BHO

Charles II: November 1670

Pages 510-560

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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November 1670

Nov. 1.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I am commanded by Sir John Bennett to inform you that Ant. Buckley is the man who disturbed Capt. Thos. Langley at Harwich. Noted by Williamson that Trye is to be found at the Gray's Inn Walks Tavern, Gray's Inn Lane, Strickland in Somerset House, and Boylston at a scrivener's shop, against the Artichoke in Middle Row, Holborn. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 67.]
Nov. 1.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. A friend of mine having on just occasion, on 16 Oct. last, apprehended Thos. Horneby, Rich. Halse, and another, as suspected highwaymen, they are committed to Exeter Gaol by Sir Thos. Heald, J.P., who desires this may be inserted in the Gazette, so as to elicit further discovery about them. They lodged at an ale house in Brent, Devon, for six weeks, but Horneby says he is a barber, and lives at the Bull in Bishopsgate Street. Halse alleges that he was born at Mather in Cornwall, and receives a pension from the King. The former rode a bay, and the other a grey mare. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Nov. 1. Proceedings at a meeting of the Commissioners for the Union of both kingdoms. The Earl of Lauderdale proposed on the second point of the King's message—the reduction of both Parliaments into one—that it should be done by uniting the entire Parliament of Scotland to that of England, not by lessening their numbers. The Commissioners for England desired time to consider this, on which the meeting was adjourned to 8 Nov. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Nov. 1. Petition of the Merchant Adventurers to the King. In May last we represented to you that in November 1655, we removed our mart from Rotterdam to Dort, from which we obtained greater privileges than before, and the city has maintained us therein, the resolutions of the States to the contrary notwithstanding; but the city was free to be absolved of the treaty in 15 years, and this we fear they will do, because our trade has so greatly diminished by your suspension of our charter at home, and your throwing open the whole woollen trade to all persons, that the city will not be at the expense of us, unless by charter we may enjoy the whole woollen trade. We beg a proclamation to reduce the trade to the regulations of our charter, with such qualifications for admission of merchants as you think good.
On 6 May you directed the hearing of our case, Mr. Kiffin and other interlopers attending. On 17 June, the case was referred to the Attorney and Solicitor General, and the report annexed (missing) was made. We beg your judgment and final determination, being much importuned by the interlopers. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Nov. 1. Requests by Rob. Mayors for warrants to receive from Arthur Showell 20 loads of elm timber at Deptford, and 15 loads at Woolwich, 31 Sept. and 1 Nov. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 83.]
Nov. 1.
Dublin.
Peter Bronsdon to the Navy Commissioners. I lay 3 weeks at Chester, on account of the winds, but sailed from Holyhead 27 Oct., arrived in Dublin 28th, and delivered your letters to Sir Fras. Brewster, who said I had come at a bad time of the year to go into the woods, there being so much water that I could not pass in many places. He recommended Lord Strafford's woods at Shelela as being very good, and bids me procure a guide, as I should not be able to travel without. Sir Francis not being much acquainted with the woods lying northward, I have promised to inquire about them of Sir Geo. Rawdon, who lives in those parts. I hoped to return by the same packet, but have been detained for Sir Francis's answer; Sir Frescheville Hollis is not here, but at Charleville. Let my letters be directed to Mr. Northeast, the Golden Leg, Castle Street. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 84.]
Nov. 1.
Woolwich.
Jno. Harris to the Navy Commissioners. I have made great provision for making sails at London, Chatham, and Portsmouth, and request a bill of imprest for 500l., which I will take up and discharge before Christmas. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Nov. 1.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Pepys. I will hasten the galleries of the Assistance, and shall want some boats mentioned; but as they cannot be built in the yard for want of materials, let them be built either at Deptford, or by Mr. Stafford, in his own yard at Woolwich. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Nov. 2.
Woolwich.
Same to the Same. I have set men to take off the Milford's galleries, which I presume will serve the Assistance. Pray hasten the carver with his work, as we cannot get on for want of the figure-head and trailboard. I have sent to him so often that I fear it signifies little; I suppose he has some merchants' works in hand. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Nov. 2.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The St. Andrew has arrived at Blackstakes, and the Bonadventure has been launched; the St. George will be launched on Friday, and the Bonadventure docked in her room, to mend the defects in her keel. I cannot give any account of the Defiance, until I have advised with Sir Jer. Smith and Esquire Pepys, who are expected here soon. I send a contract for timber. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Nov. 2. Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. It will be impossible to provide sea victuals for 8 months for the ensuing year for 25,000 men, without an estimate of what it will amount to, so that a privy seal may be granted thereon; pray transmit the estimate to his Royal Highness, that I may have particulars as to the distribution of the said victuals, so as to know what to provide for each port. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Nov. 2.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to [the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of Cambridge]. Hearing of the learning, loyalty, and ability of Chris. Halleley, student in physic, for his further encouragement, we require you, with consent of the Earl of Manchester, to admit him to the degree of D.D., he paying the fees, and performing the exercises at such times as you think fit, or giving security therefor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 160.]
Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church of Manchester. We require you to admit Geo. Ogden, M.A., to the first vacant fellowship in your church. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 27, f. 20.]
Nov. 2. Warrant for a pardon to Capt. John Martin, searcher of the port of Plymouth, accused of divers misdemeanors in regard to his office; granted on account of his services to the late and present King, in the worst of times. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 44.]
Nov. 2. Warant for 200l. to Rob. Needham, out of the privy seal of 22 Aug. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 56.]
Nov. 2.
Treasury Chambers.
Erection of the office of Treasurer and Paymaster of the Ordnance, and grant thereof to Geo. Wharton, salary 20 nobles a year, with all fees, profits, &c. (excepting poundage), belonging thereto. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 71. See p. 505 supra.]
Nov. 2.
Yarmouth.
Sir Thos. Meadows to [Lord Townshend]. Being ill, I could not return you any positive answer as to the Major's place, its concerns involving his Majesty's interests, your lordship's honour, and the peace and safety of the town. I presume my affections in promoting those particulars are well known, but it is much admired how men who were in arms in the late rebellion are esteemed by you as the only men for public trust, and the most fit for your correspondence. I formerly received instructions for acting from you or the deputy-lieutenant, but now Mr. Johnson conveys your commands, which I dislike, as also having those to bear command under me, whose principles are destructive to the interests we are bound to maintain.
After your lordship had purged the house here of all the Independent and most of the Presbyterian faction, the government of this town remained for some years in the hands of those well inclined to the King and Church's interest, who so successfully put the laws in execution against Nonconformists, that there was not a private meeting but by stealth; and if discovered, they were prosecuted, so that many of Mr. Bridge's members, and those most eminent, came to church. Had those in your esteem discharged their duty, we might have been ere this in a happy condition; but Messrs. Thaxter and Huntington coming to the cushion in 1666, the Nonconformists who frequented the church forsook it, and the turbulent spirits who had left the town returned, their meetings became public, and their numbers increased, and not the least notice was taken of them.
This connivance put the Independents upon bringing Mr. Bridge to town, and Sam. Shipdham, a member of Bridge's congregation, solicited charity from all the Presbyterian party, for their and the Independents' ejected ministers; this gave the Independents such satisfaction that, upon their general and free contributions, Bridge was immediately brought back to town, when they flocked together in great numbers to the house of Capt. Ravens; Bridge's son-in-law, who was proposed by Thaxter and Huntington for a common councilman; and when it was moved in the assembly that he should renounce the Covenant, they opposed it, and said he should do it at their house, where he signed a paper to that effect when he had not renounced at all, as he afterwards confessed.
Thus they began to recruit the house with the old tribe, to overpower the King's party, and there are now 30 who have not received the sacrament. The faction increasing, one place would not suffice, and the grand meeting is now held at a house upon the quay near Huntington's house, who although he is a magistrate, and sees them resort there, yet puts not the least check upon them; their coming so near may be out of respect to his wife's lameness, she being a constant frequenter of their meetings.
This shows the encouragement given by Huntington and his party, so as to make void the former Act of Uniformity, and also his design in practising his tricks upon Capt. Clarke, while in execution of his office under the Act against conventicles. It is well known how active and zealous Huntington was here, by virtue of a commission from the late Committee of Safety, in levying money upon the inhabitants for payment of the soldiers over whom he was lieutenant; and how he reproached his captain and the other officers for their disaffection when they refused to collect; since you have made him a captain, his carriage in church has been generally noticed; for during prayers and the creed he is sitting, while others are kneeling and standing.
Before the new bailiffs were elected, the old ones came the day before the election, to prevent the dispute which formerly arose as to those capable of being elected, and moved in an assembly that the churchwardens should search the church books, and render an account of those who had and had not received the sacrament; but Huntington and his party opposed it, and one of them has since got on the cushion, Huntington being a J.P. Of the 12,000 communicants esteemed to be in the town, there are not 500 who have received the sacrament, and many of these are those that receive collection. I conceive it is neither to the interest of the King nor the Church, your lordship's honour, nor the safety of the peace, to put men in command possessed of such principles; I cannot therefore join with Huntington. [2 pages. In the handwriting of Rich. Bower. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 72.]
Nov. 2.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. Two vessels have arrived from Bordeaux, in company with 150 sail of English, Dutch, and French. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Warner at the White Hart, Winchester. To the same effect as that of 29 Oct. last; also,
Mr. Bushell, and the rest of the jury who refused to pay the fine inflicted for not finding [Wm.] Penn and [Wm.] Mead guilty, moved the Court of Common Pleas for a habeas corpus, when the Court requested to be furnished with precedents, which when produced were held not to apply, as being in criminal matters, and a further search was requested.
His Majesty has granted a pardon to the City of Norwich, for coining and vending farthings, they being the first that have desired it by petition, but the Council threw out other petitions from persons in London made since.
The French letters speak largely of the continuance of their levies for sea and land, and that they have taken an English ship near St. Christopher's. The States have written to acquaint Count Monterry what levies they are making, and what garrisons should be well furnished with men and provisions, and desiring him to do the like, and omit nothing that may tend to security, whilst their neighbours make such great preparations. He is also to press the Queen of Spain for the third payment of the subsidies, so that they might be ready for service upon the first occasion.
The House of Commons met again on 31 Oct., and having heard the report of the estimate of the fleet, and the debts for which his Majesty paid interest, they ordered a committee to prepare the matter by 3 Nov., when the whole House went into a committee upon it. The bill for planting hemp and flax was read a second time, and the Committee on Plantations was revived. The Prince of Orange arrived on the 28th, and was entertained by the Duke of Ormond on the 31st; Van Beuningen, who was ordered home, has been allotted a longer stay in England, on account of his arrival. The convoys have sailed from the Downs with a fleet of merchantmen.
Dr. [John] Hacket, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, being dead, Dr. [Thos.] Wood, the dean, is expected to succeed him.
Mr. Loving will leave in a few days for Denmark, having received his despatches.
When the Earl of Ossory went with his Majesty's yacht to Helvoetsluys, he gave the usual salute to the fort, but receiving no answer, made complaints to the States that it was an affront to his Majesty's flag; the States excused themselves on account of the absence of the Governor, and the ignorance of his officers, for whom they requested pardon. Lord Fauconberg is daily expected, having been in Holland a short time since. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 74.]
Nov. 3.
Southampton.
Thos. Butler to Williamson. I must apologise for having been another person's advocate, being a beggar myself. As you promised your interest with the Bishop of Winchester on my behalf, pray use it; the Bishop daily attends Parliament at Westminster; I suppose you can easily get his Majesty to recommend me to him, in consideration of the loyalty and ruin of my father and his family. The living of Fawley, near Southampton, is likely to be soon vacant, the present parson being very ill; and although it is a very sickly place, yet the living is worth 200l. a year. I desire directions how to steer if the parson should die, the donation being in the Bishop of Winchester. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Nov. 3. List of persons nominated for selection by the King as sheriffs for 1670, with additions [by Lord Arlington], and checking those who were pricked. In the first column is a list of those selected as sheriffs to serve from 1668–9 to 1670–1. [6 sheets. Ibid. No. 76.]
Nov. 3. List of persons nominated by Council for the King's selection of sheriffs for England in 1670, with checks against the names of those pricked. [Ibid. No. 76a.]
[Nov. 3.] Reasons why John Cartwright should not be sheriff of Oxfordshire, viz., that he has served already, was not returned in the Exchequer list, is a non-resident, old and infirm. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 76b.]
[Nov. 3.] Note of John Morecroft, as one of the 6 sheriffs named for Essex, for the ensuing year. [Ibid. No. 77.]
[Nov. 3.] Note by C. Perrott that Wm. Kenrick should be excused from the office of High Sheriff of Berkshire, being captain of a Militia company in the Isle of Wight during the late war, and not yet paid, and that Lord Lovelace recommends John Plummer as a fit person to put in. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Nov. 3.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to [the electors of Winchester College]. Suit has been made us on behalf of John, son of Wm. Packer, one of our household servants, for his admission into your college. He being capable of election, and on your rolls, we require you to admit him at your next election, and doubt not your ready compliance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 160.]
Nov. 3.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Pray take my last letter into your serious consideration, and let me have the fruits of my just desires; Sir Denis Gauden's bad compliance with all my bills at home, suffering them to be returned protested for non-payment, not only fills me with care and plunges me into inconveniences, but deters the merchants from dealing with me. I beseech you not only to command that all my bills upon the Board be punctually satisfied, but to prevail with Sir Denis to be kinder and more punctual for the future. I hope my zeal and fidelity in serving the King will encourage his faithful ministers to give me all just encouragement. I presume Sir Thos. Allin will have arrived home as soon as this, having been advised from Alicant that he had departed without any vessels with him, and that Sir Edw. Spragg had his flag in the maintop, and was gone for Port Mahon to clean, and then to stand for Algiers, and endeavour some attempt there. I hope God will crown his endeavours with success. [1⅓ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 69, with the letter of 27 Oct.]
Nov. 3.
The Resolution, St. Helen's Road.
Sir Thos. Allin to the Navy Commissioners. I have safely arrived here at ebb tide, the wind being N.N.W. I have despatched Lieut. Montague to his Royal Highness with an account, and to receive orders from you, and sent our purser ashore, so that nothing may be neglected in getting his pay-books ready. I beg your acceptance of a bill of exchange, payable to John Gardner, for 3,000 pieces of 8 borrowed of John Mathews. I made him angry for keeping him without his money till my coming away, and for not giving him 4s. 7d. for each piece of 8 instead of 4s. 6d., as agreed. I have made use of my own money and credit when I possibly could, before charging you with bills. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Nov. 3. John Harris to the Navy Commissioners. Considering the great quantity of sails making and to be made by the spring, I requested a bill of imprest for 500l.; but Mr. Hayter intimating that you expected a more particular obligation for the performance, I hereby oblige myself to finish the 14 suits of sails by the 20th, and to supply the 50 ships by the spring; only I want the 500l. and a warrant to press, which shall not be immediately used. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 91.]
Nov. 3.
Chatham.
John Brooke and 2 other officers to Col. Thos. Middleton. Particulars of the lengths of various ropes supplied to Capt. Langston for the rigging of his ship. We have inquired into the causes of his complaint, and find that those which he says are too short are the length formerly allowed to his ship, and others of the like dimensions, and will suit if the boatswain puts them up as they were allowed; but if he makes them to go after other fashions, it alters the case. We judge that her masts and yards are made tauter and squarer since we fitted her rigging, which might render the ropes shorter than they would have been; but we heard nothing from the boatswain that we could have remedied, and the captain was not present to find fault whilst the ship was being fitted. As to the barricado stuff, it was such as the Commissioner upon the place appointed for such purposes, and on our computation of what might serve, we allowed 300 fathoms, besides 10 fathoms of junk; we hope this will render us fair from designedly doing anything to disserve his Majesty, with which the captain seems to stain us. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 92.]
Nov. 4.
London.
Sir Rich. Ford, Lord Mayor of London, to the Navy Commissioners. I earnestly desire the discharge of Dan. Lane, and 3 other joiners named, impressed from the Royal Exchange for service at Chatham, by which means the finishing of the works of the Exchange—which is of great advantage to the City, and for which his Majesty has taken particular care—are retarded; also for an order that no workman may be impressed from the public works of the City for the future. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Nov. 4.
Mark Lane.
Alderman Edw. Backwell to the Navy Commissioners. Hearing from some of my workmen in Lombard Street that several persons employed by me there have been impressed for his Majesty's service, I beg their discharge, otherwise it will redound very much to my detriment in this juncture. [Ibid. No. 94.] Enclosing,
List of 4 men pressed as above mentioned.—3 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 94i.]
Like list of 6 carpenters and one joiner. With an endorsement by Pepys in shorthand, with reference to the place of storekeeper at Portsmouth, the death of Capt. Johnson, and Jas. Pugh. [Ibid. No. 94ii.]
Nov. 4. Joseph Williamson to Sir Jer. Smith. Melchisedec Richardson, a poor country joiner, is the person I spoke to you about; I beg you will get him freed from this press. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Nov. 4.
Between Sicily and Malta.
Chas. Wylde to Mat. Wren. We arrived safe at Malta as specified in our bill of lading, where Capt. Clap left the Little England under the land; our two Venetian ships are bound thither. I gave chase to 2 ships, but they proved to be French ships from Cyprus. I inquired of Sir John Harman, who has gone to those parts, but heard no news of him. Captains Middleton and Amice being about to depart for Venice, we shall be reduced to the Turkey ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 96.]
Nov. 4.
The Greenwich, off Malta.
Capt. Rob. Robinson to Mat. Wren. We sailed from Tunis 31 Oct., with 14 sail, leaving the Martin behind. We saw the same two Frenchmen we met off Porto Verena [Farina ?], but they did not come off to us, although the Consul showed me a letter from the French Admiral, that his master had commanded that no ship or vessel should be suffered to enter the bay of Tunis or Verena [Farina]. Off Sardinia we met one of the French squadron, who reported their Admiral and 4 sail to be off Tripoli. Those of Tunis have an absolute antipathy against the French, and as much devotion to keep their league with us, though there is some misunderstanding between them and Tripoli. We heard that 12 Algerines are abroad, and I believe they are about Cape Melo, or Corsica. I wish that all his Majesty's men-of-war may have due respect shown them whenever they come or go, and that the Consul of the place would stir himself for that purpose. I sent for him at 5 a.m. to advise about it, but he did not come until 7 p.m., and then I was ready to sail.
We hear that 3 Tripolines lie off this place, and 8 elsewhere; and that 12 Algiers men-of-war are expected at Tunis, as also the French Admiral, which is no great matter, but I would rather meet them at sea than in a bay. Our Armenian is left here; all our commanders being aboard to dinner out of respect to the Consul, he got leave to go ashore for two hours, when he told the men he should go to Venice, and not return before to-morrow; I shall not stop such an estate for him, but sail for Candia. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Nov. ? Petition of Sam. Rich, B.A., to the King, for a letter to the University of Cambridge that he may have his M.A. degree, which he has not yet taken. With note by the Earl of Manchester, Lord Chancellor of Cambridge, of his willingness for this request to be granted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 79.] Annexing,
Certificate by John Howe, and 13 others, in favour of the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 79i.]
Similar certificate on his behalf by William, Bishop of Gloucester.—29 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 79ii.]
Nov. 4. Licence for Sam. Rich, B.A., to be M.A. in Cambridge. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 62.]
Nov. 4. Appointment by the King, at request of the Mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Newport, Isle of Wight, of Edw. Hayles to the office of common clerk of the town, void by decease of Fras. Roll. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 55.]
Nov. 4. Warrant to Sir H. Wood, treasurer and receiver of the jointure of the late Queen, to pay 700l. to Madame Civett; 50l. to Varenne; and 40l. to Ann Gray, alias Walters, widow; this warrant, attested by 2 Treasury Commissioners with their receipt, being a discharge for the said sums. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 55.]
Nov. 4. Warrant for 2,000l. to the Earl of Oxon, as the King's free gift, without account. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 255.]
Nov. 4. Harangue pronounced to William Henry, Prince of Orange, in the name of the French and Dutch churches in London, by Louis Herault, minister of the French church, and one of the King's chaplains. [3 pages. Printed. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 80.]
[Nov. 4.]
London.
Harangue by M. de Breval, chaplain of the French church in the Savoy, to the Prince of Orange, proferring their respect on account of his descent from a race of heroes, his relationship to the King, and his interest in the reformed churches, and in religion. [3 pages. French. Printed. Ibid. No. 81.]
Nov. 5. Abr. Barrington to Pepys. I am directed by Sir Rob. Vyner to ask for the release of the bearer, who has been pressed for Chatham, and who was recommended to be discharged at Sir Robert's request, by Wren, the Duke of York's secretary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 98.]
Nov. 5.
London.
Sam. Beake to Capt. Cresset in the Tower. I beg you or Sir John Robinson to intercede for release of Rich. Corneleston and Jacob Abrahams, Dutch carpenters, who were pressed out of my house yesterday by Mr. Shish, to work at Chatham; I think it was done out of malice. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Nov. 5.
Hull.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. John Harrison, master of the Thomas of Hull, has taken in 84 loads of his Majesty's timber lying here, and has left 40 loads behind, the most part of which he might also have shipped, and which now lies here sunk at the pier. I beg 168l. to pay the land carriage, at 14s. a load for 240 loads. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Nov. 6.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to Pepys. I suppose some extraordinary business hindered you and Sir Jer. Smith from being here, but the sooner you come the better, as Mr. Arkinstall is very weak and ill, and Mr. Homewood, Capt. Pyend, and the rest are all in town, and only Mr. Petty is in London. I shall say little of the matter until I see you, but you will have enough to prove Mr. Pett an unjust steward of the poor's money. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Nov. 6.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Not knowing whether the order sent to Lord Townshend concerning the conventicles has been returned, Capt. Clarke has put himself to the trouble and expense of this second journey, for the issue will be of grand concernment to his Majesty and the Church's interest here. If Clarke is baffled when, as a churchwarden, he is bound in duty to prosecute, no person will concern himself, and encouragement will be given for reviving the meetings now laid down, and the most eminent of them now come frequently to church. The former Act of Uniformity took the same effect at first, when the government here fell into the hands of him [Huntington] and his party, who by their connivance made the law a dead letter, and they endeavour the same now, as appears by their tricks upon Clarke. The factious here are so numerous and eminent in trade that the rest depend upon them, so that few dare appear for the King or Church's interest, as they meet with all possible discouragement, when they need all encouragement from authority, to support their spirits, which otherwise must of necessity sink. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 82.]
Nov. 7.
Yarmouth.
Sir. Thos. Meadows to Williamson. Capt. Clarke not having heard the result of the order upon which he attended at Norwich, has resolved on coming to London, to prosecute the business de novo and to move for a second order; so I presume the matter in the petition will be made good by him and others. Pray give him advice and assistance, as the welfare and happiness of all the loyal party here, who in no way equal the factious in number, depend upon the affair. You will soon hear from me about the military affair here, and into what hands part of it has been newly entrusted, to which I cannot in the least adhere, nor will I forget my loyalty by permitting such persons to act, where I am in the least concerned. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Nov. 7.
Emsworth sloop, Yarmouth.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. I want further orders, as the herring season is past, and most of the fishermen have gone home. They have made but small voyages, the weather having been so bad, and not a fresh herring has been brought in these 7 or 8 days. I wrote Mr. Wren last week, and desired his Royal Highness's pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 102.]
Nov. 7.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Are the pressed men from London to have their board wages paid weekly, and to be allowed an hour on Fridays to go to market ? The days being so short, they will not work above 3 hours that afternoon, and the other pressed men, who have been there all the summer, having been content without it, I suppose they may be the same.
The workmen are much dissatisfied for want of their quarter's pay, the little they had being all expended, and they having no credit. I have endeavoured to satisfy them with all the persuasions I can, but they answered good words would not satisfy their and their families' hunger, and I have them daily making their complaints. I send a contract for pantiles. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Nov. 8.
Downs.
Capt. Ar. Herbert of the Dragon to the Navy Commissioners. I send a list of men discharged since the pay, with the reasons, which I hope will in some measure excuse my proceedings; I believe the further discharges that are made will be found from another hand. I am told some tickets have been made for men now on board, for which I am sure my signature cannot be produced; I am unwilling to reflect upon anybody, as I believe the author may be found without my accusation. The muster master of Deal has a book signed by me, as exact as it was possible to be from memory, and I could never receive anything from the clerk of the cheque; I will send you from Plymouth a copy of it, which will free me from blame. Let not other men's faults reflect on me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 104.]
Nov. 8.
London.
Sir Rich. Ford, Lord Mayor of London, to the Navy Commissioners. I return hearty thanks, on behalf of the City, for the release of some workmen who were pressed from the works at the Royal Exchange; I beg also the discharge of two other joiners named, lately taken from their works at the Exchange. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Nov. 8. [—Seymour, see p. 525] to Viscount Conway, Ragley. The Committee of the House of Commons yesterday debated how to raise a supply for the King, when it was strongly urged that tobacco could not be further charged without prejudice to the English plantations and navigation; but Sir R. Howard boldly asserted that 320,000l. a year could be raised upon that, and salt, foreign silks, stuffs, linen, lace, spice, fruit, iron, sugar, and drugs; which with 18,000l. a year by the additional duty of 5d. and 6d. upon strong and small beer, would realize 500,000l. a year, without prejudice to the King's present revenue. He said that he would desire no other powers than were fit to be acted by and imposed upon Englishmen, and that the additional excise should not, as it was feared, impair the revenue of excise, nor extend to private families, provided they were not permitted to brew within 4 miles of any corporation, unless they had done so for 12 months previously. This being so acceptable, the House adjourned until Thursday, being the day desired by Sir R. Howard to complete his proposal. I am informed that it is not advisable to offer anything concerning the proxy. [S.P Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 84.]
[Nov. 8.] Petition of Ann, widow and executrix of Benjamin Henshaw, late citizen of London, to the King, for payment of 1,038l. 13s. 10d. for wares delivered by her husband to the use of the Queen Mother, on the happy occasion of the birth of his Majesty, and also of that of the Princess of Orange, which debt the late King had transferred to the Wardrobe, intending to make her Majesty a present of the wares. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Nov. 8. Recommendation by the King of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 135.]
Nov. 8. The petition of the knights, burgesses, and inhabitants of co. Northampton, for the issues levied by process out of the Exchequer, towards the repair of Lallam Bridge, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, to certify what his Majesty may fitly do in it for the benefit of the county. [Ibid. p. 134.]
Nov. 8. The petition of Capt. William Reeves, for the increased rent of Laverton farm, co. Somerset, for 31 years, at 10l. rent, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. p. 136.]
[Nov. 9.] Petition of Margaret, widow of Wm. Mackreth, lieutenant to Capt. Peters, in the Duke of Albemarle's regiment, to the King, for a grant of the sutling house in the Tilt Yard, promised her but not given to anyone, and the house converted to private purposes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 86.]
Nov. 9. Reference of the above petition to the Surveyor-General. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 135.]
Nov. 9. The petition of Major Smithson and Capt. Fras. Wilkinson referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid.]
Nov. 9.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a writ of ad quod damnum on the request of John Ford, for licence to hold a weekly market at Ashburton, co. Devon, for the sale of wool and yarn only. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 183.]
Nov. 9. Warrant for a grant of pardon to John Bryan, tallow chandler of London, informed against for usury, he having agreed to receive 23l. 8s. for a loan of 260l., contrary to statute, and thereby forfeited to the Crown treble the value of the debt. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 44.]
Nov. 9. Mich. Harrison to Viscount Conway. I have reminded Mr. Lea of his accounts, and he promises to have them ready, and all accounts closed by Christmas, and doubts not to give you satisfaction and regain favour. Sir George Rawdon has gone for Dublin. [James Scudamore] Lord Dromore continues very ill; the Presbyterians have begun to renew their Covenant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 87.]
Nov. 9.
Chatham.
Wm. Rand and Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. We return a petition referred to us, and also a certificate by a surgeon of the Chest, of the amount of relief the petitioner is entitled to, for wounds received in the West Indies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 106.]
Nov. 9.
Portsmouth.
Edw. Silvester to the Navy Commissioners. I send a certificate as to how much of the chain is finished, and ask orders for proceeding with it. [Ibid. No. 107.] Encloses,
Certificate by H. Salesbury and Thos. King, that they have surveyed part of a chain made by Edw. Silvester, for the use of the harbour, and find it contains 203 links, each weighing 1 cwt. 2 qrs. 2 lbs., or in the whole 308 cwt. 14 lbs.—9 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 107i.]
Nov. 10.
The Bristol, Spithead.
Capt. John Holmes to the Navy Commissioners. My ship will not be fit for sea without she is docked, as her complaints are general, particularly about her head and quarters; so I hope the next post will bring your orders. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Nov. 10.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir George Downing to Pepys. The Treasury Commissioners desire a statement of the debt owing by the East India Company, for the freight of the Leopard. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Nov. 10. Hugh May to Pepys. I beg the discharge of two joiners who have been pressed for service at Chatham, whereby my carpenter, Edw. Moorcock, whose foremen they were, is much disordered in his business. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Nov. 10.
Navy Office.
Certificate by Joseph Smith, that Jacob Bryan, purser of the Royal Katherine, has no account standing in this office for any provisions, moneys, or stores, and that the ship has never been in sea victuals since Bryan was appointed. Endorsed with a note from Smith to Thos. Hayter, to like effect. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 111.]
Nov. 10. Licence for Rich. Pease to be in town [at request of the] Earl of Sunderland. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 56.]
Nov. 10.
Upton.
T. Bromley to Viscountess Conway. I am sorry that Mrs. Pordage does not suit you. I hope that you have found satisfaction in discourse with George Keith, and that he is not so rigid now against other Protestant ministers as he was when he wrote his discourse on immediate revelation. (fn. 1) Arguments in favour of Christian charity. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 88.]
Nov. 10. Certificate by Pr. Butler, and 12 other English merchants, trading to Ostend, Nieuport, and Bruges, that it is necessary for the advancement of trade and traffic in those ports in Flanders, and of consequence to his Majesty's revenue, that a Consul should be appointed there, to countenance English merchants, and procure redress for all abuses and obstructions to commerce and trade, more particularly as the States General have lately placed one there; also that Steph. Lynch, merchant, is a fit person to be entrusted with the office, he being of known integrity, well skilled in languages and the laws and customs, and a resident there for 7 or 8 years past. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Nov. 10. Edw. Hales to [Williamson ?]. I am desired by Mr. Bradley to signify that my three sons John, Charles, and Thomas Hales, as also Charles Dering, Esqre., Dr. Carew, Edw. Carew, and Sam. Symons, a minister of Merston, Kent,—all my friends and kindred,—are dining with me. Endorsed [by Williamson], "Brunetti's house searched." [Ibid. No. 90.]
[Nov. 10.]
Thursday. Stamford.
Sir Rob. Southwell to his brother Williamson. We got to Retford on Sunday, and on Tuesday Sir Edw. Dering was elected nem. con. We saw my lord of Newcastle at Welbeck, 7 miles off. We sailed to Newark through a sea of waters, and lay at Grantham. Being near this place, our axle-tree broke, so we must stop here to-night, and cannot be in London till Monday. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Nov. 10. Case of Wm. Sancroft, Dean of St. Paul's and prebendary of Durham, as presented by him to the King. Having in 1664 been unexpectedly nominated to the deanery of St. Paul's, for the better enabling me to attend to its affairs, I resigned one of the best parsonages in the North, as also the mastership of a college at Cambridge, worth together above 500l. a year, and only retained the smallest of the 12 prebends of the church of Durham, which is all I enjoy to help to defray the expense of so chargeable a deanery. As soon as I had paid my first fruits of the deanery, the rental of which was diminished upwards of two-thirds, or above 600l. a year, by the great fire, I was at vast charge in rebuilding here a mansion house for myself and successors, and also my prebendal house in Durham College, which was demolished during the late rebellion, and which I now let to the present occupier gratis, as directed by the statutes of the Church.
The Bishop and Dean of London for the time being are the only persons of the quorum in the commission issued by his Majesty for the repairing of St. Paul's; the present Bishop being of great age, and often employed in his diocese, and in other affairs appertaining to his position as a peer, Lord High Almoner, and privy councillor, it often happens that no decree can be made, or other act done, by virtue of such commission, without my presence; I have also to give close attendance and see to all orders made by the Commissioners since 1664, as well as to all bargains for materials and accounts thereof, so that I cannot attend the church of Durham or keep residence there, as directed by the statutes.
Those statutes impose strict residence upon the prebendaries, subject however to certain limitations in case of lawful impediments, such as being chaplain in ordinary to his Majesty, or a Lent preacher, both of which I am, or through attendance on the Convocation, of which I am a member, as well as prolocutor.
Having in 1662 been employed in the King's business, in revising and reprinting the Liturgy of the Church of England, his Majesty directed letters to the Dean and chapter of Durham, requiring them to make me as full allowance of all profits belonging to my prebend as if I had been resident, which they ordered to be duly observed.
In 1668 I was summoned, as ninth prebendary, to his third episcopal visitation by John, Bishop of Durham; he required an account of my non-residence, and upon receipt thereof, excused my absence, with the privity of the Dean and chapter, through some of whose hands it passed. This dispensation, with their order of obedience on his Majesty's letter, remains on record in the registry of the bishopric. This notwithstanding, since I have been made Dean of St. Paul's, and employed in his Majesty's special service, the Dean and chapter have not made me the full and just allowance of the profits of my said prebend, and have lately come to a resolution never to allow them for the future, without great abatements and defalcations. I submit the case to your wisdom, justice, and clemency, and beg redress. [1⅓ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 92.]
Nov. 11.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and chapter of Durham. Dr. Sancroft, chaplain in ordinary, prebendary of Durham, and Dean of St. Paul's, is also one of the Commissioners of the quorum for repair of the ruins and desolations of St. Paul's, with Humphrey, Bishop of London, who beside his great age is often employed in his diocese, and also as a peer of the realm, High Almoner, and one of the Privy Council, so that nothing can be done without Dr. Sancroft's presence, no materials bought nor accounts passed without him. His perpetual and close attendance here being required, he cannot well keep residence at Durham; but the statute excuses those who are absent on lawful impediments; we declare his present employment to be such, and request that he may have his full allowances, notwithstanding his non-residence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 10.]
Nov. Draft of the said letter by Sancroft. Endorsed with an abstract of portions of his case. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 93.]
Nov. 11.
Friday.
Sir Rob. Vyner to Williamson. Mr. Baldwin having made many friends to avoid serving as sheriff of Hertfordshire, our fears are renewed about my brother-in-law, Emarton; pray remind Lord Arlington of his true character, that he is a plain bumpkin, and not worth 150l. a year, and a rank Anabaptist, either of which is sufficient to excuse him from such an office. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Nov. 11.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. At the last sitting of Parliament, I put in a printed paper concerning an imposition to be laid upon cordage, but was informed his Majesty had sent to the House some days before that they should receive nothing more, judging they had more than they could well despatch. It cannot be denied but that it would be of great advantage to the kingdom, as there is no other duty upon it than what is paid for unwrought hemp; it clearly destroys the Act of Navigation, and the Act for sowing and planting hemp within this kingdom. The former Act was for the encouragement and increase of navigation, wherein it was provided that no foreigner should import any goods that were not of the growth or produce of their own country; yet to evade the Act, the Hollanders bring home the growth of other countries, and alter the properties by manufacture, whereby the English receive a double mischief, their navigation being destroyed, and their manufacture lost, and all encouragement for the sowing and planting of hemp taken away, when it [cordage] is imported from foreign parts at the same rate as the unwrought hemp.
Three or four men in the town, who drive a great trade in Holland ropes, wrote to Sir Wm. Coventry to put a stop to my paper, when Sir William told a member that they had some Yarmouth cordage in store, and knew not what to do with it, as it was so bad. In Oliver's time some was sent up by Major Burton who, being under a contract he could not perform, bought up all the trash hemp, and this is supposed to be some of it.
Seven ships and ketches have sailed with red herrings for Rochelle, Bordeaux, Naples, Marseilles, and the Straits, 2 more for Rotterdam, and one from Hull with lead and tar. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 95.]
Nov. 11.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Lord Brouncker. The anchor smith is dissatisfied with his bills, they not making the ordinary distinct from the extra work, as is done for similar smiths in other yards; this is a great detriment to him, as he has more for the extra work than the other. I beg you to grant him an order that his bills may be made like the rest, his work being as good, so that he may be encouraged to go on with his business, which is backward. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 112.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant reinforcing a former warrant to Capt. Rob. Cooke, to keep the game on Banstead Downs, great abuses having lately been committed in destroying it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 184.]
Nov. 11. Privy seal for 50l. to the poor of St. Margaret's, Westminster, as the King's usual bounty for their relief. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 56.]
Nov. [11.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 250.]
Nov. 11. Petition of Hen. Harris to the King, for the place of engraver of the seals to his Majesty, void by death of — Rawlins. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 96.]
Nov. 11. Grant to Hen. Harris of the office of making and engraving the King's signets, arms, seals, &c., except the irons of the Mint and medals; salary 50l. a year. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 56.]
Nov. [11.]
Whitehall.
Draft of the said grant, but the office said to be void by death of Thos. Symon, to whom it was granted in 1661, including the office of graving the irons. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 97.]
Docquet of the above, dated December. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 276.]
Nov. 11. The petition of John Chase, the King's apothecary, for payment of his arrears, and for some course as to his present salary, recommended to the Treasury Commissioners, his Majesty reflecting on his long and faithful service, and he having reaped no benefit from a former order on his behalf. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 136.]
Nov. 12.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. Twenty ships have sailed southward. A vessel of Dover has arrived with hemp from Riga, after a dangerous passage, and gone to Portsmouth, and another has come into the Downs. His Majesty's yacht has come from Calais with Lord Belasyse [Fauconberg ?], Lord Douglas, and Senr. Don Francisco De Mello, Ambassador from Portugal, and another yacht is waiting there for Lord Berkeley. There are great divisions amongst the loyal and disloyal inhabitants of Dover, as to the persons to be chosen as Mayor and burgesses. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 98.]
Nov. 12. [— Seymour] to Viscount Conway, Ragley. Yesterday the House [of Commons] voted 15d. on strong and 6d. on small beer and ale, with restrictions on private persons not to brew without paying excise, which some think the first step towards excise in private houses. To-day they have voted 3d. a lb. on tobacco from English plantations, and 6d. on all other tobacco; also taxes on salt. On 12 Nov., Sir Rob. Howard, Sir Geo. Downing, and others are to bring in a bill for the additional excise. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Nov. 12. Lancelot Bolton to the Same . . . . . . . . . (Damaged). Mr. Seymour told me he would give you a full account of all Parliamentary proceedings, and he being the better intelligencer, I left that to him, but he will probably omit that Sir Rob. Nugent's business against Col. Talbot has a day of hearing appointed. I was at the debate, and Lord Anglesey urged mightily in behalf of the complainant, so I suppose he has made some bargains of that nature, and may have the like inquiry. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 100.]
Nov. 13.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners of Scotland, to pay to the Commissioners for the treaty of union between the two kingdoms not only the sums already ordered—viz., 500l. sterling to the Chancellor, 300l. to each earl, 200l. to the Bishop of Galloway and to each of the Lords of Session, and 150l. to each of the rest of the Commissioners, on account of the expenses of their equipage and journey—but also to pay to them, from 14 Sept. to 12 Nov., when the treaty was adjourned, the Chancellor 5l., each earl 4l., Bishop of Galloway 3l., and the rest of the Commissioners 2l. a day, and 100l. to their secretary, with interest of 1 per cent. a month until the said sums be paid. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 19.]
Nov. 13.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The St. Andrew has come to her moorings at Gillingham. I want orders about the Defiance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 113.]
Nov. 13.
Portsmouth.
Rob. Woodward, purser of the Resolution, to Thos. Hayter. Let some books be sent down for the Resolution and Bristol, which are at Spithead, that we may be prepared when called to account. We have been expecting both pay and books, and we are hastening to get the ship upon the careen. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Nov. 14.
Maidstone.
John Mason to the Navy Commissioners. Pray order the treasurer to pay my bill to my son, who was put off when he presented it, so that I may be able to comply with my contract, which will prove the best pennyworth that has been bought for Chatham Dock this year. I beseech you to give order for the better taking up of my timber; I have been sufficiently abused by being put by my turn, and am so like to be, without your speedy favour; also let another team of horses that will work in earnest be supplied, and let the men who are at the crane be made to work, that I may not have to complain of such loss of timber. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Nov. 14.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to [Pepys ?]. As Capt. Hubbard, master attendant at Portsmouth, is ordered to sea, I beg to recommend the bearer to Esquire Wren, as deputy to Capt. Hobbard in the yard during his absence. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Nov. 14.
Chatham Dock.
Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Let some speedy course be taken for sending down two carvers who were pressed by Mr. Fletcher, but refuse to appear. The new ship which is expected soon to be launched has a considerable part of her works yet to be done, and if the men mentioned are not sent, Fletcher will be much behind, and it is feared this may induce the other pressed men who are at work with him to leave, they being much dissatisfied at the others not coming. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Nov. 14.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Let me know how high the Mary Rose and Mermaid are to be sheathed, as the seamen are commencing to clean them. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Nov. 14.
Deptford.
J. Uthwat and Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. We have surveyed and measured the 29 New England masts and 3 bowsprits, belonging to Sir Wm. Warren, John Taylor, and Mr. Page, and send particulars; they are all fit for the service, except one of the bowsprits, which is partly rotten. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 119.]
Nov. 14. Sir Wm. Hickman to Col. Reymes. Please to tell the Navy Commissioners that I and my cousin [Ant.] Eyre will not be able to deliver in above 300 pieces of canvas this year, beside the 62 pieces now ready. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Nov. 14.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Sir Hen. de Vic, chancellor of the order of the Garter. We request a place as poor knight of Windsor, on the first vacancy, for Wm. Peters, who suffered much in the late wars. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 183.]
Nov. 14. Certificate of Lord Fauconberg's return into his Majesty's presence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 56.]
Nov. 14. Certificate of Mr. Loving's departure for Denmark, 7 Nov. [Ibid.]
[Nov. 14.] Petition of James Harrison and Chidiock Pawlett to the King, for payment by privy seal of 100l. due for their wages during the year of suspension; served 3¼ years before as keepers of the privy lodgings and gallery at Whitehall, and received nothing, till on petition the Board of Greencloth ordered their future payment, but no arrears, and then came the year of suspension. The Treasury Commissioners have given a warrant on the hearth money for the 100l., but there are so many warrants before theirs, that they know not when it will be paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 101.]
Nov. 14. Recommendation thereof to the Treasury Commissioners, his Majesty noticing their constant and strict attendance, and much compassionating their distress occasioned by their long arrears. [S.P. Dom., Entry Books 18, p. 354; 33, p. 136.]
Nov. 14. The petition of John Crane, citizen and dyer of London, for the King's right to certain lands purchased by Rebecca Goodman, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid.]
[Nov. 14.] Petition of Rob. Seymer to the King, for licence to go into another county, if needful for his own affairs, during the ensuing year, for which he is chosen High Sheriff of Dorsetshire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 102.]
Nov. 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Licence to the High Sheriff of Dorset, to live without the county, when his special occasions require it, taking care that the service shall not suffer in his absence. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Nov. Minute of the above, dated 16 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 62.]
[Nov. 14.] Petition of Capt. Geo. Legg to the King. His late father, Col. Wm. Legg, Lieutenant of Ordnance, petitioned for some houses and wastes in the Little Minories, and the Lord Treasurer appointed Sir Chas. Harbord to report thereon, but died before further progress was made. Begs continuance of the favour intended his father, by a lease of the premises. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 104.] Annexing,
Report by Sir Chas. Harbord, Surveyor-General to the Lord Treasurer, that part of the houses and ground desired by [Col. Wm. Legg, Lieutenant of Ordnance] in reversion after a lease granted by King James for the benefit of Sir Roger Dallison, which expires in 1672, should not be separated from the Ordnance Office, and therefore the petitioner does not wish for these; the rest are in or near the Minories, yearly value 276l., beside a piece worth 8l. Advises a lease in reversion of 26 years, at the rent of 70l., being one fourth of the value, the present rent being 10l.—23 March 1667. [Ibid. No. 104i.]
Report by Jonas Moore and 3 other officers of Ordnance— on perusal of Sir Chas. Harbord's report, and the grant to Mr. Merry for the use of Sir Roger Dallison, Lieutenant of Ordnance—that great part of the mansion house, the saltpetre and carriage storehouses, and much of the gardens and back sides are reserved to the Ordnance, and that what Col. Legg petitions for he recovered at great charge from such as possessed them on pretence of the City's right; and recommending a grant according to the said report, as no prejudice to the service, and an augmentation of salary to the present and succeeding Lieutenants-General of Ordnance.—23 March 1667. [Ibid. No. 104ii.]
Nov. 14.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a lease to Capt. Geo. Legg, son of the late Col. Wm. Legg, Lieutenant of Ordnance, of the reversion of a lease of certain houses, gardens, waste ground, &c., in the Minories, St. Botolph's without Aldgate, Whitechapel, &c., on an increased rental of 60l., beside the 10l. formerly paid, the title to the premises, as belonging to the Crown, having been cleared by the late Col. Legg, at his own expense. [12/3 pages. Ibid. No. 105.]
Nov. 14. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 58.]
[Nov. 14.] Draft of the above. [4½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 106.]
Nov. [14.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 252.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation of John Dove to the vicarage of Welton, diocese of York. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 22.]
Nov. 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Has no news to send, all things being quiet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 108.]
Nov. 15.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. I had perfected the graving of the Assistance before the receipt of your letter, nevertheless I sent for the master calker, who had never seen such graving laid on, and propounded the way; which was to get some glass from the glasshouse here, and after pounding it, to mix it with brimstone and temper it with rosin and oil. I desire a speedy answer if you wish a coat of it laid upon that already put on, so that she may be fitted for launching. Let the bricklayers promised from Deptford be sent to cover the new storehouse, so that the house carpenters may be able to work in the dry. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 121.]
Nov. 15.
Dover.
Capt. John Kellsy to the Navy Commissioners. We have been on the coast of Kent, and had very bad weather; having but 10 days' provisions, shall I victual at Dover, or elsewhere ? [Ibid. No. 122.]
Nov. 15.
Dublin.
Peter Bronsdon to the Navy Commissioners. By advice of Sir Fras. Brewster, I waited for Sir Geo. Rawdon, so as to have his advice as to what timber was growing in the North; but he said he did not live in those parts, and so could not advise. I hear that there is much good timber in Coleraine, and that it is the most crooked of any in Ireland, and as it is near to the river of Bann, it may be brought down to the seaside in boats. I am going to the woods, the most part of which belong to the City of London, and on my return to Dublin, I will send you an account, after which I will go southward to the woods there. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Nov. 15. List of 3 ships and of their masters, hired to carry victuals to Port Mahon. Noted as brought by Mr. Sprigge. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Nov. 16.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir Geo. Downing to Lord Brouncker and Sam. Pepys. The Treasury Commissioners desire you to attend them on Friday morning about the Navy debt. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Nov. 16. Sam. Ford, son of the Lord Mayor, to Pepys. I beg a protection from being pressed for a servant of Rich. Kedge, who is working as a joiner for my father. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Nov. 16.
Emsworth sloop.
Capt. Walter Perry to [Pepys ?] I want 3 or 4 weeks' provisions, as I have orders to carry down some money to the Downs, for the men that have tickets, as also such men as Sir Wm. Jennens shall send on board. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Receiver-General of the duchy of Lancaster, to increase the salary of Capt. Rob. Cook, keeper of the game in and near Banstead Downs, from 30l. to 60l. a year, in consideration of his charge in paying several deputies. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 91.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Admiral the Duke of York. The Sapphire ran aground on the coasts of Sicily some months ago, and part of her guns, tackle, &c., was saved, but in places so remote that it would be a great charge to bring them into the stores. You are therefore to give an order empowering Ralph Montague, Ambassador in France, to sell the same for his own use, as a reward for services. [Ibid. f. 93.]
[Nov. 16.] Petition of Sir Wm. Basset to the King. My late father's losses and sufferings amounted to 10,000l. Since his death, I have lost 3,000l. in endeavouring your Majesty's restoration, of which 1,358l. was laid out in your immediate service. I beg repayment of that sum from the hearth money, after discharge of all the present engagements thereon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 109.] Annexing,
Account of the expenditure of 1,358l. in horses for intelligence, and in arms, 1656 to 1658. Endorsed with a note that the petition was brought in by Sir John Ashburnham, by the King's command.—27 April 1671. [Ibid. No. 109i.]
Report of the Treasury Commissioners, on reference to them of the above petition, advising his Majesty to recompense the petitioner for his own and his father's constant loyalty, as he thinks fit.—1 May 1671. [Ibid. No. 109ii.]
Nov. 16. Petition of John Bilton to the King, for a mandamus to the Master and Fellows of St. Mary Magdalen's College, Cambridge, to be admitted to the next foundation fellowship that shall become vacant, except that called the Quinquennium or Mr. Spendluff's fellowship, and to enjoy the profits of his present fellowship in the meantime. His Majesty formerly granted letters mandatory by virtue of which three persons are in possession of foundation fellowships in the said college, any of which petitioner might have challenged by seniority, and he is now a senior by three years to any that can pretend to one. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Nov. 16. The King to the Master and Fellows of Emanuel's College, Cambridge. We hear that Mat. Browne, M.A., and Fellow in your college, has become deprived of his senses, and is thus rendered incapable of performing the prescribed exercises, and that you are therefore proceeding to elect another Fellow. We pity his condition, as he has no other support than the profits of his fellowship, and wish you, during his distemper, to grant him the usual allowances, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 62.]
Nov. 16. Licence for Sir Solomon Swale, High Sheriff of Yorkshire, to be out of the county. Minute. [Ibid. f. 63.]
Nov. 16. Warrant for a discharge to Henry, Marquis of Worcester, of 40l. and 80l. due by the late Marquis for poll money, and 100l. for subsidies; also of an imprest of 500l. advanced to the said Marquis for repair of Chepstow Castle, and of 100l. imprested to him for demolishing the walls of the city of Gloucester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 57.]
Docquet of the above, dated December. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 269.]
Nov. 16. Order for a warrant to pay 800l. to George Weld, for executing the office of Lieutenant of the Tower, during the Mayoralty and absence of Sir John Robinson, in execution of which he was at great expense, having many prisoners of consequence under his care, and receiving no recompence for the same; also because he had been lieutenant of Sir John Robinson's company of foot, but was dismissed from all his employments, 1 March 1667. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 58.]
Nov. [16.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 253.]
Nov. 16. Petition of Wm. Owen, son and heir of Sir John Owen, to the King, for the grant of Harlech Castle, co. Merioneth, void by the death of Wm. Owen, his uncle, with the fee of 50l. a year, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 111.]
Nov. 16. Grant of the office of Constable of [Harlech] Castle, co. Merioneth, to Cornelius Man; fee 50l. a year, payable by the receiver of the county. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Nov. 16. Minute of the above, giving the name as Corn. Manley. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 60. See 28 Nov., infra.]
Nov. 17. Warrant for restitution of goods to Thos. Atkins, Esq., convicted at Chester of the manslaughter of Thos. Baker, he having already received the punishment for manslaughter, and the Recorder of Chester certifying that he was first assaulted by the said Baker. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 45.]
Nov. 17. Caveat in favour of Sir Wm. Trevor, that no presentation pass of the vicarage of the Welton, co. Yorkshire, the same being already granted to John Dove. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 10.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
Earl of Lauderdale to the President and Senators of the College of Justice. The King is well pleased with your entering the Act of regulation in your sederunt books, and requiring the advocates to give due obedience thereto. He will not alter anything therein, and he wishes you to suffer no advocate to plead till he takes the prescribed oath; those who refuse will be the greatest losers. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 20.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Warner at the White Hare, Winchester. News-letter. On the 10th the Lord Mayor and aldermen of London waited on the Prince of Orange, when the Recorder, in the name of the City, complimented his Highness, after which the Lord Mayor made a further address, to both of which the Prince replied in a short speech, acknowledging their kindness.
On the 11th the House of Commons, having committed a bill for better regulating the making of serges at Kidderminster in Worcestershire, heard the report of the committee of the whole House for his Majesty's supply, when they ordered, by way of an addition to it, that there should be an additional excise of 15d. upon every barrel of strong beer and ale, and 6d. on every barrel of small, brewed by the common brewer and retailer, and an additional moiety added to the duty upon other excisable liquors; any person living in or within a certain distance of a corporation, who has not brewed within a given time, is not to be permitted to do so, during the payment of the additional excise, without being liable to the payment of it.
Nov. 17. On the 12th, a bill was read for regulating serges, and the report was heard from the committee for examining the authors of libellous books, stating that the witnesses refused to discover the authors, and were abusive. The committee then proceeded to the supply; threepence a lb. additional is to be laid on tobacco from English plantations, and 6d. on all other; 2d. a gallon on foreign salt, and 1d. on Scotch and other native salt; but upon that partly made of foreign salt, a halfpenny; the like imposition is to be laid on salt in Ireland, save the Scotch, which is to be 1½d.
On the 14th, the committee of the House resolved that every piece of French lockram imported, containing 100 ells, shall be charged with a duty of 7s. 6d., Normandy and other French canvas 6s. for every piece of 120 ells, and French and other foreign linens and calicoes, except lawns and cambrics; foreign fustians, tape, thread, &c., to be charged proportionately. Brussels, Brabant, and other ticks are to be charged 3s. each.
On the 15th the House ordered all wrought silks imported to pay double the former proportion, and thrown silks, a farthing in the lb.
On the 16th a committee was appointed to inspect former Bills, the committee for indigent loyal officers was revived, and that for enabling vicars to recover tithes was ordered to be brought in; the Bill concerning jurors was sent down with amendments from the Lords, some of which were agreed to, and a committee appointed to draw up reasons for a conference with the Lords concerning the rest. A committee was appointed to inspect a former Act for regulating measures, to consider defects in the former one, and what is fit to be done, and to receive information of abuses to evade the law.
On the 17th the House also resolved into a grand committee for his Majesty's supply, and agreed upon the several impositions on sugar.
The Paris letters of 15 Nov. report that the Dutch Ambassador, Mynheer de Groote, was to make his public entry the next day, and have an audience with the King at St. Germains, and that he seemed to resent having been so long delayed to such little purpose, not having been permitted a conference with M. Colbert, under pretence of referring him to a personal discourse with the King himself; so that it is said he intends pressing for a positive answer to his memorial, complaining of the high impositions.
The French King pursues his levies by sea and land, and upon the advice of the English and Dutch preparations, has ordered 40 of his best men-of-war for the sea, and 30 for the Mediterranean, to be got ready by the spring.
We are advised from Leghorn that some French men-of-war lay before Tunis, without sending on shore or acting anything, and that they had taken a ship laden with boards, wherein was a famous corsair. That Sir John Harman and the Dutch convoy being driven back, were denied pratique. That 4 Algerines were abroad, and 5 more going out, but the soldiers, hearing of the loss of their 6 ships, would not go on board.
It is reported from Rochester that they are daily entering men for repairing the fleet, and that the St. Andrew has been brought up to her moorings at Gillingham. The States of Holland have given order for equipping 50 men-of-war for 8 months; the new impositions on French wares progress, and Holland and three other provinces have agreed that no brandy shall be imported.
Upon the Duke of Muscovy's overture for peace, the rebels proposed that he be acknowledged King of Astrakhan and Kasan, tribute paid to his army, several heads sent to him, and the Patriarch restored with him.
Most of the Commissioners for the Scotch union have taken their leave, there being an adjournment until the end of March.
The Elector of Cologne's Minister has given in a memorial to the States, offering an alliance if they will re-deliver to him Rheinberg, and satisfy his other pretensions; they have a jealousy of the Dane's kindness, their Minister having, in a memorial, pressed for a positive answer as to whether they intend sticking to their former agreement.
Mr. Bushell and the other jurymen who continue prisoners for not paying their fines were brought before the Common Bench, and ordered to the Fleet, since which their cases have been argued by counsel on both sides, but no opinion has been given. The Wine Act licences have been farmed for 5 years, commencing at Michaelmas, at 600,000l. a year, Sir Rich. Ford, the present Lord Mayor, Alderman Jonathan Davys, Giles Dunstan, John Baker, and John Ball being the new Farmers, who are to advance 150,000l. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 113.]
Nov. 17/27.
Port Mahon.
Rich. Gibson to the Navy Commissioners. I arrived here in the Portsmouth ketch's boat, on 27 Oct., leaving the ship 4 leagues off at sea; an hour after Capt. Haddock came in, and next day Morley, and the ketch, and two days after the Jersey. We found the Admiral in the Revenge, newly righted from careening, and the Golden Hand, Portsmouth frigate, and Victory, ready to clean; the Rose and Frog prize ships are laid aside, the latter being good for little.
I have not yet been able to take a survey of the remains of the provisions, as the hulk had the Revenge's guns and stores on board; since the delivery of them, I have careened the Portsmouth and Victory, and I have seen to their victualling. I have been viewing conveniences for the hiring of houses for the stowage of stores, buying and issuing wine, and unloading the victualling ships, so as to save demurrage.
1st. The hulk could not have taken the sails or stores which came in the Bantam, and was also not fit, being swarmed with rats; lying so near the shore, she was supplied with them from there also, and a great loss will arise for want of a better place to stow the bread.
2nd. There are no houses by the waterside to hire.
3rd. No houses in town, save one, which I hired with some difficulty, and which is only large enough to stow 100 of the 430 tons of stores sent in the two ships, so that most of the
Nov. 17. Bantam's stores are put into a cave, 50 feet above the water, as is the house I hired, and all the others, they being as high above the surface of the landing place, as the roof of Westminster Abbey is above the ground, so that all had to be carried up by strength of arm.
4th. There being no other place, I stowed the bread in the Rose and Portsmouth, which had to be emptied, cleaned, and prepared for it; this has obliged her men to lie under an awning this winter time; and after all is done, I fear any single-decked vessel's fitness for such use. The doing has had its difficulties, for want of carpenters and calkers, many of whom are sick, and the others are at work on ships.
These straits occasioned the Admiral's order for the harbour to be surveyed, and a report made, a copy of which is enclosed, which caused the making the hulk a victualling ship to take in all Morley's provisions, and the sending the Jersey to Messina for crabs, so that ships might careen by the shore.
The ships here are in great want of cask; the Portsmouth had only 20 tons, but has been somewhat recruited since our coopers came; they are good workmen, although their want of lodging, otherwise than in a cave, has almost crippled them, and this cannot yet be remedied, my own having been little better. I have bought 3 tons of woodbound casks of Mr. Morley, at 5s. a ton, to put the wine of the Portsmouth frigate into, and have reminded the Admiral to buy some at Tangiers. The staves in the ships here are so worm-eaten that the most promising to sight often prove not worth working. When I was in London, I made a demand for 5,000 iron hoops from the Victualling Office, but had only rivets, upon which I applied to your Honours, who sent me 2,000 by Capt. Haddock, which have since been used up, but the rivets were returned to Deptford stores. I was called last week to see a cask of beef which had been well saved, but was spoiled for want of pickle, upon which I proposed to have the rest looked after, when it was found there was not pickle enough in 32 casks to secure 6; as the flesh would have been unfit to eat in a month, although salt was scarce and dear, I yet had it taken on shore, and washed out with new pickle, and repacked into new casks, where required; care has also been taken to stow the flesh come from England, so that it may be looked upon when salt arrives from Ivica, which the Admiral has ordered the Portsmouth to fetch, as also wine, when we can fit up casks to put it in.
I want directions about this wine, as the Admiral has no orders to send for it, and although I have the money, I cannot perform without a concurrent help from him, which he denies, saying that if his Majesty had the profit, he would do his best, but not for a private person; he expects this island to find everything, which it will never do, the disbursements for the fleet having raised most things to double, some treble, and others quadruple the former prices. What can be had here shall be bought, but the days of plenty are past, so that the inhabitants fear a want for themselves; to prevent this, the jurats made an order that the
Nov. 17. seamen have no more fresh meat for their money, our sick men (about 30 in the infirmary, who shall not be left behind) only 2 "cabriettas," and the Admiral but one, and every housekeeper but a pound of flesh each day.
The sickliness of the ships here is occasioned chiefly by the smallpox, a disease which, when it comes (which this 3 times has happened once in 22 years), lets few escape; but it is not so mortal to them as to our people, who have lost half a score by it; in order to their preservation, there is a cave—no other place being to be found— fitted for an infirmary.
Although I have informed you of the hindrance I met with in sending a statement of the stores and provisions I found here, yet there was little left before our stores arrived, save tallow, sheathing board, a few knees, and 3 masts; the old stock of victuals will last about a month longer, the Admiral having of the old, and the Portsmouth and Victory of the old and new, 3 months' allowance. The Admiral has ordered the Portsmouth ketch to be fitted pink fashion, the Algerines having of late taken all which had ketches with them for men-of-war.
Since my arrival, a house has been hired at 110 pieces of 8/8, 630 feet of wharfage, 30 feet deep, at 35 pieces of 8/8, and 4 little rooms at the water-side at 22 pieces of 8/8 a year; these are to be used for stores, and for the smith, so that he can leave his cave to the coopers. I shall be at a stand what to do with some oil which the Admiral has undertaken to send in, and the other stores coming from England, which will be double Morley's quantity.
I mustered the Jersey and Guernsey, but wanting form books, was forced to use some others; they are sent by Mr. Stanley, who formerly mustered them, and who, I doubt not, will make good the defects.
The purser of the Revenge has 2,000 pieces of 8/8 left in his hands by Sir Thos. Allin, which the Admiral keeps to make good the indents of his squadron and other disbursements. I have demanded an account from each purser of all his receipts, and copies of his surveys of cast provisions, which I will return to Sir Jer. Smith, but Capt. Beare will return the boatswains and carpenters' indents to the surveyor; I enclose a copy of the Admiral's order as to how they are to act in future.
I design to give each purser a receipt for the broken remains he has left at the end of his last victualling, and to charge myself with it, and afterwards to carry on the victualling by proportions, to which end I have procured an order from the Admiral, of which I also send a copy, to supply what shall prove defective by a like quantity of good.
I pray that all casks sent out to stay abroad may be new, and well hooped with iron, as although we are nearer England than the East Indies, yet there is as much need of good casks. I am in great want of 10 calkers, which is the only cause of ships staying so long in port; also a bricklayer, and a smith, with 20 chaldron of sea coal for his forge; what is used here is juniper charcoal, of little heat for his work.
Nov. 17. I have received from Capt. Haddock the price of a barrel of tallow, 3 cwt. with allowance for freight. The Jersey will accompany the store and victualling ships to Leghorn. The slop clothes are all gone, and would if they had been twice as many, and more shoes and stockings are required for the seamen. With note by Sir Edw. Spragg that he ordered Capt. Haddock the tallow gratis. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 128.] Encloses,
Sir Edw. Spragg to Capt. Poole, and 7 others named. As the place where the Golden Hand hulk lies has not the convenience of a wharf, so that 5 of the hulk's beams are broken, and we are in daily fear of her being rendered unserviceable, and unfit to take in the sails and other things brought from England in the Bantam; and as money cannot procure us warehouses, I require you to survey the harbour of Port Mahon, and report to me whether a place may be found therein, where the ships under my command may put their stores and provisions on shore, and be careened, and where a storehouse, &c., may be erected for the stowage of the provisions now sent from England.—Revenge, 1 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 128i.]
Report of Capt. Wm. Poole and 6 others that, in pursuance of an order from Sir Edw. Spragg, Admiral of the Fleet in the Mediterranean, they have viewed the harbour of Mahon, and found under the west end of the town 7 partitions or distinct grounds, of 630 feet long and 30 feet broad, where a third and fourth rate ship may at one time lay their sides to the wharf, to put their guns and ballast on shore, and have fit places to lay crabs for careening, and have conveniences to erect storehouses for securing provisions and cooperage, except bread and sails, which the Golden Hand may be made serviceable for; all of which might be enclosed at either end with a stone wall (it being backed with a high cliff) at a reasonable charge, to prevent embezzlement. The channel against the wharf is so large in length and breadth as to moor 20 third and fourth rate ships, in between 5 andfathoms of water.—Port Mahon, 1 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 128ii.]
Sir Edw. Spragg to Rich. Gibson, victualling agent at Port Mahon. His Majesty has made this place a victualling port, and appointed you to provide and issue the provisions sent there for the use of the fleet under my command; but I find that, through a defect in one species of victuals, the remaining sorts are thereby rendered unuseful, to the shortening the whole forthe time the defective fall short; as this is great obstruction of the service, you are hereafter to supply each of his Majesty's ships which arrive with the like quantity of good and wholesome provisions as shall be certified by them to have proved defective at their last being abroad, and to take a receipt, and not at any time to in clude it in an indent.—Revenge, 14 Nov. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 128iii.]
Sir Edw. Spragg to Capt Beare, commander of the Golden Hand. The Navy Commissioners have charged you with their stores designed for supply of the fleet under my command, and with the care of careening, cleaning, furnishing with stores, and repairing all the ships that come to Port Mahon for that end, according to orders from me. As it would many times obstruct the service if you were always to expect particular orders from me for issuing such stores to such ships as may need them, I hereby empower you to supply the same, upon any demand made by the commanders or officers in my absence, with such stores as, after a survey of their wants, you shall judge necessary, provided that no stores be issued to any of them without an order under your hand to your boatswain or other officer, and a receipt signed by the commander or other officer to whom the stores shall be delivered.
For the better enabling you to acquit yourself of this trust, I strictly require all the commanders of the ships which shall be sent to the said port, not only to give you their best advice and assistance, but to command all their officers and seamen to do the same, and to obey your orders and directions. If any merchant ship laden with provisions for the fleet comes into the port, you are to assist Mr. Gibson in the unloading and stowing thereof, to prevent damage. As the Golden Hand under your command is unprovided with a purser, you are to take the charge of the victuals, and issue them to the seamen thereof. You are to give an account when required to Mr. Gibson of all stores issued by you, and of those remaining in your charge, the better to enable him to discharge the service he is appointed to in this port.— Revenge, 14 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 128iv.]
Demand by Capt. Amos Beare, for supply of various stores named for Port Mahon, as they will be wanted for the next 3 ships he fits, having none left of those brought by Capt. Haddock. The whole fleet is very much out of studding and stay sails; desires that the canvas may be sent in bales, the bolt ropes in coils, and the twine in casks. Wants also the frame of a lighter of 14 or 16 tons, which the carpenter can set up when there are no ships here. Has some of the tallow left which was brought from England in the Golden Hand, and other ships named. [Ibid. No. 128v.]
Nov. 17.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Duplicate of his letter of 3 Nov. Pray consider it and procure me relief; I cannot express the great inconvenience Sir Denis Gauden's bad compliance exposes me to, for which the service suffers. Capt. Poole now orders victuals for himself and the Guernsey, and Sir John Harman, before his departure, ordered victuals to be got ready for 3 ships for 4 months; the Kent and Swallow are hourly expected, and will need at least 5 months' provisions, and other ships will daily drop in and want something. All things are bought here with the ready penny, and not receiving any supplies from home, I have had to pay back a great part of the money I took up by exchange, which I could not have effected but by parting with some of the necessaries of my house.
I believe you will consider that my zeal and fidelity are ill requited; I much depend upon your justness and goodness in procuring me speedy relief. I still attend your resolution as to my taking up provisions to be sent to Port Mahon, and desire you to hasten your order for it. The Guernsey arrived 3 days since, with the John and Thomas, the Florentine, and the Society under her convoy, and will proceed with Capt. Poole to Zante. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 129.]
Nov. 17.
The Bristol, Downs.
Capt. John Holmes to the Navy Commissioners. I received your and His Royal Highness's orders to bring the Bristol to Woolwich, and am on my way thither. My purser having left me to go to London without consulting me, I presume it was to attend you about his books. [Ibid. No. 130.]
[Nov. 18.] Statement that the Commissioners for the Royal Aid, &c., in Bury and Beccles divisions, Suffolk, having raised their proportions of the sum imposed on the county, the head collector of the third division has failed for a considerable sum; query whether the Commissioners are to re-assess for the money, and if so, whether the whole county or that division only, and by what commission the money is to be levied. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 114.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of the Commissioners for the Royal Aid and other assessments in Bury and Beccles divisions, Suffolk, to the King, to obtain the opinion of the Lord Keeper and judges, on a case suggested by one of the high collectors, the determination of which will greatly affect the collection of arrears. With reference thereon to the Lord Keeper and judges, and their report, dated 30 Nov., that as a suit on the case is already depending in the Exchequer Court, they do not think it proper to express an opinion, but leave it to that Court. [Ibid. Nos. 115, 116.] Annexing,
Certificate that process of distringas is issued against all the Commissioners of Suffolk except such as are dead or members of Parliament, for the insufficiency of one of the head collectors appointed by them to gather in the Royal Aid of 2,477,500l., to be raised in 3 years, and 1,250,000l. for the King's present supply.–28 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 116i.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
The petition of Madame Carey, maid of honour to the Queen, for 2 lives more in a lease of a house in the Mews bought for Mr. Forbes' life, recommended to the Treasury Commissioners, the King inclining to gratify the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 137.]
Nov. 18. Order for a warrant to pay to Edward, Earl of Sandwich, President of the Council for Foreign Plantations, 700l., and to Richard Lord Gorges, William Lord Allington, Thomas Grey, Henry Brouncker, Sir Humphrey Wynch, Bart., Sir John Finch, Silas Titus, Edmond Waller, and Henry Slingsby,—the members of the Council,—500l. a year each as salary, also 1,000l. a year on account to Henry Slingsby, for incidental charges relating to the service. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 117.]
Nov. 18. Draft of the above. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 118.]
[Nov. 18.] Another draft; endorsed with a note of [Henry] Stafford as High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, and [Thos.] Collins of Sussex, instead of [John] Fuller. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 119.]
Docquet of the above warrant, dated December. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 272.]
Nov. 18. Entry of the above warrant, with an amendment signed Dec. 2, for payment of 300l. a year to Dr. Ben. Worsley, for his assistance therein. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 59.]
Nov. 18. Licence for Thomas, son of Sir Thomas Clifford, to travel. Minute. [Ibid. f. 60.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Capt. Rob. Rind for life, of the King's portion of the fines of persons who have contravened the Act of Parliament forbidding persons residing in Scotland to marry others in England and Ireland; also of persons discharged by Privy Council from marrying minors, without consent of their parents or tutors. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 20.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter, under the great seal of Scotland, to John Bayne, of Pitcarlie, of the seventh part of the lands of Easter Lumbenny, in the sheriffdom of Fife, lately belonging to James Barclay, of Collerine, as heir of his late father, Rob. Barclay, but invested in John Bayne by assignation of And. Aikman, writer of the signet, by whom they were apprised, 23 June 1669; with proviso of redemption within 10 years by Jas. Barclay on payment of the sums for which the lands were apprised, with charges and interest. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 21.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent to Wm. Bennett of Gruibett, of the dignity of a knight baronet of Scotland. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 22.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter under the great seal of Scotland, to Alex. Arnot of Balcormo, of the lands of Balcormo, void by resignation of David Wallace in Baldutho, to be held from the King in taxt ward, the blanks for the sums to be paid for reliefs and marriages to be filled up by the Treasury Commissioners. [Docquet. Ibid.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a like charter to Sir John Young of Lenye, of Over and Nether Lenye, on resignation of Sir Patrick Honston and Sir John Young, disjoining the half formerly belonging to Sir Patrick Honston from the barony of Balglass, and incorporating it with the other, as the free barony of Lenye, the holding to be changed from simple ward to taxt ward, &c. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 23.]
Nov. 18.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Sir Wm. Bruce of Balcasky, Bart., of six sixteenths and one thirty-second of the town and lands of Drumclery, formerly pertaining to John Carstaires; also of one sixteenth of the town and lands of Balcirstie, and Newburn Mill, with the right of patronage of Newburn Kirk, on resignation of Thos. Alexander, senior and junior, and on payment of the fief duties, but free of all arrears. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 24.]
Nov. 18.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. I wrote you that Lord Townshend had required a positive answer from Sir Thos. Meadows as to the Major's place for this town. I have desired Capt. Clarke to show you Sir Thomas's answer, upon which his lordship required Sir Thomas to send him his commission. The only reason is Sir Thomas's dislike to receive Mr. Huntington as one of the captains of the train bands here, for which he has good cause, as I will justify. I will withhold nothing from you, either for fear or favour, so long as I hold correspondence with you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 120.] Encloses,
Lord Townshend to [Sir Thos. Meadows]. I find more in your letter than I think fit to trouble myself about, but as you dislike those whom I have lately commissioned as captains under you, I conceive it reasonable and becoming to let you know that it is time for me not to pretend to command you, and that I expect your commission as Major of Yarmouth, after which I shall have as great veneration for your judgment and regard for your honour as may stand with the discretion of not only yours, but my lady's humble servant, Townshend. [Copy by Bower. Ibid. No. 120i.]
Nov. 19. Commission to — Rerisby to be ensign to Sir Chas. Wheeler's company, in Col. John Russell's regiment of Foot Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 20.]
Nov. 19.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Hen. Newte, Tiverton, Devon. News-letter, to the same effect as that to H. Warner of the 17th. Also;—
It is reported from Venice that the Grand Seignior has caused the chiefest of the Divan to meet at Adrianople, to consult with the Vizier about disposing of the militia, who are apt to fall into disorder if unemployed. A vessel arrived at Leghorn from Smyrna reports that a stop has been put on English and other vessels going there, and that the like was done at other ports, the Grand Seignior intending to have 300 ships at Constantinople, but the last letters say nothing of it.
Upon complaint made by the English Consul at Leghorn, Lee, the merchant and creditor of Mendez, has been released out of prison.
On the 16th a Flemish East India merchant, outward bound, got on to the Goodwin Sands, and having fired guns, 12 boats went out to help her, but the captain refusing to admit any of their men on board, it is feared her men and goods will be lost.
On the 17th, the Commons, being in a Committee for Supply, agreed to the following impositions on sugar, viz.:—Upon muscavado sugar of Brazil, 2d. per lb; pannell, ½d.; other foreign white, 2d.; other foreign in loaf, 3d.; muscavado of the English plantations, ¼d.; and white of the same, 1d. All of the English plantations are to have the duty repaid upon exportation, and those sugars manufactured in loaf are to have ¾d. rebated upon the same.
On the 18th the Commons sent a message to the Lords, to remind them of the Bills for prohibiting the importation of brandy, for taking an account of money given in the time of the fire, and to prevent spiriting of children. They ordered the Bill for cozenage of servants to be engrossed, and on the 19th committed that for regulating serges, and passed that for Kidderminster. They also agreed to the impositions on fruits, spices, drugs, glass, stone, earthenware, copper, stuffs, &c. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 121.]
Nov. 19.
Southampton Square.
F. Howpert to Viscount Conway. I am glad to hear that M. Van Helmont thinks her ladyship is not incurable, and pray the Lord will guide him and Dr. Rugeley to such a course as may tend to her recovery. I delivered the letter from Van Helmont to Mr. Stevekins, who will do as directed. Lady Clifton begs to be remembered to your lordship, and longs for your return, as do also Dr. Rugeley's patients for his, they being almost mad for him. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Nov. 19.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I shall, as ordered, cause Mr. Gould's men to forbear working on the Defiance. I am satisfied of Mr. Bronsdon's ability and faithfulness as to choosing and measuring timber, of which you have had some trial, and doubt not he will answer your desires.
I have endeavoured myself, and employed others, to persuade the pressed men to attend, but they would not come to the yard until 3 o'clock to-day, pretending they had 2 hours allowed on Fridays for market time. As they did not come in as the other pressed men that have been here half-a-year, I would not suffer them to go to work, upon which I understand they are very high, and will apply to the King and the Duke. I ordered the payment of their board wages, and hoped that would have taken away their pretences, but they are stubborn and perverse; so I hope, if any of them come up, that you will take some speedy course with them. I will give you an account of those I find absent to-morrow without leave. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 131.]
Nov. 20/30.
Port Mahon.
Rich. Gibson to the Navy Commissioners. I send by the Admiral, who sailed on the 18th with the Portsmouth frigate and the Victory fireship, duplicates of my letter of the 17th and its enclosures. Since then I have cleared with Capt. Haddock and Mr. Morley, and send their discharges. Although the former pretends to an advance of tonnage for having brought more than the freight he was allowed for, I have not made him any allowance, but referred him to you, as he was more than half discharged before he demanded it, and it was not proper to calculate the tonnage afterwards, for want of a regular survey, which occasioned your Honours' empowering me to do it here, and his estimate exceeding the 7 tons you limited him to. As he agreed to acquiesce in what you should allow him, I have given him a certificate upon Chas. Longland and Co., as he and Haddock have made a faithful and just discharge of the stores they brought.
Let no more junk or oakum be sent, the wear and tear of our cables exceeding our expense thereof. Capt. Poole sails to-day with Capt. Haddock and Mr. Morley, leaving only the Portsmouth ketch in port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 132.] Annexed,
Rich. Gibson to Chas. Longland and Co., Leghorn. Being informed by Capt. Rich. Haddock that you are empowered by Alderman Edw. Backwell of London to pay the said captain the freight due to him on my certificate, I inform you that the several stores laden on board the Bantam have been delivered at Port Mahon, according to charter party and bill of lading made by the captain with the Navy Commissioners, and that there is due to the captain, for the freight of the goods, 3,427/68; pieces of eight, which pray pay at sight. I have signed another certificate of like date, &c., and, on accepting one, you are to cancel the other.—Port Mahon, 20/30 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 132i.]
Rich. Gibson to Sir Denis Gauden. Thos. Morley, commander of the Bermudas Merchant, has made good delivery of provisions mentioned, according to the bills of lading, amounting to 212 tons, 1 hogshead, andbarrels, for which I have, by command of Sir Edw. Spragg, paid him 106½ pieces of eight for primage and average. Morley was unladen within the time limited by charter party. I have signed 3 certificates of the like date, and upon accepting one, you are to cancel the others.—Port Mahon, 20 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 132ii.]
Duplicates of Gibson's letter and enclosures of 17/27 Nov. [Ibid. Nos. 132iii, 132iv.]
Nov. 20. Certificate by Wm. Rand and John Brooke. The sails returned from the Newcastle in the Downs as unserviceable were spread in the sail field, and viewed by us and others, and were found sufficient for the service of any ship, and not above a third part worn. They have been ill-husbanded and much abused, beyond what half a year's fair service would have rendered them, and the clues, which were newly fitted at her going forth, are all unseized; this reflects upon those who have made all this noise, to so ill a purpose. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Nov. 20.
Court at Whitehall.
Proclamation requiring the immediate tenants of certain fee-farm rents, named in a patent granted 11 Nov. instant to Lord Hawley and others for their sale, to proceed in their purchases within the 6 months limited by the Act; declaring that the time for contracting for rents mentioned in a former proclamation [See 14 June, p. 275, supra] will expire on 15 Dec., after which they will be exposed to general sale. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 280.]
Nov. Draft of the above. Endorsed as received 16 Nov. [5 sheets. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 123.]
Nov. 21.
York.
Lord Frescheville to Williamson. At Lord Arlington's command, I send by Mr. Hayes the Quakers' register. It is a very methodical record of their sufferings, as they term them, and of their monthly and quarterly meetings. One of their sect, of the name of Watkinson, formerly a captain in Col. Lilborne's regiment of horse, has lately died. He was a rich man and a good officer, and has left 600l. to the Friends, who have a bank of money. If I might reward persons able to give intelligence of these and other dangerous people, it would not amount to anything considerable, and yet do his Majesty good service. The bearer was clerk in the proceedings against the rebels, when Rymer and 20 others were executed, and is industrious and trusty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 124.]
Nov. 21.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. The public credit is in such low esteem, by Sir Denis Gauden's suffering all my bills to be returned protested for non-payment that, after I had given my bill upon you to Signor Francesco Milanese for 386l. 5s., he brought it me back, and was much troubled that he could not return me the other bills, saying that he and all others on the place were resolved to be more cautious in parting with their money for the future; so that you may easily see the condition I am in. I am ashamed to look any of the merchants in the face, especially this honest gentleman, who has supplied me with 16,000 pieces of 8/8 upon my bills, and has yet only heard of the payment of three, coming to 826l. 6s. Yesterday I had another protest from a merchant, for non-payment of his bill for 1,000 pieces of 8/8, so I must find out a way to repay him, which makes me at my wits' end, not knowing what to do.
The provision I am to make for ships expected will require great disbursements, and I am so far from a supply from home to carry on the work, that I must pay back several other bills exchanged many months past, for which I have received the money, or else be content to go to prison. I earnestly request you to lay my condition before his Royal Highness, for if I do not immediately receive relief, the service must suffer. I have with much difficulty prevailed with Thos. Dethick and Co. to take my bill on you for 386l. 5s., payable 20 days after sight. I pray that it may be punctually discharged, and that when the gentleman comes for his money, you will assure him that he and all others shall at all times find a fair compliance for whatever bills I pass, and also desire him to signify as much to his correspondents at Leghorn. I will reply shortly to your letter. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 134.]
Nov. 22. Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. Understanding that it is expected I should put the ship's company to two-thirds allowance, according to custom, "for lengthening of our provisions," and as we are only going as a convoy into the Straits, and not to join with the fleet, I have ordered my purser to wait upon you to receive your commands. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Nov. 22.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. Having received a letter from Esquire Wren to hasten the Milford, we much need compass timber, knees, &c. If you will send down Mr. Mayors, I will give you an account of what is required. Let some spruce deals be sent from Deptford for her. Is the Milford to be sheathed and have galleries ? A sad accident happened to-day; a boat with 10 people who were going to Gravesend foundered near the yard, when 7 of them were drowned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 136.]
Nov. 22.
Paris.
Jean Senius (?) to M. de Morinville, London. I entreat you to inquire after the condition of my wife who is ill, and let me have constant tidings. I shall never return to London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 125.]
Nov. 22.
Westminster Palace.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Algernon Peyton, Bart, of the holding of two yearly fairs and a weekly market at March in the Isle of Ely. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 184.]
Nov. 22. Dispensation for Sir John Hartop, Bart., High Sheriff of Hertfordshire, to come to London and Westminster on occasion. Minute. [Ibid. f. 185.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Thos. Fuller, D.D., to accept and hold the rectory of Willingale, co. Essex, with the rectory of Naneby, co. Lincoln, of which he is now possessed. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 22.]
Nov. 22. Warrant to Fras. Paulet and John Hall, justices of peace for Somersetshire, to release on bail Thos. Huntley, of Shepton Mallet, committed to Ilchester gaol in 1669, charged with clipping and coining; on report of Sir John Archer, Justice of Common Pleas, that Huntley has discovered many coiners, who have been hung chiefly on his testimony, and may yet make discoveries of like offenders. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 46.]
Nov. 22. The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Convocation of Cambridge. The Prince of Orange intends on his return from Newmarket to pass by Cambridge, and see the University. We desire that he be received in all places in the kingdom with the respect due to his birth and our affection for him; we wish that amongst other compliments, a public creation be made, by conferring degrees on such of the Prince's gentlemen as desire the same, and on as many others as the Vice-Chancellor and heads of houses think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 63.]
Nov. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Thanks for your vigilance in suppressing the mutiny named in your letter of the 13th. We are glad you are satisfied with the account of the timely provisions made for the forces; we approve your resolution to inquire if the pay has been kept from the soldiers, or if any other miscarriage reduced them to necessity, that suitable remedies may be applied. You are to publish such of the articles of war as you think necessary to be the rules of martial law for the foot regiment, 2 troops of horse, and the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, and Dumbarton, that mutiny may be punished, and military discipline preserved. Two or three of the ringleaders are to be proceeded against for sedition, and for continuing in arms after our Council had ordered them to lay them down. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, pp. 25, 26.]
Nov. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Alexander, Earl of Kincardine, of all the gold and silver coined or uncoined, stuffs, and other commodities, tackling, guns, and furniture, in the ship Carmeline, belonging to the Dutch East India Company, and cast away on the coast of Orkney or Shetland, in the late war; including the goods intromitted with by Andrew Dick, for which he is accountable by virtue of a commission from the Treasury [of Scotland], which is now made void. With exception of the gold and goods belonging to the ship, and intromitted with by William, Earl of Morton, for which a decree was obtained against him. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 27.]
Nov. 22. Notes by Williamson of the substance of letters sent to Lord Lieutenants of counties between 1663 and 1666, as to their power to secure disaffected persons within their lieutenancies, or such as they deemed dangerous to the government, and to retain them in custody until they found security for their good behaviour; also notes, 22 Nov. 1670, of the examination of Sir Sam. Starling, with reference to his proceedings against certain Nonconformist meetings in which Hayes, Jekell, and others were concerned. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 126.]
Nov. 22.
Westminster.
Certificate by Wm. Cunningham, that the Scotch regiment in the service of his Catholic Majesty in the Netherlands, and now in garrison at Liere, notwithstanding their bad usage—having received but two months' pay in 15 months—mustered 190 men on his coming away on 21 Sept/1 Oct. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Nov. 22 ? Notes of Dr. Fell's letter and the Prince of Orange (crossed out); of a difference between the City and the Swedish Resident; for Sir John Bennet and Mr. Povey to be put in the Commission for Scotland Yard, Mr. Cooling and Mr. Brouncker in that for licensing Hackney coachmen, and for the latter to be a justice of peace for Middlesex. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Nov. 22.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Vice-Chancellor and Convocation of Cambridge, to confer the degrees in the several faculties upon such gentlemen of the Prince of Orange's retinue as may desire them, the Prince intending on his return from Newmarket, to pass by Cambridge, and see the University. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Nov. 22. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 63.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
The petition of Thos. Fretter for 1/5 of a certain discovery referred to the Treasury Commissioners, to report what has been paid on the discovery, and with what part the discoverer in like cases is gratified. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 137.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
The petition of the Mayor and aldermen of Worcester to farm the Excise of their county, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid.]
Nov. 23.
Court at Whitehall.
Order for a grant to Sir Edm. Wyndham, Knight Marshal, and Rob. Phelips, groom of the bedchamber, of a fine of 1,800l. inflicted on John Drury, cheesemonger of London, for extortion. Also for a warrant to the Treasury Commissioners to allow the same on the accounts of the sheriffs of London and Middlesex. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 94.]
Nov. 23, The King to the Master and Fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge. We wish you to admit Wormley Martin into the next vacant fellowship, having received good testimony of his proficiency from Dr. Boldero, head of Jesus College. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 63.]
Nov. 23. Order for a warrant to pay an imprest of 200,000l. on account to George Wharton, Treasurer and Paymaster of the Ordnance, one half to be employed for service by land and one half by sea. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 60.]
Nov. [23.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 259.]
Nov. 24. Warrant to [the keeper of the Gatehouse] to detain Nath. Vincent—committed to the county gaol of Surrey on the Act for restraining Nonconformists from inhabiting corporations, and then removed to the Gatehouse—till the six months named in his warrant are expired, or till he is discharged by due course of law. Endorsed with a note by Williamson, 18 Nov. 1670, that this draft was made by the Attorney-General, and by him given to Lord Arlington for his signature. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 130.]
Nov. 24 ? Petition of Anna, wife of Nath. Vincent, prisoner in the Gatehouse, to the King, for permission to attend her husband with a nurse, and for a physician and his relatives to have access to him, he having been taken dangerously ill, by reason of his close confinement. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Nov. 24.
Court at Whitehall.
The petition of Edw. Trussell, his Majesty's mercer, for payment of a tally of 2,000l. on the Customs, and of 726l. paid by him for interest of money advanced thereon to Ald. Vyner, recommended to the Treasury Commissioners, the King being sensible of his present condition, and of his good and loyal service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 138.]
Nov. 24.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Richard, Archbishop of York. We formerly recommended Thos. Wright, vicar of Ecclesfield, co. York, and King's chaplain, to be chosen prebendary residentiary of York in place of Dr. Ant. Elcock, deceased; we recommend him effectually for the next vacant prebend residentiary, and doubt not your compliance with this second recommendation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 23.]
[Nov. 24.] Petition of Sir Fras. Rhodes, Bart., High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, to the King, for a dispensation for non-residence, his dwellinghouse being in Derbyshire adjoining. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 132.]
Nov. 24. Licence to Sir Fras. Rhodes, Bart., High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, to live out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 63.]
Nov. 24.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Emanuel College, Cambridge. John Parker, B.D., of your college, is worthy of a fellowship therein, but is made incapable thereof by a statute forbidding the election of two persons of the same county as Fellows. At his request, and to encourage him in his studies, we grant him a dispensation therefrom, and require you to elect him to the first vacant fellowship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 161.]
Nov. 24. Approbation of Sir Edw. Seabright as deputy-lieutenant for Worcestershire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 15.]
Nov. 24.
Cadiz.
John Mathews to Pepys. I received your letter with the enclosures for Lord Middleton and Sir Hugh Cholmely, which I immediately forwarded by John Mackemath, who went thither [to Tangiers] the day following. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 137.]
Nov. 24.
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I acquainted you that I had received your order for providing victuals for 8 months for 25,000 men, and asked to what ports it was to be distributed; as I have not received the information, nor any money to go on with it, and as the proper season is far advancing, I desire your consideration, as most of the commodities require ready money. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Nov. 24.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Pepys. Both the Mr. Castells have viewed the remains of the Defiance, and find it will be a pity to break her up; it is to their interest to undervalue her, though I am confident it would cost his Majesty more than 1,000l. before so much work could be performed, while if she was broken up, the profit would not much more than countervail the charge. They say she may be worth 400l., besides the charge of carrying her about, but I presume your Honours may bring them to a greater sum; before you treat, it will be necessary to have what they find in writing. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Nov. 24.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to the Navy Commissioners. Being informed by Capt. Juniper, living next door to the Black Swan, kept by John Morehouse, a shipwright, that deals, plank, and balks were brought into Morehouse's back-yard late at night, I repaired there with other officers of the yard, and examined Morehouse and his wife; they confessed that their yard was rented by Mistress Welsh, widow of the late house carpenter, and that the timber was brought there by Dobbs, a house carpenter belonging to the yard, with the help of Mrs. Welsh's servants, and that it was an old practice, as goods had been carried there by Mr. Welsh in his time. John Shish, the master shipwright's assistant, and others believing they are the King's goods, and stolen out of the stores, I have seized them; particulars of the quantity, &c. If one of your Board would come down and examine the matter, it would make a large discovery of many great abuses of the like nature. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Nov. 25.
Whitehall.
The petition of Sir Fras. Leke, for a grant of the decayed trees and roots in the woods of Birke and Billow, Sherwood Forest, co. Notts, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, the King being inclined to gratify his loyalty and good services, but the present suit being one that his Majesty has always been tender about granting. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 138.]
Nov. 25.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to pay out of the militia money now in his hands, 87l. 0s. 8d. to Sir Thos. Colepeper, for money paid to the militia company in Kent, which continued in service 28 days above the time the county was chargeable. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 50.]
Nov. ? Petition of Sir Rob. Cann, Bart., sheriff of Gloucestershire, to the King, for licence to be absent at Bristol and elsewhere when required, during the year of his shrievalty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 133.]
Nov. 25. Licence for Sir Rob. Cann, sheriff of Gloucestershire, to remain out of the county when his occasions require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 60.]
Nov. 25. Order for a warrant to pay 10,800l. to Col. Fras. Wyndham, from moneys received for the sale of fee-farm rents, for services in forwarding the King's escape after the battle of Worcester. [Ibid.]
Nov. [25.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 258.]
Nov. 25.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Copies of his letters of 17 and 22 Nov. Thanks for your punctuality in discharging my bills; I beseech you to let me receive the same just encouragement for the future, and to let the merchants at home be fully and frequently reminded of your kind intentions towards me, so that their correspondents at Leghorn may have a better opinion of the public credit.
If Sir Denis Gauden be not only desired but enabled to pay the bills I draw upon him, at the very hour they fall due, I must be content with the loss of my liberty, and the service must suffer; I am sure the respect I have shown to Sir Denis and Company, and my zeal in promoting his Majesty's designs, justly entitle me to better usage than I have hitherto found.
I hope that the value I put upon the pieces of eight will be satisfactory, and that you will command perfect bills to be made out for the sums I have hitherto drawn upon your Board, as the very name of imprest sits very uneasily upon me.
I observe your reply to my proposition of delivering provisions at Port Mahon, and shall only say that if the charge of transportation is added to the first cost of those sent from England, you will find that his Majesty is at the cost of 10½d. a man per day for victuals, besides loss in weight, damage by transportation, and the uncertainty of conveyance from England to Port Mahon, which disappointments may prove the overthrow of a hopeful design. I never expected that any of his Majesty's frigates should neglect their duty by coming to Leghorn, to take care of such vessels as I might have laden with provisions; but only desire that if any put in there by accident, they may have orders to take my ships under their convoy. I will take care to have the provisions seasonably lodged for the use of the fleet, and will only add that fresh provisions for two or three months is far wholesomer, and will give better content to the mariner, than old and stale.
I am advised by the Consul at Tunis that 14 Algiers men-of-war are abroad, and most of them to the eastward; a vessel of mine was chased near Monte Cristo by 5 Algerines, but cleared herself by getting into Porto Ferraio. The 5 sail were not long since in sight, and I fear you will hear of some great damage, as the commanders of the merchant ships often slight a convoy. The Tunisians will not consent to a peace with France, unless they will buy their 300 slaves. A vessel of Tunis has brought a French one from Tripoli and Cyprus laden with silks and other goods into Biserta. The Dutch at Leghorn report that their ships have destroyed six Algerines; but to allay the report, and likewise to show that the English ships have not been altogether unsuccessful in those seas, I have had a relation printed, of which I enclose a copy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 141.]
Nov. 25.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir Geo. Downing to Pepys. Pray return the Navy Bill for registering the Navy debt, with the words you want added. Had you not taken it away, I should have despatched it to-night. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Nov. ? Petition of Wm. Smith, shipwright, to the Navy Commissioners, that his son may be borne with him upon the works at Chatham Yard, whereto petitioner has been pressed, he being a lusty youth, and having served in that calling for above two years. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Nov. 25.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Castell has viewed the Defiance wreck, and finds the bottom is worth more than 500l., which I believe he will give, and be at the charge of finding stuff and workmanship to carry her about, if it is thought fit to rebuild her.
I think Mr. Mason has made a very unjust complaint, and know not why more than others he should trouble you about being hindered of his turn, which is false, as his boatmen have put others by, to the hindrance of both. Here are plenty of labourers and teams, unless we had more cranes; the two we have are constantly employed in taking up plank, hemp, timber, &c., and Mr. Mason has his turn; but he would have all works stand until his timber was taken up, which would discourage others that serve the King.
When last at the Board, I moved that Mr. Gregory might have a warrant for paying the pressed men their board wages, but he has not received any, nor the 200l. you imprested to him for board wages, but has used 160l. he had by him to buy provisions which I want, by reason of the merchants not having served in their goods; so I desire you will order down the 200l. already imprested to Gregory, and supply him with more money, as we have nothing here to make another pay; if the workmen are disappointed, I fear it will hinder the launching of the new ship and the Bonadventure, and the docking or launching of other ships, for which I desire your concurrence, because of issuing warrants to their officers for the performance of it.
Having many cables to lay, and the men of the St. Andrew being idle, I ordered 120 of them to be at the ropeyard to join the ropemakers; but when they appeared they refused to work, so I have given them until to-morrow to consider of it; if they do not then appear, I shall suspend all that deny the duty, both from victuals and wages, as it has always been the custom of the place that if any ship's company lay here unpaid, and the master attendant had occasion for them, he could command them either afloat or on shore; but there is no appearance of any money to pay them.
I have ordered the son of Wm. Smith, the shipwright lately impressed, to be entered, but he is a small lad, and I doubt if he has served two years as an apprentice, for no indenture appears.
I send the names of certain pressed men who have absented themselves, some of whom say they will go to the King and his Royal Highness, and not trouble the Navy Commissioners; some course should be taken with them, or else they will still be absent.
The mastmaker has found the mast of 20 hands and 26 yards long, which he intended as a fore-topmast for the new ship, so defective that it will scarcely make a bowsprit for a fourth-rate ship. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 144.] Enclosing,
List of 32 pressed men who did not answer to their muster on 25 Nov. 1670, giving their different trades. [Ibid. No. 144i.]
Nov. 25.
Deptford.
J. Uthwat and Rich. Manden to the Navy Commissioners. We have computed the tonnage of the stores on board the Hamburg Merchant for transportation to Port Mahon, and estimate them at 198 tons. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Nov. 26.
St. Helen's [London].
Sir Rich. Ford, Lord Mayor, to the Navy Commissioners. I importune you for the dismissal of a joiner who has been impressed for the service, he having engaged himself on some public buildings in the City. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Nov. 26.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to [the Navy Commissioners]. As we intend launching the Mary Rose and Mermaid next Tuesday, let me know what ships are to be put in the dry dock, that a warrant may be sent to the master attendant for bringing them up. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Nov. 26.
Deptford.
Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. I want a warrant for removal of some Sherwood Forest timber from Deptford to Woolwich, for the use of the Milford; I will hasten down what else is required. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Nov. 26.
Dublin.
Capt. Jas. Sharland to the Navy Commissioners. I was commanded from Dublin to Chester Water last October, but on the 16th a storm arose, which broke my boat and anchors. Pray deliver 2 bills enclosed for their repair to Thos. Hayter's clerk, so that I may be able to draw the amount.
Also direct Sir Denis Gauden to pay me a bill I had of him last March for 204l. 3s. 3d., as it is all owing in this city for provisions, and some of it has been due for almost 3 years; I am led a sad life by the people for it. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Nov. 26.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Col. Thos. Middleton. I want some spruce deals from Deptford for the Milford, and some dram timber if she is to be sheathed. Mr. Mayors has been, and taken an account of the compass timber wanting for her; according to his custom, he has promised very fair, I wish he may perform. I have been very sick and weak, but the worst is past. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Nov. 26.
Downs.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. I have examined my own ship's company and the Princess's, but cannot find any more bills or tickets than those enclosed; the men who are coming down in the Emsworth may have some. I judge the men do not credit our report, as many that had tickets promised to come down, but have not come as yet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 151.]
Nov. 26.
Wapping.
Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. On receipt of your imprest bill of 100l., I paid it to Sir Rich. Ford. A noble lady—I think Lady Abergany [Abergavenny]—hearing that I was recovering this loss from the Hamburgher, petitioned the King for it, and he granted it, and she brought the order to the Treasury Commissioners, who wrote to me. I attended, and told them that I had orders to prosecute the recovery of the loss on the Elbe 24 Aug. 1666, which was 3,656l. 1s. 0½d., with 250l. 4s. advance on the goods at 20 per cent., and 600l. interest to 24 Oct. last; total, 4,506l. 5s. 0½d.; and that I was in hopes it would be speedily paid by the city and senate of Hamburg. Also that I was not satisfied for the loss by the Navy Office, but expected bills to clear the imprest. The lady's servant or son follows me about to get in the money for her, but I suppose this will be stopped on my complaining of it at Brooke House. Pray desire the Treasury Commissioners to stop any further proceedings thereon. The lady has just come to me herself about this loss. [Ibid. No. 152.] Enclosing,
Sir Wm. Warren to Sam. Franklin. On 6 Oct. I sent you my account of the King's claim upon the Hamburgher, being 6,941l. 17s.; but I find that 1,787l. 10s., freight of the ship Olive Branch, must be waived, so the total is 5,154l. 7s. 6d. Further particulars relating to the said charge.—Wapping, 13 Oct. 1670. [Ibid. No. 152i.]
Sir W. Warren to Franklin. By advice of Sir Walter Walker, I have reduced my charge of 25 per cent. for advance on the goods lost to 20 per cent. Particulars of demands for damages.—Wapping, 1 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 152ii.]
Receipt by Sir Rich. Ford of 100l. from Sir Wm. Warren, towards the 3 per cent. for reimbursement of himself and others concerned in the said loss. [Ibid. No. 152iii.]
Sir Wm. Warren to Franklin. Further statement of the said accounts. There having been an error, the total of my present demand is 4,506l. 5s. 0½d.—Wapping, 1 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 152iv.]
Nov. 26.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. The Speed of Hamburg has arrived from St. Lucar with salt and wine. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 134.]
Nov. 26. Dispensation for John Cartwright, High Sheriff of Oxfordshire, to go to Northamptonshire, London, or Westminster. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 185.]
Nov. 28. Warrant for a grant to Cornelius Manley, of Bistock, co. Denbigh, of the office of constable of Harlech Castle, Merionethshire, with a market, fair, court of pye-powder, &c., void by decease of Wm. Owen, to whom it was granted by the late King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 61.]
Nov. 28.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I have given Mr. Gould's agent notice to forbear breaking up the Defiance, and to bring all the plank and ironwork they have taken out of her into the yard; but some plank must be found for new laying of the rope ground.
There were 90 of the St. Andrew's men who appeared and were willing to go to work without any allowance, and I suppose we shall have the full number to-morrow. I well know that no allowance was ever made here on his Majesty's restoration to the 4,000 men belonging to the ships then here, who constantly came to all works afloat and on shore; so I forbear offering any encouragement until I see what appearance they make; indeed, I fear I shall not be able to employ them for want of plank.
All the pressed men who were absent have appeared except 4, and have desired to be allowed to work their dinner hour on Fridays and leave at 3 o'clock to go to market; this will be a loss of less time than the other, and be a means of breaking an ancient and evil custom. For instance, I design docking the Henry at 1 p.m. on Friday, when many of the pressed men are to attend, and if they have their old custom allowed of not coming in until 3, the work will not be performed without taking others from their work, which is prejudicial to the service. If they plead custom, I believe their working for 1s. 10d. a day is more ancient, and now they have 2s. 1d. in lieu of chips, yet carry them away; if they had their wills, they would make walking with their hands in their pockets and doing nothing a custom too. There used to be 100 shipwrights, besides calkers and scavelmen, to shut the dock gates at the docking of a ship, who were allowed 3 tides, or a whole night extra; but now it is done with less than 4 score men, and only 2 tides are allowed; they also pleaded custom, but I did not allow it. I could instance other customs and privileges, but if these unruly fellows apply to his Majesty and his Royal Highness, and obtain their desires, I must be content.
I hope that I shall persuade the men to continue their work, although we may want money to pay them, so that the launching of the new ship and the St. Andrew may not be hindered; also that it will not be long before some money arrives for relief of the men. What number of men in ordinary are to be borne on those ships? Two more of Mr. Stockman's masts have proved faulty, but have been made to serve for the new ship.
I hope we shall have the pleasure of your company at the launching of the new ship. Is the usual dinner to the officers of the yard on the launching to be allowed? [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 153.]
Nov. 28.
Chatham.
Same to Thos. Hayter. What is the price of candles in town? They have risen 6d. in the dozen since I last bought any, and I cannot have any under 5s. per dozen lbs. If they are cheaper in London, let some be sent down in the horse boat. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 154.]
Nov. 28. Capt. John Willgress, of the Welcome, to the Navy Commissioners. I am upon sailing for the Hope, as it will be far better than Long Reach. Mr. Sprigg has promised to send down the dry provisions, if you do not command him to the contrary. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Nov. 28. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. Pardon the slowness of the account enclosed, but I have only just received it from the person I employed, and it took some time to read our catalogues and consult MSS. We will accommodate your friend with anything he desires in our collection. Your building goes on well, and your steward employs all his thoughts upon it; if I can assist I shall be ready to do so, as it is a good work. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 135.]
Nov. 28.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. The wife of Sir Fras. Gerard was brought ashore dead, and sent to London. Lord Brereton has gone for Paris. Several vessels have passed through the Narrows; I hope you have had a good account of them from Deal. There is no further news of the East India ship cast away upon the Sands.
Esquire Breames showed me the copy of Lord Arlington's letter to the Treasury Commissioners, and of theirs to the Farmers of Customs, as to the affront offered by some officers of the port to Madame Colbert, the French Ambassador's lady, when she was here, of which complaint was made to his Majesty, but without cause; only the captain of his Majesty's yacht which carried her over, being drunk, abused the searcher's deputy, beat him with his wooden hand, and drew his blood, because he threatened to search the vessel for prohibited goods; the grand complaint is that Madame received ill language, and paid 22s. 8d. for her servants' droits. Breames and I have made strict inquiry into the business, and find that she did not receive ill language, and it was only 8 followers for whom her steward paid the usual droits of 2s. 8d. per head; neither herself, steward, nor waiting women have paid anything either for themselves or baggage, so that Madame has no reason to complain. It is the searcher who should complain, and if his Majesty's officers are to be beaten for doing their duty, by such a captain, who was not sensible of what he did, it will be a great discouragement for the future. The droits of 2s. 8d. per head have been paid ever since the English got Calais, and it is made up as follows, viz.:—
s. d.
Half passage and head money 1 2
To the clerk of the passage 0 4
To the King's searcher 0 6
To the master of the ferryboat, for his and his company's attendance to the water 0 6
To the Bailiff 0 2
2 8
which is paid by all who pass, and sometimes more, especially by Ambassadors. I beg a line if the French Ambassador makes any complaints. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 136.]
[Nov. 28.] Memoranda of proceedings in the House of Commons relative to the King's supply, by an additional excise, duties on tobacco, salt, &c.; with objections thereto, and note of the charges of the collection of customs. [Ibid. No. 137. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 162, 171, 173, dates 11, 26, and 28 Nov.]
Nov. 29. Sir Roger l'Estrange to Williamson. The extract sent concerns two books. The Englishman I found in Brooks' trunk, with several other seditious pamphlets. I can prove the queries against the printer of the manuscript, and also that Brooks dispersed them. I will attend the House on Thursday, and if it shall then be found that a better government of the press is necessary, I shall have some additional clauses in readiness, which will probably do the work. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Nov. 29. Privy seal for 2,000l. to Mrs. Mary Courtney, as the King's free gift. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 61.]
Nov. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift, under the Great Seal of Scotland, to Chas. Maitland of Halton [Laird of Haltoun] of all remainders, reversions, &c., of lands made in favour of John [Scrimgeour], late Earl of Dundee, and his heirs, or in favour of any of his predecessors and their heirs, and especially of the lands of Baldovan, &c., baronies of Ulishaven, Ross, Glassey, Dundee, &c., and other lands and offices belonging to the said late Earl, which have come to his Majesty as ultimus haeres, seeing there is no person who can be served as his heir male. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 29.]
Nov. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Chas. Maitland of Haltoun of the ward, non-entries, farms, and duties of the lands above mentioned, and all other pertaining to the late Earl of Dundee or his ancestors, or to David or Sir John Carnagie of Craig, held by service of ward and relief, and of all years to come therein, till the lawful heirs of the said Earl and Carnagie enter and be of full age. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 30.]
Nov. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter, under the Great Seal of Scotland, to Chas. Maitland, of the lands and offices in the above-mentioned grant, belonging to the late Earl of Dundee, or to David Carnagie of Craig, and their ancestors, and now in his Majesty's hands, Maitland giving the former services. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 31.]
Nov. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for presentation of Chas. Maitland of Haltoun, and his heirs, to James Archbishop of St. Andrews, Charles [Hamilton] Earl of Haddington, — Earl of Kingorn, Walter [Sandilands] Lord Torpichen, and the Provost and Masters of St. Andrew's college, as superiors of the lands lately held by John, Earl of Dundee, who leaving no lawful heir male, the King presents Maitland to hold the said lands from them as superiors. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 32.]
Nov. 29.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. The Treasury Commissioners desire you would meet together, and make a true state of the account between his Majesty and the East India Company, as to what the freight amounts to for the tonnage of goods brought home by the Leopard, Dunkirk, Mary Rose, and Convertine, as also of what was wanting which they might have brought home, and the cause thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 156.]
Nov. 29. W. Castell to the Navy Commissioners. I have surveyed the Defiance wreck at Chatham; particulars of what is remaining of her; I estimate the charge of fitting and bringing her about will not exceed 150l., much of which may be saved if she is towed by one of the King's vessels.
As to breaking her up, I think that although the stuff saved may be very useful for rebuilding, it will not be of great advantage, the plank being mostly winding, and the timber compass. Noted that Capt. Deane being in town, and going down to Chatham to assist in launching the new ship, he was directed to give the Board his opinion, a stop being put to her breaking up in the meanwhile. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Nov. 30.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. We have hauled up another Rowsey mast for the Henrietta pleasure boat, but I am afraid to make a mast of it, as the spreet [spurt ?] of those boats strains the masts so much, that only extraordinarily tough wood will hold. Mr. Wood has two Gottenburg masts which I judge more fit, as I know by experience that no other masts will endure the great strain. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Nov. 30.
Chatham.
Edw. Homewood to Pepys. I am ashamed of the delay in sending a certificate enclosed, and hope it will not come unseasonably to hand. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Nov. 30.
The Quay, Bristol.
Rob. Bodenham, sailmaker, to the Navy Commissioners. It is 12 months since I was with you, and I hoped long since to have received the money due by bill under your hands of 25 April 1668, for sails, &c., supplied by contract to Mr. Furzer for the St. David. My father has been dead 17 months, and has left me in such a condition that I am not able to pay the creditors of whom he had the money, and am in continual danger of being put into prison; and I have besides to pay interest on it. I beg you will commiserate my condition, and order me my money; the non-payment of it was the means of shortening my father's days, it lying so near his heart. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Nov. 30.
Rye.
Ja. Welsh to Williamson. The Dover packet which sailed for Calais on Wednesday was constrained to land her passengers at Blackness; before she could get out all her goods, the storm forced her away, and she has since come into Rye. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 139.]
Nov. 30.
Deal.
Wm. Genvey [for Rich. Watts] to Williamson. All the ships from Yarmouth have sailed from the Downs. The Princess and Falcon, and 4 others, are riding at Deal, one of which is bound for Dantzic. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 140.]
Nov. 30. Certificate by Sir Rich. Chaworth and 10 others, that Thos. Wrightson, clerk and M.A., is a person of good life and conversation, of a peaceable disposition, conformable to the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England, and of good abilities for the work of the ministry. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Nov. 30. List of the general members of the Royal Society, of whom 10 are to be chosen into the Council, and also of the present Council—President, William, Viscount Brouncker—consisting of 20 members, 11 of whom are to be continued. [Printed sheet. Ibid. No. 142.]
Nov. 30.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Having been requested to allow a levy of 300 Scots to recruit the regiment under command of Lord George Douglas, in service of the King of France, we authorise you to permit Lieut.-Col. Alex. Monro, Capt. James Douglas, and others, to levy the said soldiers in the ordinary way. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 23.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Petition of John Digby to the King, for a grant to him of the keepership of Somersham park and chase, co. Huntingdon, long the possession of the Earls of Suffolk, which his late father, Sir Kenelm Digby, purchased from James, now Earl, for 2,500l., but the purchase required a surrender of the Earl's estate to his Majesty, and was not completed at Sir Kenelm's death. With reference thereon to the Lords of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 143.]
Nov. 30. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 139.]
[Nov. 30.] Similar petition to the Treasury Commissioners, but altered as for the King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 144.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The petition of Sir Tobias Bridges, for a lease of fee-farm rents in Leicester, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, the King reflecting on his merits and services, and being willing to gratify him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 139.]
Nov.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master of the Ordnance. We have desired that a competent number of brass chase guns be cast, for the first-rate frigates to be set forth in spring. You are therefore to have all the brass guns which can be spared, and are fit for refounding, removed from our forts, castles, and garrisons, and delivered to our founder, to be cast into chase guns; all the governors and officers of our said forts, &c. are to yield obedience to these our commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 145.]
Nov. 30. Note of a pass for Col. Wm. Vavasour of Haslewood, and his nephew, Thos. Thwenge of Kilton, both co. York, to travel for 3 years. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Nov. ? Petition of Wm. Pinckard, officer to the sheriff of Middlesex, and Henry Wilson, his assistant, to Lord Keeper Sir Orlando Bridgeman, for release on bail from the Fleet, to which they are committed by the House of Peers, for entering the house and seizing some goods of Lady De la Warr; they were so tender as not to remove any of her goods, though ignorant of the privilege due to her. [Walcot] Brisco, the attorney who employed them, is not to be found to answer for his conduct. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 147.]
[Nov.]
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent under the Great Seal of Scotland, confirming that granted by the late King at Oxford, 3 Aug. 1643, to William [Murray], late Earl of Dysart, and his heirs, of the title of Earl of Dysart, and Lord Huntingtower; and he having no male heirs, grant of the same to Elizabeth, Countess of Dysart, his eldest daughter, and what child of hers she shall name, and if female, to the eldest, with remainder to her heirs whatsoever, they taking place according to the former patent. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 28.]
Nov. Privy seal for 200l. to Sir H. de Vic, for payment of a debt contracted at Brussels by the King's command. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 61.]
Nov. Grant to Abraham Dowcett, with reversion to his sons Abraham and John, of the office of keeper of the lodge and paddock-walk in the Great Park, Windsor. With note by Sir Phil. Warwick, that this grant was directed to the then Lord Chancellor in 1660, to pass by immediate warrant, but is now brought to pass by the seals. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 254.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to the Cofferer of the Household various sums of money, not exceeding 20,000l., for extraordinaries in that office. [Ibid. No. 255.]
Nov. Warrant to allow Sir Wm. Bucknall and others 62,915l. 19s. 4d., without account, as due to them by tallies for moneys advanced for the King's service. [Ibid.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to Sir Wm. Armorer 500l. as the King's free gift. [Ibid. No. 256.]
Nov. Warrant to the Treasurer of the Chamber to pay to Wm. Shugfer, yeoman footman in the room of John Harrald, deceased, 40l. a year. [Ibid. No. 257.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to George Wharton, Paymaster of the Ordnance, 30,685l. 8s. 4d., 20,974l. 12s. 9d., and 22,541l, 7s. 10d., and all other moneys formerly made payable to Col. Wm. Legg, deceased, for the Ordnance Office. [Ibid. No. 258.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to the Duke of York the interest of 20,000l. granted to him, and made payable from the duty on wines, &c., at 6 per cent from the time the principal money was registered, to the time of its payment. [Ibid. No. 259.]
Nov. Warrant to pay Sir Denis Gauden, Surveyor-General of Marine Victuals, 3,704l. 3s. 11d. to make good to the Navy victuallers the issue of victuals exceeding the declaration for the year, of 5,000 men for 365 days. [Ibid. No. 260.]
Nov. Grant to Sam. Fortrey, on surrender of George Wharton, of the office of clerk of the deliverance of all ordnance; fee 12d. a day. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 260.]
Nov. Warrant to the receiver of the Duchy of Cornwall, to pay to Sir Jonathan Trelawney 839l. owing to the King for fines on estates granted to Sir Jonathan and others, in copyhold tenements in the said duchy. [Ibid. No. 261.]
Nov. Petition of John Axon, mariner, to the Navy Commissioners, to retain the balance which may remain of his pension of 6l. 13s. 4d., when a debt of 5l. 2s. has been paid out of it to Mrs. Edwards. Is a poor pensioner of Chatham chest, having lost his right leg in an engagement with the Dutch, and being indebted to Mrs. Edwards, a sailsman's widow, she arrested him, whereupon he gave her a letter of attorney to receive his next year's pension, in satisfaction of her debt and charges. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 161.]
Nov. ? Petition of Thos. Baynham, purser of the Reserve, to the Navy Commissioners, for payment of a balance due on his account for the Princess frigate, as Sir Denis Gauden refuses to give it to him. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Nov. Petition of the carpenters pressed to serve in the yard at Chatham to the Navy Commissioners, being all poor men, for payment of their wages weekly, for the better support of their wives and families resident in London. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Nov. Petition of Henry Coleman to the Navy Commissioners for relief, that he may be preserved from utter ruin. Has been sued in the Exchequer as security for Roger Gravett, formerly purser of the Martin, and then of the Charles V., for 52l. 13s. 10d., balance of his victualling account for the Martin; but as the greater part of Gravett's papers were lost in the Charles V., in June 1667, when he was slain, it does not appear what provisions and pressed men were victualled by him, and no allowance has been made of that nature, otherwise he would have been a considerable creditor. The other security being dead, and Gravett's widow refusing to administer, so as not to make herself liable, petitioner is daily threatened with an extent, which he is not able to satisfy, being reduced to a low condition by the late war, wherein he served his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Nov. Petition of Dan. Furzer of Bristol, shipwright, to the Duke of York. I am reduced to great extremity and want; my family, who live 100 miles distant, are ready to be turned out of doors, and have their goods seized for rent and debts, and I have not wherewith to send them relief, or so much as will defray my ordinary charges, and am forced to run upon score for whatever I have. There is 1,465l. 5s. 5d. due to me on bills for building the St. David, and fitting her with stores; as also for repairing and fitting the Harp, Dartmouth, and Richmond at Bristol; also 1,549l. 5s. 3d. due to poor workmen and others, for which I stand obliged. His Majesty having, on 26 Jan. last, referred my case to you for relief, I beg your considera tion of my case. I ask an order for speedy payment of a portion of the said sums, and of my salary for the time I have wasted in town. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 165.]
Nov. Petition of Edw. Silvester of Portsmouth, anchorsmith, to the King and Council, for a supply of money. Contracted with the Navy Commissioners to make a chain for the mooring of the ships at Portsmouth, which it was computed would cost 1,700l. When he began the work, had 200l. in hand, and was to receive an imprest of 200l. more for every 10 tons weight of iron he wrought into links; but this has not been complied with, although he has made twothirds of the chain, or 15 tons of iron, and as it lies on his hands, it is much more damnified than if it lay in the place intended for it. As the master attendant has since certified that a chain of less length may serve, the whole price whereof will not amount to above 1,000l., only 700l. or 800l. more is required, with the money petitioner has in hand, and this is but the charge his Majesty is at for 2½ years' moorings for want of it. When the chain is made and used, will engage to keep it in repair during his life for 5l. yearly, which will be a great saving. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Nov. Petition of Judith, widow of John Stephenson, late purser of the Royal Katherine, to the Navy Commissioners, to move his Royal Highness for an order for payment of 113l. 18s. 5d., due to her late husband from the Navy and Victualling Office, for wages and disbursements on the said ship's account, her husband having left her nothing else to subsist upon. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Nov. Petition of Thos. Steynes of Chatham, platerer, to the Navy Commissioners, to move his Royal Highness for an order for payment of part of the 1,100l. due to him, on bills for stores supplied by contract. On his first employment, brought down the price of the commodities he served in from 25 to 30 per cent, cheaper than those served in by any other, and has ever since continued to supply the stores; but for want of ready money as agreed on, he has not only taken up money at interest to answer his Majesty's occasions, but himself and family are reduced to such necessity that, without help, they must be utterly ruined. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Nov. Petition of John Wood, master of the William and Thomas, on behalf of himself and the owners of the ship, to the Navy Commissioners, for demurrage and satisfaction for damage in transporting soldiers, &c. Their ship was let to freight by the ton to the Navy victualler by charter party, and was to leave Gravesend last December, but was not despatched until March following, by which means they were at great expense in victuals and wages. After the ship was loaded, some soldiers were put on board, and 100 tons of freight were taken out to provide room for them. The soldiers proved such an annoyance that half of the ship's company left, so that other men had to be provided, at a great advance of wages. Notwithstanding the ship was let to freight by the ton, after entering into charter party, the petitioners were commanded to attend Capt. Beach, and by following him, the ship lost 14 days between England and Cadiz, stayed 24 hours at Tangiers, and 4 days at Malaga, making 19 days, yet have not received any necessary money for the soldiers, or satisfaction for damage to bread and biscuit, or for the lumber they brought on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 169.] Annexing,
[The owners of the said ship to the Navy Commissioners.] We conceive the 7 objections to be fully answered by the petition, and pray your Honours to consider our great loss and damage; first, by the ship not being despatched in December; second, by putting the soldiers on board, whereby we lost the carriage of at least 100 tons, as also in following the convoy; which together is estimated at 500l. to our damage, above all the freight we are to receive. We pray for 700l. to be allowed. [Ibid. No. 169i.]
Nov.
London.
John Harrison, master of the Thomas of Hull, to the Navy Commissioners. Shall I go to Hull for the remainder of the timber? There were only 40 or 50 loads left, but I was informed by Mr. Russell that there was as much more up the river. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Nov. Daniel Furzer to [the Navy Commissioners]. I met near the Strand Mr. Ager, surveyor of Dean Forest, who informed me that he had received orders from the Treasury Commissioners to sell the timber, and that Lord Ashley had bid him take me down to choose what was fit for the service. I told him I was not at my own disposal, as I was waiting upon you, and asked Ager to wait upon you; this he refused, and said if I was not down in a week, he should go in hand with the sale. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Nov. List of 14 shipwrights pressed from Mr. Castell and sent to Deptford and Chatham, whom he desires to have cleared. [Ibid. No. 172.]
[Nov.] Proposals made to the King by the officers of the Mint, for the coining of a public farthing of intrinsic value, except the expense of coinage, suggesting copper as the most suitable metal, and stating the terms and manner in which they propose to coin farthings, and the improbability of their being counterfeited, from the great trouble for small profit. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 148.]
Nov.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge, to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind.
Vol.280. No. Date. King's Merchants'. Wind. Remarks.
149 Nov. 2 2 14 S.W. The wind turning to the westward, the ships under sail last night came to an anchor, but they are under sail again.
150 " 28 2 2 N.
151 " 29 2 15 N.

Footnotes

  • 1. George Keith, Quaker, published his "Immediate Revelation" in 1668.