended for the place of house carpenters of this yard, are both strangers to us; what we wrote on behalf of White was by report of Mr. Shish and others, who know him to be an able man; it is nothing to us whom your Honours shall pitch upon; we well know the place is at your disposal. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Sept. 24. Proposition by the Scottish Commissioners [for the Union] on the 1st head of the King's message [See 17 Sept.] that the laws and customs of each kingdom remain entire as before, and that all processes, civil, ecclesiastic, or criminal, against the subjects of Scotland, be determined in Scotland, without appeal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 211.]
Sept. 24. Preliminary articles agreed on between the Commissioners of both kingdoms, that they shall proceed by conference and debate, the copies of proceedings to be delivered to the respective Commissioners; but that nothing shall be considered binding till reduced to instruments tripartite, and ratified by the respective Parliaments. With resolution that the two nations be inseparably united into one monarchy, under the heirs of the body of King James, and that this monarchy be called Great Britain. [Ibid No. 212.]
Sept. Copy of the above: endorsed 25 Sept. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Sept. 24.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Magistrates and Council of Glasgow. Robert, Bishop of Dumblane, not having yet been invested with the archbishopric of Glasgow, vacant by dismissal of the late Archbishop, and the time of election of magistrates drawing near, we require you to receive Wm. Anderson as your Provost for the ensuing year, even if you have chosen any other before receiving our command. We leave the election of the other magistrates for this year to the said Provost and Council. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 6.]
Sept. 24. Roger l'Estrange to Williamson. I was asked by his Majesty what I had further done with the printers, and told him nothing more than he was informed of, but I would give a further account; he commanded me to despatch the business as soon as possible, and gave promise of encouragement which was very fair. I send a draft, approved by the Lord Keeper, to be addressed to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, and another containing the heads of such an order as will be necessary to enable me to proceed. I have directed Mr. Jeffreys to attend you, being otherwise engaged. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 214.] Enclosing,
Order from the King to the Surveyor of the Press, to direct the Stationers' Company to call a court, and to signify to them his Majesty's pleasure that they proceed to the execution of their resolutions of the 5th and 19th instant, as to the better goverment of the press.
As the company plead in their excuse that they have not sufficient power over their own members, his Majesty is resolved to supply that defect so far as he lawfully may, by renewing their patent gratis; and the Surveyor is to consult with the company as to what further powers are necessary, and refer to his Majesty's counsel at law in all cases of difficulty.
Upon renewing the patent, care is to be taken that the Surveyor and his deputies are enabled to execute their duties without opposition or control, according to the powers and authority granted to the Surveyor by his Majesty, and the Surveyor is to render an account to his Majesty from time to time of his proceedings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 214i.]
Sept. 24.
Rugeley.
Wm. Chetwynd to Williamson. Joseph, without either dear, or honest, you neither visit nor write to me, and I hate you. The knight [Sir Nich.] Armorer has been with me, whose belly I have filled with pudding, and if you baste him well with claret, when he comes to town, he may be a fit dish to present to the Prince of Orange. You are a monster; for there are monsters in morality, as well as nature, and it was a poor, ill-natured trick to come to Northampton, and not to Stafford; to prefer O'Brian before sack and rare cider, and old women before young; you may therefore now walk in Tothill Fields, dine at your taverns, and treat your friends at your coffee-house in Scotland Yard, but I will not join you. I am resolved to stay at home next session, lest you revenge yourself on me for writing this. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Sept. 24.
Staveley.
Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I beg you to pardon me for writing so often; I have made several addresses to Lord Arlington without receiving any order about those affairs. I hope his Majesty's affairs have not been neglected at York; I delayed returning until I had further commands, but am now going there. [Ibid. No. 216.]
Sept. 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Reserve frigate, which is to act as convoy to the Canaries, remains at Spithead for orders, and the Kitchen yacht has brought her seamen and their clothes. Many Dutch ships, forced into the Isle of Wight by the easterly winds, are observed to pass this port. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Sept. 25.
Hull.
Luke Bourne, for Charles Whittington, to Williamson. Six Hull ships have sailed for Holland, one for Dort, and 2 for Bordeaux, with lead, cloth, and rapeseed; also 5 of France with lead and butter for Rouen. Several others are passing. [Ibid. No. 218.]
Sept. 25.
6 p.m. Plymouth.
Charles Honeywood to Williamson. Please to acquaint Lord Arlington that I embarked at Portsmouth as ordered, on board the Merlin yacht, with a party of soldiers, and sailed to Guernsey, where I received from Lord Hatton the body of John Lambert, commonly called Major-Gen. Lambert, whom I delivered to Lord Bath, and have his receipt. [Ibid. No. 219]
Sept. 25.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. The Merlin ketch has arrived with Major-Gen. Lambert a prisoner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 220.] Annexing,
List of the names of 36 ships and their masters who sailed yesterday out of the Sound for the Straits, and other places mentioned. [Ibid. No. 220i.]
Sept. 25. The King to the Duke of York. We wish you to order the hiring of 2 good ships of 150 or 200 tons, victualled for 5 months, to bring home such subjects as still remain at Surinam. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 62.]
Sept. 25. Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Capt. Phil. Bell and Rich. Lockhart, for renewal of their patent for sealing butter firkins; with commendation of them as having long been in the service of the late Queen Mother. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 132.]
Sept. 25. Reference to the Treasury Commissioners of the petition of Sir Jonathan Trelawney, for payment of 883l. out of the Duchy of Cornwall. [Ibid.]
[Sept. 25.] Draft of the above 2 references, and of a third to the AttorneyGeneral, of a petition of the fishmongers, relative to a supply of fish which is much wanting in the nation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 278, No. 221.]
Sept. 25. Pass for M. Blanquefort to Calais. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 50.]
Sept. 25. Warrant for a grant to John, Lord Lovelace, son and heir of John, Lord Lovelace, of the offices of steward, lieutenant, and bailiff of Woodstock manor, park, and hundred, and Wootton hundred, &c., &c., on rentals of 114l. 1s. 10d., and 20l., as granted to the late Earl of Clarendon, with the customary fees. [Ibid.]
Sept. 25. Warrant to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, to appoint 50 musketeers of the Tower companies to be ready tomorrow to obey the orders of the Marshal of the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 18.]
Sept. 25.
Plymouth.
Jas. Blackborne to the Navy Commissioners. I received the enclosure for Mr. St. John, on board the Maryport [Merchant], but she had sailed, and Capt. Robinson also; I will keep it a post or two, in case they put into Falmouth, when I will forward it. The Merlin yacht has arrived with Gen. Lambert from Guernsey. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 131.]
Sept. 26.
Deptford.
Capt. Thos. Crowe to the Navy Commissioners. I would have been at the Navy Office to-morrow, to answer the complaint exhibited against me, but I have his Royal Highness's order to carry Sir John Chisley for Flanders, so I desire forbearance until my return. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Sept. 26.
Woolwich.
Capt. Will. Hannam to Col. Thos. Middleton. I am sorry I did not see the boats sent from Chatham before you left, as the longboat will only weigh an anchor of 35 cwt., and the pinnace is too small; but what with them and the help of those in the river, I will make shift until others arrive. Is the ship to be launched this spring tide? I would not lay out the cables and anchor for heaving her too long beforehand. The buoy has broken away from the wrecks, and the anchor cannot be found, but as we are so well acquainted with the spot where the wrecks lie, we conceive the buoy may be discontinued. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 133.]
Sept. 26.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to [Pepys]. I am glad you hope one quarter's pay of the old arrears for the poor workmen, as it will be a great encouragement for them to go on with the work. The timber bought of Mr. Maplesden lies in Cobham Park, and amounts to 120 loads, and as the land carriage will be 1s., and the water carriage 4s. a load, he has agreed to abate 5s. a load, so that it will not cost the King any more than was first agreed upon. I cannot say how many carts will be needful, but the justices will equally divide the carriage of it to Stroud, if you hasten down the warrant; there are some large pieces of timber amongst it, which are much wanted for breast-hooks for the new ship. The Riga hemp will be very welcome, as also the old plank promised to mend the ropeyard. Mr. Gould has not begun to break up the Defiance, as he has not signed the contract. Mr. Gregory has so far recovered from his illness as to be able to sit up. I beg that Mr. Amhurst's 500l. on account for his timber may be sent down, as he will be here on Thursday for it. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Sept. 26.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. The George of London and others have come in for pilchards for the Straits. The David of Weymouth from Newfoundland reports that they have had a bad year for fishing, and that they met the Straits fleet of 200 sail off the Lizard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 1.]
Sept. 26.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. About 40 sail are in the harbour, some of which are to take in pilchards for the Straits, and others, including French and Dutch, are bound for Ireland, France, and Malaga. Three Newfoundland ships homeward bound report a very bad market, owing to the frost which continued until 12 May, and the loss of one of their ships, when 41 men were drowned. There are 2 small French men-of-war also in the harbour, who were sent out by the French King, with another supposed to be lost, to discover a nearer cut to the East Indies; but after they were 60 degrees northward, they were compelled to return, on account of the coldness of the place, and the violence of the weather. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Sept. 26.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Earl of Clanricard sailed on Thursday for Dublin, in the Supply of Chester; Lord Bryan [O'Brien], Sir Edw. Massey, and several other gentlemen arrived from Ireland on Saturday. Lord Bryan has since gone for London. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Sept. 27.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Although there are still many troubled spirits, yet the justices have taken such care to proceed against the conventiclers, and other unlawful assemblies, that they are now pretty calm. Three light vessels have arrived from Holland and several others from the coast; 6 of Hull have sailed for Holland, 1 for Dort, 2 for Bordeaux, and 5 French vessels for Rouen, all laden with the commodities of this port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 4.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Sir Phil. Honeywood, Lieut.-Governor of Portsmouth. News-letter. The Spanish Ambassador, Conde de Molina, has not made any public entrance, and it is not expected he will, having refused the entertainment usually given to Ambassadors, from having received it lately in England.
Three French galleys arriving at Leghorn, under command of Hippolito Centurione, refused to salute the town until they had been saluted, which could not be granted until order had been received from the Grand Duke, to whom a courier was despatched. They had visited all the ports and places of Corsica, which has made the people think the French have some design on it, the island being easy to take, and the people being much dissatisfied with their government. They report that Mr. Hamilton was civilly treated at Rome by the Pope himself, who had written a letter, and sent some presents to our Queen, "a favour not formerly granted, out of the respect borne to Spain."
The French have fortified a place 25 miles from Tabarca, on account of the Tunisians having taken a French bark there, laden with corn.
Sir Thos. Slingsby, Sir Philip Monckton, and Sir Jno. Talbot, with several other gentlemen, have taken possession of the government of Scarborough Castle for his Majesty. Lord Lovelace died on the 24th. An order of Council has been issued to his Royal Highness, to cause a fleet of 50 of the best ships to be fitted for next spring. Major Banister is going to Surinam, to fetch such Englishmen as have a mind to leave, and will carry despatches from the States to that purpose. Capt. Peirce and Lieut. Loggon have been shot, according to their sentence. His Royal Highness has gone to Newmarket till October, and her Majesty to Audley Inn.
The taking of Epinal by the French, and the destroying 6 Turkish men-of-war, have been omitted, as being in the Gazette. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 5.]
Sept. 27.
London.
Rob. Bransby to Viscount Conway. I beseech payment of money due for household goods sold and hired, it having been a long time owing, and my occasions for it being great. I sent divers letters and accounts while I was in Ireland and since my return, but have never received any reply. I hear that you have disposed of your house in Queen Street, and sent the furniture to Ragley; amongst it are things mentioned belonging to me, an account of which I have given to your servant. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trevor to the Mayor and aldermen of Gloucester. The King sees no reason to recede from his former letter, directing the election of Dr. Fowler as Mayor of Gloucester, although Dr. Fielding and others have presented a petition against his election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 179]
Sept. 27.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen of London. It has been the custom of the City that 2 of the eldest aldermen next to the chair be nominated to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, in order to the election of a Mayor; the leaping over the heads of others has been found to cause great dissension in corporations, and caused suspicion of ill will to government, when loyal persons were passed over. As divers corporations would be encouraged to do this if they had the example of London, we recommend you, in the present election, to follow the ancient and laudable custom of nominating 2 of the eldest aldermen, to be returned to the Mayor and Court of Aldermen for choice of a Mayor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 62.]
[Sept. 27.] Draft of the above, noted " To be communicated to the common hall of that our city." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 7.]
Sept. 27. Sir Wm. Jennings to the Navy Commissioners. I send a petition from Capt. Cowdrey, who has been to sea with me; as I am well satisfied with his ability, I shall take it as a favour if you comply. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 135.] Encloses,
Petition by John Cowdrey to the Navy Commissioners, for an appointment as master under Sir Wm. Jennings in the present expedition. Commanded the Hardareen flyboat in 1665 and 1666, and a large sum is still due to him for stores, &c., as also upon a ticket; has been out of employyears, and at great expense in fruitless waiting for his money, and is much impoverished. [Ibid. No. 135i.]
Sept. 27. John Morehouse to [the Navy Commissioners]. I have cleared all the timber from Aliceholt Forest, brought it to the water side, and sent the greater part to the stores at Woolwich. The lieutenant of the forest intends to fell 700 oaks for post rails, and to pale in the parks; and as no man has been appointed who is knowing in the work, half the oaks will be turned to waste. If the 1,000 oaks which are to be felled for plank are felled and sawed, there will be plenty left for the rails and pales required. I beg a bill of imprest for 500l., so as to discharge my debts. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Sept. 27.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I send the master's receipt for masts shipped on board a flyboat. The vessel is detained by southerly winds. I hope the second vessel will arrive before the winter sets in, as it will be cold wading and working in the water then. The stack of chimneys will be finished to-day. [Ibid. No. 137.] Encloses,
Receipt by Chris. Goodale, master of the Good Hope, for masts mentioned, shipped by order of Wm. Wood for the Navy Commissioners, for transportation to the stores at Portsmouth. [Copy. Ibid. No. 137i.]
Sept. 27.
Wapping.
Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. I informed you some time since that young John Taylor and Gregory Page had paid for one half, and I for the other half, of 259 masts in New England, which I and old Capt. John Taylor had bought, by order of the Navy Board, and that the ship Sun had been sent for part of them. As the ship has since arrived at Plymouth with 29 masts of dimensions given, which are well sorted and fit for the Navy, and as you are bound to receive them, as also to send for the residue, I will attend you as soon as the vessel arrives in London, to know your resolution.
As a monition has been published that the Admiralty Court will, in 24 days, examine the losses sustained by the ships and ladings which were taken and burnt in the Elbe in 1666, in order to issuing letters of reprisal for reparation, and as the time expires on the 30th instant, I will then attend the Court, and after I have done all that is necessary to make legal proof, will wait upon you about the imprest bill for 210l., for satisfying the 3 per cent. to be paid to Sir Rich. Ford, and 2 others, who have the management of the Hamburg business, so that those gentlemen may cease their importunities, and I will see that no damage arises by its nonpayment before. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 138.]
Sept. 27. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Requests warrants directed to Deptford, for receiving 18 loads of knee timber from Peter Holborow, and 13 loads of oak timber, &c., from Capt. Shorter for the use of the ship London. [Ibid. Nos. 139, 140.]
Sept. 28.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Thos. Hayter. I want a copy of a survey for the repair of the wharves and docks referred to in a warrant of June 1669, as being with the clerk of the survey at Chatham, who knows nothing about it; the original is in your office. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Sept. 28. Warrant from Sir Edw. Hungerford, justice of the peace for the county of Wilts, to the keeper of Fisherton Anger Gaol, to receive and keep the bodies of Nath. Barnard and John Love until next assizes, they having been convicted of being at a conventicle at North Bradley, and of speaking treasonable words against his Majesty and his Government. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 8.]
Sept. 28.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The John Bonadventure and two or three others have arrived from London to take in pilchards for the Straits; also the St. John the Baptist of Dunkirk, bound to find out the North-West Passage. The David of Weymouth from Newfoundland reports a bad fishing season; she met the Straits' fleet of 200 sail off the Lizard. Several merchantmen have put to sea with a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Sept. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Reserve has had orders to sail for the Downs the first fair wind. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Sept. 29.
London.
H. Slingsby to Mr. Bridgman at Lord Arlington's, Newmarket. The clerk of the Signet has waived demanding any fees for his Majesty's indenture for the Mint, and turned it over to the clerk of the Privy Seal; but he detains it for a like demand of 16l., although Sir Thos. Strickland promised that whatever the clerks of the Signet did, should be done by those of the Privy Seal. Sir Thomas being out of town, and the rest of the Commissioners not sitting, I beg you will get Lord Arlington to procure the King's signature to an order enclosed, or to such as he shall think fit, without which the indenture will remain until the King's return, which will be of ill consequence to the Mint, and also to the service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 11.]
Sept. 29.
Colbrook.
Ja. Dawtry to Rich. Wilkinson, Swan Inn, Strand. Your brother will be with you to-day; I hope he will be provided for, but do not approve of the way suggested, as too much piping and potting will be an enemy to him, although I do not question his ability or ingenuity. Considering the time, I think the amount of his charges not too much, being 44s. or 6½d. a day, and 32 farthings over. Pray satisfy it as soon as possible, for both our credit's sake. [Ibid. No. 12.] Encloses,
Wm. Jumper to Mr. Dawtry. Being much troubled for your account of the drink imported into this country, I desire you will draw it up, and be with me to-morrow at Mr. Web's, the Woolpack, near Smithfield Bars. You are to come early, so as to be able to make an affidavit before a Baron of the Exchequer, and return speedily.—28 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 12i.]
Sept. 29. [Sir] Wm. Doyley to Wm. Clarke, Yarmouth. You are to attend on 5 Oct. at the Angel in Norwich, with your witnesses, to support the allegations contained in your petition to the King, which was referred by Council to Lord Townshend, and by his lordship to me and Rob. Suckling, who are to report to his lordship thereon. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Sept. 29.
Ordnance Office.
Jonas Moore and 2 other officers, to the Navy Commissioners. We could not reply before, as we had not a full Board until the Master-General of the Ordnance returned from the country. We desire you will forbear the retrenchment of the watch at the old dock at Chatham, until the Master of Ordnance has ascertained from his Majesty whether it shall be continued or not. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 142.]
[Sept. 29.] Proposal by Rob. Mayors of ships tendered for the West Indies, Surinam, &c., particulars of their tonnage, number of men, names of their commanders, &c. With notes of calculations. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Sept. 29. List [by Pepys] of 5 French and 4 English ships, with their tonnage, number of men, names of commanders, time when they will be disengaged, the rate they can be hired at, and various calculations. [Ibid. No. 143a.]
Sept. 29.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Copy of his letter of the 8th instant. I repeat the request made in mine of the 1st, that a person may be appointed to come with the convoy from Port Mahon, to take a note of and give a receipt for the provisions I shall ship, and to issue them out to the respective ships on their arrival here; and that upon my producing such receipt, the remaining half of the purchase money may be paid in to my order, the first half being previously charged by bills. You may be confident that the mariners will have what is just, and it will soon be seen that sending supplies from Leghorn will not only ease the King's expense, but conduce to the advancement of his service, which has too much suffered by disappointments from England, always incident to long and tedious sea conveyances. Three days' favourable wind will always enable me to lodge anything in Port Mahon.
I offer to supply powder, cables, cordage, pitch, tar, and other stores, and presume that when the extravagant freight and other great expenses attending their transportation from England are considered, the supply from Leghorn will prove the best husbandry. I shall contribute my utmost strength to promote the service. I will now despatch the St. David, Dartmouth, and Orange fireship, who all came in, not only destitute of provisions, but of all necessaries. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 144.]
Sept. 29. List by the Surveyor of the Navy, of 18 ships at Chatham, 18 at Portsmouth, 5 at Woolwich, and 6 at Deptford; with particulars as to when they were launched, and what has been and is required to be done to each. Noted by Pepys as being an answer to the Board's request that the Surveyor should report what King's ships of the best quality would be in condition to be fitted for the next spring, according to his Royal Highness's order for preparing 50 by that time. [Ibid. No. 145.] Annexing,
Memorandum [by Pepys] that towards the 50 ships to be fitted, the Board may reckon, by Mr. Wren's discourse with Sir Jer. Smith, on the Resolution and 5 others named, who will have returned from Newfoundland by January next. [Ibid. No. 145i.]
Sept. 29.
Portsmouth.
Chris. Brouncker to the Navy Commissioners. I saw your order to Capt. Deane about the brazier's work for the new ship, and do not deny to serve you at the price agreed with Commissioner Tippetts; but this piece of copper is 20d. a lb., and is intended for the chimney in the great cabin; I shall not get anything by it; but I hope you will not put me upon work to lose by it. I only ask for extra pay in extra cases, as all others have. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Sept. 29. Jonas Shish to Commissioner Tippetts. One of the pits at Greenhithe has been dug 16 or 17 feet deep, but on account of the wet weather, the ground gave way, and it was a mercy two of the men were not buried in it. We could not perceive any springs at that depth, and the ground is marshy, mingled with sand. I am going there this morning to finish the other pit. The beacons are yet standing, but I think you must carry the gates of both docks more to the westward. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Sept. 29. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. To avoid further troubling his Royal Highness, and my own everlasting waiting, I submit various reasons for your consideration, why my salary for services rendered in mustering the Mary Rose and other ships in 1667, and in checking the accounts, by which I saved upwards of 643l. to his Majesty, should be paid, seeing I was commissioned by his Royal Highness and the Navy Board, both of whom have certified that my work was satisfactory, and that I ought to be paid. Noted as read at the Board, but an answer judged unnecessary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 148.]
Sept. 30.
Chatham.
Commissioner Jno. Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will see to the fixing of the chain, and the providing 20 pinnaces, with other necessaries. I have had 16 fitted since March, but the stores are kept so bare of oars that they are not ready when required; the Greenwich and Newcastle were fitted out of those sent. I have not promised the workmen a quarter's pay of their arrears, but I wish I could do so, as they have been very pressing for it. I did not forget the charge of the purveyor, when Maplesden proposed to abate 5s. a load for the carriage of his timber, but Maplesden was to see it brought in, and the King was only to be at the charge of converting the large pieces, to make them carriageable and fit for the new ship.
I beg your approval of my appointment of Rob. Eason, in the absence of Brunsdon, to see to it, as he is an honest man and was once purveyor of Chatham Yard, and assistant to Capt. Taylor, the master shipwright. Mr. Amhurst was here yesterday for his money according to contract, and was much troubled at being disappointed, but I promised it would soon be down. Thanks for a copy of Mason's contract, and the warrant. Wondering it came so soon, I heard that Mr. Pett had it from Mr. Lawrence, who told him that Mason had sold his timber to the Board for 57s. a load, although I would only give him 52s. Mason too, on his return to Chatham, was so big with it that it was his whole discourse, and he gave out that he would spoil me of buying timber for the Navy, which he may well do, when in all parts where he goes, he bids the people not to sell their timber to the King without they wish to lose their money, as he has money owing, and cannot get it. I believe some is owing to him, but he need not noise it about, to hinder the buying of timber for the King, and he ought not to be suffered to do so. I was told by him, on one of the wharves at Maidstone, that he never got a farthing by serving timber to the King, and he then slighted the service very much, which Mr. Gregory and Mr. Wilson heard.
If I have not bought a pennyworth to your Honours' liking, I am very sorry, but Mason has been the chief cause of it, as he goes about and offers 50s. a load for the choicest; and well he may, when he is certain what his profit will be, and knows that some of his timber did not cost him 40s. a load. I hope you will not be displeased at my giving this account of Mason's actions; I had hoped to have broken the ice without it, and bought timber in these parts as cheap as Mason could, your Honours supplying me with money; and I doubt not but I may, with your assistance.
I am not the person to object against what you do, but am troubled that a person should act so unhandsomely by us both, and that he cannot fare well but must make so great a noise of it. Mr. Cole's treenails have come, and there are 19 loads of compass timber and 7 loads of knees in the hoy; as I can have the compass at 57s. and the knees at 3l. a load, I beg directions as to buying them. A hoy with hemp has also arrived. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 149.]
Sept. 30.
Limehouse.
Phineas Pett to Pepys. I wrote you on my return from the country 3 weeks since, of my intention to attend the Navy Board; I have been prevented from doing so by illness, but hope to be able to come speedily, and to find that you still continue my friend. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Sept. 30. Same to Col. Thos. Middleton. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Sept. 30.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to the Navy Commissioners. I return a letter which should have gone in the Maryport [Merchant]. The Newfoundland men that have arrived met the fleet some 16 leagues south of Scilly, so that although the wind is against them, they make shift to keep at sea. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Sept. 30.
Woolwich.
Capt. Will. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. As Mr. Byland has resolved to launch the St. Andrew on Tuesday 4 Oct., I desire that some men may be sent from Deptford to assist, also 100 watermen, and an order for entering men, as also a master. The longboat you wrote about formerly belonged to the first ship called the London, and is not the one which was built at Deptford, and would have been too small for the purpose. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Sept. 30. —to the Navy Commissioners. We have noticed a paper on the Treasury Office door in Broad Street, that all seamen who were discharged before Dec. 1665 are to bring in their tickets this day, and that only they, their wives, brothers, or sisters, are to attend to receive the money, otherwise the tickets will be detained and the persons punished. Such limitations have often been published to small purpose, and it is well known that, notwithstanding such provisoes, much water goes beside the mill. The paper so affixed on the doors will serve only to adopt your clerks and others to be wives, brethren, and sisters of the persons to whom such tickets belong as shall be brought in, and from 5s. to 8s. in the pound will still be paid as formerly on such tickets, as you and the authors of such restrictions know.
What is it to you, or what prejudice is it to the nation, if you pay to such as present them, provided they give security that the seamen who did the service shall never demand the money for them ? You may be sure they did not part with their tickets without some consideration, and if it was only 10s. in the pound, they who pleasured them ran a great adventure as to their own interest, and showed more charity than those who cry out against them and make laws to afflict them, to which end the inquisition [Committee of Accounts] at Brooke House was erected, and the money spent by those Commissioners would have paid many a poor man's ticket. We know several that have at small rates supplied the seamen in their necessities, and some who have accommodated their friends, in whose hands they left their concerns while again at sea, without 1s. profit, and who are yet unpaid, because they will not allow 5s. or 6s. in the pound on the amount by them disbursed for little or no profit.
We have heard many seamen wish they had allowed 10s., or a noble in the pound at first, to have had ready money. You may notice that for years your clerks could not honestly have lived at the rate they do upon their salaries.
We hear that many great ships have to be provided by the spring, but where are your men ? or if they were all before you, what encouragement have they to go, or to show themselves valiant, when they have but small hopes of receiving their pay on their return now, when they were so shamefully neglected at the first engagement, when above two millions were ordered for the service ? And what encouragement have their friends to supply them again, who have suffered so deeply for pleasuring them before ? As we see and know more than you do, we advise you to pay all the arrears, whoever brings the tickets, provided they be known persons, or give security that the owners of the tickets shall not demand it again. Noted as picked up in the Navy Office by Capt. Shales, and delivered by him to Lord B[rouncker], then in the office, 4 Oct. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 154.]
Sept. 30.
Doddington.
Hester Doddington to Williamson. Thanks for your kindness shown to my husband, which merits all manner of acknowledgments from him and his poor family; I hope we may be in a capacity to serve you. I beseech you to solicit his lordship to complete the honour obtained for my husband, so that he may be fixed and past all danger; it does not appear by his letters that he has yet obtained his commission to stay. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 14.]
Sept. 30.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for Blackborne] to Hickes. Three ships of Plymouth have arived from Newfoundland, and report that they have made but an indifferent voyage. [Ibid. No. 15.] Encloses,
List of 4 ships which have come in from places named. [Ibid. No. 15i.]
Sept. 30.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. The Lily of Barnstaple, with timber from Rotterdam, and a small Breton from Rochelle with salt, have arrived. [Ibid. No. 16.]
[Sept.] Petition of Sam. Curtis, house carpenter, to the Navy Commissioners, for a recommendation to his Royal Highness for the place of house carpenter at Deptford Yard, vacant by death of Isaac Welsh. Served a 7 years' apprenticeship in the yard with [Edw.] Rundall, the late house carpenter, and was at the making of the wet docks, apron, and gates there, and was constantly employed for years in dock and wharf works, as well as house work, so that his ability is very well known to most of the officers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 155.] Annexed,
Certificate by J. Uthwat in favour of the petitioner, and repeating the before-mentioned circumstances.—Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 155i.]
Sept. Petition of Mary, relict of James Norman, to the Navy Commissioners, for payment of arrears of salary due to her late husband, and his servant, as clerk of the survey at Chatham Yard, amounting to 140l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 285, No. 156.]
Sept. Petition of Tubal-Cain Porter, purser of the Dragon, to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Sprigg has received an order for putting 26,880 lbs. of bread and 112 tuns of beer on board this ship, being a full proportion for her complement of 160 men for 6 months; but as the ship cannot stow away above 4 months' beer and 20,000 lbs. of bread, begs that only that quantity may be put on board. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Sept. Estimate by Dan. Furzer of the charge for building at Bristol a third-rate frigate of dimensions mentioned; total 5,390l. Noted by Commissioner Middleton that the freight of the timber to Bristol has to be remembered. [Ibid. No. 158.] Annexing,
Estimate by the Navy Surveyor of the charge for rigging the same, including boatswain and carpenter's stores, 2,911l. 9s., which added to the charge of building, comes to 8,301l. 9s. [Ibid. No. 158i.]
Sept. Estimate by Dan. Furzer of the charge for felling, preparing, and bringing in timber from Dean Forest and elsewhere to Bristol, for building a third-rate frigate; total 5,378l. 10s. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Sept. ? Petition of Sir Wm. Bucknall to the King, for direction to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland to allow him exchange at the rate of 5 per cent., as well as 10 per cent. interest, on the repayment of 10,000l. advanced for his Majesty to Wm. Chiffinch, 26 Oct. 1669, and for which he has a patent for repayment from the revenue of Ireland, but scruple is made about the rate of exchange. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 17.]
Sept. ? Petition of Sir Wm. Bucknall to the King, showing that a loan of 2,800l. made by him to Wm. Chiffinch for his Majesty, 10 May 1670, was ordered to be repaid out of the 300,000l. to be raised by the Act of Settlement in Ireland; begs that in the payment, 10 per cent. may be allowed for the difference in the rate of exchange. [Ibid. No. 18.] Annexing,
Warrant to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, to repay to Wm. Bucknall 2,800l. lent by him to Wm. Chiffinch for the King, with interest at 10 per cent, the money to be detained from the present farm of the revenue of Ireland, if not repaid in 2 years.—13 May 1670. [Ibid. No. 18i.]
Receipt by Wm. Chiffinch of the above money from Wm. Bucknall.—10 May 1670. [Ibid., No. 18ii.]
Sept. Petition of Geo. Freeman, painter, to the King, for the place of chief painter and designer of tapestry, having attained some skill in designing and painting history, by his travels and industry, his relations being always loyal, and his mother his Majesty's laundress. [Ibid. No. 19.] Encloses,
Certificate by Sir Peter Lely, that he has seen several drawings of the petitioner's, and believes him to be the best fitted that he knows, to be employed in making designs for tapestry, prints, or any other inventions belonging to an historical painter, and that he would employ him himself before any other on such occasions.—23 Sept. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 19i.]
Sept.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edw. Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, to pay 20l. to Gideon Royer, for writing, flourishing, and embellishing 2 skins of vellum in gold, with the King's arms, badges, &c., being letters to the King of Persia on behalf of an Armenian bishop, and to the Emperor of Russia on behalf of General-Major Van Buckhoven, Caspar Calthoff, and Wm. Parke, merchant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 88.]
Sept.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a presentation of Tobias Conyers to the rectory of Medley, alias Methley, co. York, void by death of Dr. Elcock. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 21.]
Sept.
Windsor.
Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse, Westminster, to permit Mrs. Vincent, with an apothecary or nurse, to have access to [Nath.] Vincent, and supply him with requisites for his health. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept.
Windsor.
Commission for Sir Thos. Slingsby, Bart., to be captain of the foot company in Scarborough Castle, Yorkshire, [Hen.] Crosland his lieutenant, and [Peter] Hawkins his ensign. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 16.]
Sept. Warrant to pay to George Sawyer, page of honour to the Queen, in place of Chris. Roper, 100l. yearly for entertainment, and 20l. a year to buy horses. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 238.]
Sept. Warrant to pay to Sir Allen Apsley, for service of the Duke of York, 48,000l. without account; viz., 24,000l. a year for 2 years, in lieu of the revenue from wine licences, which the King has taken into his own hands. [Ibid. No. 239.]
Sept. Warrant to the Exchequer officers, to take care that the 55,135l. 18s. 6½d. registered on the Additional Aid for payment of the creditors of the Navy, and 2,250l. 13s. remaining on orders in the Exchequer, be settled on a branch of the revenue where it may best be paid; also to pay 18,176l. 2s. to Sir Thos. Player, chamberlain of London, for satisfying the assignments of Sir Geo. Carteret, late Navy Treasurer, and 186,661l. 19s. 6¾d. to Sir T. Osborne and Sir T Littleton, now due on bills, and 282,484l. 8s. 3¼d. for interest and other services. [Ibid.]
Sept. Warrant to pay to Sir Stephen Fox, paymaster of the guards and garrisons, 1,120l. a month on account, for the pay of the 200 recruits added to the King's 3 troops of guards; 14l. a month additional for the secretary of the forces; 9l. 16s. a month for Sir Chas. Wheeler, with 431l. 4s. due to Sir Charles at 7s. a day, from 7 March 1667 to 30 July 1670; also to pay Sir Stephen's disbursements for interest, &c., not exceeding 20,000l. [Ibid.]
Sept. Rich Napier, and two others, to the King. We recommend Edw. Smith, engraver and citizen of London, who has been employed for many years by the officers of the Tower, in engraving stamps and seals for ammunition, and in other works under his late father-in-law, his Majesty's engraver, and also has engraved for the city of London; as a fit person to succeed an engraver of the Tower lately deceased. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 20.]
Sept. ? Deposition by William Tubman in the case of Fras. Lowther v. Miles Pennington, late sheriff of Cumberland, sued for the escape of William Hutton, that deponent tendered to Lowther 113l. 0s. 6d., being Hutton's debt, with costs and damages, which Lowther refused to accept. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Sept. Catalogue of Council books 1540–1645, and other books in the Council office, in the custody of Mr. Rider, consisting of Acts of Parliament, Proclamations, atlases, treaties, orders, &c. With note that the Council books 1601–1613, with many others of Henry VIII., Edward VI., and Mary, were burnt with the banqueting house. [6¼ pages. Ibid. No. 21a.]
Sept. Journal notes of occurrences, domestic and foreign, from 4 April to 8 Sept. 1670 [by Williamson]. Large bundle of loose papers. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Sept.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind. With 3 duplicates, 8, 11, and 19 Sept., more detailed, addressed to Ant. Halford of the Kentish post office. These are marked thus*.
Vol. 279. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind. Vol. 279. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind.
23 Sept. 2 4 15 N.N.W. 34 Sept. 15 2 76 S.W.
24 " 3 3 19 W. 35 " 16 2 77 S.W.
25 " 5 5 30 W.N.W. 36 " 17 2 83 S.W.
26 " 8 3 55 S.S.W. 37 " 18 2 87 S.W.
27 " *8 [3] 55 W.S.W. 38 " 19 2 87 S.W.
28 " 9 2 56 S. 39 " *19 2 87 S.W.
29 " 10 2 61 S.S.E. 40 " 20 2 89 N.W.
30 " 11 2 64 S.W. 41 " 22 N.E.
31 " *11 2 64 S.W. 42 " 23 1 N.E.
32 " 12 2 67 W. 43 " 28 S.S.E.
33 " 13 2 72 W. 44 " 29 S.S.E.