BHO

Charles II: December 1670

Pages 560-609

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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December 1670

Dec. 1. Account of moneys paid or payable for the tithes of divers parishes mentioned within the City of London, and liberties thereof, where the churches were destroyed by the late fire, as also the several sums agreed by the aldermen and ministers at Guildhall, on 1 Dec. 1670 as reasonable and necessary, to be propounded to Parliament, and to be established by their authority, in lieu of former tithes mentioned; together with reasons why such additions should be made, viz.—that the rates for tithes were too low, many houses being let at low rents, with quarterly fines; that considering the lower value of money and the expense of living in the city, the former tithes would not afford a competent maintenance to ministers, especially as their rents have been lessened two thirds by the late fire, and their parsonage and vicarage houses demolished, and must be rebuilt; that the discouraging maintenance of the regular clergy would encourage the upholding of conventicles; and that the rates and dues now propounded would not exceed 6d. in the pound on the rents. [Printed broadsheet. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 152.]
Dec. 1.
Deptford.
Humph. Cadbury to the Navy Commissioners. I have spoken to Mr. Byland at Woolwich, but there is not a mast or yard fit for the Crown and Dover, so that new ones must be made. I have taken up one for the Henrietta, and also made a mainyard for the Assistance at Woolwich. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 173.]
Dec. 1.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the Navy Commissioners. I will, as ordered, join Mr. Meadwell and Mr. French when they come down, and see that no money is paid upon bills or tickets, but to the persons who belong to the ships, and are on board. I mustered the Princess and Falcon twice in the Downs, and will do so again before the bills and tickets are paid, and then notice the men's names, and the sums paid in the muster books, and send you a list. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Dec. 1. Certificate by Capt. Silas Taylor, that Christopher Goodale, master of the Good Hope flyboat, who was employed by Wm. Wood to transport masts from Harwich to Portsmouth, had some twice-laid rope and 3-inch plank out of the stores at Harwich, which he has not redelivered, according to promise. With note that the Board remitted him the rope, Justice Wood having urged that a greater quantity of his own was expended about the masts. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Dec. 1.
Deal.
Sir Wm. Jennens to the Navy Commissioners. I desire you to despatch my lieutenant and the men he has with him, as well as the money for bills sent up, for the men are in great necessity. The Yarmouth fleet has sailed, under a Dutch convoy that is bound for the Straits, although they pretended they would only go to Plymouth; but since I am informed of several of the masters meeting with the commander of the convoy to that purpose. I wish them a good voyage, and hope the next they have allotted to them will not be so served. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Dec. 1.
Navy Office.
Certificate by Joseph Smith, that Capt. John Shales, purser of the Princess, has no account standing out for provisions, moneys, or stores committed to his charge. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Dec. 1. Rob. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Asks a warrant directed to Woolwich, for the receipt of 5 loads of knee-timber from James Buckwell, for the use of the ships repairing there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 178.]
Dec. 2.
London.
Wm. Penn to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letter demanding the return of a draft of the River Medway, alleged to belong to your office, and to have been left with my late father; I will examine his catalogue of drafts, and if I find it or a copy, I will return it; or if it was his, I will lend it, confiding in your generosity to return it. I have superstition enough to value the smallest relic that may be deemed a badge of my father's trade, which rendered him what he was, and us his relations what we are. I do not question your verity, when you say that it belonged to that office, and was in his hands, but the integrity of those clerks whose neglect or carelessness in losing or mislaying it may have put them upon such an answer. [Ibid. No. 179.]
[Dec. 2.] Petition of the Bailiffs, Burgesses, Aldermen, and Commonalty of Great Yarmouth to the King, for pardon for vending and exchanging halfpence and farthings. They sent for some to London, for convenience in acts of charity and exchange, not knowing that thereby they incurred his Majesty's displeasure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 153.]
[Dec. 2.] Warrant to Sir Thos. Chicheley to pay needful allowances and wages to the additional storekeepers, clerks, labourers, &c., at the Tower, Woolwich, Chatham, Portsmouth, Plymouth, and Hull, rendered necessary by the increase of the Navy, [Ibid. No. 154.]
[Dec. 2.] Warrant [to Sir Thos. Chicheley] to pay 400l. a year to George Wharton, Treasurer and Paymaster of the Ordnance, and 120l. for two of his clerks. Also to cause Wharton to sit and vote as a principal officer at the Board. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Dec. 2. Entry of the above two warrants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 62.]
[Dec. 2.] Petition of Rich. Creswell to the King, for licence to live in Shropshire, where he is now sheriff, during the ensuing year, for which he is chosen sheriff for Staffordshire, in which county he has no settled habitation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 156.]
Dec. 2. Licence to Rich. Creswell, High Sheriff of Staffordshire, to live out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, p. 63.]
Dec. 2.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin to Hickes. A vessel has arrived from the Straits, and part of the fleet bound there has sailed; also the Newcastle, Dragon, and some Scotchmen for Calais. We are looking hourly for the fleet expected down, but the wind continuing easterly, ships cannot come in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 158.]
Dec. 3.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I received your letter by Mr. Scott. I had hopes of sending his lordship's horses to Calais by a London ketch, but Sir Bernard Gascoigne having hired it, he was not so kind to my lord as he might have been, for he could have carried them over; I shall lose no opportunity to send them. I hope his Majesty is satisfied that no affront or rudeness was offered to the French Ambassador's lady, as all that was done was committed by Dongan, captain of the King's yacht, who beat the searcher's deputy, for saying he would search the vessel for prohibited goods. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 280, No. 159.]
Dec. 3.
London.
R. Hutchinson to the Navy Commissioners, Chatham. I had order last night from Sir Thos. Littleton to acquaint you that they could not get the money until to-day, by reason of some difficulties in the Exchequer; but it will be with you by Monday, and I hope by then to be able to come myself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 180.]
Dec. 3.
The Newcastle, Kinsale.
Capt. Ant. Langston to Mathew Wren. We arrived here after much bad weather and contrary winds, but as yet know not what ships expect our convoy; several that came with us from Plymouth have been separated by foul weather, but I think they willingly parted, as we kept our light according to directions, and made but little sail. I heard some speeches before we parted that they had no inclination to go so far out of their way.
Our gun deck has not been well calked, and water has leaked into the sail room and wetted all the sails, but we hope to dry them while we are here. Our standing and running rigging is also so bad that we know not what to trust to; but our greatest misfortune is the weakness of our foremast, the length of the cheeks being made smaller than is proportionate with the swag of the yard in foul weather. I am an utter stranger to the persons concerned, but can assure you that his Majesty is not well dealt with in the setting out of his ships from Chatham, if others speed no better than we do. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Dec. 3.
Harwich.
Capt. Thos. Langley to Pepys. Capt. [Silas] Taylor having reported that a ship is to be built here, I beg to recommend Sam. Morris to be smith. I shall also be always ready to pay that service I owe to you. [Ibid. No. 182.]
[Dec. 4.] Petition of Edmund Lewin, High Sheriff of Essex, to the King, for licence to travel out of Essex during the time of his shrievalty, that he may visit his estates in cos. Somerset, Gloucester, Derby, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 105.]
Dec. 4. Licence for Edm. Lewin, High Sheriff of Essex, to go out of the county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 64.]
Dec. 4. Warrant for a licence to Sir John Monson, Bart., K.B., to empark and store with deer and conies 320 acres of meadow, pasture, and wood grounds in the parish of Broxbourne, co. Herts, with right of free warren therein, provided the land lie not within the King's forests. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 63.]
[Dec.] 4.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A Rochelle vessel, laden with salt and bound for Holland, has been in great danger, and was brought into the Downs by the Deal hookers with her mast gone. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 1.]
Dec. 5.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I answered your letter by Mr. Scott, who has left the horses to be transported by me. He has not ordered me to hire a vessel on purpose, which would cost 7l. or 8l. by reason of the grand tonnage at Calais, but if we stay the arrival of a French shallop, it is very uncertain. Let me know whether his lordship would trust his horses in one. I have promised to pay Mr. Rous, the postmaster, his charges for the man and horses for Mr. Scott, when he was here.
Two small vessels of this town, with 3 men each, have been cast away and all the men drowned. Our packet-boat could not get into Calais harbour last week, owing to the stormy weather, and was forced into Rye, but has since safely come here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 2.]
Dec. 5. Nich. Wood to Williamson. Our play has been but small this week, as after losses and paying rent, salaries, and candles, the clear gains only amounted to 6l. 18s. 6d. I hope we shall be better at Christmas. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Dec. 5.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Lieut. Chas. Serres to the King, for a pension of 100l. a year out of the Queen's portion. Served 6 years under his Majesty's banners in Portugal, and on the peace, conducted his forces to Tangiers, and has since waited employment. Lieut.-Col. Rumsey and Major Trelawney, who served in Portugal, have pensions of 200l. a year each from the said portion.
With reference thereon to the Lords of the Treasury. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Dec. 5. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 139.]
Dec. 5. The petition of Sir Wm. Sanderson, for compensation for a paddock walk in Windsor, which the King intends to take into the park, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. p. 140.]
Dec. 5.
The Bantam, Leghorn Road.
Capt. Rich. Haddock to the Navy Commissioners. I forwarded Mr. Gibson's letter from Port Mahon, in which I doubt not you had an account of our clear discharge of all the stores on board. I presented Gibson's certificate, and the letters of credit from Alderman Backwell to Mr. Longland at Leghorn, for the freight, but he refused to pay it upon a bare letter, not knowing the alderman's hand; although he had several times remitted and drawn money on him, he had never received a letter from him; so rather than ruin my voyage for want of my freight, I have been forced to give him security to repay, if the bills are not accepted. I beg you not to let me be a sufferer herein. I admire not a little that the alderman did not back his letter of credit with an advice, and beg that he may accept the bills, so that on my return from Galipoli, both myself and security may be discharged.
I have desired my brother-in-law, Capt. Bradenham, to attend you as to the misunderstanding between me and Gibson about the calculation of the tonnage, and hope the 7 tons claimed will be allowed, as promised. I shall receive 3,427 pieces of 8 for freight and primage from Mr. Longland this day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 183.]
Dec. 6/16.
Port Mahon.
Rich. Gibson to the Navy Commissioners. The Admiral (Sir Edw. Spragg) having returned to fish his foremast, I send by him a copy of my letter sent by Capt. Poole of the Jersey. I have secured the bread by taking 700 bags on board the Hand (for which I want tin plates, to secure the bread room), and 450 bags to the town, and with only the loss of one.
Two of our coopers are down; I much fear for one of them, and the third begins to complain of pain in his bones by their hard lodging, having hitherto had to lie nightly by their work and tools, to prevent embezzlement; but that will be remedied in a week.
The Admiral thinks Capt. Haddock has been allowed sufficient for freight, as he quitted his claim to him for more, and would never have asked for it had not Capt. Beare given the other a private item to demand it. I shall go about the survey when Capt. Beare has finished with his boatswain and carpenters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 184.] Annexing,
Certificate by Capt. Amos Beare and Jno. Wyborne to Sir Edw. Spragg, Admiral in the Mediterranean, that in landing 450 bags of biscuits out of the Bermudas Merchant, one of them fell overboard, between the ketch and the town quay, by which it was made unfit to eat; as the men of the Golden Hand and Portsmouth ketch had an equal hand in it, we refer the case to your consideration.—24 Nov. 1670. With certificate by Sir Edw. Spragg that his Majesty ought to bear the loss.—Revenge, 3 Dec. 1670. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 184i.]
Dec. 6. Warrant to Charles, Earl of Warwick, to preserve the game within 12 miles off Leez [Leighs ?], co. Essex. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 185.]
Dec. 6. Dispensation for Sir Phil. Twistleton, Bart., High Sheriff of Flintshire, to go into Yorkshire or elsewhere. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 6. Warrant for a corroboration of the presentation of John Opie, rector of the parish church of St. Breock, co. Cornwall. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 23.]
Dec. 6. Memorandum of letters from Sec. Trevor to the Mayor of Gravesend, the chief magistrate of Harwich, and the clerk of the passage at each port, to keep strict watch for all persons offering to embark in the ports, and to detain such as they may suspect to be concerned in an attempt made that evening on the person of the Duke of Ormond, by several horsemen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 46.]
Dec. 6.
Portsmouth.
John Brangwin to Hickes. The Jonathan and Endeavour of Plymouth from Rotterdam with cable yarn and iron, and the Sarah of Plymouth from Portugal with oil, have arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 5.]
Dec. 7.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of the Kings, Heralds, and Pursuivants at Arms to the King, for a command to the Lords Commissioners for the office of Earl Marshal of England, to consider of some expedient for rebuilding the Heralds' Office, near Paul's Wharf, which was burnt down in the great fire, but the records, rolls, and books were, by the diligence of some of the petitioners, rescued and preserved.
The office was given by his Majesty's predecessors to the petitioners, and their successors for ever, as a place for keeping and preserving the records, &c., concerning their faculty, and as a residence or place for meeting, to treat and debate on matters touching the state and government of their corporation. Their faculty and employment, having reference to matters of honour and arms only, is of great concernment to his Majesty's service, and to the nobility and gentry of the kingdom, which will wear out and cease, if the college is not rebuilt. Have neither lands nor revenues belonging to their corporation, enabling them to rebuild, and the time limited by Act of Parliament for rebuilding London has nearly expired.
With reference thereon to the said Lords Commissioners, and the report of the Marquis of Dorchester and Earls of Manchester and Carlisle, that it will cost 5,000l., at a moderate estimation, to rebuild, towards which the petitioners have not any means; so that the inconveniences mentioned in the petition will be inevitable, unless His Majesty's favour is extended, which he can do by commission under the Great Seal, recommending the same to the nobility and gentry, for their voluntary offer and benevolence towards so good and necessary a work. If his Majesty gives an example, they will readily contribute, as it is their own proper concernment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, Nos. 6, 7.]
Dec. 7. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 140.]
Dec. 7.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Hull is free from any disturbance, Hayes and Jekell's business having much discouraged the Nonconformists, who had hopes that the House would have been favourable towards them. Three ships have arrived from Bordeaux with wine and prunes, and 4 from Holland, but with very little goods, the trade being lost in this port; also the late duty on wine hinders two-thirds of the importation of that commodity; to one ship that now comes in, there were three, four years since, for our gentry are all turned ale drinkers. A vessel from Hamburg has had very bad weather at sea, and a flyboat has put into Bridlington Bay, having lost her fore and mizen masts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 8.]
Dec. 7.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. We hear by the Adventure of Plymouth from Dublin, of the loss of the Gift packet-boat, on her passage from Holyhead, when 22 passengers were drowned, amongst whom was Capt. Bulkeley, brother of Lord Bulkeley. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Dec. 7.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I received your letter to-day with Mr. Clifford's; he set sail with Sir Bernard Gascoigne for Calais on Friday, in a London ketch, and arrived there within 4 hours afterwards, as Major Andrews, who went over with them and has since returned, can give an account. It was the same vessel by which, as he formerly wrote you, Lord Crofts was to have carried my lord's two horses, but the master deceived us, and Sir Bernard not being so kind as he might have been, the horses, with Will Cooke, were left behind until further order; the sooner the order comes the better; I will lose no time in transporting them. I will send Squire Clifford's letter after him; he and Sir Bernard Gascoigne's, lay at the post house, where his lordship's horses also are. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 10.]
Dec. 7.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Katherine and the Vine of London with pilchards, and several others, have gone to Kinsale, to wait the coming of the convoy there to victual. The Truelove of London is also loading with pilchards, and will sail with the first fair wind. The Ormond of Dublin from Amsterdam reports that great preparations are being made in Holland for a war with France. The Prosperous of Falmouth, from Norway with timber, reports that the frost has set in there. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Dec. 7. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Dec. 7.
Court at Whitehall.
Proclamation offering 1,000l. reward to any who shall discover any of the 6 persons who on 6 Dec. forced the Duke of Ormond out of his coach, as he was going from St. James's to Clarendon House, set him behind one of them on horseback, and in his endeavour to rescue himself, so wounded him that he now lies languishing of his wounds at Clarendon House. Pardon, and the said sum, to be given to any of the conspirators, if he will declare his whole knowledge of the conspiracy. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 281.]
[Dec. 7.]
Court at Westminster Palace.
Warrant to Sir Thos. Chicheley, Master-General of Ordnance, to pay to David Walter, appointed Lieutenant-General of Ordnance 15 Nov. 1670, 800l. a year and 50l. for a clerk, it being ordered that on the death of the late Col. Wm. Legg, no one person should be both Lieutenant-General and Treasurer and Paymaster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 13.]
Dec. 7. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, p. 64.]
Dec. 7. Commission to Henry Farmer to be ensign in Capt. Walter's company in Col. Russell's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 20.]
Dec. 7. Ph. Edgcumbe to Pepys. I have received a letter from Major [Nath.] Darrell, Governor of Sheerness, who has been to Commissioner Cox and Mr. Pett at Chatham, about the boat which the Duke of York issued a warrant to the Navy Commissioners last August to supply. I brought you a copy of the warrant a fortnight ago, when you promised to order the making of one; I will wait on you to morrow for the warrant. Pray move the Navy Commissioners to hasten the finishing of the boat, as the Governor is much prejudiced for want of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 185.]
Dec. 7.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the Navy Commissioners. I give you a list of sums paid to officers and men named belonging to the Princess and other ships, upon their bills and tickets. The Emsworth sloop has returned for the Thames with Mr. Meadwell, Mr. French, and the remainder of the money; on their arrival in London, they will give an account of their proceedings. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Dec. 7.
Golden Hand, Port Mahon.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letter by Mr. Gibson, and send some indents of issues made since my arrival here. As I have only issued sea stores, this strikes the more dread upon the receivers; my care has been such that I do not question a continuance of your good opinion of me. I have only been able to receive cables, sails, &c., in lieu; particulars of receipts.
I was forced to command 1,500 ells of canvas from the gunner to repair sails, otherwise several ships could not have gone to sea, and the gunners having had several things from me to supply their necessities, I have nothing more left for them. I desire you to desist from sending any more chain plates, bolts, &c.; list of plank and other things in store. All the elm board which came in the Summer Island Merchant was not worth the freight. I want beams for the Golden Hand. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 187.]
Dec. 8.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. All the men of the St. Andrew are paid, save some letters of attorney; also the extra, the ordinary, and the ropeyard; but I had not enough to pay the fireships or the board wages of the pressed men; I fear they will be disorderly if not speedily supplied.
The decks of the Henry must be new laid, but I have no timber to do it, and if not supplied, most of the shipwrights must stand idle. I desire that Mr. Harrington's spruce deals may be received, so that there may be wherewith to keep our men employed. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Dec. 8.
Rochester.
John Stephens to Thos. Hayter. On 21 Sept. 1664 I became security, with Hen. Venman of this town, for Peter Southwood, purser of the Assistance, for the passing of his accounts, in which I was like to have come to some damage through his neglect. As he has however passed his account, and is suddenly bound out again, and as Venman refuses to give me an indemnity promised, I request that Southwood may be forced to put in a new security, as I will stand no longer. I have sent a similar letter to John Marlow of the Navy Office. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Dec. 8. Memorandum that the Summer Island Merchant, commanded by Capt. Nich. Cholwell—having been hired to carry provisions and stores to Port Mahon for the fleet under Sir Thos. Allin, and the Duke of York having appointed the Advice and Guernsey to attend her as convoy, she having to bring over the Princess Henrietta—got into the Downs on 10 May 1670, when she was ordered to Ports mouth to attend the coming of her convoy, where she remained 29 days, according to a certificate produced; and that the demurrage for the same, according to charter party made between Capt. Cholwell and the Navy Commissioners at 7l. a day, amounts to 203l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 190.]
Dec. 8. Account by Fras. Sprigg, for Sir Denis Gauden, of provisions shipped on board the Katherine, Castle, and Boston for the fleet in the Straits, being 140 tons 1 cwt. 1 qr., the freight of which amounts to 595l. 8s. 9d. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Dec. 8. R. Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Asks a warrant directed to Woolwich, for receipt of 5 loads of compass timber from James Buckwell, for the Milford in the dock there. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Dec. 8.
The Welcome, Hope.
Certificate by Capt. John Willgress and 5 other officers of the ship, that she is in a good capacity for sea, that the damage she was reported to have sustained in her stern has been viewed by them and Mr. Shish, his Majesty's builder, and found to be no way prejudicial to her intended voyage, and that she is not more than ordinarily leaky. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Dec. 8.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to Col. Thos. Middleton. I took a pair of oars and went and viewed the Welcome in the Hope, and found the damage not so much as reported, but her leaking continues; if she is pumped dry in the evening, there will be 2 ft. of clear water in the hold in the morning; it is a bad sign of mischief when the water pumped out is clear, for while she lay in the river taking in her provisions, the little water pumped out was very thick and black. There are some of her company at Deptford; I wish you would examine them. I cannot find any neglect in the captain, for since his seamen came, he has taken as much pains and given as good attendance as any I ever knew, and is still willing to lay down his life for the service. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Dec. 8.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to the Navy Commissioners. Pray be mindful of your promise of sending some 4-inch plank from Deptford, it being much wanted. I wish that received had remained there, it being rotten, and not fit for the purpose for which it was demanded. Mr. Mayors has furnished some knees for the lower deck of the Milford, but for harpins, breasthooks, and cheeks for the head, we have not one piece. The yard begins to be very much disfurnished of timber, we having received but one barge load for 4 months; so I beg a speedy supply. [Ibid. No. 195.]
[Dec. 8.] Statement of the case between John Dutton Colt, son of the late George Colt, on the one side, and Thos. Colt, his uncle, and Hen. Hall on the other, showing that by decisions in several courts, it was decreed that the defendants had endeavoured to defraud the plaintiff, by pretending that lands conveyed to Hall in trust for the plaintiff were intended as in trust for Thos. Colt, and restitution was ordered, on which an appeal is made to Parliament. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 14. See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 384.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
[H. Muddiman] to Mr. Worth, collector, Falmouth. News-letter. Dec. 1 the House of Commons resolved that there shall be no land tax raised towards the supply. On 2 Dec. they considered the proposals for supply, viz., subsidies, polls, privy seals, titular honours, 3d. a pound on all commodities not already charged, probate of wills, an imposition on charters, writs, papers, &c. On the 3rd the two committees for regulating the making of cloth were ordered to be joined together and made one, and that for hemp and flax to be revived. After this it was ordered that no member should depart the House between 11 and 12 o'clock without leave, and that the House should be called over on Tuesday week; that meantime a committee should inspect the journals, and consider former proceedings for the punishment of members who absent themselves from the service of the House, and report as to the best way for filling up the House; it then resolved into a grand committee on the supply, and it was ordered that letters patent, charters, grants, writs, and copies of proceedings in the courts of law, both ecclesiastical and civil, be charged with new impositions.
On the 5th, after passing some private bills, the House laid impositions on several processes, licences, &c., and appointed a Committee to inquire what would be raised, and give in an estimate, and to-day the report is to be received.
On the 6th, a bill passed to prevent frauds and abuses by servants, and a bill for settling a maintenance on the London ministry was committed. Also the report was read from the Commissioners for supply, as to charters, grants, &c., but it was not agreed that a dispensation for two livings should cost 10l.
On the 7th the House read a bill against conventicles, and a second reading was ordered, and agreed to, with the report on the supply for charging offices of law; also an imposition was ordered on the proceedings in the Admiralty Court, a Committee to be appointed to inquire what it should be, and what sum it would raise. The Lords also sent down a bill for a general naturalization.
The City of London invited the Prince of Orange to dine with them on the 6th. The Dutch are debating as to a yearly pension for the Prince, but no sum has yet been agreed upon, as some propose 100,000 and others 50,000 guilders a year. Friesland has agreed to the new impositions on French commodities.
Moscow is said to be in great danger, and barricades to have been made about it, to hinder the progress of the rebels.
They write from Venice that the Vizier has many enemies, who represent that he is attempting to gain the soldiers' interest in his favour; but the Grand Seignior still retains him in his service, having such a kindness for him.
The great ships in the dock at Portsmouth and Chatham have been launched, as also one of a smaller rate, and the Henry has been put on the stocks; that greater diligence may be used in fitting out the fleet, the Navy Commissioners have been down to Chatham, and paid the men employed in that service.
The Earl of Newburgh died on the 4th. Several persons who had coined brass and copper pieces for halfpence, having petitioned his Majesty for pardon, and for his acceptance of some moderate fine for the offence, his Majesty ordered in Council that the AttorneyGeneral should stay the prosecution until the Treasury Commissioners had made their report.
Those who offered his Majesty 610,000l. for the Customs are Lord St. John, Sir Rob. Howard, and the two Forths, with who are joined Sir Wm. Bucknall, Sir Jas. Hayes, George Blake, Alderman Brydall, and Messrs. Guy, Hunt, and others.
A proclamation has been issued offering 1,000l. reward for the discovery of the two armed horsemen who made an attempt on the Duke of Ormond, forced him out of his coach, and carried him some distance behind one of them, until the Duke disarmed and dismounted him.
On the Dutch convoy going to Genoa, he was advised to salute the town according to custom, upon which he put out a white flag to treat, which was taken no notice of; after this he went into the new mole, and in the evening was asked again to salute, which he refused, unless they answered gun for gun. The next morning he fired 7 guns and was answered with 5 from the fort, which he thanked with 3, after which the Consul went to the Duke, and told him the salute was not to the city, as supposed, but done on the going ashore of General Wrangel's son, whereupon the captain was again ordered to salute, or go out; but there being a calm, he could not go out till he had one killed, 2 lost their arms, 2 their legs, and 4 others were wounded. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 15.]
Dec. 8.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to Sir Wm. Sharp of Stonyhill, to be receiver-general of the supply of 360,000l. Scots granted to the King by the late Parliament of Scotland, he receiving 300l. sterling as his salary, and also the sums of money readily advanced by him on his own credit for the King's service. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 34.]
Dec. 9.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin to Hickes. I send the names of 3 ships arrived since I wrote last, viz., the Constant Katherine, of London, with sugar from Barbadoes, the Peter of Plymouth, with linen cloth from St. Malo, and the Polebear merchant of Brighton, from Bristol for London, with iron, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 16.]
Dec. 9. Warrant to Thos. Cheek to take away the gamekeeper of Hamfields near Kingston, and appoint another fit person in his place. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 65.]
Dec. 9. The petition of Mrs. Legg, for payment of a pension of 500l. a year, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 140.]
Dec. 10.
London.
Sir Thos. Bludworth to Sir Jer. Smith. I beg the discharge of Fras. Stint, a carpenter, who has been pressed for the yard at Deptford, where he has served 5 or 6 weeks. I know him to be but a weakly fellow; he is foreman to my father-in-law, a boat builder, who suffers greatly by his absence, and is in danger of losing his trade, which will ruin several families. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 196.]
Dec. 10.
Chatham.
John Brooke and Edw. Homewood to [the Navy Commissioners]. The greater part of Mr. Smith's contract has been completed by the delivery of the blocks, pumps, tops, &c., and there are only the small blocks, trucks, &c., undelivered. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Dec. 10. Warrant for a lease to John Smith for 30 years, on expiration of the lease to Sir John Meldrum, of which the said Smith now holds the interest, of the lighthouses on North and South Foreland, Kent, at the former rent of 20l., the Duke of York reporting his service to the Crown during the late wars, his care in improvement of the Forest of Dean, and the necessity of the lighthouses for the safety of ships. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 186.]
Dec. 10. Dispensation of residence for John Bradbourne, High Sheriff of cos. Cambridge and Huntingdon. Minute. [Ibid. f. 187.]
Dec. 10. Privy seal for 100l. to the poor of St. Martin's for their relief. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 64.]
Dec. [10.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 270.]
Dec. 10. The King to the President and Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford. We recommend Thos. Cradock for one of the fellowships now void in your college. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 11.]
Dec. 10. Petition of Capt. Thos. Kingsley to the King, for a mandamus for his son, for a fellowship in Magdalen College, Oxford, in which he is a demy; was 11 times imprisoned in service of the late King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 17.]
Dec. 10. The King to [the President, &c., of Magdalen College, Oxford]. We recommend for the next vacant fellowship the son of Thos. Kingsley, who faithfully served the late King in the wars, suffered many and great imprisonments, and has not yet been any way considered. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 11.]
Dec. 10. Notice [to the clerk of the Caveats] that his Majesty having given to Sir Jno. Reresby and Edw. Progers his right to the estate forfeited through — Bromley cutting his throat in Brinson Manor, co. York, he is to enter a caveat to that purpose, so that no other pass anything to their prejudice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 18.]
Dec. 10. Sir Geo. Downing to Williamson. The Treasury Commissioners desire you to insert in Monday's Gazette that the bidding for farming the Excise, appointed by them for 12 Dec, has been put off by them to 13 Feb. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Dec. 10.
Portsmouth.
Col. Walter Slingsby to Henry Brouncker, at his Majesty's backstairs, or the porter's lodge, Whitehall. I have received into my charge a great quantity of naval stores; the trust being great, the care and diligence must be proportionable, but the profits will be nothing for months. I am allowed a house, but it has only bare walls, and wants furnishing, and my family must have bread. If I fail in my duty, I shall quickly suffer. Lord Arlington has this opportunity to oblige a whole family, and 100l. from his Majesty would fix me in a position never to trouble him again. I am in mourning for my brother, being the last of eight loyal men left to crave this boon from his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 20.]
Dec. 10.
Post Office.
—O'Neale to Williamson. I am sorry to find by many observations that what you told Father Patrick, as to the miscarriage of your foreign letters, reflects unjustly upon my credit. I am much wronged, as is also the memory of my dead friend [Dan.] O'Neale who, when I was less capable, thought me not unfit to bear a particular share of his Majesty and Lord Arlington's concerns in the office. I must confess I have been very remiss, but not without some excuse. I crave pardon for it. Pray disabuse his lordship's mind of anything to my disadvantage. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Dec. 11. Warrant for Mrs. Price to be taken into custody by Thos. Dixon, messenger, and no person to speak to her except in his presence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 65.]
Dec. 11. Warrant to — Buxton to apprehend Thos. Hunt, — Ayliffe, — Hollyway, and [Sam.] Holmes, suspected with others of the late assassinate on the Duke of Ormond. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12. Warrant to John Bradley, messenger, to apprehend Thos. Hurst and Mary his wife. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12. Like warrant for apprehending Thos. Grantam. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12. Warrant to Wilson, the messenger, to apprehend Sam. Holmes, and convey him to the Gatehouse. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12. Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse to receive Holmes close prisoner, as supposed to be accessory to a late attempt on the Duke of Ormond. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12.
London.
Sir Rich. Ford, Lord Mayor, to Pepys. The bearer, Mr. Exton, having a bill of exchange upon the Navy Commissioners, for money furnished for the use of the Navy at Leghorn—he being a person that deserves well of his Majesty, and has done good offices in the Admiralty, in affairs in which you and I have been concerned—I recommend him for the acceptance and timely payment of his bill. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 198.]
Dec. 12. The petition of the Earl of Bridgewater, for payment of 5,000l. in consideration of 9,000l. lent to Charles I., referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 141.]
Dec. 12. Like reference of the petition of — Lane for the fee-farm rents of Staffordshire. [Ibid.]
Dec. 12. The petition of the inhabitants of Greenwich, for a market and incorporation, referred to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, f. 141.]
Dec. 12.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Thos. Wrightson, M.A., to the King, for a presentation to the rectory of Kirkheaton, in the county of York. With reference thereon to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, and his report in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 22.]
Dec. 13.
Hull.
Capt. Thos. Bennet to Lord Arlington. The great storms having taken away a great part of the jetty on which the fort stands, under the south blockhouse, I desired Mr. Hardy to view it, who has placed some anchors and boards to prevent further damage; but if there is more foul weather, and it is not repaired, it will jeopardise the fort. I presume it belongs to the town, and intend writing to the corporation, and will send their answer; but I am informed that their right to repair it will be disputed, because the pressure of the fort is partly the cause of it. I beg your lordship to write to the magistrates about it. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Dec. 13. Information of Thos. Peachy. Hen. Davis, formerly one of the guards in the Queen's troop, having shown particular kindness to the informant's brother, while he was ill of a wound received from the Earl of Rochester's servant, of which he died, the informant, in return for his kindness, presented him with a sword, which he believes to be the same as was taken from the attempted assassin of the Duke of Ormond, and is deposited in Clarendon House; but the carbine also taken is not the one that Davis was in the habit of borrowing of the informant. Went to Davis' lodgings in a lane near the Haymarket against Leicester Fields, but found he was in the country. The woman of the house said he had sent for some linen. [In Williamson's handwriting. Ibid. No. 24.]
[Dec. 13.] Statement of the case of John Digby, of Hanslope Park, co. Bucks, on whom his late father, Sir Kenelm Digby, engaged to settle 3,000l. or 4,000l. a year, on his marriage with Lady Catherine Howard; but the property being left in trust to Chas. Cornwallis, now Member of Parliament, he has employed it to his own profit, and a bill is filed in Chancery against him, but stayed during the session of Parliament. Mr. Digby requests that it may be allowed to proceed. With note that [Cornwallis] has concealed from Digby concerns to the value of many thousand pounds relating to his father's estate, which would have been totally lost but for his Majesty's favour therein. [Ibid. No. 25. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 182.]
[Dec. 13.] Copy of the above, without the note. [Printed. Ibid. No. 26.]
Dec. 13. Grant to John Crewe of exemption from the shrievalty of the county of Chester, as granted to his late father, John Crewe, whom he has succeeded in his office of bailiff of the Forest of Delamere, county palatine of Chester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 187.]
Dec. 13. Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse to permit Mrs. Holmes to have access to her husband, and bring him necessaries during his imprisonment, in presence of his keeper. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 65.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Carter, King's messenger, to apprehend [Thos.] Sunderland, and bring him before a Secretary of State. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 13. Robert Foley to the Navy Commissioners. As my occasions require my being more frequently in the country than in London, I have appointed Thos. Winchurst the elder, ironmonger of London, to manage all my business as ironmonger to the Navy. I agree to abide by and make good all contracts or agreements made or to be made by him in my name and on my account. I desire you to order the storekeepers and clerks of the cheque at the several yards to make out all bills for goods served in on my account in Winchurst's name until further orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 199.]
Dec. 13.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. I received the bill of imprest for 168l., which you promised to pay upon its return signed by me, and which I sent by post, and ordered the money to be paid at London, to Mr. Grimes, master of the Custom House at Hull. Pray get order for its payment, as I am in great trouble for want of it to pay the workmen, who are at me every day for it. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Dec. 13.
The Welcome, Hope.
Capt. John Willgress to the Navy Commissioners. I arrived on board on Monday, and found all things in good order, the ship making between five and six inches of water in nine hours; I judge her leak to be between wind and water. John Martin, the pilot, has come on board, and we intend the first opportunity to bring her up to Woolwich. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Dec. 13. Request by Commissioner John Cox that Thos. Smith, master of the William and Katherine of Ramsgate, living at Bear Quay, London, may be sent for, as he took up an anchor and cable near Gillingham. Noted that a warrant was made out to Mr. Marlow to summon him. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Dec. 14.
London.
Sir John Frederick to Pepys. When I was with you yesterday, I supposed I had the copy of the King's order for the delivery of the Punny to me or my agents in Spain, but I cannot find it, and suppose I left it in your office, when I had the order for her appraisement. I refer to Secretary Wren for the truth of what I assert, that she ought to have been delivered there; we can produce letters that our agent at Cadiz, Mr. Duncan, demanded her of Lord Howard, and that his refusing was above 200l. prejudice to us, in regard to the condition she was in when retaken from the enemy, and to the 100l. freight we could have made of her homeward; but she came home laden either in the King or his lordship's service. As to her worth when delivered to me by the Commissioners, she was only valued at 150l., out of which I paid the eighth part as salvage; I hope this will satisfy the Commissioners that I have nothing to do with any charge laid out upon her by his lordship for the King's use. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 203.]
Dec. 14.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Pepys. I have prepared for the docking of the Welcome; as her sheathing has been on some years, there may be some butts and seams open underneath, which may be the cause of her leaking; if so, it will be convenient to strip it all off and calk her, and then search if she is not iron sick, like the Ruby now in dock, whose rider bolts, formerly 1¼ inch thick, are eaten away by rust to quarter of an inch, the spikes under water to the bigness of a straw, and the nails so eaten that a man may pull them out with his finger and thumb.
After the Welcome is docked, all her guns, provisions, and ballast should be taken out, and 6 or 7 feet of water let into her hold; as where the water gets in, it will find a vent out. If I am forced to shift the sheathing, you must order 3,000 feet from Deptford, and 30,000 tenpenny sheathing nails. I will hasten the Milford, but I found her so defective that I admire she did not make a hole when in the sea, and a grave for her men. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 204.]
[Dec. 14.] Account of the case of Rob. and Mary Pelham, and John and Mary Still, the two women being heirs of Ezra Shirley, in an appeal to the House of Lords by Rob. Pitt, who has bought from others their interest in certain lands left them by Ezra Shirley, and wishes to compel them to convey the land to him. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 27. See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 389.]
Dec. 14. Warrant to Thos. Woodhouse, King's messenger, to take into his custody Thos. Sunderland, for having in some discourse justified the attempt to assassinate the Duke of Ormond, or at least declared the persons that encouraged the assassins to be as good men as the Duke. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 65.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Carter, messenger, to apprehend Hen. Davis, and bring him before a Secretary of State. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 14.
London.
Certificate by Law. Martel, and 18 other merchants and inhabitants of the City of London, that Isaac Delamere, Wm. Fletcher, and Wm. de Senne are merchants formerly residing in London, and persons of credit, and left London for Rye, intending to embark for Dieppe; but on arriving at Hastings, the vessel they intended sailing by had departed, whereupon they were seized and imprisoned, on suspicion of being concerned in the barbarous attempt made on the Duke of Ormond. With a note by Rob. Packer that Fletcher is sent to France by him, and is not a dangerous person. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 28.] Annexing,
Mayor and jurats of Hastings to the Lieutenant of Dover Castle. We have secured the persons above named, and been informed by Peter Boitott, also a merchant of Dieppe, that Delamere and de Senne are also merchants and inhabitants of Dieppe, and Fletcher, a citizen and stationer of London; but as our orders will not admit of any such excuse, we desire that an investigation may be made with all expedition, and that we may be reimbursed the expense to which we have been put, in securing and keeping the prisoners, as the town will not bear any of it.—Hastings, 11 Dec. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 28i.]
Dec. 14.
Brooke House.
Geo. Thomson and 7 other [Commissioners of Accounts] to Wm. Wardour, Clerk of the Pells. We repeat our application of 19 Oct., for an account of all sums of money received and issued at the receipt of the Exchequer upon the Additional Aid and Poll Bill, since your last account. Endorsed with a note by Wardour to Mr. Taylor, to get it fairly written out by Friday.—Chiswick, 15 Dec. 1670. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Dec. 14.
Letter Office, London.
James Hickes to Lord Arlington. I send by Mr. Ellis a copy of a petition presented to your lordship in July 1669, to be laid before the King, when you ordered it to be deposited with Mr. Williamson until an opportunity offered for presenting it. I have since often moved Williamson, but have received no hopes of attaining anything, unless I fix upon some place in the Customs, to which I am a stranger, and the reversion of which would be but of small value to me, considering I cannot long continue in strength to work.
Having spent over 30 years in the service of the Post Office, and only gained a daily subsistence, and but small means for the future support of my wife and family, should I lose my health and strength or be dismissed, I beg you to present my petition to his Majesty, and use your interest for obtaining effect to the prayer of it. [Ibid. No. 30.] Annexing,
Petition of James Hickes to the King, for such compensation for his services and sufferings in the work of the Post Office as will support himself and wife in their old age, he being now nearly 60, and not having gained anything, but weakness and severe distempers, by his assiduity and daily attendance. Has been a member of the office 30 years, and managed the Chester road in the said office in London from 1640 to 1643, during which time he carried his Majesty's foreign letters and packets to Oxford, at the hazard of his life; has since had frequent laborious journeys, and other duties and correspondence in connexion with settling and improving the office, which was formerly a charge upon the Crown.
Was committed to prison in 1643 by Miles Corbet, the traitor, and in danger of being tried for his life, for holding correspondence with Secretary Nicholas; but escaping to Oxford, was employed in several expeditions of trust by both the principal Secretaries of State, and settled by his Majesty's warrant at Weymouth, to manage two packetboats for conveyance of his despatches to and from foreign parts. Was the only member who did not withdraw from the office during the sickness, when between 20 and 30 of them died; but continued to despatch the business and preserve the revenue, thereby exposing his wife and children to the charity of others, himself to great danger, and his small fortune to an utter diminution. [2 copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, Nos. 30i, 30ii.]
Dec. 14. Like petition to Lord Arlington to similar effect, requesting for himself and his son the first land waiter's place in the port of London, or the searcher's place there or at Gravesend. [Ibid. No. 31.]
[Dec. 14.] Account of the services done by James Hickes since the first conveyance of letters by post in 1637. The first letter by post from Nantwich in Cheshire was sent by him, and he continued settling the conveyance of letters by post until Sept. 1640, when he was sent for by Philip Burlamachi, to manage the whole road to Chester, and afford assistance in other branches at the Letter Office in London. In Aug. 1642, settled post stages between Bristol and York, as will appear by Sir Edw. Nicholas's commission for that date; and from the time of the fight at Edgehill until the April following, carried his Majesty's foreign letters from London to Oxford, to the great hazard of his life, being often taken by the enemy, yet never surprised to the loss of one letter. Was apprehended and committed to prison by Miles Corbet, for corresponding with Sir Edw. Nicholas, they having intercepted his letters, and should have been tried for his life; but being admitted to bail, escaped to Oxford, and did his Majesty that service which no other clerk ever did, or hazarded his life to do.
In 1643, was employed by George, Lord Digby, and Sir Edw. Nicholas, to settle post stages in the West of England, from whence his Majesty had a weekly correspondence; was by his late Majesty's warrant of 28 Jan. 1644 commanded to Weymouth, to manage two packet-boats, and take care of the King's letters to and from his ministers in foreign parts, which came by way of Cherburg in Normandy.
In these and other services, and by the loss of employment for 7 or 8 years, expended and was damnified to the value of 1,500l., for which he has received no consideration, and has sustained loss and damage by the death of his father, who was one of the first to take up arms under the old Earl of Northampton, and was killed at Edgehill in his 70th year. Is weakened in purse, and afflicted in health by many violent distempers, yet prays God may spare him to see his Majesty peaceably established through all his dominions, and blessed with victory over all his enemies. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Dec. 14.
Thetford.
Rich. Lincoln to Williamson. Can you procure us an order from the Privy Council, to put a stop to vexatious suits against some of the tenants of Pulham Manor, Norfolk, and settlement of our rights, as we shall not mind 20 or 30 pieces to obtain quiet possession ? The lordship, with the demesnes thereto belonging, is of the value of 180l. a year which, with a yearly rent of 100l. due to the Master of the Greencloth, is paid by the tenants. It will appear by an order of Council enclosed, that the manor was purchased from the Crown for a certain fine, which broke former customs, by forcing many poor tenants to pay an additional fine, and others to en franchise their lands, whereby they raised up their purchase money; some tenants who were rich, namely one Sir Peter Gleave, have never paid any fine, but tendered the customary fine, which is only 8d. per acre, and so were never meddled with. I have copyhold land value 20l. a year, held of the said manor, which I took up 4 years since, and tendered the customary fine, but it being refused, proceedings in ejectment were taken against me, and in a trial at the Thetford assizes, before the late Judge [Wadham] Windham, I obtained a verdict; after this they commenced a suit in the Exchequer, when another trial was ordered, and being held at Norwich before Lord Chief Baron Hales and a special jury of squires and gentlemen of worth, I obtained another verdict, since which they have been quiet for a year, but have lately commenced sequestering some of the weak-spirited men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 33.]
Dec. 14.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The St. Christopher of Rochelle has arrived from Guadaloupe, with sugar and tobacco for Dunkirk. She has come in for a pilot, belongs to the Royal Company of France, and is the vessel that carried the French King's orders to the Governor of St. Christophers, for delivering over that part of the island which before the wars was in possession of the English, on condition that the English repay to the French the charges laid out upon several plantations; but it is expected that they will be too unreasonable, and many of the English have settled in other plantations. They say there was a hurricane there on 17 Aug., when 2 or 3 ships were lost. Their cargo is supposed to be damaged, as they have entered a protest here against the sea.
The Katherine of Falmouth has also come in from Bordeaux, with wine and prunes bound for Topsham, and reports that she came out with 40 others, but was parted from them in a storm; that they talk there of a war with Holland next March, and that the English will stand by them against the Dutch; that the French are fitting out a fleet of 100 men-of-war for the spring, some of which are to carry from 80 to 100 guns, and that they have a great army already in arms; that very few Dutch ships are at Bordeaux, and that there have been less this year than formerly; also that the new river in Languedoc has only a league to be completed, which is to be done speedily. The Truelove has gone into the road with pilchards, bound for the Straits, and will sail to Plymouth for the convoy. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 34.]
Dec. 14. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 35.]
Dec. 14.
Pendennis Castle.
Fras. Bellott to [Perrott]. The St. Christopher of Rochelle, belonging to the Royal West India Company of France, has come in from Guadaloupe bound for Dunkirk; also 2 or 3 others for Guinea and Ireland. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Dec. 14.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Lilyrose, Prosperous, and Jane of Lyme have arrived from Morlaix. They came out with several others belonging to Topsham, Plymouth, and Looe, and report that the French King will be very formidable by sea and land next spring, but that a good understanding exists between him and the Dutch; also that he has taken all mills drawn by water belonging to his subjects into his own hands, as grand lord of the royalty, to their prejudice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 37.]
Dec. 14.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. I hear that 30s. a wey has been laid by Parliament upon all foreign salt to be imported, but do not hear of any duty upon that made within the kingdom; the duty being upon one and not the other will ruin many, and undo all who make salt upon salt. The matter was considered in the late times, when the same duty was laid upon foreign salt, but they also imposed 15s. a wey upon that made in England without salt, and 7s. 6d. upon that made with it, for the reason that all salt made in England is either made of salt water alone, or foreign salt dissolved into salt water, and both boiled until it turns into salt. Those who make it of sea water have salt wells, and reside at Newcastle, Sunderland, and in inland counties, where coals are of little worth. But others who have not that benefit are forced to melt foreign salt to strengthen the sea water before boiling, otherwise their coals would stand them in as much as they could sell their salt for. I informed you of this when in London the last session, when some papers relating to it were delivered to the House. I hope Capt. Clarke will have a hearing on his business. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Dec. 15.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. There are here about 14 sail under Sir Wm. Jennings, bound for the Straits, 16 to other ports in Virginia and the West Indies, and 12 sail of Dutch, with two convoys, bound for Spain, one of which has on board the Dutch Ambassador who is going for Madrid, and who came on shore to-day, attended by the masters of the ships. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Dec. 15.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The Neptune of London has arrived from Barbadoes with sugar, having left some negroes there which she brought from Guinea. She came out with the Royal Katherine, and Bendish of London, and the Golden Falcon, the Boston Merchant, and another of Plymouth, bound for Ireland, but they were separated by a storm, and it is feared some of them have been wrecked. Barbadoes is in a very healthful and flourishing condition. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Dec. 15.
Leghorn.
Capt. Wm. Poole to the Navy Commissioners. I have been detained 9 days, instead of 3 as I expected, with bad weather, so that I could not take in 3 months' victuals for each ship, but hope, if the weather continues fine, to do it to-day, and be ready to sail the day after to-morrow. The ships that are to go with me for Naples, Messina, Venice, and Gallipoli are the Bantam, Bermudas Merchant, John and Thomas, Florentine, Society, and Guinea.
Sir John Harman arrived yesterday from Zante, with the Dartmouth and fireship; he only left Capt. May there with the Golden Fleece, but says the ships from Venice will be there, and ready to sail, by the time I arrive. A vessel from Algiers advises that there are only 8 of their frigates at sea, and that 4 more were fitting, but 2 of them were laid up for want of masts, and other sea stores; also that they cannot get their soldiers to embark, as the biggest of those abroad have not above 200 men on board. I much want a cable, but could not get it at Port Mahon, because they said I was bound home, notwithstanding I have a whole winter's voyage in hand, and am sure to meet with as bad roadsteads as anywhere. My cable broke twice in this road, yet I am unwilling to make one here if I can make any shift. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 205.]
Dec. 15. Deposition of Thos. Smith, master, and 3 other seamen of the William and Katherine pink of Ramsgate, before Thos. Aleyn, Mayor, that upon weighing their anchor in the Medway in March last, a piece of junk of 30 or 40 feet came up on the fluke thereof, which they took into their vessel, and on their arrival at Ramsgate, gave notice to the Lord Warden's deputy, who considering it of little worth, would not take any notice of it. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Dec. 16.
The Newcastle, Kinsale.
Capt. Ant. Langston to the Navy Commissioners. I made a survey of the provisions lying here to his Majesty's damage, and enclose a copy, by which you may perceive that the beef is past help, and the pork and beer not good; but being desirous to save expense, I have completed 5 weeks' provisions out of it; as it is winter time, I hope it will be spent before it is worse. [Ibid. No. 207.] Enclosing,
Certificate by Lan. Wright, and 2 others, that by virtue of a warrant from Capt. Ant. Langston, they went ashore to the victualling office at Kinsale, to survey the provisions there ordered for the Newcastle and Dragon, and found the beer reasonably good, and the pork very rusty, but both fit for present spending; the beef was not fit to be spent; the peas and butter were very good.—5 Dec. 1670. [Ibid. No. 207i.]
Dec. 16.
The Newcastle, Kinsale.
Capt. Ant. Langston to Mat. Wren. To the same effect. My purser being absent, and the ship utterly unprovided either with wood or candles, I have been forced to procure them, as well as deals and nails, although I know not where to be reimbursed, as a bill for 1l. on the victualler here is not worth 3d. a pound. No man could be more strict with his officers than I have been, but I was slenderly provided at Plymouth, and little occasions happening daily, all was expended, and I am now detained by contrary winds and bad weather.
I send a list of our convoy, and of those we found here, by which I doubt if the merchants that moved his Royal Highness for the convoy truly represented the value of their trade; my charges will nearly amount to the worth of their cargoes, which is the nearest way to make the merchants rich, and his Majesty poor. [Ibid. No. 208.] Enclosing,
Names of 12 ships and of their masters, with particulars of the places to which they are bound, their tonnage, and their number of men and guns. [Ibid. No. 208i.]
Copy of the preceding letter, and 2 copies of its enclosure. [Ibid. No. 208ii–208iv.]
Dec. 16.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. The Treasury Commissioners desire to know if you have met about adjusting the matter about the ship Leopard; if not, they request that you will meet and send a report. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 209.]
Dec. 16. Warrant to Thos. Woodhouse, messenger, to set Hugh (sic) Sunderland at liberty. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 65.]
Dec. 16. Warrant to — Wotley to apprehend — Ungar, pewterer of Whitechapel, and — Bridges, lodger at his house, and bring them before Lord Arlington. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 16.
Court at Whitehall.
Approval by the King of Wm. Blackett as deputy-lieutenant for Newcastle-on-Tyne, and of Ralph Grey, Edw. Widdrington, and Thos. Forster for Northumberland; the Duke of Newcastle and Earl Ogle to issue their deputations accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 20.]
Dec. 16.
Hull.
Capt. Thos. Bennet to Col. Gilby, M.P., Westminster. The Mayor and aldermen have surveyed the jetty, but pretend they have no right to repair it. There is another great breach on the Holderness side, which I have desired Sir Edw. Bernard to see to, and report to the Commissioners, as if it is not repaired, the South house will be an island. Pray acquaint Lord Arlington with this; but I suppose they will write my lord about it. Endorsed with a draft by Williamson of a proposed letter from the King to the Mayor, aldermen, &c., of Kingston-upon-Hull thereon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 41. See p. 587, infra.]
Dec. 16.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. The shallop which carried the two horses sent by Lord Arlington to Marshal de Bellefonds has arrived; I will send an account of the freight and other charges. Sieur [Van] Beuningen has sailed for Holland, and two sons of Lord Howard have arrived from Calais, and gone for London. The 3 persons arrested on suspicion of having attacked my Lord of Ormond are known to a merchant of the town as respectable people. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Dec. 16.
Plymouth.
John Brangwin to Hickes. The wind being contrary, very few ships have come in of late. With list of ships arrived, viz., the Morlaix Merchant of Plymouth, from Morlaix, with dowlas; the Diligence of Fowey, with salt from Croisic; the Ormond Merchant of Topsham, from Amsterdam for Dublin, and the William of Plymouth, from Barbadoes with sugar. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Dec. 16. The petition of George Lord Berkeley—conceiving that he is not ranked according to his right in all public places and assemblies, and desiring his Majesty's favour to restore him—referred to the House of Lords. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 142.]
Dec. 17. John Fowler to Williamson. Please to insert an advertisement enclosed in the next Monday's Gazette, and I will pay the duties. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 44.]
Dec. 17.
Chester.
Dr. Allan Pennington to Williamson. I have long desired a line concerning his Majesty's leave to refine silver in North Wales, as also whether a mandate could be procured directed to Cambridge, to admit Andrew Mathews, formerly of St. John's, as an M.A. Mr. Garner, a late patient of mine and a relation of your lord, promised to mind you of these things; let me have an answer, as I have something more to impart of greater moment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 45.]
Dec. 17.
Dublin.
Phil. Frowde [son of Sir Phil. Frowde] to Williamson. The enclosed is all the news, save that all our duellists, except Slaughter who was killed, and Capt. Fitzgerald who keeps his chamber, are out of danger, and abroad. They have given bail to appear when called to their trial. Four posts are due, and the wind is as contrary as ever, so that it is a long time since we had any letters from England. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
The King to the Attorney-General. Edw. Lewis has stated in a petition that his mother, intermarrying with the Duke of Richmond, left his estates to be managed by Edmund Lewis, his guardian, who refused to give any account thereof, pretending to have accounted to the late Duchess; but Caradock Butler, a minister, has since, from remorse of conscience, confessed that he forged the name of the late Duchess of Richmond to the pretended releases. Edmund Lewis, being powerful in the country, on discovery of the forgery, compelled Butler to fly his benefice. We order a pardon for Butler, at request of Edw. Lewis, that his evidence may be used against Edmund Lewis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 47.]
Dec. 17.
Dublin.
Peter Bronsdon to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of 22 Nov., but had much to do to read it, as it got very wet by the packet-boat being cast away; I understand you are about contracting with Sir Frescheville Holles, in which I will not be wanting to serve you. I have viewed the woods at Coleraine, and think there may be 1,000 loads of good knee and compass timber, with standards, and some very good timber for plank and treenails.
I discoursed with Col. Young and Capt. Jackson, put to look after the woods by the City of London, as to the price and method of hewing and transporting; they informed me that the compass timber will be 1s. per ton in the woods, as the tenants pay, but that they cannot set any price on the strait timber without liberty from the City of London; for the manner of felling, hewing, and transporting, it is by the dozen pieces, and not by the load, which they did not understand. I find that there are 3 loads in a dozen pieces, and that the felling and hewing will be 12s., the land carriage to the lough side and drawing it over the leaps 18s., the water carriage down the river Bann 8s., and sending it from thence to the Lough of Derry or Portrush—the places where ships above 8 ft. of water must ride to load—10s., making in all 48s. for 3 loads of timber shipped on board. Felling, squaring, and sawing 3 or 4-inch plank is 6s. per 100 ft., and for drawing it to the lough side and over the leaps 6s., carrying it down the Bann to Coleraine 4s., and from thence and shipping it at Portrush or the Lough of Derry 4s., making in all 20s.
The making of treenails of from 2 ft. to 3 ft. is 16s. per 1,000, and carrying them down the Bann 10s., and from thence aboard the vessel 4s., in all 30s. I cannot hear anything about the freight, as there is no shipping there. I shall go southward as soon as I can, and be ready to wait on Sir Frescheville Holles. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 210.]
Dec. 17. Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. The Boston Merchant, commanded by Capt. Peter Lunt, taken up to carry provisions to the fleet in the Straits, had all her provisions on board on the 10th instant, and the commander his imprest money and sailing orders last Tuesday; yet the ship has got no further than Gravesend, although the wind has been fair to carry her to the Downs. I acquaint you with this, that order may be taken with the said commander, and I may be freed from blame. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Dec. 18.
The St. Andrew.
Capt. Will. Davies to the Navy Commissioners. I have 30 tons of ballast in, and hope to get the rest to-day and sail to-morrow, as the master and pilot are on board. Let me know whether I may sail without further orders, which I am unwilling to do, it being necessary for a couple of vessels to wait on us down. I also need an order enabling me to command men from the yard to assist us down, should we want them. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Dec. 18.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Upwards of 30 ships have arrived from the Straits, under convoy of 2 Dutch men-of-war. Six ships were carried by the back of the Goodwin for London, by 6 Dover pilots, to avoid the press in the Downs; which Sir Wm. Jennings hearing of, he now rides singly a league to the southward of all the other ships, so as to command them if any others shall attempt to go that way. A ship from New England reports that colony to be very quiet. About 60 sail are in the Downs outward bound. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 47.]
Dec. 18.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Hickes. The Vrede of Hamburg, from St. Lucar with salt, has been forced in by contrary winds, and is repairing her leaks, having been damaged at sea. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Dec. 18.
Ingleton.
Ant. Bouch to Williamson. Having been appointed sheriff of Cumberland, and being aged and not able to travel, I beg a license to live at my residence at Ingleton in Yorkshire. I desired my cousin Duckett to inform you that I would part with my advowson of Bentham, worth 200l. a year, void by death of my brother Lowther, and would rather that you had it than any other. [Ibid. No. 49. See 20 Dec., p. 588, infra.]
Dec. 19.
Monday.
Order in the House of Commons—on information given of a great scandal and reflection upon the honour and justice of the House, by several persons, shopkeepers, tradesmen, and others, sheltering themselves under the colour of protections of Parliament privilege, against the due course of law, to evade satisfaction of their just debts—that no members shall grant any protection but to their menial servants, and that all others shall be withdrawn. That protections and written certificates of members be declared void in law, and be also withdrawn and called in, and none granted for the future; that the privilege of members for their menial servants be observed according to law, and that if any menial servant be arrested and detained contrary to privilege, he shall upon complaint be discharged by order from the Speaker.
Order that these votes be printed and set up at the Exchange, Westminster Hall Gate, Guildhall, the Compters, and other public places, that all persons concerned may take notice. [Printed. 2 copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, Nos. 50, 51.]
Dec. 19.
Bodney.
Jo. Tasburgh to Williamson. Burrage Martin, thinking I have some interest with you, has solicited me to use it for his son's success at Cambridge, and to intreat you to prevail with Lord Arlington, so that no new affront may be put on his son. I send an abstract of Martin's own letter, and join with him in hoping the mandamus will be made as effectual as was intended, whereby you will be eased of much pain, and Martin of distress. I hope you will not forget my former solicitations. I am going to dine with Sir Harry Bedingfield. [Ibid. No. 52.] Encloses,
[Burrage Martin to Jo. Tasburgh.] My son delivered the mandamus to the Master of Pembroke Hall [Dr. Rob. Mapletoft], who promised to communicate with his Fellows and then give an answer; but instead of doing so, he has privately gone for London to prevail, as Dr. Boldero conceives, with the Archbishop of Canterbury to go to Lord Arlington to recall the mandate. Pray write to Mr. Williamson to induce Lord Arlington to have it obeyed, and not taken off by false suggestions and assertions, as was the other to Bennet's College, the Master whereof coming off so well makes others as obstinate as himself; otherwise my son will be ashamed to appear in the University. [Ibid. No. 52i.]
Dec. 19.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. A barque of Lyme, from Croisic with salt, has been cast away at Bridport Creek, and two of her men drowned. She came out with two others, who are also supposed to be lost. The Success of London, bound for Galloway, has come in through stress of weather. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Dec. 19.
Yarmouth.
Rich, Bower to Williamson. A pink of Yarmouth has sailed with pilchards for the Straits; another vessel of Lyme has arrived from Lisbon with fruit; 3 others are in the roads bound for Rochelle, and a Frenchman is in the haven, with herrings for the Straits. It is much admired how Capt. Clarke has frightened the Nonconformists to church, by stirring in the business about the conventicles, insomuch that the most eminent and head of the party now duly come. I beg your interest to procure the captain a hearing, as it will bring out things of greater consequence than is imagined, and will so discourage them and their confederates that they will not dare to resort together again; but should he not prevail, the additional Act against conventicles will signify nothing, as no man will be so mad as to concern himself to get the ill-will of his neighbours, and be slighted for his trouble and charge. I doubt not Sir Wm. Doyley is using all his interest to prevent Clarke having a hearing. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Dec. 19. Warrant to Lord Chief Justice Kelynge to order the liberation of Fras. Thompson, convicted at the Old Bailey of felony and manslaughter, for which he has received other penalties, the King dispensing with the 4 months' committal to Newgate to which he was sentenced. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 48.]
Dec. 19. Privy seal for 1,500l. to Viscount Mandeville, as the King's free gift. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 66.]
Dec. [19.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 252.]
Dec. 19. Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. Not having received any money, nor assurance when it might be expected, so as to enable me to go in hand with providing and saving the victuals required by the declaration, it has made me forbear giving any trouble concerning the distribution of it; but as you again desire my opinion about it, I beg to say that if your account of the distribution be suitable to the service, of which you are the best judges, I will conform to it, if I am not disabled for want of a timely supply of money, without which I cannot proceed. Unless some speedy course is taken therein, the season for providing pork and other things for the victualling will be wholly over, and the time too strait to provide the remainder. I can neither supply the Adventure nor Milford with the victuals required, without present money.
The distribution above referred to is to supply London with sufficient for 17,000 men, Portsmouth for 6,000, Dover for 1,300, Plymouth for 500, and Kinsale for 200; making together 25,000 men, all for 8 months. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 213.]
Dec. 19.
Deptford.
John Shish to Thos. Hayter. I desire that 6 sheets of copper, of the lesser size, may be sent down for the despatch of our business, as there is none to be had of the larger size. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Dec. 19.
Chatham Dock.
Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I received your warrant for sheathing and fitting the Friezland flyboat for sea. The Leopard is coming into the dock, and wants sheathing, but we have no sheathing nails. I desire you to send some, as also some candles, grindstones, and other things formerly demanded, as we are almost at a standstill for want of them. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Dec. 20. Sir George Downing to Pepys. You are to send the Treasury Commissioners a copy of the order in Council of 21 Feb. 1665, by which interest is payable on several Navy debts, and certify what they amount to, as the Navy privy seal is stopped for want thereof. Noted that the bills for stores, upon which interest was so allowed, amount to 2,196l. 14s. 2d. [Ibid. No. 216.]
Dec. 20.
Dublin.
Peter Bronsdon to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of 22 Nov., and sent you one the night I came from Coleraine to Dublin. The woods adjoin the great lough called Neagh, which lies 20 miles from Coleraine town. From this lough is a river called the Bann, in which the timber must be floated down to Coleraine by flat-bottomed boats called coots. There are two rocky places in this river, in which the water has great descents or falls, so that they land the timber at the upper part of these leaps, and draw it over the lands for about a quarter of a mile, and then put it into the river again, to swim it with their boats.
As to the growth of the timber, some of it is very large, but the most part is sizeable for our use. There is much old amongst it, but we only take what is sound, and there is plenty of that. I cannot promise that it is generally so strong and tough as our English oak, but some is as good.
As to the nature of the soil, the best timber grows in the midst of boggy ground, upon little rocky hills, but the greater part on rocky ground, and it is very good, if not too old and crooked. Another part grows on sandy ground, mixed with reddish earth; "this timber is shaken and coltey, but as for clay I see very little here." The best timber to choose for compass, knees, and standards lies 4 miles from the great lough, to which place they must be drawn for boats to float them to Coleraine; the whole charge for them delivered on board ship will be 48s. for three loads, but the price of the timber must be added, which will make it 51s. 9d. As to the timber for plank, Capt. Jackson says you must treat with the Society of the City of London, but the whole charge will be 20s. per 100 feet for 3 or 4 inch, one with the other, and treenails will be 30s., beside the price of the timber. I cannot ascertain what the freight will be to London.
I intend for Kinsale, to see what woods are there. If you command me in anything concerning the contract with Sir Frescheville Holles, I shall be ready to wait upon you. [12/3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 217.]
Dec. 20.
Court at Whitehall.
Commission to John Napier to be Lieutenant of the Life Guards of Horse in Scotland, under John, Earl of Atholl. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 36.]
Dec. 20.
Court at Whitehall.
Commission to George Murray to be cornet of the said Life Guards. [Ibid. p. 37.]
Dec. 20. The King to the Mayor and aldermen of Kingston-upon-Hull. We understand that the jetty raised for preservation of the south blockhouse's foundation is so decayed that, without speedy repair, the works raised on it will be in great danger. As it belongs to the town of Kingston-upon-Hull to maintain the jetty, you are to cause an exact view to be taken of its condition, and the decays to be forthwith repaired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 64.]
Dec. 20.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to George Wharton, Paymaster of the Ordnance, to pay 5,000l. to Sir Thos. Chichely for moneys advanced by him during the late rebellion, to be repaid from the 20,974l. 12s. 9d. due to Wharton as part of 40,000l. payable to [Col.] Wm. Legg, late Treasurer of Ordnance, for providing a magazine of saltpetre. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 66.]
Dec. 20. Licence to Nich. Lloyd, Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford, for the sole publishing for 14 years of Carolus Stephanus' Poetical Dictionary and Philip Ferrarius' Geographical Lexicon, in one volume, entitled, "Dictionarium Historicum, Geographicum, Poeticum," forbidding their vending or printing by others, on pain of confiscation. [Parchment. S.P. Dom., Case C, No. 16.]
Dec. 20. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 67.]
Dec. 20. Note of the King's approbation for John Lord Belasyse, Baron of Worlaby, to be High Steward of Kingston-upon-Hull. Minute. [Ibid.]
Dec. 20.
Kendal.
Rich. Duckett to Jos. Williamson. Your endeavour to promote piety and religion is evident to the world. Mr. Bouch, High Sheriff of Cumberland, who desired your brother to procure him a licence to live at Ingleton, is patron of a good living called Bentham, worth 200l. a year; this being void by the death of Mr. Lowther, formerly Chancellor of Carlisle, he has the advowson; he wishes to sell, but not to present, and thinking you might be inclined to affix it to some college, and it being near Westmoreland and Cumberland, on which the basis of Queen's College stands, he makes you the first offer. What he sells it for he intends bestowing on a younger son, for his education and study at Gray's Inn. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 55.]
Dec. 20.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. I received your packet of letters for Italy, but no list, and was assured they were all that were to come; but after the mail was gone, another parcel arrived, together with the list. It is very inconvenient sending letters by unknown messengers, without specifying how long the mail is to stay, and the ordinary porter should not be changed without advice. If you wish the letters sent to Dover, they can be put in the mail, or upon receiving a word, I will send them by express, though it may disorder the mail. I observe that letters sent by Thursday's ordinary reach Leghorn as soon as those that were sent by Monday's. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 56.]
Dec. 20. Rich. Pitt to Prince Rupert. I send you this enclosure, considering the dangerous consequences which might ensue by concealment. I petitioned you for an appointment at sea during the late Dutch wars. [Ibid. No. 57.] Enclosing,
Rich. Wilkinson to Rich. Pitt, Muzzled Boar's Head, Vere Street, Newmarket. As a soldier under the Duke of Albemarle, I was instrumental in bringing his Majesty into his kingdom. While staying at Great Musgrave, Westmoreland, by reason of some passionate language, I pricked Thos. Breacks in the thigh with my rapier, of which he afterwards died. Thereupon I came to London, and the army being disbanded, I served his Majesty in Flanders under Sir Edw. Harley; while doing so, I was outlawed, but continued to serve as a private, and lastly as serjeant of a company under Lord Culpeper, Governor of the Isle of Wight, until we were discharged.
Having continued in London some time out of employment, I met a former acquaintance in the old army, who looking upon me as a person of desperate fortune, related a grand conspiracy on foot, viz., that a certain person had engaged 50 men to fight the guards at Whitehall gates, and that there was a strong design against his Majesty, carried on by very prudent persons, who instead of wearing armour, had designed for themselves close-bodied coats lined with quires of paper, which would bear carbine shots; he says that there is a place in the city where their declarations and other concerns lie dormant, until a convenient opportunity offers, such as masking or other jovial sports at Court, and that 500 persons would be ready at an hour's warning.
If his Majesty would grant me a confirmation of my reprieve, formerly obtained by Col. Carlos, which has lain dormant in the secretary's office for want of money to sue it out, and would also advance me funds to keep up a correspondence with the parties concerned, I doubt not to give a full account and discovery of most or all of them in a short time; but without this I neither can nor dare appear. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 57i.]
Dec. 20. Dr. J. Fell [Dean of Christchurch] to Williamson. I will inform the Vice-Chancellor of what you write concerning Mr. Ellis. The Prince [of Orange] arrived with his train between 5 and 6 last night, attended by the Mayor and his brethren to the East gate, and there presented with gloves. The Vice-Chancellor and University received him at St. Mary's, in their scarlets and other formalities; from whence he passed towards Christchurch, the scholars making a guard until he came to the college gate, when myself and the chapter, with our whole society, received and conducted him to his lodging, where I had provided such accommodation as I could; but only receiving notice of his intended visit on Sunday morning, it was no easy thing to get provisions, there being no market to assist.
To-day at 8 he began to visit Oriel and other adjoining colleges named; after that he returns to Christchurch to prayers, and to visit the schools, library, and theatre, where the convocation will be held; he then dines with the Vice-Chancellor at St. John's, and in the evening visits New College, and returns hither to supper and bed. I hope that it will all be performed with due respect and order, and that you will have a satisfactory account from his Highness, Lord Ossory, and others.
We have now a canon's place void by the death of Dr. Gardiner, and as Dr. South pretends to it, it will be a pity if his attendance here to serve the Prince should defeat him of it. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 58.]
Dec. 20.
Sheldon Theatre, Oxford.
Questions to be discussed at the convocation held 20 Dec. 1670, on the advent of William Henry, Prince of Orange, and Count of Nassau. 1st question—Are brutes mere machines ? Negative. 2nd question—Is the reason of good and evil eternal and immutable ? Affirmative. Resp.—[Rich.] Old of Christ's College; Opponents—[Rich.] Russell of Magdalen, — Porter of Trinity. [44 Latin hexameters and pentameters. Ibid. No. 59.]
Dec. 21 ? R. S. [Sir Rob. Southwell to Williamson ?] On Sunday the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, Dr. Mews, having an express of the Prince of Orange's intended visit, made preparations. The Prince entered on the Monday between 4 and 5, and was received by the Mayor, &c., at the East gate; the respective graduates were drawn up between there and St. Mary's Church, where the Vice-Chancellor at the head of the doctors received him. He passed on to Christchurch through a line of torches held by the scholars, where the Vice-Chancellor, canons, students, and Dr. Fell, the Dean, received him, and the latter led him to his lodgings. He then visited Merton, Magdalen, Brazenose, and Oriel Colleges, returned to Christchurch to prayers, thence to the library, and thence to convocation.
The Vice-Chancellor then read a letter from the Chancellor, naming only two persons for degrees, as thinking such a course contrary to the honour and interest of the University, he had refused others, and this gave great satisfaction; then the Vice-Chancellor read a list of those whom the Prince wished to be admitted to degrees, which was done, when the great door of the theatre opened, and the Prince appeared in the scarlet gown and hood and velvet cap of a Doctor of Law, the Earl of Ossory on his right, and Dr. [Thos.] Bouchier, Professor of Law, on his left, and the ViceChancellor expressed the University's sense of honour in admitting him to a degree; the nominees to degrees were then presented. Dr. South made an eloquent oration, and a disputation on questions succeeded; the Prince expressed himself much pleased with all he saw, and had a present made of the works of his grandfather, Charles the Martyr. He then went to St. John's College, where he dined; thence to Wadham and New College by torchlight, where he heard prayers, and thence to Christchurch. He much praised the beauty of the schools, theatre, &c., and said he had heard great things of Oxford, but had seen greater. He left the next morning at 8 a.m., making a great impression by his carriage in general, but especially his devotion. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 60.]
Dec. 21.
Oxford.
Dr. P. Mews, Vice-Chancellor, to Williamson. I should have written concerning the Prince's reception, but that the bearer, Sir Chas. Cotterel, who was present, will give a relation. I wonder I had no letter concerning [Hen.] Bold, and desire you will inform Lord Arlington that I should readily have served him. I write in pain, having received a bruise on my breast against a post, which makes bending troublesome. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Dec. 21.
Norwich.
Thos. Corie to Williamson. I beg your assistance in procuring me a commission for a receiver's place for the subsidies for Norwich and Norfolk, if any are granted. I have written to Lords Arlington and Howard. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Dec. 21. Capt. Sam. Sandys to his father, Col. Sam. Sandys, M.P. I find all the people here and your horses well, but at Kempsey there are 40 or 50 persons calling themselves Levellers, who commit such mischievous things that their neighbours are afraid of them. Some of the suspected have been brought before Sir Fras. Russell, but nobody dares give evidence against them; Sir Edw. Seabright sent for a party of horse, thinking to surprise them at one of their houses; but they hearing of it dispersed, pursued by a troop of horse to the woods, where they stood and called the horse cowardly rogues, asked what they would have with Robin Hood and Little John, and fired a pistol or gun at them.
I was asked to call my troop together, but shall not do so without orders from Lord Windsor; if he gives me orders, I doubt not but to give a good account of them, dead or alive. In the night they kill fat cattle and carry the flesh away, leaving the skin behind; they enter people's houses, throw down hay ricks, break open smiths' shops, and throw the anvil and other tools into the well, and leave a paper upon the doors bidding them to be gone by such a time, otherwise they will be burnt in their beds; they lay harrows with the teeth upwards in the highway to do passengers mischief, knock people off their horses in the night, and borrow their money. I hope you will acquaint his lordship with it, that some course may be taken by the military power, as they contemn the civil. Remember me to my mother and sisters. Frank Sheldon's wife has been brought to bed with a lusty boy. Endorsed, "Riotous disorders in Worcestershire." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 63.]
Dec. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Ferrers to the King. King Edward III. granted to Henry Ferrers (of whom I am heir male) two yard lands and other small parcels of lands at Walton in Derbyshire, and also the manor and advowson of Walton; but the said premises are so mixed with my other lands that I can neither make a jointure, nor provision for my debts, or my younger children, the reversion being in the Crown, though there are now sixteen persons living descended in the male line from the said Henry. I beg the reversion of the said premises.
With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners; their reference, dated 17 Feb. 1671, to Sir Charles Harbord, Surveyor-General; his report that, the Crown interest being small, and the lands of no great value, the reversion might be granted, there being many preceedents; and the final report of the Treasury Commissioners, dated 18 April 1671, in favour of the petition, there being 4 heirs male alive, besides John Ferrers and his son. [Ibid. Nos. 64–66.]
Dec. 21.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Thos. Hayter. I beg an order for issuing provisions, as the Leopard is docked, and it is uncertain when our Commissioner will be here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 218.]
Dec. 21. List of 15 persons to be relieved out of the 2,000l. extra money, with the amount each is to receive; total 603l. 18s. 3d. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Dec. 21. Grant to Dr. [Rob.] South to be canon of Christ Church, in the room of Dr. [Rich.] Gardiner, deceased. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 12.]
Dec. [21.] Docquet of the preceding grant. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 263.]
Dec. 21.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Katherine of Dublin, from the Canaries with wine, reports the safe arrival there of all the English fleet; that there is an indifferent vintage, and that the Bear of Dantzic, having 200 pipes of wine on board, was cast away in that road, and her skipper and two men drowned. The St. Peter of Amsterdam, which had been trading to the Straits, has been seized by the French, on pretence of carrying contraband goods. Her captain travelled home through France, and advises that great preparations are being made in all their sea ports, to disturb the Dutch, and hinder their growing trade in the East Indies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 67.]
Dec. 21. Same to Hickes. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Dec. 21.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The wind having changed, about 40 out of upwards of 100 ships have sailed, and the rest will sail to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Dec. 22.
Deal.
Same to the Same. The wind having shifted, the ships which sailed yesterday have all returned to the Downs. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Dec. 22. Warrant to Sir Edw. Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, to pay to Alex. Boschar, surgeon to the Queen Consort, 429l., for his lodging out of Court 8½ years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 95.]
Dec. 22.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to Williamson. Since my return, I have sounded the person spoken about, and find him very willing to serve his Majesty by a journey either by sea or land. If he goes by sea to Toulon, the Turks have to be feared, but not if he goes to Brest, Charente, or in the Bay; if he goes by land, he requires 60l. for his family's subsistence, 40l. to defray expenses, and bills of credit for what he shall want on his journey; and if engaged 6 months, 100l. reward, with his expenses, 200l. if for 12 months, and so on in proportion. If he goes by sea, he requires 100l. every 6 months, for his trouble and victuals, and 50l. for his family. He will give better satisfaction if seen; he is the only person fit for such a work, and I am sure he will bring home a full freight. I only advise this side of France, leaving Toulon, if he goes by sea; but if to Toulon, I advise overland for fear of the Turks. Endorsed, "A spy into France." [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 71.]
Dec. 23. W. C[arter] to Lord Arlington. I am prevented coming to give you an account of my endeavours and progress, or to thank you for the obligation I lie under by the enlargement I have had, which I shall not soon forget. Were I not assured, from having discovered the combination to bring me into the snare, that my present confinement is a hundredfold more prejudicial to his Majesty than to myself, I should be more silent, but as it is preventing the comple tion of what has been for more than three years endeavoured, in bringing many guilty persons to trial, and has occupied his Majesty and the Council for two days, I cannot be silent. It would be too tedious to rehearse to your lordship what I have done, but I hope in its season you will condescend to hear it by the testimony of others. I have surrendered myself to Mr. Bradley, according to promise. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 72.]
Dec. 23.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council that the petition of Wm. Clarke of Great Yarmouth, concerning meetings of Nonconformists there, and of a paper annexed, entitled, "A true and perfect narrative of the Government of the town of Great Yarmouth, as it now stands," be sent to Lord Townshend, the Lord Lieutenant, to examine and report. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Dec. 23. Rich. Pitt to Prince Rupert. Since sending you Wilkinson's letter, I have discoursed with him, and find that the person designed to lead the party is Capt. Mason, who was condemned at Carlisle for treason, and in his journey from thence to York to be executed, was rescued from the guard by Blood, Butler, and another. Wilkinson knows where Mason is, and the name he goes by, and has seen one of their declarations, which they told him was printed six months since. If the matter is kept private, and Wilkinson is assured of his liberty, he undertakes to make out this and much more in a very short time, or submit to be hanged. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the King of his granting the honour of knighthood to Chas. Quinn of Amsterdam, who having visited many Eastern countries, on his return home visited this court, and gave many splendid proofs of his various knowledge and experience. [Latin. Foreign Entry Book 12, p. 354.]
Dec. 24. Order by the Navy Commissioners to the Treasurer to pay 2,438l. 10s. 1d. to Peter Barr, for the use of the West India Company in France, being the value of certain goods belonging to them which were taken out of their ship, the St. John Baptist of Hamburg, at Portsmouth in 1665, for the use of his Majesty. Cancelled, and noted that the delivery of it to Barr was suspended by order of the King and Council, 27 Dec. 1670. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 220.]
Dec. 24.
Wrenthorp, near Wakefield.
Rob. Benson to Williamson. The report of the execrable design to assassinate the Duke of Ormond has alarmed all this country; it is well for the Duke that it has happened, as it has opened all men's mouths and thoughts to speak their liking for him, as well as their detestation of the attempt. I understand Lord Arlington has discovered the names of the rogues; if John Savile—a young fellow of desperate fortune and resolution, who came down here in great haste after the attempt—is suspected to be one of them, I will have him apprehended, or examined; but as he is related to persons I would not willingly disoblige without some grounds, I desire instructions before acting. Mr. Musgrave is in town, and has written to me of this business. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 75.]
Dec. 24. W. Carter to Lord Arlington. I have been commanded by the Duke of York and the Duke of Ormond to ask for further time to pursue my intentions; I question not but to do something in the business, if your lordship says Amen to the method I have thought of. As I cannot come to your lodgings without orders, I have sent my servant, who waits for an answer. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Dec. 25. Postscript to a torn letter unsigned. I am told that Allin or Ayliffe, mentioned in the Gazette, as one of the persons suspected in the attempt on the Duke of Ormond, was at sea in the Portland frigate, and that Jennings or Jennins, who was formerly surgeon to that ship, is a great crony of his, and a likely man to give an account of him. Jennings lives over against the Coach and Horses, in St. Martin's Lane, and his wife works at the Exchange; it will not be amiss to call upon him when you go that way. Endorsed that John Rogers received this letter from Wm. Rogers of Lincoln's Inn on 24 Dec., and that John Rogers believed it came out of Worcestershire; he does not know from whom, but will write about it to Wm. Rogers, who has gone to Gloucestershire. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Dec. 25.
Portsmouth.
Notes from Hugh Salesbury to Williamson, that he has no news to send, all things being quiet, of 4, 6, 8, 11, 13, 18, and 25 Dec. [Ibid. No. 78–83.]
Dec. 25.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Capt. John Earle, Lieutenant and deputy-governor of the garrison at Sandown Castle, died there yesterday evening. The place cost him 80l. seven months ago, besides 20l. in getting it, which is now all lost, it being only a place for life; 100 sail are in the Downs outward bound, but the wind is full against them. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Dec. 25. Account of moneys paid into the Exchequer, from seven counties and the nobility, on the Act for poll money, from 9 July 1669 to 25 Dec. 1670; total, 377l. 12s. 10½d. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Dec. 25. Account of moneys paid into the Exchequer on the Additional Aid, from 15 counties specified, from 9 July 1669 to 25 Dec. 1670; total 4,238l. 9s. 2d. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Dec. 26./Jan. 5.
Leghorn.
Sir Thos. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Being solely taken up in adjusting my accounts with the officers of the Swallow and Kent, to whom I have delivered 4 months' victuals at whole allowance, as well as several other necessaries, as they have resolved to sail to-night or in the morning, I beg to be excused answering your Honours' letter of 24 Nov. until the next post, when I will transmit the officers' indents and receipts.
I am obliged for your ready acceptance of my 3 bills for 986l. 5s., and depend upon their being punctually discharged, so that the merchants may have a better opinion of the public credit. I cannot hear that Sir Denis Gauden has yet found the way to satisfy one of my many bills drawn on and accepted by him, which is such a piece of injustice as was never offered to any other. I want words to express the trouble and inconveniences I am exposed to. I beseech you to prevail with him to be more just towards me, or otherwise to provide for my relief, so that his Majesty may be better served, and his loyal subjects may receive all just and lawful encouragements. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 221.]
Dec. 26.
Portsmouth.
Wm. Griffin to Commissioner Thos. Middleton. I have done with my employ for Sir Rob. Holmes, and arrived here with the hoy. I made 5 voyages in 8 weeks, which was as much as I could do, considering the season, and shortness of the days; I went to Sir Robert for his certificate, or for allowance of my expenses, but he was very angry, and bade me begone, and address the Navy Commissioners. I was at the expense of 3l. 15s., which might have been saved had I not been so employed; I hope you will get me the money, as my expenses are great, and my income small.
I was told by Sir Robert's men that they are to have 200 loads of timber about March, and that they shall have a hoy to fetch it; but I hope I may be excused going, as it has already been a great trouble to me, which was made the more so by being forced to take in and put out with my own tackle, as they had not a piece of rope but what belonged to the hoy, and they must and would have it. [Ibid. No. 222.]
Dec. 26. Same to the Navy Commissioners. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 223.]
Dec. 26.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The Golden Salmon of Amsterdam, with rice, raw silks, &c., from the Straits, missed her course in the fogs, and has been embayed 8 days between Wormshead and Tenby; although she is now at anchor, the captain has been advised of the danger of his vessel, in case of a storm; nevertheless he will not be warned, and the people are hourly expecting to see her on shore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 87.]
Dec. 26.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoffry Shakerley to Williamson. Understanding his Majesty may have occasion for a Receiver-General for the town and county of Chester, I beg to recommend Somerford Oldfield of Somerford, for whom I and my cousin Cholmondeley, who has already moved in the matter, will become bound. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Dec. 26.
Alicant.
Sir Edw. Spragg to Williamson. Thanks for correspondence; I arrived here on the 23rd, and brought in the Town of Algiers, a Turkish man-of-war, only 10 days old when I took her. She is an excellent frigate, and will carry 38 pieces of ordnance, and had a complement of 200 men, not above 40 of whom got ashore, the rest being all killed and drowned, except the captain and his chief renegado rogue, a Hollander. She had besides 33 Christian slaves of several nations, whereof 9 are English, all of whom, on this occasion, will get their freedom. I also took one of their brigantines, laden with corn.
The Algerines are all out, and I hope by the next to give an account of further success, being under sail to go with my fleet to their several stations, and then to Cadiz. I had no ship in my company when I took the man-of-war, except the Little Victory fireship, whose boatswain was killed; I chased her 5 days and nights before I took her, and had but 9 of my men wounded, and only one that I think will prove mortal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 89.]
Dec. 27. Dr. Adam Littleton to Williamson. I understand your readiness to serve me, for which I am thankful. The Dean of Christchurch has recommended me to Lord Arlington, and Mr. Bold has not been wanting, which is sufficient to divert the warm attempts of the person now at work, although I cannot tell what encouragement he may have, or by what method he manages his business. I am not personally known to his lordship, but suppose he remembers my name; I doubt not to obtain what further commendations are necessary from Christchurch for his lordship's satisfaction. I am going with some company to spend 3 or 4 days with the Provost at Eton. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Dec. 27. Information of Rich. Wilkinson, late serjeant of a company in the Isle of Wight. Being in London five weeks since, I was in the company of a former acquaintance and a stranger, when the stranger began reading a paper, to the effect that honest people were under a great cloud for conscience sake; he alluded to what they formerly enjoyed, and still ought to enjoy as free born subjects, and went on to incite persons concerned to take courage and use their swords, as phlebotomy was the only way to cure the distemper.
Three weeks since, I was again in his company, when he stated that his party had printed their declaration half a year since, and that many honest persons had endeavoured to put themselves in a condition for carrying out the design, being well mounted and armed, and that a certain person had engaged 50 men to fight his Majesty's guards at Whitehall gates; to which an objection being made that their passage would be obstructed in the streets before they could get there, the stranger replied that they were such courageous men as would soon force the citizens to shut up their shops, and that their leader was Capt. Mason, who was formerly condemned at Carlisle for treason, but made his escape, and that divers other persons, to whom he would introduce me, had promised to be ready at an hour's warning. Also that one of them was a person concerned in the Wood Street insurrection, but was saved by his wife's hiring two journeymen shoemakers to swear that he was 40 or 50 miles from home at the time. I could have learned much more, but my necessity is such as renders me incapable of keeping company with them to make a further discovery [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 91.] Annexing,
Examination of the said Rich. Wilkinson before Lord Arlington. Was informed that the seditious party have a printed declaration, but has only seen it in writing; will help his lordship to obtain a copy. Has been promised a sight of Mason, but for want of money, and through the uncertainty of his own condition, has been unwilling to seek his company. Can discover the person who gave information. Has been told that this is the time they mean to attack the Guards. Butler is in town, or near it; does not know whether any of these persons had a hand in the attempt upon the Duke of Ormond. [In Williamson's handwriting. Ibid. No. 91i.]
Dec. 27.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Though the wind continues high, 98 ships are riding in the Downs without danger. Thos. Crispe, master of the Vintry ketch, who has come from Sheron [Charente ?] reports that we are going to war with the Dutch, and that it is so reported in their printed news. Capt. John Earle, deputy-governor of Sandown Castle, was buried this afternoon. The deputy-governors of Deal and Walmer Castle went from Deal to Sandown, at the head of the company of yellow coats, and then marched back through the Beach Street, before the corpse, the relations and those invited following behind. Eight guns were fired at Sandown Castle, Deal and Walmer gave 4 each, and the matter was very handsomely carried by direction of the two lieutenants. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 92.]
Dec. 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Adventure frigate is ordered to be fitted out for the Straits. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Dec. 27. Wm. Clarke to Williamson. The advertisement prefixed which Lord Anglesey directed, and Lord Arlington approved of for the Gazette, was that—in pursuance of the brief granted by his Majesty for the redemption of captives—it was ordered in Council that such persons as by their friends or their own industry should be redeemed, should have an allowance of 50l. for each redemption, payable to the party disbursing the money out of the common stock of the said brief, upon the appearance of the party redeemed in the Chamber of London; or in case of death after his redemption, upon proof on oath, and a certificate from the master and other officers of the ship on which he was shipped for his return; that half of the money collected should be deposited for such use, until 5,000l. was brought into the brief, and that the Committee of Lords appointed by his Majesty in Council on this behalf would meet every Monday fortnight in the Council Chamber, for the speedy and effectual redemption of captives as money shall come in. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Dec. 27. The King to the deputy-lieutenants of co. Worcester. Hearing of riotous proceedings near Kempsey—great numbers assembling, and committing spoils and violence, which may be of serious consequence; in the absence of Lord Windsor, the Lord Lieutenant, we desire you to communicate with the neighbouring justices of peace, to apprehend the authors of these disorders, and commit them to prison, or bind them on security to answer at the next county assizes. If needful, the Militia troop of horse of the county, under Capt. Sandys and Sir Edw. Seabright, is to be employed to prevent such assemblies. You are to give account of anything of moment to us, or the Lords of the Privy Council. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 20.]
Dec. 28. Dispensation for Thos. Ireland, High Sheriff of Montgomeryshire, to repair to Lincolnshire or elsewhere. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 187.]
Dec. 28.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission under the Great Seal of Scotland, to Charles Maitland of Haltoun, for his constant affection to his Majesty from childhood, to be deputy-treasurer and a Commissioner of the Treasury for Scotland, at his Majesty's disposal by the demission of William, Lord Bellenden, and to have a voice as an officer of state in all Parliaments, General Councils, &c., with power to grant infeoffments, confirmations, &c., during the absence from the kingdom of the principal treasurer; fee, 1,500l. Scots a year. With proviso that the Treasury being now in commission, this grant shall not derogate from the powers of the Commissioners. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 38.]
Dec. 28.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The St. Peter of Amsterdam, said to be seized by the French at Marseilles, was really seized at Genoa, and the skipper came through France. The [French] King is fitting out a great fleet, and the Dutch are sending 50 men-of-war to ride at Spithead, for fear they should be frozen in Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 95.]
Dec. 28. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Dec. 28. Sir Rob. Long to Pepys. I conceive that you and Lord Brouncker took away the Navy officer's certificate upon which the privy seal I am to draw is to be founded; I desire you will send it back, and will clear up some doubts. In the words you have added to the privy seal, interest is to be paid on 19,536l. 4s. 8d. for goods delivered, which interest you contracted by virtue of an order in Council. My query is whether that sum is part of the 186,661l. 19s. 6¾d., or of the other sum of 282,484l. 8s. 3¼d. As you mention interest included in this last sum, tell me whether it is the interest on the first-mentioned sum, or any part thereof.
It will be convenient to mention some time from which the interest begins; but if that cannot be done, in regard that the goods were delivered at several times, and by several persons, and each man's interest must begin from the time of his contract, I will endeavour to so express it, but the privy seal should be as par ticular as the subject matter will bear. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 224.] Annexing,
Memorandum that 17,339l. 10s. 6d. of the 19,536l. 4s. 8d. was formerly certified into the Exchequer, upon the Act for 1,256,347l. 13s.; the rest, viz., 2,196l. 14s. 2d. is part of 186,661l. 19s. 6¾d., or rather of 189,100l. 9s. 7¾d., and was altered by adding the debt of the French West India Company. That the interest included in the 282,484l. 8s. 3¼d. is the interest of 19,536l. 4s. 8d. to 4 Aug. 1670, from which date the interest is to begin, and to be continued until payment of the principal is made to each creditor respectively. [Draft. Ibid. No. 224i.]
Dec. 29.
Whitby.
Thos. Ellis to Williamson. Hearing that Thos. Faron, living at Culvagh, near Cockermouth in Cumberland, was preaching upon a stool near the Cross in the market, I went and dismounted him, and carried him to prison. It was strange to see the throng of people about him, and although very seditious words were given, no one interrupted him; a Quaker laying violent hands on me would have rescued my prisoner, so I was constrained, although a constable, to break the peace, to secure myself and my prisoner. He has good clothes, and he says he has been a merchant, and has travelled in Italy, Germany, and several other nations, and has lately come from London. Abundance of friends came to see him, and two desiring his enlargement till Monday, I let him go upon their engaging body for body; but the next day he was at it again in the street, so I seized and carried him to the justice 14 miles off, who bound him over to the sessions. We shall see how the bench will resent these audacious ways of contemning, and affronting his Majesty's laws in this tumultuous manner.
Coming from the justice, the man told me he would have the passages here printed shortly, as he had been a printer himself in Ireland. He came very well mounted, but his horse has been conveyed away, which I would gladly have found, as this bold blade may prove one of those that assaulted the Duke of Ormond. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 97.]
Dec. 29.
Grittleton.
Dr. Thos. Tullie to [Williamson]. Your kindness pursues me wherever I go, and your letter gives such signal evidences of your friendly and obliging care for my concerns, that it is fit you should use your own method in bestowing it. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Dec. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a discharge to William, Lord Bellenden, from the office of deputy-treasurer in Scotland, which he has held since the Restoration, and confirmation of former grants by the late and present King, of a pension of 500l. a year to him for life. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 45.]
Dec. 29.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the officers of Exchequer in Scotland. Lord Bellenden has resigned his office, because his health sometimes prevents his attending. We wish him to remain as one of the Exchequer, that he may still be serviceable when his health permits. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 46.]
Dec. 29. Certificate by John Hough, public notary, that there is a claim in the Admiralty Court by Sir Wm. Warren, of 2,405l. for the loss of the freight of the Red Lion; of 1,208l. 15s. 10d. for loss of goods in the Olive Branch, and of 42l. 15s. 2d. for loss of goods in the King's Merchant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 225.]
Dec. 30.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Many of the pressed men having absented themselves, which will be a great hindrance in getting the ships repaired, I beg that some effectual course may be taken to send them down, and that more money may be imprested to Mr. Gregory; he has only 30l. in hand of that formerly imprested to him for payment of board wages, and there will be two weeks due to the men next Friday. The Henry being so defective, they are forced to shift a great deal of the plank, so that she cannot be despatched out of dock this spring[tide]. [Ibid. No. 226.]
Dec. 30.
Plymouth Sound.
Capt. Rob. Werden, of the Falcon, to the Navy Commissioners. I sailed yesterday according to instructions. An East Indiaman, driven with the winds, came so near my bows that I was forced to let slip my small bower, and leave my anchor behind, a great gale arising; but I have given notice of it to Mr. Culmer. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Dec. 30.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners of Scotland, to pay to Charles Maitland of Haltoun, deputy-treasurer, the arrears of excise still due from 1661 to 1663; also the King's part of the prizes taken in the late Dutch war, and the remainder of money due on prizes before their commission as Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 47.]
Dec. 30.
The Mews.
Thos. Peachey to Williamson. I find that Hen. Davis, one of her Majesty's guard, whom I suspected of having had a hand in the horrid business connected with the Duke of Ormond, is no such person; for he has the sword and carbine I gave and lent him; he has been twice to see you without being able to meet with you. I am going to Windsor for a short time. Do not inform Davis that I gave information against him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 99.]
Dec. 31.
London.
Lord St. Albans to Lord Arlington. I consent to the change of Captain [George] Raleigh's commission from my company to that of Sir Thos. Morgan. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Dec. 31.
Saturday.
Col. [D. ?] O'Brien to Williamson. As I am confined with the ague, do me the favour to call upon me at "Mr. Lord's house, next door on your right hand going out of the gate of Sir John Denham's Buildings." [Ibid. No. 101.]
Dec. 31.
[Jan. 10.] Lierre.
Bedford Whiting to Williamson. What has passed since I wrote you last, the enclosed printed Arrest will show. All our woollen manufactures are prohibited, or at least ordered to pay the duties in the French tariff, as 80 livres (?) upon a cloth and 12 livres (?) upon a serge, and all other goods accordingly, which can never be paid; the clothiers here complain of the cheapness of our English woollen manufactures which come in in such abundance that they have no encouragement to work, and must go to ruin.
I told you that the Intendant, M. Pelletier, was very much for them, and wrote in their behalf to M. Colbert, who sent M. Bellizan to make inquiries. Immediately upon his return, he procured this enclosed order. The drapers opposed it, and gave their reasons to the Intendant, that their trade would be lost, for they could not live upon selling two or three sorts of goods of the town fabrics, which all the world knew the price of; and for the English fabrics, they were so reasonable that the common people were clothed at a cheap rate. Besides, they had above 12 sorts of strangers' fabrics in their faculty, which now they are deprived of.
His answer was, that he wondered they should so much promote stranger fabrics, which was but to nourish their enemies, and cut the throats of the King's subjects, and besides, said he, "La commerce aujourdhuy en France est une matière d'estat."
I wish his Majesty of England would consider how much the banishing our English manufactures from the French dominions is matière d'estat in that Court. I hear that they will prohibit all our leathers that are drest. They are subtle enough yet to let our wools come in free, without which they cannot make all their newfashioned stuffs, which makes them the more presume to prohibit our manufactures.
Whereas we usually furnished the French, for clothing their soldiers, with a coarse sort of light grey cloth, Colbert obliged all the infantry to be clothed with a cloth called Serge de Bery, made about Rouen; it is tolerably good for clothing, but it is not to be made without English wool, and unless it came to hanging for wool stealing—as indeed all thieves, ought, and especially such notorious thieves as rob a whole kingdom—in time we shall lose the reputation of our fabrics.
Strangers I find far more thrifty than we are; they can work cheaper than we, and they have many pleasing inventions, which we are not addicted to, and by making so many new fabrics, the French fabrics are in greater estimation than many of ours. There are able heads in England to consult on matters in trade, but I fear we are not so diligent as our neighbours. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 101a.]
Dec. 31. Warrant for a grant to Sir Sam. Moreland, Bart., of a sum not named, to be paid in eight quarterly portions from the 140,000l. a year, payable by the Farmers of Excise for London and Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 69.]
Dec. 31.
London.
Wm. Penn to the Navy Commissioners. I have searched my father's closet for the draft of the Medway, but cannot find it; if you doubt my skill, you can direct one of your clerks to assist me in a further search. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 228.]
Dec. 31.
Navy Office.
Navy Commissioners to Sir George Downing. Let the Lords of the Treasury know—in answer to their command to us to adjust the accounts depending between his Majesty and Sir Wm. Warren, for loss sustained during the war with the Dutch, for which reparation is claimed by him on behalf of his Majesty and himself from the State of Hamburg—that we have understood that the reparation was to be claimed of the State, and that the greater part of Sir Wm. Warren's evidences, charging his Majesty with the loss, wer grounded upon letters and other information from Hamburg, the validity whereof we could not judge of, or inquire into so well as the State can, when they come to enter into the merits thereof, which they will do, stating this particular loss with the rest for which satisfaction is demanded.
We chose, therefore, to suspend closing with Sir Wm. Warren until the same has been adjusted between him and the State, lest we should be misled to the allowing him from his Majesty what the State—from their better capacity of controlling their accounts—shall not own it reasonable to make his Majesty satisfaction for. This is the posture in which we stand with Sir William, and the reason why we have not ascertained the King's share of the loss; we conceive it may amount to 4,500l. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286, No. 229.]
Dec. Portion of a draft of the above. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Dec.
Deptford.
Certificate by Thos. Turner and Pet. Rowles to the Navy Commissioners, that the William and Peter took in 650 deals mentioned at Deptford on 1 Nov., to be transported to Portsmouth; that she could not stow away any more, being full, and that there was no warrant granted by the Navy Commissioners for sending away anything else. [Copy. Ibid. No. 231.] Annexing,
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I measured the William and Peter pink, and found her length by the keel is 59 ft. 6 in., and the breadth 18 ft. 7 in., which produces in burden 109 tons. [Copy. Ibid. No. 231i.]
Dec. ? Sam. Martin to Wm. Hewers, Navy Office. John Terrall claims to be administrator to Wm. Woof, who died on the Yarmouth. Woof's wages were paid (except 50s. due to the surgeon, which I hold) to his brother, but I fear he will be troublesome about the matter. [Ibid. No. 232.] Enclosing,
Petition of John Terrall to Mat. Wren, secretary to the Duke of York. I am creditor and administrator to Wm. Woof, seaman of the Yarmouth, who died half a year ago; but the then purser, Sam. Martin, detains the administration, and pretends that his 9 months' wages were paid to Woof's brother; they are entered on the book as paid to his widow, but Woof was a single person; his brother disowns receiving the money, which I believe to have been taken by Martin. I beg you to summon Martin to show cause why he keeps the administration in his hands.—Dec. 1670. [Ibid. No. 232i.]
Dec. Price list of medicines supplied by J. Pearse out of the magazine chest, for ships named, from Jan. to Dec. 1670. [Book of 13 written and several blank pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 286,No. 232a.]
Dec. Petition of Henry Loader of Deptford, anchorsmith, to the Navy Commissioners, for liberty to make the remainder of his great anchors in the spare forges in Deptford Yard, where Capt. Hall and [John] Downing made theirs. Contracted to make and deliver several great anchors, part of which have been completed, but the Duke of York having given him a part of the anchorsmith's work in the yard, which requires his constant attendance there, his men at home idle away their time,—there being many tippling houses in the town,—which is a great prejudice to him. [Ibid. No. 233.]
Dec. ? Petition of Thos. Cradocke, demy of Magdalen College, Oxford, to the King, for a letter to the President and Fellows to admit him to the fellowship void by death of Hen. Edwards, his father, Wm. Cradocke, having faithfully served the late King in the wars. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 102.]
Dec. ? Petition of Clara Wood to the King, for a mandate that her brother, John Robinson, scholar in Brazenose College, Oxford, may be admitted a Fellow of Magdalen College in room of Hen. Edwards, deceased; her father suffered much for loyalty. [Ibid. No. 102a.]
Dec. ? Petition of William Dickinson, Joshua Westerman, John Eastwood, Israel Rands, Luke Lune and Jacob Ellis to the King, to consider their repentance and grant them pardon; being dependent on labouring for others, they were drawn into the late bloody and inhuman plot, but finding it dangerous and detestable, abhorred the same, and will show their repentance by revealing the persons and intentions of those concerned therein, if they may have leave to return home. With note that the three first whose names are given are the most ingenuous and fit to serve his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 103.]
[Dec.] Petition of John Gibbon to the King, for the grant by letters patent of the office of Bluemantle Pursuivant-at-Arms, void by death of Thos. Segar. [Ibid. No. 104.] Annexing,
Certificate by the Marquis of Dorchester, and Earls Manchester and Carlisle, Commissioners for the office of Earl Marshal, in favour of the petitioner.—9 Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 104i.]
Dec. Grant to Gibbon of the said office. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 265.]
Dec. ? Petition of Col. Hen. Lillingston to the King, for the reversion of the pricker's office of the Still Yard, likely to be void; his Majesty promised to remember him if anything likely offered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 106.]
Dec. ? Petition of Col. Guy Molesworth to the King, for the reversion after Chas. Hearon [Herne], of the warehouse-keeper's place of the City of London, his petition for which was referred 2 years ago by Lord Arlington to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 107. Annexing,
Petition of Col. Guy Molesworth to the King, for a life in reversion after Chas. Herne of the warehouse-keeper's place in the Custom House, London, value 40l. a year, as his Majesty's late seasonable bounty does not suffice for his growing necessities. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, with his Majesty's gracious sense of petitioners loyalty and worth.—Whitehall, 20 Nov. 1668. [Ibid. No. 107i.]
Petition of Col. Guy Molesworth to the Treasury Commissioners, for a scire facias to be admitted to the administration of the said warehouse, the Exchequer officers having declared Herne's patent forfeited. Endorsed with note that on 24 Nov. 1668, a warrant was issued granting him the reversion of the place, and leave to prosecute the present warehouse-keeper upon misdemeanour. [Ibid. No. 107II.]
Dec. ? Petition of Wm. Whorwood to the King, for the first company that shall fall void. The Commissioners of the Treasury, to whom his former petition was referred, have done nothing therein. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Dec. Warrant to pay to Lady Eliz. Delaval 2,000l. as the King's free gift. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 264.]
Dec. Warrant to pay to the Earl of Bristol and Lady Anne his wife 2,250l. from the tenths of the clergy in counties [dioceses] York, Exeter, Winchester, Lincoln, and Sarum. [Ibid. No. 266.]
Dec. Warrant to pay to Philip Packer, paymaster of the works, 6,000l. on account, for impaling and fencing Windsor Great Park. [Ibid.]
Dec. Warrant to the Master of the Great Wardrobe, to pay to Thos. Bocock, tailor of the Robes, in place of Wm. Creed, deceased, a pensionary livery of 40l. a year, above the allowance of his office. [Ibid. No. 267.]
Dec. Grant to Edw. Wood, in reversion after Serjeant Leigh, of the office of serjeant-at-arms attending on the Lord Keeper. [Ibid. No. 268.]
Dec. Warrant to the trustees of the late Queen Mother, to grant to Hen. Brouncker and Wm. Younge, Somersham manor, park, and chase, and other manors, &c., in co. Huntingdon, for the residue of 99 years, on determination of the leases now in being, and at the rents therein reserved. [Ibid. No. 271.]
Dec. Presentation of Thos. Wrightson, M.A., to the rectory of Kirkheaton, co. York, in the King's gift by reason of simony. [Ibid. No. 274.]
Dec. Grant to the Duke of York and his heirs male of 24,000l. a year, payable out of the excise on beer, ale, and other liquors in 11 counties, to be charged during the King's life on the excise of the said counties, settled on his Majesty for life. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 275.]
Dec. Grant to Michael Wharton and his heirs of the advowson, &c., of the rectory of Saxby, co. Lincoln, in exchange for that of Rider, alias Ryther, co. York. [Ibid. No. 277. See p. 261 supra.]
Dec. Presentation of Ezerell Tonge, D.D., to the rectory of Broadwater, co. Sussex, void by simony. [Ibid. No. 278. See p. 407 supra.]
Dec. Warrant to pay to Rich. Mason 3,210l., without account, for the use of the Duke of Buckingham, in payment of his expenses on his employment into France. [Ibid. No. 280.]
Dec. Warrant for repayment of all moneys that shall be lent to the King in advance upon the Customs, to commence from Michaelmas 1671, and to be paid in course; also warrant to the Auditor of Exchequer to keep a register of all orders, that every man may know his time of repayment, with half-yearly interest at 6 per cent. per annum. [Ibid. No. 281.]
Dec. Orders by the Lord Mayor of London to the aldermen of the several wards, e.g.: To hold and regulate the inquests for the year; to have convenient watch kept, and lanterns hung up by nightertail in the old manner, and none be allowed to go by nightertail without light, nor with vizards; to choose discreet common councilmen, who are to take oaths given of fidelity to the City, and of supremacy and allegiance; also against the power of the Pope or any other to depose the King, and against the position that it is lawful under any pretence to take up arms against him and against the "solemn league and covenant." Also directions about constables, scavengers, beadle, raker, cleaning of the streets, for keeping a roll of names of residents, innholders, lodgers, sojourners, and search for suspected persons; care against fire; for suppression of hucksters of ale and beer; aliens not to accept office; assize of firewood; punishment of vagrants; register of jurymen; suppression of harlots, &c. [Printed. 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 109.]
Dec. ? The King to the Provost and fellows of Eton College. A very late decree passed that 5 of the 7 fellows of Eton College should be chosen from King's College, Cambridge. (See Calendar, p. 448.) We therefore commend Wm. Fairbrother, D.C.L., a senior fellow of King's, who suffered for the late King, and was zealous for our restoration, to your next vacant fellowship. With note that any other letter to the same effect, which in the diversity of affairs the King might sign, is to be considered null. [Draft, damaged. Ibid. No. 110.]
Dec. ? Anon. to Squire Williamson, burgess of Thetford. I request you to cause this petition to be read in the House of Commons. [Ibid. No. 113.]
[Dec.] Earl of Clarendon to the Duchess of York. I would not displease you; but no distance of place, nor still greater distance in reference to your high condition, can make me less your father, so I must inform you of anything reflecting upon you. Your reply to the reports concerning your defection in religion much satisfied me, but the report increases, and last week the English Ambassador in Paris said you were become a Roman Catholic, and you are said to be much changed as to the Church of England, "the best constituted and most free from error of any Christian church in the world."
I presume you do not meddle in controversy, and think you must be taken by some fallacious argument of the antiquity of the Church of Rome. There are only two persons who suffer more in this rumour than I do. Arguments against the Church of Rome. If you embrace it, you bring irreparable dishonour on your father and your husband, and ruin on your children. It is the saddest circumstance of my banishment that I cannot confer with you. If you cannot impart your doubts to the learned persons about you, impart them to me before you suffer them to prevail over you. [7pages.] Also,
[Dec.] Earl of Clarendon to the Duke of York. I deeply regret the rumour that your wife has become a Catholic; pray apply some antidote, as you cannot be without zeal for the Church to which your blessed father made himself a sacrifice. Such a change in her would have an ill effect on you, and even on the King himself. I have never wished persecution of Catholics, but such a change, if true, would raise a great storm against them. I beseech you to use your authority to rescue the Duchess from bringing irreparable mischief on you and yours. No severity that I may undergo can lessen my most profound duty to his Majesty or your Royal Highness.* [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 281, No. 114.]
[Dec.] Copy of the above 2 letters. [7½ pages. Ibid. No. 115.]
Dec. Extract from Mr. Dodington's letter relative to the currant trade. The usual product is 13 million lbs. a year, of which 1½ million comes here [to Venice], 10 millions for England, and one for Holland; besides which Cephalona and Morea produce two millions yearly, which also goes for England, and for which we pay after the rate of 30 to 33 and 34 pieces of 8 per thousand, besides 7l. a ton for freight. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Dec. ? Note that a ship from the westward has arrived in the Downs, and reports that the William and John has been cast away near Fiall, but all the men were saved. [Ibid. No. 117.]
[Dec.] Notice that as the letters patent granted in Nov. 1669 to certain poor captives redeemed from Turkish slavery, to make collections in certain counties for a year, are now expired, the persons still collecting money thereon are to be apprehended, and punished according to law. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Dec.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind:—
Vol. 281. No. Date. King's. Merchants'. Wind. Remarks.
119 Dec. 1 2 1 N.E.
120 " 2 2 1 N.E.
121 " 4 2 7 N.E.
122 " 5 3 6 S.
123 " 7 2 10 N.W.
124 " 8 2 12 N.
125 " 9 2 16 S.E. The Princess, commanded by Sir Wm. Jennings, and the merchant ships were under sail, but the wind turning, they have come in again.
126 " 11 2 11 S.W.
127 " 12 2 10
128 " 13 2 24 S.W. Ten sail of Hamburghers, outward bound, have been forced in by contrary winds.
129 " 14 2 27 S.W.
130 " 15 2 34 S.W.
131 " 16 2 32 S.W.
132 " [17] 2 37 S.W.
133 " 18 2 52 W.
134 " 20 2 48 S.W.
135 " 20 2 47 S.W. The wind bearing S.W., all the ships are anchored at night.
136 " 21 E. All except the East India ships are under sail.
137 " 24 5 S.W.
138 " 25 2 54 S.W.
139 " [27] 2 49 S.W.
140 " 28 2 53 N.
141 " 30 1 1 N. The Princess and Falcon with their convoys, and the East India ships and the rest of the fleet, which could not weigh through the stormy weather, have sailed.
1670 Tenders of goods addressed to the Navy Commissioners by merchants and manufacturers, as follows:—
Vol. 286. No. Date. Name. Article. Terms.
235 Jan. 25 Geo. Body Deals From 9s. to 16s.
236 Feb. 8 Dan. Eymes Timber and treenails 5l. per load and 6l. per mill.
237 " 8 Wm. Wood Masts Various prices.
238 " 9 John Stacey Tar From 8l. 15s. to 10l. 15s. per last.
239 " 10 Sam. Sowten 79 masts 431l. 12s.
240 " 15 Thos. Poole for Capt. Gibbs. Timber
241 " 15 Wm. Fownes Tar 10l. 10s. per last.
242 " 17 Sam. Sowten 62 masts Various prices, total 270l.
243 Mar. 1 Wm. Wood 300 loads of timber 2l. 10s. per load.
244 " 17 John Stacey Stockholm pitch 4l. 15s. per last.
245 " 19 Geo. Goffright 100 loads fir timber 2l. 10s. per load.
50 loads balks timber 2l. per load.
246 " 22 Robt. Cleeves 12 or 14 tons blackrosin. 9s. 6d. per cwt.
Contracts and minutes of contracts with the Navy Commissioners for purchase of goods:—
Vol. 286. No. Date. Name. Article. Terms.
247 Jan. Sir Wm. Warren Deals 6l. per hundred.
Spars 1s. and 5s. each.
248–250 " Ruffhead and Loader Anchors Various prices.
251 Feb. 19 Nich. Clements Timber, plank, and top hoops. 1l. 16s. to 3l. 17s. per load, and 16s. per 100 ft.
252 June 24 John Greenaway Ironwork 4d. per lb., and 1l. 9s. per cwt.
253 July 23 Chas. Newland for Fir timber 27s. a load.
Ben. Newland. Stockholm tar 9l. 18s. a last.
Deals 5l. 6s. 6d. per 100.
Rosin 8s. 6d. per cwt.
Gottenberg masts 7s. to 3l. 10s. each.
254 Aug. 6 Nich. Clements Timber to be chosen 2l. 10s. a load ready money.
255 " 8 Thos. Streaton Red deals 4l. 16s. and 7l. per hundred.
Palm trees 60 ft. long 4l. 10s.
Spars and balks 1l. 10s.
256 " 9 Thos. Gould Square and raking knees. 2s. per foot.
257 " 12 Wm. Oxford Oak plank 3l. 12s. a load.
Square and raking knees. 48s. a load.
Compass timber 30s. a load.
258 " 16 Peter Hasler Oak timber 38s. and 40s. a load.
259 " 20 Thos. Staines Tin hand lanterns 27s. a doz.
260 " 27 Peter Hasler Ash and oak timber 31s. 8d. a load.
261 " 29 Wm. Stores and Rich. Wilkes. Oak timber 40 ft. long. 1l. 16s. 6d. a load.
262 " " Fras. Page Blocks 1s. 10d. and 11d. a foot.
Seizing trucks and pins. 1s. 10d. a doz.
263 " " Wm. Cozens Oak timber 50 ft. long 38s. a load.
264 " 30 Nich. Clements Elm timber 18 ft. long 30s. 6d. a load.
Oak timber 14 to 30 ft. long. 3l. 5s. a load.
265 " " Wm. Oxford Elm timber 38s. a load.
266 Sept. 3 Chris. Coles Oak plank 3l. 18s. a load.
Ash timber 25s. 6d. a ton.
Treenails 24s. to 6l. 7s. 6d. a thousand.
267 " " Wm. Hammond Plain tiles 19s. a 1,000.
Ridge tiles 3s. a dozen.
268 " " John Fachen Elm timber 32s. a load.
269 " 8 Fras. Page Elm timber 37s. 6d. a load.
270 " " Ben. Newland Whale oil, ½ tun 20l. a tun.
271 " " " " 3,000 deals 5l. 10s. a hundred, ready money.
272 " 9 Rich. Iremonger Oak timber, 90 loads 37s. a load.
273 " 10 Wm. Hammond Timber 30s. a load.
274 " 13 Gervase Maplesden Oak timber, 20 loads 45s. a load.
275 " " Chas. Amherst Oak timber 47s. a load, 500l. to be paid 29 Sept., and the rest on delivery.
276 " " Sam. Crudd and Fras. Paley. Oak and elm timber 47s. to 35s. a load.
277 " 15 Edw. Hill Wood-burnt lime 12s. a load.
Wood-burnt stock bricks. 15s. a thousand.
278 Sept. 28 Thos. Gladwin Oak timber 57s. a load.
Knees 3l. a load.
279 Oct. 1 John Moore Square and raking knees. 1l. 10s. a foot.
280 " 7 John Polhill and John James. Oak timber 40s. a load.
281 " 10 John Watts Plain tiles 17s. a thousand.
282 " 12 John Polhill and John James. Compass oak timber 40s. a load.
283 " 14 Edw. Hills Elm and oak timber 35s. a load.
284 Nov. 2 Stephen Pyend Holland pantiles 58s. a thousand.
285 " 8 Rich. and Wm. Flight Dry broom, 3½ ft. long, 10,000. 12s. 6d. a thousand.
286 " 11 Ben. Newland Black Bordeaux rosin, 12 tuns. 8l. 3s. a tun, ready money.
287 " 12 Mark Edwards Tallow candles, 30 doz. lbs. 4s. 6d. a doz., ready money.
288 Dec. 1 " " Tallow candles, 20 doz. lbs. 5s. a doz.
289 " 9 Ben. Ekin Broom sheaves, 3,400 30s. a thousand.
290 " " John Falesberry Handspikes, 6½ ft. long, 100 doz. 4s. a doz.
291 " 30 Thos. Cockes Reed, 5 ft. long, 24,000. 22s. a thousand.

Footnotes

  • 1. The date of the Duchess of York's change of religion was December 1670, and she died 31 March 1670–1.