BHO

Charles II: October 1670

Pages 465-509

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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October 1670

Oct. 1. Constance Pley to Thos. Hayter. I beg the delivery to my cousin Knight of a piece of sail cloth, which I brought as a sample to the Navy Office, or a bill for payment of it. Noted that the canvas was delivered 6 Oct. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 1.]
Oct. 1.
Bristol.
Jas. Baskerville to Williamson. I will wait upon you next week. The new Mayor has been sworn in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 45.]
Oct. 1.
Westminster.
William, Bishop of Lincoln, to Lord Arlington. I beg you to recommend Thos. Stanhope, a member of Lord Chesterfield's family, to his Majesty, for the rectory of Market Bosworth, he being well fitted for it, both from his learning, prudence, and piety, and the judicious manner in which he managed the affairs of the Ecclesiastical Court, which has given satisfaction to the gentry of Leicester, to whom no one would be more acceptable. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 46.]
Oct. 1. Certificate by the said Bishop, that Thos. Stanhope, M.A., intending to petition his Majesty for the rectory of Bosworth in co. Leicester and diocese of Lincoln, he can recommend him as a man of good learning and life, and as having been a stout promoter of the Royal and ecclesiastical government, since his abode at Leicester. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Oct. 2.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Hickes. The Bideford, Margaret, and other vessels have arrived from Newfoundland. They sold their fish in the country, as have also most of the Newfoundland fleet, very few of them going to a market. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Oct. 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Reserve has sailed for the Downs, to take charge of the convoy for the Canaries; the Princess is also appointed to sail, with Sir Wm. Jennings as her commander. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Oct. 3.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Several vessels have sailed for France; some Londoners bound for the Straits, 3 Dutchmen and 2 Frenchmen with salt, and several others outward bound, are in the harbour. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Oct. 2.
Euston Hall.
[Lord Arlington] to Williamson. I have received your letters and advices. Pray encourage Mr. L'Estrange in prosecuting the printers or publishers of the books he sent, and give him 10l. to reward the men, if he desires it. I have not had the opportunity to show his Majesty the Spanish Ambassador's letter, but fear the condescension of the Queen, his mistress, will not be satisfactory to France, who will submit to nothing beyond what is named in their first offer, and therefore those in Sweden must forbear to send their Minister hither, until France agrees, which I fear they will never do. Thank M. Ognate for his letter; I shall be glad to see his news made good, that the Emperor and princes will come into the amnesty. Thank Lord Craven for his letter, and for taking care of my house, and also Secretary Trevor. I want a clerk sent down to help me to write, as his Majesty will stay the full time assigned. Mr. Treasurer is still with him. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 51.]
Oct. 3.
Padua.
H. Yerbury to Williamson. I gave you an account how I parted with my Lord Ambassador, who was not less ready to befriend me than Lord H. Howard, but your single patronage is sufficient to enrich a man of my modest pretensions. By the statute and practice of Magdalen College, it is ordained that, if any Fellow happens to be employed on his Majesty's service abroad, he may claim the emoluments of his fellowship as if he were residing in the college; consequently I take it for granted that if demand is made, the President and auditors will not deny me an annual sum of 10l. for my diet, which was yearly allowed while I travelled with Mr. Packington; nor was the allowance any more 50 years since, when Mr. Mabb, a Fellow, was secretary to the Earl of Bristol in Spain; but the diet of the house was then without stint for bread, beer, &c., which being retrenched 3 years since, every senior Fellow now receives the just value of 10s. weekly, in consideration of his diet. Pray procure a letter from his Majesty to the President and auditors, for payment of such sum, so long as I shall be employed on his Majesty's service in Italy; if the business is done according to the wishes of the Ambassador, Lord Fauconberg, his Majesty and Lord Arlington will be my paymasters. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 52.]
Oct. 3.
York.
Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I beg instructions as to whether I am to remain here, or come up to Westminster. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Oct. 3. Post label for letters between Thetford and London, on his Majesty's service, despatched 1 Oct., 10 p.m.; received at the Letter Office by Hickes, 3 Oct., at 2.30 a.m. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Oct. 3.
Framlingham.
John Maddocks to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letter accepting my tender of 200 loads of plank, but with a greater abatement in the price than I expected, as all Suffolk cannot afford the like; but I will stand by it, as my brother has finished the business for me, and will send the first freight to Chatham. Pray order the hastening of the unloading of the vessels, so as to prevent demurrage. Let my bills be sent up to my brothers Robert or Richard, and care be taken for their payment. I shall be ready to send one or two freights more if you will give the order, and will perform all agreed by the contract, of which I have a copy; but if one freight fails of the length, and another makes it good, I beg that I may not be abated.
If you will let me have a bill of imprest for 500l., I will undertake to supply Chatham, Woolwich, or Deptford with 500 loads of plank of Suffolk growth, according to the dimensions expressed, but dare not undertake for their meeting at the top end, although it is generally known that this country plank holds out well at the top. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 2.] Enclosing,
Tender by Maddocks of 500 loads of plank, of sizes mentioned: 200 loads to be delivered by 1 May 1671, and the remainder between that and 1st Feb. following, at 4l. 7s. a load for that delivered at Chatham, and 1s. less a load for that delivered in the river; 500l. to be paid in advance, and the rest as the timber is delivered. [Ibid. No. 2i.]
Oct. 4.
Portsmouth.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. I am on board his Majesty's ship Princess, which will be launched to-day, and only want men to get her to sea. I did not know until I came down that they might be entered, as you denied me an order for it. I am assured by the victualler that nothing will be wanting on his part. I have sent a notice to the seamen in London to come down; let Mr. Steventon be supplied with conduct money for them, or it will fall very heavy on me, having passed my word for it. I will ask Mr. Pepys for the instructions, muster-books, and tickets, and if he would send them down, I would forward a receipt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 3.]
Oct. 4.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Several Plymouth ships from Newfoundland report that they have made but indifferent voyages, and that the convoys with the fleet of fish ships intended leaving Newfoundland on 20 Sept. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 55.]
Oct. 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Princess, bound for the Straits, and the Tiger are launched from the dry dock, after being repaired and fitted for sea. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Oct. 4.
Newmarket.
Wm. Bridgeman to [Williamson]. I send copies of papers received from Mr. Wren for insertion in the Gazette. The Queen is expected presently, and will go from hence to Euston, and then return to Audley End; but the King will not leave this place until next week. I return a petition by command of his lordship [Arlington]; Lord Ormond having recommended another person for that living, at the Bishop of Lincoln's request, the two bishops are to agree upon the person they will recommend to have it. [Ibid. No. 57.]
Oct. 5.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Unity of Falmouth and several others have put to sea for Barbadoes, Madeira, and the Canaries. The Town of Flushing, from Holland, reports that 50 more ships are fitting out there to fetch salt; the Walsingham of London has also arrived from the same place, bound for Virginia. The Prince William of Middleburg came in to stop a leak, and has since gone for Bordeaux, as has also the Woodworth of London, having Sir George Browne and his lady on board, with his coach and horses. Sir George intends travelling up the country as a remedy for the gout. The horse and foot militia have been reviewed, by order of the Lord Lieutenant of this county. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Oct. 5. Thos. Holden to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Oct. 5.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. Two small French vessels have arrived with salt from France, and will return with butter, &c. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Oct. 5.
Euston.
Jo. Swaddell to [Williamson]. I delivered your letter to Lord Arlington, who arrived at Newmarket yesterday at 10 a.m., as did also the Queen, accompanied by the Duchesses of Buckingham and Monmouth, and Ladies Suffolk and Arlington, at 11; they all dined at one table with his Majesty and his Royal Highness, after which the Queen took coach with the ladies for Euston, where she was very nobly entertained, the Duke of Ormond and Sir Bernard Gascoine being there likewise. The King is expected at Euston during the week; the Queen will return to Audley End to-morrow, and on Monday the Court will move towards London. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 61.]
Oct. 6.
London.
Sir John Frederick to Pepys. Being very unwell, I have sent my man for an order for the appraisement of the vessel, as also for another to the party whom the Commissioners have appointed to join Mr. Wood in making it; my man will pay the fees due to your clerks for the order. Whatever salvage shall appear to be due to the King, I engage to pay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 4.]
Oct. 6.
Navy Office.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. The Spy has returned from Portsmouth, is at Holehaven Bay, and wants provisions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 5.]
[Oct. 6.] Petition of Richard Whinyard, joiner, to the Navy Commissioners, to move his Royal Highness for an appointment as master joiner at the yard at Greenhithe. Has served in the several yards ever since his Majesty's restoration, and served his Majesty's father also for many years, but having 40l. due for services done at Deptford and Woolwich, it has caused him and his wife and children to fall into several straits. [Ibid. No. 6.] Annexing,
Certificate by Thos. Turner and 4 others in favour of the petitioner.—Deptford, 6 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 6i.]
Oct. 6.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Capt. Elliot, commander of the Reserve in the Downs, and convoy to the merchant ships to the Canaries, has obtained some volunteers by beating a drum about the town, and making certain promises, otherwise they intended a press from Dover Castle. The Dutch ship which lost her main and fore masts, and was brought in out of imminent danger by the Deal hookers, is also in the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 62.]
Oct. 6.
Newmarket.
Jo. Swaddell to Williamson. The Queen arrived to-day, and after witnessing the races from her coach on the heath, went to Audley End, attended by Lord Arlington. She seemed to have been extremely satisfied with her entertainment at my lord's house, and says it shall not be the last time. The races were run by Gargrave and another, and by Mr. Moye's gelding, who got the course against a horse said to be backed by several rich citizens. My lord will be in town on Wednesday at farthest. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Oct. 7.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to Hickes. Has no news to send. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Oct. 7 ?
Saturday.
Mr. de Leyonberg to Lord Arlington. Could I conveniently have a copy of that Spanish paper which you promised me last night? [Ibid. No. 64a.]
Oct. 7.
London.
John Harris, sailmaker, to Col. Thos. Middleton. Understanding that many of the King's ships at Chatham, Portsmouth, and London, are ordered for sea in the spring, and knowing how empty the stores are of sails, I beg you to consider what may be wanting for each place, that I may take speedy course to supply them; it cannot be done in a short time, as the men who attended that affair during the war are scattered, for want of employment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 7.]
Oct. 7.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I have viewed the chain, and think it is too small for such a great concern; a bigger one ought to be made. The east side of it ought to be carried more north, so as not to thwart the river, and it ought to be more slanting, so that if any ship came against it, it would be put on the lee shore; and if any one ship dared to attempt coming up, she would have to do so with an easterly wind, and would then lie so that the guns of Upnor Castle would soon destroy her. The new chain too would not require so many guns, and would be hove taut with more ease.
I pray that the Royal Sovereign, Loyal London, and St. Andrew at Gillingham, may be supplied with small arms, powder, and shot; that two of them may be made guardships; and that a gun may be placed on the old dock, to give notice in the night if any accident should happen to his Majesty's ships, which would be sooner heard by the officers than the customary ringing of the bell. Some persons have commenced making a way in St. Mary's Creek, to get to their marshes; but as it would stop the current of the water, and prevent the boats belonging to the ships at Gillingham from going up and down, I forbade them going on with the work, until his Royal Highness's pleasure is known.
I reminded you some time since of a breach that had been made in the river near Rochester Point which, unless seen to, will render that part between the bridge and the new dock unfit for the service for which it has long been employed. I hoped the persons in controversy about the land would have agreed, but as that is not likely, and as the water, which formerly went in but at one place, now goes in at several, if it is not speedily prevented, the point will be in danger of being washed away. It will cost 200l. to make the banks good, and as there is no other way of getting it done, his Majesty might bestow the overflown land, by Act of State, upon some person who would undertake to mend the walls, &c. I want plank and timber to carry on the works. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 8.]
Oct. 7.
Dover.
Capt. Wm. Younger to Pepys. I beg you to split the ticket due to Purser Swan, so as to secure the repayment of 40l. due to me in the Horseman, of which Swan's wife defrauded me by receiving it. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Oct. 7.
Downs.
Capt. Thos. Elliot to the Navy Commissioners. The Reserve came into the Downs last Saturday, and on Wednesday I went down to her, but she is not fit for sailing, for want of men. I have used all means, by pressing and beating of drum, but I still want above 100 able men, and the wind hanging northerly, there is no expectation of any ships coming in. There are 10 sail of Canary men in the Downs, who would willingly have gone without me, but their men refuse to sail without convoy. I want men, and necessaries for the sick, as I had a very sickly ship at Portsmouth, and without physic the men will not recover. I will disburse the money for them here, if you will send a line that it shall be repaid. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Oct. 8.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I send contracts and a demand for provisions. The pantiles required for repair of the masthouse can be had here. There being so much provision coming into the stores, I have ordered the reentering of Mr. Wild's team, and also 6 labourers; I could employ 50 more shipwrights. Let some means be devised for supplying them, as they will not enter themselves. Capt. Stephen Sartan, of the Francis fireship, died to-day. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Oct. 8. Estimate by Surveyor Middleton of the quantity of stores named which will be required for fitting 50 sail of ships, and continuing them in sea service for eight months in the year 1671. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 12.]
Oct. 8. List of 7 watermen belonging to the Navy Office barge, to whom protection was granted from being pressed. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Oct. 8. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. The same power which caused you to stop my salary has long since desired you to grant it, and no other can be granted by his Royal Highness. No cause has been shown why it should not be paid, but the contrary, under the hands of 5 of your board; all the clerks and others have signified that I did more service (as muster master in 1665), and sent more books than those who received their salary, and had better times.
I hope after 4 years' waiting at extraordinary charge, and being damnified at least 1,000l., you will think my salary, which is under 50l., should be granted, and thus prevent my appearing more public, and making a precedent which cannot be serviceable to the King, either at sea or on shore. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Oct. 8.
The Greenwich, off Cadiz.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. We made the Burlings on the 7th, with our fleet of 76 sail, and having seen those for that place past danger, we proceeded for the southward cape. We had a violent storm, which separated us, but got together again next morning, and put 6 sail into Faro, and others into St. Lucar and Traverero; and have now arrived here with nearly 60 sail. When those bound here are in, we intend for Tangiers, whence I will send an account. This convoy is too big to be together; it is dangerous amongst themselves, and offers advantages to the enemy. [See p. 473 infra.] We have not seen any Turks. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Oct. 8.
Downs.
Capt. Thos. Eliott to Pepys. Being continually importuned by the Canary merchants and masters to sail, I beg you to hasten Capt. Langston of the Newcastle, with the seamen and soldiers ordered, or send them in some other vessel, as I have used all my endeavours to get men. When these come, I will sail with the first wind. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Oct. 8.
Wapping.
Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. I have attended the Admiralty Court by your order, to prove the quantity of his Majesty's loss on the river Elbe, of which Sir Walter Walker is busy in preparing the allegations. The loss of 6,941l. 17s. 6d., with 25 per cent. damages, Sir Walter expects to recover with interest. His Majesty's proctor, Sam. Franklin, is preparing the papers.
As to the payment of 3 per cent. to Ford, Tite, and Harris, he allows that they have been at much charge, not only at Hamburg but here, attending Council and the Admiralty Court, and have spent much of their own time in the matter, yet he thinks payment of ⅓ should be suspended; they would be much encouraged if they had 100l., which is the half. Franklin, the proctor, must also be paid, and that privately, not to be known to Sir Rob. Wiseman, the King's advocate, who has often appeared on behalf of the Hamburghers, labouring to destroy the claims of those who have suffered in this grand loss. The matter will take 3 or 4 weeks more in the Admiralty Court. I beg that the money allowed on account of the 3 per cent. may not be imprested to me, but to Ford, Tite, and Harris, who would not like to give an account to me how they share or pay it. I dread the name of an imprest. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 17.] Annexing,
Sir Rich. Ford to Sir Wm. Warren. I hear you received the money to pay the charges of loss for the King's account. Pray pay me, or give me a satisfactory reason for your refusal.—London, 5 Oct. 1670. Also,
Sir Wm. Warren to Sir Rich. Ford. I have not received money to pay charges of the King's loss on the Hamburg account, but a bill of imprest was made, to enable me to satisfy at 3 per cent. the value of the loss, and I was desired to prove the loss in the Admiralty Court. I am now told that nothing can be done in that court till Sir W. Walker comes to town to-day. There shall be no delay on my part, but till I have done at the Admiralty, I cannot ask at the Navy Office for money to pay the 3 per cent. I have proposed to them to imprest the money to you.—5 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 17i.]
Oct. 8.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Hope, Rose, and Charity have arrived from Rotterdam; the Elizabeth from Hamburg confirms the destruction of the Algiers ships by the English, and gives one more to the number destroyed; they say that the people are willing to comply with the demands of the King of England, and make satisfaction for the English merchantmen lost during the late wars at Ortington, in the river near them. The Greyhound has come in from Dublin and the Mary from Morlaix, and report the success over the Turks; also that a stop has been put to the proceedings of the French forces in Lorraine, through the Emperor or some other prince having interceded for a treaty between them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 65.]
Oct. 9.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for Blackborne] to Hickes. The Newfoundland fleet has arrived. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Oct. 9. [Sir] Thos. Clarges and Thos. Bayles to Williamson. The abuse on the country by counterfeit briefs and passes being so great, we have examined many persons, and endeavoured to detect the contrivers; if the advertisement enclosed is published in the Gazette, it may be the means of putting a stop to these proceedings. [Ibid. No. 67.] Annexing,
Notice to all Mayors, officers of corporations, justices of the peace, bailiffs, constables and others, to detain all persons found begging with false briefs or counterfeit passes, or certificates for pretended losses, by which his Majesty's subjects have been much imposed upon for 5 or 6 years past. Names of the chief delinquents. Many of these change their names, but if their writings, or copies of them, are sent to Wm. Taunton, keeper of the House of Correction at Westminster, he will certify whether they are true or not, being ordered to do so by the justices of Middlesex; such writings are mostly forged in or about London or Westminster, with the names and seals of persons of quality, well known. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 67i.]
Oct. 9.
The Greenwich, off Cadiz.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to Williamson. We sailed from Plymouth 24 Aug., with upwards of 80 sail bound for Lisbon, Faro, and the Straits; also with the Turkey ships and others, with goods for Spain and Italy. We arrived safely at Lisbon, where we met a convoy of salt ships from Holland; after putting in those ships bound for Lisbon, we sailed with the rest for Faro, and have returned with a fleet of 56 sail, which is now before Cadiz. When we have seen those safe which are bound for London, we shall sail for Tangiers and Malaga with the rest, and proceed as my instructions lead me. We have not met with any Turks, and I hope we need not fear if we do, but such a convoy of ships, which are valued at 1,500,000l. sterling, never went together. I sent your packet to Lisbon. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Oct. 9.
Portsmouth.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. Had I thought the ship was not in a condition to enter men, I would not have demanded them; it was you who said it was contrary to the rule of the Navy to enter men before the ships were ready to receive them. After being with you, I found it would have been no prejudice to the service to have entered them 3 days before; it could not in reason be judged that men should fit themselves and get down under 7 days; when I asked for the order, I had 53 men to enter, but had to tell them I had no order, and did not know when I should have.
Thanks for the bill for conduct money, which I have given to Mr. Steventon, but I think he will not pay conduct money without your order. Let the carriage for the seamen's clothes be paid, or I shall be troubled with the men. Also let a lieutenant and 5 other officers named be hastened down, as I shall soon be ready to take the beer, which I hope will be provided for me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 18.]
Oct. 10.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. The order you sent Lord Townshend, concerning the churchwarden Wm. Clarke's petition against Rich. Huntington, was sent by his lordship to Sir Wm. Doyley, who wrote Clarke that he and Rob. Suckling being appointed to examine into the truth of the allegations, they desired Clarke to attend them with his witnesses, at the Angel in Norwich, on the 5th instant; afterwards Sir William, with Rob. Kemp, sent another letter from Shottesham, that they were appointed to hear the business on the 6th. This very much discouraged Clarke and his friends, as also all who are true for the King and Church's interest; but the contrary party boasted that nothing would come of it, especially as Suckling, who is Sir William's son-in-law, was joined with him. Huntington and his cabal were the only instruments of Sir Wm. Doyley's being made a burgess for this town, which Sir William has not forgotten, having wrought his friends so far into favour with Lord Townshend that Huntington, who is a J.P., had a captain's commission for one of the train bands delivered to him, the day before the hearing; this has further discouraged Clarke and his friends, and caused the fanatics to rejoice.
Peter Cauliere, J.P., one of the bailiffs the last year, told Sir Rob. Kemp that Huntington, with his commission, was a very fit person to head the fanatics; that he and his party frequently kept their cabals to thwart the King and Church's interest, and that if such men were cherished, all the King's party would leave the house. Clarke and Sir Thos. Meadows thank you for your care in the business, and desire when it is sent up to Council, that you would inform them whether all the witnesses' names and evidence are to be sent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 69.]
Oct. 11.
Newmarket.
Wm. Bridgeman to Williamson. I return some bills signed. I have kept the warrant for the remission of quit rents to the inhabitants of Cork, as it requires countersigning by his lordship (Arlington), who arrived to-day, and will be in London on Saturday, the day appointed for the King's return. The Queen has been indisposed with a fever for 2 or 3 days, and the Duchess is not well. They are both at Audley End; I suppose if their distemper does not increase, they will return to London on Saturday. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Oct. 11.
Newmarket.
Same to the Same. Meeting accidentally with my lord, I got him to countersign the warrant for the inhabitants of Cork. His lordship intends being in town on Friday. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Oct. 11.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for Blackborne] to Hickes. Has no news to send. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Oct. 11.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Mayor of Sandwich, hearing that a fanatic had used treasonable words against his Majesty and his government, made diligent search after him, but the fellow escaped. The convoy in the Downs bound for the Straits wants 80 men. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for a pardon to Wm. Somerwell, now prisoner in the Tolbooth, Edinburgh, sentenced to death for murder of Bessie Rentown, 8 or 9 years ago, as he protests his innocence, and is willing to pay the charges of the prosecution, and give assythment to the parties concerned. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 6.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. The case of Wm. Somerwell being recommended by you to the secretary, to obtain his remission, we grant the same; yet that mercy may be mixed with justice, we wish him to be banished for ever from Scotland, or other the King's dominions. On his pledging himself to that effect, he is to be set at liberty, and have time given to prepare for his departure. [Ibid. p. 8.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for pardon of Wm. Mackie, jeweller of Edinburgh, sentenced to death for slaughter of — Murray, a soldier of Edinburgh Castle, the same being done in self-defence; with discharge of all actions, civil or criminal, brought against him for the same. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 9.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have pardoned the said Mackie, the deed being committed on provocation, and not precogitated, but require you to banish him the kingdom, giving him a month to prepare for his departure. [Ibid. p. 10.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Grant of protection from all arrests or suits of law, for 3 years, to James, Lord Forrester, who by marrying Lady Joan Ruthven, daughter to the Earl of Forth and Brentford, has become engaged for considerable debts, which he is at present unable to pay, and is meanwhile so troubled with executions of horning and captions, that he cannot with freedom to his person use means to satisfy his creditors, or prosecute his lawful affairs. [Ibid. p. 11.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for a pardon to Geo. M'Clair, ensign in Capt. John Hay's company in the militia of Haddingtonshire, for the slaughter of Alex. Adington, a soldier in his company, who mutinously assaulted him, whilst in discharge of his duty. [Ibid. p. 11.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for a charter under the Great Seal of Scotland, confirming a former charter, ratifying to Alex. Brand, merchant of Edinburgh, and Sarah Binning his wife, a bond granted them by the late Arch. Johnston of Waristoun for 12,000l., assigned by virtue of a wood-set right on the lands of Redhall, and Easterhaills, with rent of 720l. thereon; also another bond of 2,000 marks and other bonds granted by him to them. The said lands being in the King's hand, by default of the said Johnston, are to be granted to the said Brand and his wife, Brand having paid part of the wood-set of 20,000l. Scots upon them, and given security for the rest, and they are to hold them as vassals of John, Earl of Lauderdale, the King's Commissioner and sole Secretary of State, as superior thereof, in place of the said Arch. Johnston. [Docquet. Ibid. pp. 13, 14.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for presentation of Alex. Brand and his wife to the said lands, on forfeiture of Arch. Johnston of Waristoun. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 14.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for a charter under the Great Seal of Scotland, granting to John Blair of Dunskey, second son of the late James Blair, minister of Portmountgomery, and to Jean Agnew his wife and their heirs, the lands of Killencryngen and Portspitel; also to John Blair and his heirs, with remainders to his brothers Hugh and Patrick, his sisters Elizabeth and Agnes, and the heirs of the late James Blair, the lands of Uthred Mackayn, &c., barony of Montgomery and Seaport, advocation of Portpatrick, and sundry other lands, all to be united in a barony called the barony of Dunskey. The tenure of those held by ward relief to be changed to taxt ward, they paying certain sums for ward relief and the marriage of an heir, when they occur. [Docquet. Ibid. pp. 15, 16.]
Oct. 11.
Court at Newmarket.
Warrant for a charter granting to Jas. Hamilton, jun., merchant of Edinburgh, all the lands, houses, &c., in Hadderwick, in the constabulary of Haddington and sheriffdom of Edinburgh, formerly pertaining to Sir Peter Hay of Meghims, resigned by him to Sir George Hay of Pikulline, who has disposed of them to Hamilton, the holding thereof to be changed from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 16.]
Oct. 11. Grant to John, Lord Lovelace (on the death of his father) of the offices of steward and lieutenant of Woodstock manor, co. Oxon, keeper of the Great Park and ranger of the new forest there, lord warden of the bailiwick of Woodstock, &c. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 240.]
Oct. [11 ?]
Newmarket.
Warrant for a commission to Prince Rupert to be Lord Lieutenant of Berks, in the room of Lord Lovelace. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 18.]
Oct. 11.
Woolwich.
Boatswain John Attewell to the Navy Commissioners. As deputy to the master attendant, during Capt. Hannam's indisposition, I beg to report that all our standing rigging and tops are up, and that we are getting in the 5 cables from Chatham, and hope to be fit to sail shortly. As the ship draws 16 feet of water, it will not be safe to ride at Woolwich, where she will draw 17 feet, for fear of getting girt in the chain. Capt. Hannam is dangerously sick; if he dies, I hope you will not be unmindful of me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 19.]
Oct. 11.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to the Navy Commissioners. Several men of the yard, skilled in ditch work, demand 50l. for cleaning out the ditch between the King's land and that of Sir Rich. Browne, at the end of the plank yard; but Sir Richard, having to pay a moiety, considered it unreasonable, and has concluded with some poor men in the town to clean 55 rods, the length between his ground and that of the King, and to dig 4 feet lower than the soil, for 22l.; which it is conceived will sufficiently effect the work, and is so very cheap that the men will hardly get anything by it.
They have also agreed to clean out another shallow ditch of 19 or 20 rods, from the end of Sir Richard's ground up to the brick close, which belongs to the King, for 50s.; as it is very foul, and the tide flows up it as far as my back house, it will be a hindrance to both if not done with the other, so that Sir Richard's cost will be 11l. and his Majesty's 13l. 10s. The men require an imprest of 5l., and the loan of some old deals and scoops; Sir Richard and Mr. Evelyn will be sure to tie them to articles hard enough, and to overlook the work, if your Honours refer it to them to make the contract. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 20.]
Oct. 11. Cap. Robt. Werden to the Navy Commissioners. When I was bound for the West Indies, Capt. Legatt turned over to me 18 men into the Norwich from the Fountain, and to prevent the men running away, I delivered up their tickets. After a time I had orders from Sir John Harman to discharge all those men, to go on board the Willoughby and the fireship, when I delivered to each man his ticket, and John Gregory had his; but if I had known he was a servant, I would have kept it, and not delivered it up without your order. I will appear at your board if you are not satisfied. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Oct. 12.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Nothing here will be wanting for fixing the chain, and when I know whether it is to lie thwart, or more slanting, I will have it in hand. Thanks for 1,000l. brought down by Sir Jer. Smith and Mr. Pepys. Mr. Amhurst will be content to receive the rest of his money in London, when his timber is delivered. I want directions as to buying 100 loads of timber offered at 42s. a load, the land and water carriage of which will be 2s. 6d. a load more. I have refused it, as the merchant will not pay the carriage, and would have the timber measured and paid for where it lies. I accepted Mr. Coles' timber, the master shipwright judging it to be very useful and well worth the price.
I will forward an account of the officers who were to have been on board the ships the night Sir Jer. Smith and Mr. Pepys were there. I have ordered 6 tons of lead for the Duke of Monmouth's yacht; as Capt. Langston wants some junk, and is near upon sailing, may he have 20 tons of old stuff in store, which is fit for nothing else ? The master of the ropeyard estimates that it will cost 8l. a ton to make the ground tow and rakings into cordage, besides the tarring, which will be dearer than cast junk or small cordage. Pantiles may be had here at 3l. per thousand. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 22.] Enclosing,
List of 27 ships lying in the Medway. [Ibid. No. 22i.]
Oct. 12. Grant to Edw. Nowell and Arden Baggot, of pardon for killing Thos. Gleed of Ealing, co. Middlesex, with restitution of lands and goods, &c. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 201.]
Oct. 12.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Alderman Acklam, a follower of the Nonconformists, who spoke against Alderman Crowle for acting against them, has been elected Mayor, which much encourages them. Their meetings are not however so public as formerly, and as several able men of Hull, who frequented their meetings, begin to absent themselves, the rabble will fall of themselves, if the justices continue their care. Three vessels have sailed for Virginia with passengers, also 3 for Holland with lead and rape seed, and 4 have arrived thence with several commodities; also 2 from Gottenburg with pitch and tar, and 3 Zealanders for lamperns, which will be very plentiful this year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 74.]
Oct. 12.
Coventry.
[Ralph Hope] to Williamson. Thos. King, brewer, has been elected Mayor, of whose worth we are sufficiently sensible, and whom you may remember, he having waited on you about the affairs of the city; he will be an excellent magistrate. Edw. Carter, a flaxman, and Sampson Clerke, a threadman, are the sheriffs. They are honest men, but prefer the smock before the surplice. The conventicles continue uncontrolled, and are as numerous, but a more careful suppression is expected ere long. Sir Jno. Hales, Rich. Hopkins, son of Sir Richard, and Alderman Chambers, have put up for the burgess-ship vacant by the death of Serjeant [Thos.] Flint; and Sir Rob. Townshend, who has our park, and offers kindness to the city if chosen, would fain put up, but it is thought Hopkins will carry it.
Serjeant Flint's widow has been delivered of a son since his death, but he will enjoy only a small patrimony, as the Serjeant died 10,000l. in debt, which his estate will not satisfy. The Countess of Denbigh died at Mastrup [Martinsthorp] in Rutland, and was brought to Newnham, to be temporarily interred in my lord's chapel, but will be removed to Kirby church, and there buried, though not with that grandeur as was expected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 75.]
Oct. 12. Sir John Bennett to his brother, Lord Arlington. I have known the bearer, John Phillips, an ironmonger, 4 or 5 years; he has lost his nephew, who is about 10 years old, from his house, and desires your lordship's order for a notice to be put in the Gazette. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Oct. 12.
Downham.
Sir Rob. Stewart to [Williamson]. Thanks for your kindness to my kinsman. I went upwards of three times from Lynn to Thetford, to attend his lordship [Arlington] about the navigation business, and to meet your principals, as you call them; but the Queen and a multitude of persons of honour coming to Euston, his lordship could not find time to attend to his own affairs. I was afterwards attacked with a fever, and on my recovery, found that his lordship had gone to London, without making any further progress in the affair. I am hastening to London myself, to make those personal acknowledgments which are incumbent. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I am taking coach for Audley End. and intend leaving there for London to-morrow, so I hope to be in town at night. You are to send the letters of common occurrences to Mr. Bridgeman at Newmarket as usual, but detain the others. His Majesty holds to his resolution of returning on Saturday. The French and Dutch Ambassadors leave to-day. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Oct. 12.
Oxford.
Edw. Sculthorpe to Williamson. Thanks for favours received, and for your successful letter to the Provost, who has put my son into a servitor's place. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Oct. 12.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Scipio and George of London, and the Susan of Falmouth, have put to sea with pilchards for the Straits, Leghorn, and the Canaries; the Walsingham of London has sailed for Virginia. The county troops met last Monday in very good order near Truro, according to the order of the Lord Lieutenant. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. 12. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Oct. 13.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. I have received a letter from a kinsman in Jamaica, stating that a war was proclaimed there against Spain in July last. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Oct. 13. Patent—confirming a former order of William, Archbishop of Canterbury, of 11 March 1637, quoted—ordering that five Fellows of Eton College shall be elected from King's College, Cambridge. [Latin. 6 pages. Ibid. No. 83. See p. 448 supra.]
Oct. 13 ? The King to the University of Cambridge. We recommend Thos. Doughty, M.A., formerly of your University, now domestic chaplain to the Duke of York, for a doctor's degree, without performance of exercises. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b f. 10.]
Oct. 13.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. I send a copy of my letter of 29 Sept., also two orders by Sir John Harman, for careening and calking the Orange, and various officers' receipts and indents for stores and money received for the sick and wounded, total 986l. 5s., for which I shall pass bills upon you, and doubt not but you will command their punctual discharge.
I understand you demur about making me out perfect bills for the sums I have passed upon you since my return hither, on pretence that I do not value according to the exchange. I confess the exchange here is uncertain, varying from 4s. 8d. to 5s., but I have known it 5s. 3d. Mr. Longland (when he acted in the black days) took his fortune in the exchange, and passed all his bills at 5s. 3d., which was allowed. Since his Majesty's restoration, I have charged my bills at 5s., which was always approved, and I think it very reasonable, as the exchange is often at 4s. 10d., and sometimes higher; no one here will take bills directly upon your Board, or the victualler, or the public, so I have to use a third person who, for his pains, charges me with his provisions. I shall submit to your determination, and hope that what bills I pass upon you may not lie out against me as imprest, but that perfect bills may be made out from time to time, to prevent future trouble. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 23.]
Oct. 13.
Portsmouth.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Steventon will only pay 5s. a man for conduct money, and as I do not expect 100 men from London, if you will send their conduct money, 25l., I will try these parts, and doubt not they willcome cheaper.
There being no hammocks, and the weather being very cold, I stand engaged for the lodgings of all the men that have come down, and expect more daily; if you but considered the scarcity of men, I should have greater encouragement to procure them; not one officer has come down. If it had not blown so hard, I should have had all my ballast on board, but it will be in to-day, and the ship rigged. I have 40 men entered, and am ordered 58 guns, so that she will require more officers than ordinary. Tell me how many midshipmen are to be allowed me, that I may be indemnified at the end of the voyage; if they are not found deserving, I shall beg no favour. I cannot get my glass windows on board, as the man is sick that has to make them. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Oct. 13.
London.
Sir John Frederick and Nath. Herne to Pepys. We send our man with the appraisement of the ship Punny; pray get the Commissioners to certify to the Duke that the 8th part amounts to 18l. 15s., so that he may know what to take for salvage. [Ibid. No. 25.] Annexing,
Jonas Shish and Wm. Wood to the Navy Commissioners. We have been on board the Punny, and taken a survey of the hull, masts, &c, and judge that the hull, with all the materials belonging to her, is worth 150l.—10 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 25i.]
Oct. 14.
Wickham.
John Maddocks to his brother, Rob. Maddocks. Pray get Mr. Hewer to procure an order from the Navy Commissioners to protect the men of the Supply hoy of Woodbridge from being pressed, as the men will not sail without it; send it to Mr. Bass at Woodbridge. The hoy is laden with timber, and will be ready to go away on Monday. With draft of the order, in shorthand [by Pepys]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 26.]
Oct. 14.
The Greenwich, Malaga.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I sent you accounts from Lisbon and Cadiz, and put my packets on shore at Tangiers, where I lay some time with my whole fleet, and saluted the garrison. I then bore through the Straits' mouth, and met Capt. Hellen [Helling ?] off Morveale, and Capt. Poole here with the Bristol and Guernsey. I brought 50 sail in here, of which Capt. Poole will take those for the coast and Port Mahon, and I the Turkey ships, and those for Venice and Tunis; Capt. Poole and his convoy will take the benefit of our company as high as Cape Paul. I have not met with any Turks, so I suppose I shall find them higher up, laying [wait] for stragglers. [2 copies. Ibid. Nos. 27, 28.]
Oct. 14.
The Reserve, Downs.
Capt. Thos. Elliot to the Navy Commissioners. Having gained 200 men, I intend to sail with my convoy, unless the Newcastle comes down with the soldiers, when I will dismiss those incapable, although at present forced to make use of them; but I am not altogether ill manned. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Oct. 14.
London.
R. Waith to the Navy Commissioners. As to providing Suffolk canvas equalling the West-country pattern for 6 months, I have 3,000 yards wrought, and will undertake to make it up to 15,000 or 20,000 yards in 6 months, and deliver a part monthly, but it would enable me the better to promote its manufacture, if you would accept it in proportions for succeeding months. I will wait upon you to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 14.
Thetford.
John Burrell to Williamson. Upon being assured by Lord Arlington of your kind thoughts towards me, I was advised never to speak of it, a rule I have endeavoured strictly to observe; but being informed of the disposal of the last prebend to Dr. Smith, by our kind Recorder, who promised me his advice and assistance in procuring the next, I beg you to move Lord Arlington to obtain a promise of it from the Lord Keeper. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 84.]
Oct. 14. Sir Philip Musgrave to [Williamson]. My son will give an account of all affairs, which you no doubt expected I would personally do, not having failed in attending the meetings of Parliament since the first sitting; but I hope you will reflect upon the great alteration that 10 years must make in one of my age. I feared so long a journey would render me unfit for my public duties, but I am daily thinking of serving Mr. Treasurer as I engaged; my son will inform you of the truth of the matter. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Oct. 15.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. I conceive a correspondent at Canterbury necessary, as there all the eastern part of the country meet at market twice a week; I will settle one there if commanded. I intend waiting on you in three weeks, as I am coming to present articles of complaint to the Farmers of Customs against the surveyor, who put me out of that employment without cause; I shall instruct a person to act during my absence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 86.]
Oct. 15.
Deal.
Same to the Same. No damage has been done to the fleet in the Downs, which is about 30 sail, by the high winds, but a Margate man at the helm dropped overboard in Margate Road, and a Deal boat overset, and one of her men was drowned. A vessel from the Canaries reports that six Algiers pirates are about the Canary coast. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Oct. 15.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for Blackborne] to Hickes. A Dutch ship bound for France, and another of the Newfoundland fleet, have come in. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Oct. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Simon Smith of the keepership of the Paddock Walk in the Great Park, Windsor, with Listers' Lodge, herbage, and pannage, the King having restored the park, and stored it with deer for his disport. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 181.]
Oct. 15.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for an order to pay to Sir John Arundel, master of the game to the late Queen Mother, his salary of 100l. a year, from the time that he was admitted to the time of her death, notwithstanding his absence, and his not being inserted in the establishment of her servants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 89.]
Oct. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Rich. Verney, High Sheriff of Norfolk, to pay to John Knight, one of our serjeant-surgeons, for his faithful services, 150l., being fines inflicted on Barth. Stone and John Sharpin, of Hardingham (sic), Norfolk, convicted at Norwich assizes for barratry. [Ibid. f. 90.]
Oct. 15. Licence for Thos. Harrison to come to London, notwithstanding the late proclamation. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 52.]
Oct. 15. Grant to Hugh Bantock of the office of waiter in the port of London. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 242.]
Oct. 15. Grant to Swift Nix of pardon of all crimes mentioned in a former pardon, committed by him before 25 Nov. 1669, with the difference that the word "murder" is omitted, and a record of outlawry for a burglary, and an indictment for a robbery are inserted. [Ibid.]
Oct. 15. Guarantee by Rowland Powell, purser of the Loyal London, that having leave from the Navy Commissioners to substitute John Compton as his deputy, he will be responsible for his actions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 31.]
Oct. 16.
Portsmouth.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. I cannot comprehend why truths asserted should be judged expostulations; I judged by Commissioner Tippetts' words, that it would be near a month before the ship would be ready for the entering of men; this I told them, and I suppose most of them are gone to seek a speedier entry. It will not be convenient sending down the clothes in the vessels you mention, as it is winter, and if winds should hang on the way, the men would be very badly accommodated meantime.
As to stopping the charge for the hire of the wagon out of the conduct money, I conceive the men are as capable of disposing of their own money, when they receive it, as Mr. Steventon is of deducting it. I repeat my request for 25l.; I have promised that the clothes shall be paid for, and do not doubt that being done, when I shall give an account of my charges; you will find them as reasonable as any man can fit out a ship for, considering the place she is in.
I have already thanked you for the bill you sent, but have received no benefit from it, as it is gone up to London again, there being nobody to pay it, so that I lie open to all the clamours from necessitous seamen, which you know are not a few. Noted as his "unmannerly letter." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 32.]
Oct. 16. Sir Thos. Ingram [Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster] to Williamson. I send the list I told you of, and desire you will endeavour to prevent the King's signature being obtained to any of these, until I be acquainted with it. I have spoken to his Majesty, who promised not to sign any within my jurisdiction, if he knows it; the Lord Keeper and Secretary Trevor have promised the same, so I doubt not Lord Arlington will also agree, if you will remind him of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 89.]
Oct. 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Robert [? Jonathan] Atkins, late Governor of Guernsey, has arrived with his wife and family; also the wife and family of Col. Lambert. They were in the great storm on Friday night, and in great risk of being cast away. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Oct. 16.
Queen's College.
Henry Smith to [Williamson]. On arriving at Oxford, I found all the company and Dr. Lamplugh and your cousin very merry on Mr. Beeby's farewell supper; but I was informed the election would not take place until Monday, when it would be full term. I hope I shall succeed, so as to be able to live in a manner becoming one recommended by you, whom I have to thank as the author of all my happiness. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Oct. 17.
Castle Elizabeth, Jersey.
Sir Thos. Morgan to Lord Arlington. I have a turbulent adversary in England, who has held me in a Chancery suit 7 years, though I have 2 decrees for me; taking advantage of my absence, he now brings in a bill of review. Pray get me leave to come to England next April for 2 or 3 months, if the service here will not be prejudiced by my absence. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Oct. 17.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Wm. Morton, Justice of King's Bench, and the Recorder and Sheriffs of London, to reprieve Mary Carleton, alias Kirton, alias Blacke, who has been a second time condemned to death for felony, and to cause her to be inserted in the next general transportation pardon for convicts of Newgate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 42.]
Oct. 17.
Chapter House, Wells.
Order by Ralph Bathurst, Dean, and 3 other officers of Wells Cathedral—to obviate the mischiefs which have arisen by too many of the canons residing the early part of the year, and then leaving the cathedral destitute—that 2 shall be always in residence; regulations for the management of their terms, the payment of their salaries, the exercise of hospitalities, and the attendance on public worship. [2 pages. Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 93.]
Oct. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners and trustees for the sale of fee-farm rents, to admit Sir John Heath, attorney of the duchy of Lancaster, to the office of drawing, engrossing, examining and allowing conveyances of fee-farm or other rents relating to the Crown, and duchy of Cornwall, and of examining those of the county palatine of Lancaster, which are to be prepared by Sir Gilbert Gerard, clerk of the duchy, with whom he is to divide the fees, but to receive on other conveyances 10s. for all under 3l. a year, and 20s for all above that sum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 180.]
Oct. 17.
Framlingham.
John Maddocks to the Navy Commissioners. I account it hard measure that you will not allow any one freight of timber short, if made up by another; I desire I may not be a sufferer if I fulfil my contract. As to your objection against my new offer, saying that your payment is now so current as to exceed that of any private merchant, I only mentioned your advancing money as many private merchants do, and as both myself and others have to do, in buying goods. As you however do not incline to it, and think it ought not to be granted, I waive it, and propose another tender for the 500 loads of timber of sizes mentioned, viz., that it is to be delivered quarterly in 1671, at 4l. 7s. a load for what shall be delivered at Chatham, and 1s. a load less for what shall be delivered at Deptford; to be paid ready money upon the delivery of every hoy load. If you want any knees, I have between 20 and 30 loads, which I will make a tender for. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 33.]
Oct. 17.
Portsmouth.
Edw. Silvester to the Navy Commissioners. I beg you will remember the chain which lies waiting, so much to my damage, and not at all to his Majesty's profit. Capt. Ansley promised, before he died, to write about the westward part, which is 70 fathoms, and will come to 400l.; if you are willing to take it off, I will outset 150l. of the 200l. I have received, and complete the chain for 250l. more, although much to my damage; but if this is not accepted, and I do not finish it, I think I deserve 100l. for the use of that part lying in the harbour's mouth when the Dutch were here, as it wastes much more there than if it lay in the place intended, and this damage I have no right to sustain.
I am ready to complete my contract if it may be done now, and would have done it to the time, had not more urgent occasions of his Majesty's intervened; when you sent me 5 queries, with strict charge for punctual answer, I readily answered, and offered more than could with reason have been requested. I doubt not that if the moorings were sold, they would amount to almost as much as is required, and that the law would allow me to make the most of the chain in money. I shall deserve the 200l. in hand for my trouble, if my offer is not accepted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 34.]
Oct. 17.
Chatham Dock.
Wm. Rand and Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. We viewed the Little Lion fireship, and found her plank so thin and scarce, and generally so bad, that we judge her hardly worth repairing, and quite unfit for the service intended. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Oct. 17.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
Wm. Bodham to Col. Thos. Middleton. Mr. Uthwat having written to have the great cables of the St. Andrew closed, I beg an order for 80 men; the weighing of the hemp should be stopped, so that Mr. Russell may be at home to see to the work. I suppose the seamen of the St. Andrew may be spared, and some encouragement promised them. The cables of the London should be closed at the same time. Your design about the crane wheel for tarring is so much approved that I hope you will put it forward. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Oct. 17.
Rampton.
Ant. Eyre to the Navy Commissioners. I am glad you approve the sail cloth, but I have none of it ready; what I have hitherto made has only been an essay, whether our country people could be brought to understand the manufacture. If you will take what I shall make according to pattern for the next 6 months, I shall in that time have so settled the work as to be able to contract for a considerable quantity; but until I have your encouragement, I dare not venture much upon it. I shall be in London shortly, and will then wait upon you to receive your commands. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 37.]
Oct. 18. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. I could find no better way to show my desire not to trouble my Sovereign or his Royal Highness, or to show my respect to your Board, and to discharge a duty to myself, than to send you a petition enclosed, which I intend to prefer to-morrow, if not otherwise ordered. Your Board is as proper a place for the matter to be determined as any other, and I have adopted this mode of delivering it, knowing there is hardly one of you but has urgent business at the Parliament, now so near at hand. I beg you not to forget my former applications, and to return the petition, with your pleasure thereon, to Mr. Hayter, and I will call for it. Noted that it was read at the Board, and resolved to leave him to proceed as he should see fit. [Ibid. No. 38.] Encloses,
Petition of Abr. Parker to the King and Privy Council, that a day may be appointed for allowing his counsel to demonstrate the particulars of his claims before them, or before a committee, as shall seem best. For 4 years, and at many hundred pounds' charge, has been endeavouring to obtain a bill for his salary as muster master in 1666, earned with the hazard of his life, and saving his Majesty many thousands of pounds; also for labouring and proposing ways for discovery and prevention of frauds as to victuals and clothes, so that it will now be impossible for any, of what quality soever, at home or abroad, singly or jointly, to wrong his Majesty of one penny; and this without a penny additional charge, but on the contrary, it will take off much of the charge now standing, the consequence of all which has been adjudged, by one very well known, to be 100,000l. a year, according to the number of ships at sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 38i.]
Oct. 18.
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. Having been advised that the Newcastle and Dragon, bound for the coast of Ireland, might expend some of the victuals lying at Kinsale, and thus prevent loss, I desire you will order the captains of such ships to take so much as is sound and good, and as may be required by them during their stay on that coast, and we will advise Rob. Southwell to observe your orders. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Oct. 18. Same to the Same. You will find by an enclosure that your order for the issue of a further supply will exceed the last year's declaration; I ought to have had that for the ensuing year on the 15th. Pray represent this, that neither the service nor the contractors may suffer in the delay, as they have the last two years. You know what a difference a month or two makes in an action of this nature, and in a contract so severe upon the contractors, that they have no need of any discouragement or hindrance of what it allows them. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Oct. 18.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I desire an order for docking the Ruby and Assistance; also for some timber, and the copper chimney for the new ship. Shall I send some blocks to Chatham for launching the new ship, as it will save some hundreds of pounds? otherwise I will pile them one upon another, as they take much room. I would have docked the two ships this day, on account of the new ship's sailing to-morrow, but the wind keeps back the tide, and I had not enough water. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Oct. 18.
The Princess, Portsmouth.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Steventon has your order to supply me with as many shillings conduct money as he impresses men, but I cannot man the ship with 10 times a greater sum; if you will not allow me any more, I hope I shall be able to provide the rest; the King's business under my charge shall have no stops, as long as I can procure the money to supply it. I have taken in part of the beer, and shall get in the rest, and my guns, as soon as the weather permits, which is very bad. I have hands enough to despatch all business required in harbour. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Oct. 18.
Wapping.
Wm. Wood to Thos. Hayter. I pray that my bill for spruce deals, and another from Woolwich, may be perfected and sent by my servant, and that an order may be sent to Chatham, to receive the timber, deals, and spars. My last contract was 40s. a load for the large timber, and 5l. 15s. for the deals, being the same price [Capt. John] Shorter sells his at; but for the last I sold you 15 months since, I had 4s. a load less than for the large; as to my spars and balks, I will be content with the price others sell theirs for, but Lord Brouncker has promised to allow the extra charge of carrying them to Chatham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 43.]
Oct. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter under the Great Seal of Scotland to Major Hugh Bontein, of the lands and barony of Kilbryde, in the bailiwick of Cunningham and sheriffdom of Ayr, on resignation of William, Earl of Kilmarnock, dissolving the same from the barony of Boyd, and creating them into the free barony of Kilbryde, to be held of the King by taxt ward instead of simple ward, the taxt duties to be filled up by the Exchequer. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 17.]
Oct. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge. We hear that Chas. Wright, M.A., Fellow of Trinity College, and late senior proctor, could not take his D.D. degree, because of his office as proctor, although performing the exercises. We therefore require you to admit him to his degree, with the same seniority as if he had taken it when he should have done, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 159.]
Oct. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Wm. Morton, Justice of the King's Bench, and the Recorder and sheriffs of London, to reprieve Thomas Ward, labourer, of St. Mary's parish, Islington, condemned to death for horse stealing, and to insert his name in the next general transportation pardon for convicts of Newgate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 43.]
Oct. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
The petition of Phil. Mathews, for the office of bailiff and steward of Havering-atte-Bower, Essex, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 133.]
Oct. 19. Warrant to Mr. L'Estrange, declaring that George Larkin and other journeymen printers shall not, at his mediation, suffer for printing and publishing seditious pamphlets, provided they shall answer without deceit such questions as he shall put to them, Larkin's wife having helped in the late discovery of seditious pamphlets. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 52.]
Oct. 19. Grant to David Walter, groom of the bedchamber, of the place of Lieutenant-General of Ordnance, with the custody of the ordnance storehouse, artillery garden, &c.; fee 100 marks a year, with the customary profits, except the keeping, receiving, and issuing the treasure belonging to the Ordnance Office. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 19.]
Oct. Docquet of the above, dated 31 Oct. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 248.]
[Oct. 19.] Draft of a clause in the above grant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 93a.]
Oct. 19. The King to the Attorney-General. Whereas we ordered on 13 Feb. 1665, that after the decease of Col. Wm. Legg, Lieutenant of Ordnance, the office of treasurer and paymaster of the Ordnance should no more be fulfilled by the Lieutenant, but be a separate office, with a salary of 400l. a year, and 120l. for 2 clerks. Col. Legg being now dead, we require you to prepare a bill erecting the said office, and conferring it on George Wharton, with a fee of 40l. (sic) a year. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 19.]
Oct. 19.
Merton College, Oxford.
Rob. Whitehall to Williamson. Being backed by Dr. Lamplugh, I beg you to reflect on a servant of yours that has been worsted in spirituals of 250l. a year, and in nearly 1,000l. by the Cheshire misadventure; "to prescribe to you how to lick myself whole were to call an Œdipus an ignoramus." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 94.]
Oct. 12.
Council Chamber Door.
Sam. Mearne to Williamson. Being in great haste, and the printer being gone, I leave a paper in case the Leviathan business is called on. [Ibid. No. 95.] Encloses,
Affidavit by John Redmayne, printer. Mr. Leak, Master of the Stationers' Company, accompanied by Warden Roper, Mr. Norton, and Mr. Mearne, came to my house, and finding a book printing, entitled "Hobbs' Leviathan," seized two sheets of it; they came again and took away my press, demanded the residue of the sheets, and asked for whom they were printed. I told them for Jno. Williams, who had it from Mr. Crook to print, when they seized 30 sheets more.—28 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 95i.]
Oct. 19.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. A vessel has arrived from Ireland with horses. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Oct. 19.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A vessel with linen cloth from Caen in Normandy reports that the French King has offered Dunkirk, and also a great sum of money, to his Majesty, if he will join with him, and break with the Dutch. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Oct. 19.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Thos. Hayter. I beg a copy of Mr. Foley's contract, and a sample of his wares, as I am in the dark with regard to them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 44.]
Oct. 19.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to Col. Thos. Middleton. The Welcome went out of the wet dock yesterday, and lies on board the hulk (sic) in the Thames. There are 80 men belonging to her, but not one has appeared. Little has been done; I have directed the boatswain to forward the rigging, as there would be great blame if it was neglected. I wish the captain would lie on board some nights, as it would forward the business. I want leave for the apron of the wet dock to be repaired, and for 6 more scavel men to be entered for 6 weeks or 2 months. [Ibid No. 45.]
Oct. 19.
Bayhall.
Chas. Amherst to his cousin, John Cradock, Wheatsheaf, York Street, Covent Garden. Pray deliver a letter enclosed, from Mr. Gregory at Chatham Yard, to James Littleton, officer of the Treasury at the office, Broad Street, and receive from him 500l., part of 1,000l., to be sent to Chatham for payment of the yard, &c. If you receive the money, you are to pay it to Isaac Meynell at the King's Arms, Lombard Street, and take his bond for it at 6, per cent., payable in 3 months; or if Littleton will give you a note for Meynell to receive the money, it will save you trouble. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 46.]
Oct. 19. Edw. Sherburne to Pepys. I desire a list of the ships ordered by his Royal Highness to be prepared for the next summer's fleet, as the Master of Ordnance has received directions to prepare an estimate of the whole charge of the gunner's stores. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Oct. 19.
Emsworth sloop, Yarmouth.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. I have been several times at sea, and done what I could in putting off the Dutch and French fishers from our fishermen, but several others came in again, they being so numerous; we have had such blowing weather, and my vessel is so small, that I could not do what I otherwise might have done. I lost one of my anchors, and endeavoured to credit the King for another, but people are very slow to furnish without money, or else at a very dear rate. I have since swept, and found my own again with half a cable. The weather much hinders the fishermen, and the herring season is very backward; if there is not better weather, they will make a bad season. Fish is as dear now as at the first, being from 9l. to 10l. a last. I have been sick with ague and fever since I came from London, but am recovering. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Oct. 20.
Deptford.
Capt. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. I intended to go down with the St. Andrew yesterday, but there was a storm of wind and she wanted ballast; I hope to be ready by Saturday. She is very ill-manned, both with seamen and watermen; of 80 watermen on board, there is not one seaman, and they are all apprentices except two. Not more than 180 of the 300 men entered have appeared, and except some course is taken with the masters of Watermen's Hall, his Majesty's service and commands will be in contempt. When I get to Halfway Tree or Erith, I will turn all on shore who are not seamen. Let the London's longboat and pinnace be sent from Chatham in the horse boat, as the boat sent will scarcely serve a third-rate, and we cannot moor or unmoor a ship in the river without one. Also let a surgeon be allowed, in case of accident. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Oct. 20.
Downs.
Capt. Thos. Elliot to Pepys. As to the complaint that fishermen have been impressed on board the Reserve, to the discouragement of the trade, I can assure you that all the time the ships have been in the Downs, not one that could pretend to being a fisherman for the season has been meddled with, and only three, who were in an open boat usually seen on Deal beach, have been taken, two of whom are already released, and the third shall be if ordered.
I have inquired into the business, and find that Mr. Coomes, J.P., at Sandwich, will make good that the deputy of Ramsgate in Thanet, where these people live, might have helped his Majesty to above 100 able seamen, without prejudice to the place, and that those already cleared might have been spared; so I cannot imagine on what ground the complaint is made. I am a great encourager of the trade, and ready to give it all the assistance in my power. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 50.] Annexing,
William Spencer, deputy, and 4 other inhabitants of Ramsgate, to John Tomson, Ratcliffe. Pray use your interest in getting and sending down an order for discharge of Hen. Brooke and 2 others, who have been impressed out of a fishing boat, and carried on board the Reserve; and also a letter to the captain from the Secretary or Commissioners, to prevent the like in future, as it is a great prejudice to the fishing. In the Holland war, the fishermen were exempted from being liable to press, during the fishing season.—Ramsgate, 13 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 50i.]
Oct. 20.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
Wm. Bodham to the Navy Commissioners. The riggers and labourers of Deptford and Woolwich dock may suffice for helping to close the London and the St. Andrew's cables, but it would be as well to have 50 from Deptford, and as many from Woolwich, to make 150, our own number being uncertain, as disabled from sickness and poverty. Shall we work a day and a half ? It will not be a penny loss to the King, and will be a great encouragement to the people. Capt. Tinker has summoned the ropemakers to be ready at a minute's warning for sailing the St. Andrew, and Monday will be the soonest for setting upon the cables, we having the tar to take up. I propose that the master workman may be at home to supervise the closing, and think that the merchants must not be grieved if the weighing of hemp is stopped on this occasion. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Oct. 20. Capt. Jonathan Willgress to the Navy Commissioners. I recommend Thos. Thrasher, who has been with me to the West Indies, as fit to take charge in those parts, being examined at Trinity House. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Oct. 20. Statement by the Scottish Commissioners, that their meaning is not to determine every law in Scotland to be unalterable, but that they cannot suggest a way of altering, till the next article on the Parliament is treated of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 98.]
Oct. 20. Request by the Lord Keeper, that the Commissioners will explain their meaning as to the intended Parliament for Great Britain, as it will not otherwise have power to alter or change any laws however grievous, nor will there be power anywhere to alter the laws of Scotland, even if the Scots desire it. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Oct. 20. Presentation of Benj. Woodroffe, M.A., to the rectory of Market Bosworth, co. Leicester. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 243.]
Oct. 20. Warrant to pay to Philip Packer, paymaster of the works, 20,000l. on account for extraordinary services on the King's buildings. [Ibid.]
Oct. 20.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The storms which have continued above a week have wrought sad effects: a trow of Bridgwater, bound for Neath to load coals, was cast away, but her men were saved. The Count of Amsterdam, from Madeira with sugar, has put in by stress of weather. She saw two vessels, supposed to be Flemings, near the coast; and as many casks have since been seen floating, it is thought they have both been wrecked. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 100.]
[Oct. 21.] Sir Thos. Clifford to Williamson. Let Mr. Evelyn carry with him such letters and papers as he judges useful to him to his house, on his promise to return them in due time. With note by Evelyn, "Remember the papers you promised concerning the Bishop of Munster." [Ibid. No. 100a. See Evelyn's Diary, Chandos edition, p. 350, date 21 Oct. 1670.]
Oct. 21.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A ship anchored near the North Sands, in a great gust of wind, slipped or cut her anchors, and went to sea. Several others were in great danger, but little harm has been done. The wind increased yesterday at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Oct. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry, Earl of St. Albans, and the other trustees of the late Queen Mother, to pay 140l. for repair of the court house of the manor of Tickhill, Yorkshire, now so decayed that the courts cannot be kept therein, the same having been formerly repaired out of the rents of the said honour. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 90.]
Oct. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thos. Twysden, justice of assize, and to the High Sheriff of the county of Oxford, to forbear the sentence of death passed on Isaac Watson, Thomas Woodfield, and William Parker, and to cause them to be put into a circuit pardon, with a clause for their transportation to Virginia or some other foreign plantation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 43.]
Oct. 21. Warrant to Jos. Williamson, keeper of State papers, to permit Elias Ashmole, Windsor Herald, who is compiling a history of the Order of the Garter, to have access in his presence to a book of treaties recently made with the French King, which is in "the office of papers and records of State at Whitehall Palace," and extract or transcribe what he requires. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 52.]
[Oct. 21.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 102.]
Oct. 21.
The Greenwich, off Cape St. Paul.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I give you an abstract of my last of the 14th. We have accompanied Capt. Poole hitherto with the ships with stores and provisions, and shall now leave them, and proceed with the Turkey ships, and those for Venice and Tunis. We have not met with any Turks, but I suppose they will be off Cape Bona, between that and Sicily and Panta Larea, though their late loss has somewhat startled them. If his Royal Highness was sensible of the unthankfulness of some of the commanders and masters while under convoy, I believe several would go without his Majesty's ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 53.]
Oct. 21.
Framlingham.
John Maddocks to the Navy Commissioners. I send the bill of lading for timber shipped on board the Supply of Woodbridge for Chatham. Pray send the bill to the officers there, so that they may see that the master delivers all therein mentioned, and keep an account. Another hoy will be sent as soon as it can load, when I will advise you of it; I desire your orders where the 3 freights are to be sent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 54.] Encloses,
Account of 37 loads of timber shipped as above mentioned. [Ibid. No. 54i.]
Oct. 21.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Thos. Hayter. I delivered the Navy Board's letter to Mr. Gregory, to send to Capt. Rand on board the Sovereign, whose quarter it is to act. As to the mistake laid to my charge, I can acquit myself, as I never heard of any warrant for sending either a long boat or pinnace, though I know both were sent to Woolwich; but it is of too frequent an occurrence to make use of our stores without the privity of the storekeeper, which must overthrow all hopes of balancing.
Pray move the Board to send down in the horse boat some bass ropes, which will better secure the masts in the creek than old cordage, and also secure the fir timber about to come in. I want an explanation of Mr. Ruffhead's contract, as to rudder, capstan, and pump work, as he would fain have the bolts, spikes, and nails used thereon allowed for extra. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Oct. 22.
Chatham.
Same to Pepys. The remains of the Defiance have been brought from where she was burnt to the Hardway, below the old dock; as her floor is good, and timber scarce, it will be a sin to break her up, as at a very small charge she might be towed to the Thames; she did not make a gallon of water the whole day. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Oct. 22.
The Newcastle, Downs.
Capt. Ant. Langston to Mat. Wren. I understand by Capt. Elliot that several ships will take the benefit of our convoy. Particulars of certain defects in the supplies received from the yards. Although I may say that I have as good a ship as a man need to fight in, as good a company as a captain need to command, and am so well gunned and ammunitioned as that nobody can hurt me, yet I have such legs to move this body that I can hurt nobody. They have taken away the galleries, which were an ornament to the ship, and an accommodation to the captain, for the benefit of her better sailing, and fitted her with sails half worn out, and too short by 5 feet, and a parcel of rotten junk has been sent to make the barricades. If the paper mills would have bought it, it might have served their turn, but what is past their use is past all use. I shall wait the time expressed in my instructions, and as much longer as the wind lasts. [Ibid. No. 57.] Enclosing,
Account by Capt. Ant. Langston and 2 others, of sails and rigging furnished, which are all old or too short. It is the custom of the Navy that all ships bound for the Straits shall have a foresail and a main topsail, over and above 2 suits of sails; but we have only 2 suits, one of which is old and not fit to be sent to sea, and the carpenter and boatswain's stores are only for 6 months, and very bare. The junk is also not fit for use.—Downs, 22 Oct. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 57i.]
Oct. 22. Peter Southerne and Thos. Peters, pursers of the Assistance and Welcome, to Thos. Hayter. Pray remind the Navy Board concerning the imprests we are to receive, to pay the men their short allowance. Noted that the sum due to the Assistance, consisting of 180 men, at 2d. each man per day for 8 months, amounts to 336l., and to the Welcome, of 130 men, at the same rate, for 9 months, 273l. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Oct. 22. James Roger to the Navy Commissioners. I beg another order for my discharge from the Dragon, as being a Dane and a stranger, I attend at great charge. Upon a former address, you directed the clerk of the cheque at Gravesend to discharge me, and to make out my ticket. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Oct. 22. Caveat in favour of Percy Church, that nothing pass of the custody of the walk or park in Windsor, formerly in the possession of Sir Mathew Lister, without notice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 10.]
Oct. 23.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to James Hickes. Since the storm which continues, two Dutch ships have been cast away in Bude Bay, and a vessel belonging to Minehead, but all the men except one were saved. Several pieces of ships, trunks, and chests have been driven on shore about Ilfracombe. We fear we shall hear of more wrecks if the storm continues. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 103.]
Oct. 23.
Sunday, 8 p.m.
Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Keeper, to Lord Arlington. Upon my return to Whitehall, I found the writ for the Duke of Monmouth, directed according to the usual stile to dukes, charissimo consanguineo, et consiliario nostro, and upon perusing the warrant to myself for issuing it, I find it is "To our dear son James, Duke of Monmouth." I remember when his Majesty was moved in it before, he thought this last too much, without something else added to it, and gave order that the stile should run, "Filio nostro naturali et illegitimo." As the patent creating him Duke does not name him "filius," I think the writ may be made "Jacobo, duci Monmouth." I beg directions to-night, as the writ is to be sealed to-morrow. Endorsed, "Duke of Monmouth's summons to Parliament." [Ibid. No. 104.]
Oct. 23.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett, muster master, to the Navy Commissioners. Is the St. Andrew, which has arrived at Greenhithe, to be kept in petty warrant or sea victuals ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 60.]
Oct. 24.
Framlingham.
John Maddocks to the Navy Commissioners. Thanks for your granting my request; I cannot accept your bid for my new tender of plank, as I should be a great loser; as to its length, I know that no Suffolk man can produce a quarter of the quantity of the length that I have. If you like what I last tendered, I am willing to sell it at 4l. 6s. if to be delivered at Chatham, and 4l. 5s. if at Deptford and Woolwich, having ready money on delivery. I shall soon make another tender of knees. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 61.]
Oct. 24.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I have set all the shipwrights and calkers upon the Assistance, which will be ready with all expedition; the captain desires a pair of galleries, I beg orders concerning them; also that Mr. Mayors may be directed to supply some elm timber to make caps, &c. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Oct. 24.
Chatham Dock.
Wm. Rand, master attendant, to the Navy Commissioners. I have sent the London's longboat by a hoy of Greenhithe, but the former sent we took to be the biggest. I have got the Sovereign to her moorings at Gillingham. The day before we had a great storm, and 2 flyboats were put ashore, but I have since got them off. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Oct. 24. The King's speech to both Houses of Parliament. My principal design being the good of the kingdom, and believing that would be best provided for when both Houses were full, I thought fit to summon you by proclamation. The Lord Keeper will open at large the particulars I have to recommend; I would have what you do despatched before Christmas, that you may have leisure to return home to your own affairs. You have given me so many great testimonies of zeal and affection, that it would be doing you an injury to suspect your want of kindness, at a time when there is so much need of it. If you could possibly make any question of the value and love I have for you, I should think myself unhappy, since I have nothing more in my heart than to give evidence of it to the whole world. [1½ pages; in the King's own hand. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 105. Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 352.]
Oct. 24. Copy of the above. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Oct. 24. The Lord Keeper's speech, specifying the subjects to which the attention of the Houses is directed; viz., the great preparations for war made in France and the Low Countries, requiring that his Majesty should increase his forces, although he has made several leagues detailed, including the triple alliance. The ordinary cost of the fleet is 400,000l. a year, but the discharge of its debts, and the setting out of the fleet now required, will be 800,000l. The tax on wines lately granted has fallen far short of its estimated value, and therefore a speedy supply is needful. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 107. Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 352.]
Oct. 24. Copy of the above. [3¼ pages. Ibid. No. 108.]
Oct. 24.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I hope this day will produce some good news, as I suppose the King and Parliament have met. I need not inform you of the late storms, but had the wind and tides continued 4 tides more, the town would have been lost; so I hope care will be taken for the future to prevent incursions. A Portuguese gentleman, arrived in a Holland man-of-war from the Madeira Islands, reports that, the islanders having mutinied, he himself, who was one of the judges there, and the Governor, were forced to fly for their lives. Does the Court desire that Lord Hinchinbroke should be burgess for Dover, or is Sir Arnold Breames looked on as a fit person? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 109.]
Oct. 24.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. No ships have come into port, on account of the tempestuous weather. I hear of several wrecks to the westward, but cannot obtain particulars. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Oct. 24.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Squire Tracey, the chief customer of the port of Yarmouth, and a patent officer, having died this morning, several are gone for London, to see if they can get the office; it is worth 600l. to purchase. Roger Waters, one of the principal members of Mr. Bridge's congregation, who used to get into the pulpit to preach and pray, has been taken in an act of adultery. The fishing is likely to break off, by reason of the violent storms.
The justice of peace [Huntington] who was accused by our churchwarden, having received, the day before the hearing of the charge, a captain's commission in one of the train bands of the town, Sir Thos. Meadows will resign his place as Major, which he has had ever since the King came in. This justice was out of place on the going out of the old bailiffs, but has since been chosen by Michael Mew, one of the new bailiffs; it is wondered at that Mew should take office, when he knows himself not capable, not having received the communion; there are 30 of the house that have not done it.
There having been a quarrel about electing such persons, to prevent choosing them this year, the old bailiffs were directed to look into the church books, and give an account to the assembly of those who had and had not received the communion; but it was opposed by the aforesaid justice. It is believed there are 12,000 communicants, of which 500 do not receive. We cannot hear whether Lord Townshend has delivered his report on the churchwarden's petition, but if it falls to the ground, the King and the Church's friends are cast down; Justice Cauliere, who was one of the bailiffs last year, has openly declared that all the King's friends will leave the house and government of the town to the others. I wish Lord Townshend were here to take an impartial account of all transactions. Let me hear if anything has been done on the order sent to his lordship. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Oct. 24. The petition of Hum. Swinfield, a maimed soldier who produces good testimonies of his loyalty, for an almsroom in Westminster, referred to the Bishop of Rochester and Dean of Westminster, to admit him to the place lately fallen void, Council having ordered preference to be given to those maimed in the late Dutch war, and no other competitor having this claim. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 133.]
Oct. 25. The petition of George Weld, for payment for exercising the office of deputy-lieutenant of the Tower during Sir John Robinson's Mayoralty, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, to gratify him in some way, the King remembering his loyalty, and the good services of his relations, and compassionating the straits of his present condition. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 134.]
Oct. 25. Licence for Rob. Pellum, of Compton Valence, co. Dorset, to come to town, notwithstanding the proclamation of 10 June. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 53.]
[Oct. 25.] Petition of Thomas, father of Mat. Browne, to the King, for letters to the Master and Fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, to continue the usual full allowance and maintenance to Mat. Browne, a Fellow of 7 or 8 years' standing, notwithstanding his temporary absence through a brain fever. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 112.]
Oct. 25.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin, for James Blackborne, to Hickes. Has no news. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Oct. 25.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Samaritan of Cork, with wool and tallow, the Happy Entrance of Bridgewater, a collier, and 2 Dutchmen with oil and sugar, have been cast away by the storms. Several other wrecks have been reported in the Channel, but we wait further confirmation. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Oct. 25.
Oxford.
Eliz. Langbaine to Williamson. Dr. Lamplugh has acquainted me with your favourable intentions towards my poor Gerard, in bringing him in as demy at Magdalen College; I shall be heartily glad to see it, if it may be done with the President's liking; but if he comes in by mandamus, I fear it will gain him the ill will of the President and Fellows, and be a bar when he stands for a fellowship, which if he should miss, he had better never have come in at all, as when he has spent his youth there, it will seem harsh to have to go as a clerk. As he is only 14 years of age, if you can prevail with the President for a promise for this or the next year, it will be as well, as he is a good scholar. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Report of the Treasury Commissioners, on the petition of Sir Jonathan Trelawny to the King, for a privy seal for payment to him, by the Receiver of Cornwall, out of moneys arising by fines of several copyhold estates in the petition mentioned, of 883l., as recompense for his many and great sufferings. We find, by letters of privy seal of 15 July 1669, that your Majesty granted 2,000l. to Sir Fras Vincent, in satisfaction of a pension of 182l. a year, formerly granted him by letters patent; and that we, by warrant of 22 July 1669, directed it to be paid out of the fines and casual profits of the Duchy of Cornwall, being the same fund as that asked by the petitioner. It appears by a certificate of Sir Rob. Long, that only 400l. has been paid on account of such 2,000l.; that there is no register in the Exchequer to oblige payments charged upon the said revenue to be made in course; and that the money arising from such casual revenue will probably be sufficient to discharge both the said sums. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 279, No. 116.]
Oct. 26.
Chatham.
Wm. Rand and Ph. Pett to Sir Jer. Smith and Sam. Pepys. We send a copy of Sir Wm. Batten's account, but that wherein Commissioner Pett and Capt. Taylor made that extravagant allowance to themselves is in Mr. Shales' hands, who also had copies of the documents enclosed, they being letters of more than ordinary importance. We hope Commissioner Cox will be at the Council, and Capt. Brooke and Mr. Mynors waiting upon him, which will make a sufficient number to appear on the chest's behalf. We cannot send the letters which passed between the Board and our supervisors, they being committed to a chest with 5 locks, whose keys are distributed amongst so many persons that they cannot be readily collected; but we conceive there will be no need of them, the case being so evident by the accounts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 64.]
Oct. 26.
Portsmouth.
Edw. Silvester to the Navy Commissioners. Pardon my writing before in such a rude manner, but I can assure you I am very willing to serve the King in anything you like to impose. My first contract [for finishing the chain] would have amounted to 1,700l., but to show my willingness to do any part which might be most profitable to his Majesty, both myself and Capt. Ansley stated that 150 fathoms would serve, which would amount to 900l., of which I demanded 250l. in hand to buy iron, 200l. more 6 weeks after, and the remainder on finishing, which shall be within 3 months after we go on. I fitted an anchor of 40 cwt. in the yard, which will serve to fasten the eastward part; if this is done, I shall be ready to serve you with anchors as big as I can make, and as cheap as any man, as fast as you require them. I forbear my demand for the first contract, it being a greater sum than is now named, and hope I have now offered what will be satisfactory. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Oct. 26. H. de Leyonberg to Lord Arlington. As the Lord Keeper's last speech in Parliament will not be printed, I beg for a copy to send to my master, the King of Sweden, it being material that he should know the contents, since he is so deeply engaged with England's interest, as well as in the triple league. I will use discretion, so that it is not communicated to any others than the King and his ministers. I return the paper from Sir Wm. Godolphin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 1.]
Oct. 26.
Swansea.
John Man to Perrott. Part of the hull of a Dutch ship of about 500 tons has been put on shore, near Newport in Monmouthshire, through the storms. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Oct. 26.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. His Majesty's frigate, the Sweepstakes, which put to sea on the design of finding a North-West Passage, is supposed to be lost. The pink which went out with her has put into Penzance with much difficulty. It is believed there have been several wrecks, as upwards of 20 hatches of ships have come on shore about the Land's End. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Oct. 26. Thos. Holden to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 4]
Oct. 26.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The wind having changed, some small ships have sailed, and others are about going. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 5.]
Oct. 26. Order in Council, signed by Lord Keeper Bridgeman, that the Commissioners for the Union postpone their meeting until 1 Nov., on account of the business in Parliament. Notice is to be given to the English Commissioners named. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for denization of Derick Peterson Paw. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 182.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Thos. Pinfold of 450l., adventured by Sir Wm. Bateman in the stock of the East India Company, and seized for the King by the sheriff of Middlesex, because Bateman was outlawed at Pinfold's suit in 1668, for a debt of 600l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 91.]
[Oct. 26.] Petition of Ann Gray, alias Walters, to the King, for a special order for payment of a sum of money, as satisfaction for the 5 years' trouble and expense she has been put to, in defence of her own and his Majesty's title to certain lands, &c., in Twickenham parish, Middlesex. Six years since, contracted with the trustees of Princess [Queen] Henrietta Maria, for a lease for 21 years of a parcel of Twickenham manor, and paid 50 l. in part of a fine, as also several fees; but not being able to procure the lease, was ejected by a suit in the Exchequer, at a cost of 200 l. Applied to the trustees for reimbursement of the 50l. and charges, but as neither the granting of the lease nor payment of the fine had been entered in their books, through the neglect or abuse of their clerk, they, as appears by their order to the Treasury Commissioners, only offered to allow her 40l. Being entirely ruined, and her necessities rendering her incapable of attending the trustees any longer, she is forced to appeal to his Majesty for immediate relief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 7.]
[Oct. 26.] Petition of Ann Gray, alias Walters, to the Treasury Commissioners, to the same effect. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Oct. 26. Warrant to the trustees and administrators of the Queen Mother to pay 200l. to Madame Civett; 50l. to Madame la Varenne; and 40l. to Ann Gray, alias Walters, widow, as the King's bounty, for their attendance on the late Queen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 53. See p. 517 infra.]
Oct. 26. Certificate by Lord Arlington that Lord Henry Howard presented himself to his Majesty, 5 Oct., on his return from his embassy to Morocco. [Ibid.]
Oct. 27. Warrant to the Lord Keeper to seal a commission, empowering Prince Rupert to treat with Sieur Colbert, for concluding a treaty of commerce between the King and the King of France. Minute. [Ibid f. 55.]
Oct. 27.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for release on bail of Jeremiah Thornton, convicted at the Surrey assizes of stealing 6 sheep, and sentenced to transportation; but this being his first offence, the sentence is remitted, and he is to be inserted in the next general pardon, without clause for transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 45.]
Oct. 26. Commission to [Edw.] Villiers to be cornet and captain to the King's troop of horse guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 20.]
Oct. 26. Grant to Sam. Fortrey of the office of clerk of the delivery of ordnance in the Tower, Minories, or other ordnance stores. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 27.
Deal.
R. Watts to Williamson. The whole fleet of 60 sail, most of whom are bound for the Straits, have sailed within these two days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 9.]
Oct. 27.
Deal.
Mor. Lodge to Williamson. All the ships have gone or are going. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Rob. Aldworth, town clerk, Bristol. Newsletter. The three last tides have taken away a great part of the beach which defends the upper part of Dover, and further encroachments are expected from the next two tides, so that if some speedy course is not taken, a great part of the town will be washed away, and the harbour destroyed.
Although the French have a store of ships, they want seamen, and having attempted to draw some English into their service, his Majesty's Ambassador made complaint to the French King, so as to prevent the like practice for the future.
The case of the Governor of Cronenburg Castle shooting at a yacht in the Sound, because Capt. Bullman would not strike, has been heard before Council, who resolved that Mr. Loving, who was lately there, should be sent to demand satisfaction for the injury offered to his Majesty's flag. His Majesty has ordered that of the 50 ships which are to be fitted against the spring, 6 are to be of the first rate, 7 of the second, and 19 of the third. The others are to be made up out of the fourth and fifth rates, to which 9 ketches and 15 fireships are to be added.
Sir Thos. Allin having sent to Alicant for his instructions, which order him home as soon as Sir Edw. Spragg arrives to take the command, with the Resolution and other ships, has gone meantime to Algiers, to try if he can do anything against them. Sir John Harman has also orders to return home, as soon as he returns from Cyprus, and he may be expected about Christmas. His Royal Highness has ordered 4 convoys to attend the merchants going to those parts, one to go in November, February, April, and June.
Prince Rupert has been appointed Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire, void by the death of Lord Lovelace. On the 24th the Parliament met, his Majesty—who took his place with the peers, and welcomed them in a short speech,—expressing his sense of their affection, and desiring they would despatch their business by Christmas; he left the rest to the Lord Keeper.
The substance of the latter's speech was to acquaint them with the several leagues made by his Majesty, for the honour and advantage of the kingdom, and the great preparations made by the French, Dutch, and other neighbours, both by sea and land, which called for the same here. That the ordinary charge of the fleet from 1660 to the time of the war, amounted to 500,000l. a year, and that the fleet ordered for the spring was estimated at 800,000l. which, with the debts for which interest was paid, they were to take into consideration, more particularly as the supply given by the wines fell far short of what was expected.
The Duke of Monmouth has been called to the House of Peers, by a particular writ, not being of age. He was introduced by the Dukes of Buckingham and Richmond. Lord Howard was also introduced by Lord Arlington and Lord Arundel of Wardour, after which the Houses adjourned until the 27th. The Commons have ordered all committees to be revived, and new elections made for seats void; they committed a bill for regulating the making of cloth, and read another for settling hemp and flax. They ordered a committee to consider how the importation of corn by land from Scotland might be prevented, and then, considering the Lord Keeper's speech, ordered that his Majesty should be supplied proportionably to his present occasions, and that an account of his debts and the charges of the fleet should be brought in by the proper officers.
Damage done by the late storms. M. Colbert opposes all the demands made by M. de Groote on behalf of Holland, to M. de Lionne. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 11.]
Oct. 27. Petition of Rich. Taylor, brazier of Rochester, to the Navy Commissioners for a bill of imprest for 100l. There is upwards of 800l. due to him on bills for brazier's work, he has served in much work for the new ship at Chatham, and more is daily demanded; but having received only an imprest for 50l. on delivering in 200l. worth of goods, his estate and credit are so much exhausted by the non-payment of his bills, that he is disabled from carrying on the service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 66.]
[Oct. 27.] Petition of Abr. Charlton to the Navy Commissioners, for the restoration of his allowance of 6l. a year, as a look-out at the old dock, Chatham, which place he has held for 10 years, but it has lately been discontinued. Has also held, by appointment from his Royal Highness, the employment of porter and butler at the Hill House, Chatham. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Oct. 27.
The Jersey, Minorca.
Capt. Wm. Poole to the Navy Commissioners. Having discovered a defect in our rudder, I caused a survey to be made by such commanders and carpenters of merchantmen as were then in my company; they found it so dangerously loose that they concluded there was no other way for preservation of the ship, than taking her into Port Mahon to careen; this I resolved to do, and hope to make a quick despatch. This resolve discontented the commanders, as they would lose much time, and some of their ships were laden with fish; so at their request I ordered the Guernsey to go with them to Leghorn; otherwise they would have hazarded going alone rather than stay until my work was done. I hope all things will succeed well, as had I permitted them to go alone, if any miscarriage had befallen them, it would have been very ill resented at home, of which I have had too great a share already, although it may not be so deservedly as the world judges. In the exigency, having endeavoured to act for the best, I beg that whatever the event may be, I may not incur your displeasure, as I would rather have proceeded on my voyage, being homeward bound. I hope to arrive at Port Mahon to-day, and as my victuals will be provided at Leghorn, little time will be lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 68.] Encloses,
Certificate by Rich. London, captain of the Guernsey, and 10 other captains and carpenters of ships named, that on a survey of the rudder of the Jersey, they found it so loose that it could not be made serviceable, except the ship went into Port Mahon to careen.—The Jersey, Majorca, 26 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 68i.]
Certificate by Sam. Randall and 3 others to the same effect, and that they, as commanders of several ships bound to Villa Franca, Leghorn, and Naples, requested Capt. Poole to order the Guernsey to go with them to Leghorn, they being willing to adventure themselves and fortunes under her convoy, rather than stay whilst the Jersey was being refitted, as in such time some of their ladings of fish would be spoiled, and their voyages overthrown.—The Jersey off Minorca, 27 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 68ii.]
Oct. 27.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. I send accounts of the stores I supplied for ships, and have drawn 3 bills upon you, total 986l. 5s.; let them be punctually discharged, so that the public credit may have a greater reputation than at present; and if you would signify to the merchants who presented them that all similar bills would be punctually complied with, it might move them to signify as much to their correspondents here, by which means I might in time find our countrymen better natured than at present. I attend your full and effectual reply to my proposition as to victualling his Majesty's ships at Port Mahon. Sir John Harman was met 20 leagues from Leghorn by the Lewis frigate, who could not get near him by reason of the foul weather; she left the Mary 50 leagues off, in extremity of weather, which they had had for several days. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Oct. 27.
Woolwich.
W. Acworth to the Navy Commissioners. Pray send a lighter which has arrived with 12 lasts of tar from John Stacey to some other stores, as I have no room to stow them away. The deals lately received are put in the dockyard, and exposed to the weather, because the pitch and tar take all the room. I have put 100 lasts of tar and 50 of pitch on board 2 hoys for Chatham, and am about despatching the hemp there and to Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 69a.]
Oct. 27. Account by Mr. Stacey of pitch and tar delivered, and to be delivered, at Woolwich and Deptford. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Oct. 27. Col. Thos. Middleton to Pepys. I surveyed the wharf before his Majesty's house at Deptford, and finding it much out of repair, gave directions to the master carpenter to get in hand with it, as it may endanger the foundation of the house, if not speedily done. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Oct. 27. Lieut. Thos. Andrews to the Navy Commissioners. I pray that the Kitchen may be ordered to take down 30 volunteers, entered on board the Princess, under Sir Wm. Jennings, they being in town, and complaining of being kept out of victuals and pay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 72.]
Oct. 28.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Pepys. I will stop Mr. Gould's men from breaking up the Defiance until further orders. As Gould is in London, I hope you will signify your further pleasure therein, or send it down. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Oct. 28.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Pepys. I send a petition concerning my expenses for writing materials, &c., you having promised to stand my friend as you have done before. I have been at 5l. charge at least, from my appointment 14 Oct. 1668, to 8 Aug. following, the day that the clerk comptroller entered at Deptford; since then to Michaelmas 1670, it has cost me 10l. in books to follow the Comptroller's method, and I must now buy some new books, as the old ones are all full. I beseech that you and the Navy Board would settle on me a certain sum for such articles, from Michaelmas last, and that I may receive it quarterly by bill, or have it borne on the ordinary quarter books. I would have waited upon you, but am so tied in receiving and issuing provisions, that I cannot well be absent without hindrance to the service. [Ibid. No. 74.] Encloses,
Petition of Thos. Turner, storekeeper at Deptford, to the Navy Commissioners, for an allowance for expenses incurred, and for the settlement upon him of a certain sum annually for the future. On my admission, I had to provide several books, &c., and on the entrance of the clerk of the Comptrol, to procure 36 more, which books are in constant use, 18 being used one week, and 18 the other, and so on successively. I have only 20s. a year allowed me for books, paper, &c., whereas the clerks of the cheque at Deptford and Woolwich have 10l. a year apiece, and the storekeeper at Chatham has 6l., while my own charges are greater than theirs. [Ibid. No. 74i.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall Palace.
Pass for John Sebenico, an Italian master of the King, to go on business to his own country and return. [Latin. Foreign Entry Book, No. 12, p. 346.]
Oct. 28. Order for a warrant to the receivers of revenues for the duchy of Cornwall, to pay fines amounting to 839l., due to the Crown from manors in cos. Cornwall, Somerset, and Berks, to Sir Jonathan Trelawny as they are paid in; and for a warrant to the Exchequer to give receipts for the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 53.]
Oct. 28. Warrant to Jos. Williamson, for the books relating to trade with China, Japan, and India, taken in the 2 East Indies prizes, and now in the State Paper Office, to be delivered for the use of the East India Company. [Ibid.]
Oct. 28.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The fog having cleared off, the whole fleet, as also 2 men-of-war, have sailed. Capt. Herbert, commander of the Dragon in the Downs—having pressed a Deal man who afterwards made his escape—to revenge himself, pressed all the pilots, seamen, and landsmen of the Deal boats that came aboard, and refuses to release any of the pilots, although they were never known to have been pressed before. I fear if the captain should come on shore, the people will beat out his brains for such disorderly pressing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 12.]
Oct. 28.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin [for Blackborne] to Hickes. Arrival of various ships, and details of their lading. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Oct. 29.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Elizabeth of Lyme has arrived from St. Malo with canvas, and the Windsor has come into the Downs; both ran much hazard by the violence of the storms. Three out of four vessels from Croisic are supposed to be lost, and the other put back again. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Oct. 29. Statement by Roger L'Estrange to the King. In August 1663, the Press being very foul, your Majesty made me Surveyor of the Press, and granted certain advantages for my encouragement, in which office I so acquitted myself that I suppressed above 600 sorts of seditious pamphlets, perfectly cleared the press; I also attended to the duty throughout the town during the plague, as appears by several recommendations to your Majesty from the Duke of Albemarle. Towards the end of the sickness, I lost two-thirds of the profits of my commission, and not being able to defray the charge, the press broke out again, and several attempts have since been made by other persons and means to reduce it, but all in vain.
In Sept. 1670, I was commanded by your Majesty to make diligent inquiry after the printers and promoters of seditious pamphlets, with promise that I should be provided for; whereupon I commenced again with borrowed money, and discovered a most dangerous private press, which has cost me above 50l. and 3 years' trouble in hunting up. I am ready for indictments against 5 persons next sessions, but it has cost me 40l. within 6 weeks, and the charge of the prosecution has yet to come, wherein 25 witnesses have to be examined, treated, and kept together, which I am not able to do without a supply. I have beside information of another private press, which I also hope in a short time to secure.
The constant charge is for a deputy and a coach, which amounts to 200l. a year, and the contingent charges are more or less as occasion requires. I am allowed 200l. a year by Lord Arlington for his interest in the news book, and I am assured by him that your Majesty will grant me all such privileges of sole printing as counsel by their report have already stated you may lawfully do; if a moderate salary is added, sufficient to secure a competent entertainment to the officer in the execution of his duty, I doubt not but to be able to give a good account of the press. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Oct. 29.
Essex House.
C. Cratford to Viscount Conway, Ragley. I will send the articles, which have been sealed by Lady Clifton, who declined to take her moiety of the estate; but I suppose she will not long continue in that mind, for I tell her that it is put in Sir Clifford's hands; that if any of it miscarry on account of her earnestness, it would be at her loss as executrix, and not Lady Conway's; and that if she does not cause Sir Clifford's interest to be paid, all other interest would have to be paid to his lordship, both of which she assented to; so I do not see where there will be any advantage to Lady Clifton by not dividing. I have received Sir Charles Lee's assignment, but not having heard anything of him, I intend settling with Mr. Slingsby. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 16.]
Oct. 29.
Whitehall.
H. Muddiman to Wm. Scawen, Molenack, near Plymouth. Newsletter to the same effect as that to Aldworth of the 27th. Also, A poor woman at Plymouth has been delivered of a child having 2 heads, 4 arms, 4 thighs and legs, and 2 back bones, but it has only one neck, one body, and two breasts. They were both perfect females, come to full maturity, and had hair on the head, and nails on the fingers and toes.
Mr. Villiers has been appointed a cornet in his Majesty's troop commanded by the Duke of Monmouth, in place of Mr. Stanley, deceased.
It is reported from Leghorn that Francesco Mordez, an Italian, having twice failed in the English debt, without complying, and made his composition, embarked in one of the Pope's galleys, with the cognizance of the Governor, intending for Civita Vecchia; whereupon those concerned applied to Sir John Harman, who sent Capt. Darcy to the captain of the galley, to deliver him up or not depart, whereupon the Governor sent for Mordez, and the captain had leave to go.
The Smart frigate from Zante met a Tripoline, who treated him very civilly, and reported the Algerines to be plying between Sicily and Malta. The Centurion has left Genoa, where she was ill looked upon, having demanded free port in the French King's name, as the Spanish squadron had, which they excused as not having room in their arsenal for any more.
The Prince of Orange went aboard and sailed as far as the Brill, but returned to the Hague—the weather being bad—and the Earl of Ossory to Amsterdam, from whence he will also go to the Hague. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 17.]
Oct. 29. Sir Wm. Noell to Williamson. When last at Leicester, I found my interest there was so considerable that I heartily wished the place vacated. I was promised by the King that I should not be sheriff, and I hope Lord Arlington will get me off if he finds me in danger. I hear that Lord Annesley has engaged Sir Rob. Carr against me, if the business should come before the House, but I trust some of my friends will prevail so far as to prevent his violent opposition. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Oct. 29.
Court of Whitehall.
The King to John, Bishop of Durham, and to the Dean and chapter. We dispense with the residence of Denis Grenville, one of our chaplains in ordinary, archdeacon and prebendary of Durham, and rector of Sedgefield, in any of the aforesaid places, for the present and the next year; and he having been hindered some months by extraordinary concerns in London and Westminster, the said dispensation is to hold good for 6 months past. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 21.]
Oct. 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. If any accusations are made against me and another gentleman, a J.P., by Fras. Lucas, a Nonconformist of this town, at the Privy Council, let us have an opportunity of answering before any process is issued. Lucas was convicted of an assault and battery on me when I was ill, and he was bound twice to behaviour, but forfeited his recognizances; since then there have been three actions at common law, and as he has been cast in the whole, he is endeavouring to obtain relief from King and Council. He falsely accused me and the justice of embezzling stores, and the case was heard before the Navy Commissioners by order of his Royal Highness, when both of us were cleared of the charge. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 19.]
Oct. 30.
Portsmouth.
Notes from Hugh Salesbury to Williamson, that he has no news to send, all things being quiet, dated 6, 9, 11, 13, 23, 25, 29, and 30 Oct. [Ibid. Nos. 20–27.]
Oct. 30.
Lincoln's Inn Fields.
Earl of Bristol to Lord Arlington. It adds to my present sufferings by sickness to find myself forced to trouble you again concerning my poor fortune, but much more that his Majesty should be molested anew, upon a subject wherein he has expressed so much goodness and favour towards me and my poor family.
His Majesty, on perusing the report made on my petition in 1669, promised a settlement of the 10,000l., with the interest due for several years, it being my wife's jointure; and in order that there should be no delay, he promised to despatch the business himself, so that I might receive the fruits before the then following Michaelmas. As his Majesty was so careful, I concluded that the business was done, and that I should receive 2,500l. a year out of the prohibited commodities, until principal and interest were fully paid; but there being some difficulty about settling a fund for the privy purse, in lieu of the prohibited commodities, his Majesty appointed 1,000l. to be advanced to me in reduction of the debt, which Mr. May gave credit for with the receiver of that income.
Soon after, when I expected a resolution concerning the fund for Mr. May, I was informed by Lord Ashley that the King had altered his mind, and instead of paying the 10,000l., had agreed to settle a pension of 2,000l. a year on me for life—1,000l. of which only should be alienable for payment of my debts—and also 1,000l. on my wife for her life, and the Treasury Commissioners were to make an end of all my pretensions and claims mentioned in Lord Arlington and the Lord Keeper's report. I agreed to accept such pensions, provided they should be paid out of some solid branch of the revenue; after long delay they were settled on the tithes of the clergy, which were stated to amount to above 9,000l. a year, and to be clear of other charges. Sir George Downing was directed to draw the patent, but as he gave notes for it as a bare Exchequer pension, I could not accept it, and was compelled to get a new draft made by Mr. Attorney. This having passed his Majesty's hand and signet, was stopped at the Privy Seal for want of a docquet from the Treasury Commissioners, who refused to issue one, as the patent charged the payment of the pensions upon the receiver of tithes, when there was no such person, and the tithes, being a branch of his Majesty's revenue, could only be paid into the Exchequer; so I was reduced either to begin all my business again, or accept a patent of an Exchequer pension by tallies of assignment.
My patent passed the Great Seal, but instead of fixing my pensions upon the whole revenue of the tenths, it was restrained to five dioceses only; and instead of payment commencing from the new agreement, it only commenced with my patent, which was more than a year afterwards. I obtained by way of imprest the quarterage from Midsummer to Michaelmas, but three quarters still remain unpaid; this I would never have pretended to, had I not found— contrary to the assurances from the chief officers of the Treasury, that I could raise money upon the 1,000l. alienable for my pressing debts—that the whole 3,000l. a year will not be taken by any money lender in England as security for the 1,000l., and no man will meddle with an Exchequer pension, much less with a security that expires at the borrower's death. I find that the five dioceses to which my fund is reduced, instead of being clear of all other charges as alleged, are already charged with an arrear of 2,500l. which, if recovered, will jeopardise my current pension.
I know no remedy or means of redeeming myself from the most reproachful distresses, but the grant of a privy seal upon the five dioceses, for the arrears of my pension and my wife's, which amount to 2,250l., by which means I should be able to redeem my plate and best furniture, now engaged, and satisfy some of my pressing creditors who, before the grant of these pensions, were apt rather to pity than press, but have now grown insupportable, believing that the King has given me the means to satisfy them. Pray continue your obliging offices to me. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 28.]
[Oct. 30.] Petition of George Newland, Mayor, and the aldermen and burgesses of Newport, Isle of Wight, to the King, to appoint Edw. Hayles, an inhabitant, to the place of common clerk of the borough of Newport, void by death of Fras. Roll. [15 signatures. Ibid. No. 29.]
Oct. [30.] Warrant for a grant to George Wharton of the office of Treasurer and Paymaster of the Ordnance, with 400l. salary for himself and 120l. for 2 clerks, according to a former arrangement that on decease of Col. Wm. Legg, late Lieutenant of Ordnance, the office of treasurer and paymaster should no longer be executed by the Lieutenant. [Draft. Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 30. Docquets of a warrant for the erection of the said office, and the grant of the same to George Wharton, one docquet giving the fee 40l. and the other 20 nobles a year. [Docquet, Vol. 24, Nos. 246, 247.]
Oct. 30. Commission to Prince Rupert to be Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire in place of John, Lord Lovelace, deceased. [Ibid. No. 247.]
Oct. 31.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Farmers of the Customs to give order for the landing of certain goods on board 2 vessels arrived from Holland, belonging to Don Francisco de Mello, Ambassador from the Prince of Portugal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 31.]
Oct. 31. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 55.]
Oct. 31.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Chas. Perrott. Two French vessels have arrived from Bordeaux with wine and prunes; one from Dunkirk for Bordeaux, the Swallow of London from Ireland with fish for Cadiz, and others from the Isle of Wight bound for Ireland, France, &c. Upwards of 20 sail are in port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 32.]
Oct. 31.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. Let me know whether I shall be prejudiced by voting for Sir Arnold Breames. I believe we shall have as much trouble in choosing a burgess as we had a Mayor, and if the Nonconformists and those excommunicated have a vote, which I desire to know, Lord Hinchinbreke will carry it. The fanatics increase, daily. Three ships have sailed, and others have come in, and a great shipwreck is reported. I will pay for 2 Gazettes weekly, if sent. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Oct. 31.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Dolphin of Topsham, with Irish commodities, has been cast away near the Land's End, and the master and 5 more drowned; the rest saved themselves in their boats, and report that there was upwards of 1,000l. in money on board, and that the master lost his life in attempting to save it. I hear by the Content of Fowey, with salt from Croisic, that the French King has built 2 great frigates at Brest, of 1,800 and 2,600 tons, which are almost ready to be launched. The Swallow of London has arrived from Ireland, to take in pilchards for the Straits; also 2 French vessels with wines from Bordeaux, who report several wrecks upon the coast. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Oct. 31.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Newcastle and Dragon have returned to the Downs from the Ness, by stress of weather. A shark 8 feet long beat herself against the beach at Deal, and lay a considerable time in the wash of the sea, within 2 oars' length of several spectators, after which it played about, and then went to sea. The oldest man in Deal neither saw nor heard of such a thing before. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Oct. 31.
Chatham Dock.
Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Understanding that John Moorcock is likely to be sued in the Exchequer for a bill of imprest made in his name for 200l., which I received on account for a parcel of timber, also bought in Moorcock's name of Sir Humphrey Miller, and served into the stores, I request that Moorcock may be cleared from it, and that I may be charged with it, but that I may have a bill for the timber, otherwise I shall be a loser. I cannot produce any vouchers for money paid, for want of receipts; I was the more remiss in it, in regard that I was at a contract for serving in timber by the load; so I hope, in consideration of my former suspension and loss of wages, that you will give credit to my affidavit, and pass my bill. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 75.]
Oct. Petition of Mary, widow of John Langrack, purveyor, to the Navy Commissioners, to move his Royal Highness for an order for payment of a bill of 234l., due to her late husband, for bringing timber from Aliceholt and Whittlewood Forests. Her husband died 3 years since, and left her with 2 young children, who are reduced to great want by non-payment of the money. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 76.]
Oct. Petition of Charity, wife of Thos. Potts, sailmaker at Newcastleon-Tyne, to the Navy Commissioners, for an order to the Treasurers to pay the balance due on her husband's bills, for repairing several men-of-war which came into that port during the Dutch wars; total, 18l. 8s. Her husband drew a bill upon them for it, which was accepted by Sir John Mennes, Comptroller of the Navy, but only a part has been paid; and she being reduced to great straits, has been constrained to take a voyage from Newcastle to obtain it, and has lain in town 2 months at very great charge. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Oct. Petition of the ropemakers in Chatham Yard to the Navy Commissioners, to determine what shall be a day's work, or give them extra allowance, they being lately put upon making 4 strand ropes instead of 3, which requires more men and a great deal more time and care. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Oct. Capt Thos. Elliot to Thos. Hayter. Pray give protection tickets to as many men as are willing to go with me and apply for them; also get the Navy Commissioners to set my name to them. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Oct. Account of particular workmen required in the yards at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, and Portsmouth, for carrying on the works with greater despatch, distinguishing how many are wanted in each; total 797. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. Note by Mr. Harrington of the excess in measure above his contract, in certain deals supplied at from 12s. to 15s. a piece; total value, 19l. 11s. 6d. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Oct. Names of 4 men pressed by the officers of the Dragon, out of the East India Company's ship Flying Eagle. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Oct.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thos. Littleton and Sir Thos. Osborne, Navy Treasurers, to pay 50l. to Major Bannister, towards furnishing him with provisions, &c., for victualling and fitting his vessel, bound for Surinam, to fetch home such English subjects as shall be found remaining there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 36.]
Oct. Warrant to the Earl of Sandwich to deliver to Rich. Smith, clerk of the cheque of the Guards, 100 red coats guarded with black velvet, 100 pairs of red breeches, 100 velvet bonnets, 100 pairs of grey worsted stockings, 100 waist-belts, and 50 carabine belts; also 100l. to provide cloth for watching gowns. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 249.]
Oct. ? Dan. Finch to Lord [Conway]. Lord Arlington has ordered my uncle [Sir John Finch] to return, and says he may be expected in November, and a general order is to be sent from the Duke of York for one of the Mediterranean frigates to receive him; but he cannot sail before December, and intends to touch at Tangiers, Cadiz, Lisbon, &c.
It would please my father's family much to know that her ladyship's pains were intermitted, and the dowager recovered. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 37.]
Oct. ? Papers relating to the erection of a ballast shore at Jarrow Slyke, near Newcastle, viz.:—
Reasons of Newcastle against the said ballast shore, as straitening the river, and hindering the passing of vessels up and down; given in at a court held by Thos. Davison, Mayor, Sir Rob. Shafto, Recorder, several aldermen, and 12 masters and mariners.—Newcastle Guildhall, 26 Sept. 1670. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Expedients proposed for easing and advantaging the coal trade, and lessening the prices of coal:—
1. That all ships may have liberty to take up their provisions at Shields, instead of sending 7 miles up the river for them.
2. That ships in distress may use any pilot or carpenter, whether he be a freeman of Newcastle or not.
3. That a free ballast shore may be built at Jarrow Slyke near Shields, so that ships may lay their ballast there, and not be forced to carry it up to Newcastle, by which the river would be bettered, and ships could make 2 or 3 more voyages than they do, because they would have quicker despatch. Also,
Town of Newcastle's answers objecting to these proposals. Also,
Replication to the answer of Newcastle [by the Trinity House, London. 7 signatures. [Printed, 4 pages. 3 copies, one imperfect. With diagrams differing of the proposed wharf. [Ibid. Nos. 39–41.]
Certificate of the Masters and Pilots of the Trinity House, Newcastle, and their answer to the reasons of the Masters of the Trinity House, London, giving more fully the objections against the wharf, 6 Oct. 1670. Also,
Answer in detail to the 7 articles of the above certificate. Also,
Report by Sir Sam. Starling, Lord Mayor, and 14 others of London, that on considering the arguments on both sides, they think the wharf would be destructive to trade, dangerous to shipping, and would tend to obstruct the Tyne, and decrease the trade of Newcastle, 27 Oct. 1670. With answer that the reporters give no reasons for this statement, and that attention should be given to the report of the Trinity House, London, who are uninterested parties and the best judges in cases of this kind. Also,
Reports and reasons of the Masters of the Trinity House, in favour of the said ballast wharf, viz.:—
1. It will prevent the loss of ships in coming to Tynemouth bar, as they often have to cast their ballast before coming to the bar, and carry it up in keels to Newcastle.
2. It will secure great ships from casualties, in going to or coming from Newcastle.
3. It will encourage men to build larger ships for trade.
4. If the price of taking out the ballast at Shields is moderate, it will encourage navigation, as the price at Newcastle is very high.
5. Shipmasters will save so much time and charge in the taking out of their ballast, that they will be able to make 2 or 3 more voyages in the year, and thus coal will become cheaper. [With diagram, endorsed. Printed, 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 42.]
Oct ? Copy of the two first of the above documents. [Printed. Ibid. No. 43.]
Oct. ? Copy of the answer to the certificate of the town of Newcastle as above, giving in parallel columns the reply of the town to the said answer. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Oct. ? Arguments to prove the advantage of the said wharf, and answering previous objections. If it be still urged that it will spoil the river, the owners of Jarrow Slyke will be content to leave it all open but 20 or 30 acres, provided Newcastle will not hinder their making the best use of it they can. [With the diagram. Printed, 2 pages. Ibid. No. 45.]
Oct. ? Survey of the river Tyne, from the sea on the east to Newcastle on the west, and thence on the west to Heddon streams. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Oct.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind.
Vol. 280. No. Date. King's. Merchants. Wind. REMARKS.
47 Oct. 1 15 S.W. The Reserve has just arrived from Portsmouth.
48 " 4 1 10 N.E.
49 " 6 1 13 E.
50 " 9 1 22
51 " 11 1 25 W.N.W.
52 " 13 1 28 N.W.
53 " 14 1 37 N.W. Lord Howard has landed at Deal from France, and taken horse for London.
54 " 15 1 35 W.
55 " 17 1 35 W. Received the packet, and has sent it to Lisbon by the Great Eagle, commanded by Capt. Fennie.
56 " 18 1 35 W.
57 " 19 1 37 S.W.
58 " 21 1 36 S.W.
59 " 22 3 39 W.
60 " 23 3 40 W.
61 " 24 3 41 W.
62 " 25 3 44 S.W.
63 " 26 3 44 E.
64 " 28 2 E. The fleet sailed yesterday and to-day, with a fair wind.
65 " 29 1 2 S.E.
66 " 30 1 2 S.W.