BHO

Charles II: February 1670

Pages 46-95

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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February 1670

Feb. 1. The King to Sir Chas. Littleton. A recruit of seamen is to be sent into the Straits, to be distributed on board Sir Thos. Allin's men-of-war. You are to order for the said service 12 good men out of each of the 5 companies of your regiment now quartering at Harwich, Landguard Fort, Deal, Gravesend, and Portsmouth, filling up their numbers again, and to deliver the men to persons appointed by the Duke of York to transport them beyond seas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 44.]
Feb. 1.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Thanks for your constancy; I hope you will continue the favour of a Gazette or two weekly. I knew not whom to address until lately, and shall be careful in giving an account of what happens in the Downs. Thirty pipes of Canary were met swimming near the North Foreland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 170.]
Feb. 1.
Deal.
Same to the same. I find by the letters from London that the report that Lord Robartes was stabbed in Ireland, and has since died, which was the cause of Lord Berkeley going thither, has been contradicted. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Feb. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The yacht Maria is to be fitted for sea; the Holmes frigate, set out as a man-of-war against the Algerines, sailed yesterday. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Feb. 1.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Five sail have put in, and confirm the news that a great French man-of-war has been cast away at Havre de Grace. The Newfoundland ships are fitting up for the fishing trade with all speed. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Feb. 1.
Portsmouth.
John Pitt to the Navy Commissioners. I beg the situation of comptroller's clerk here, vacant by death of Sam. Knight, by which I could be as serviceable on shore as I have hitherto been at sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 75.]
Feb. 1.
Dover.
Walter Braems to the Navy Commissioners. I informed you of the contract made with themasters of 2 vessels, for the carriage of Lord Fauconberg's horses to Calais, which was 75l.; I send a letter from his lordship, by which you will perceive that the masters expect an addition, from the great charge they were at in landing the horses, being compelled to employ upwards of 80 men, through a storm coming on. I request advice as to how I am to act, and upon whom I am to draw to reimburse myself. I was informed that 40l. was placed in Edw. Wivell's hands for the purpose. [Ibid. No. 76.] Encloses,
Viscount Fauconberg to Walter Braems. Thanks for civilities received at Dover. The masters of the 2 vessels which brought over my horses have unladen their charge with all care, but they complain of the extraordinary expenses they are put to in this port. I believe it is usual on such occasions, so that I suppose you may enlarge the contract you made with them; I doubt not but the Navy Commissioners will make allowances for it. Remember me to your father, whom I will visit on my return.—Calais, 2 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 76i.]
Feb. 1.
Limehouse Bridge.
Rich. Boys to the Navy Commissioners. I pay 28s. the cwt. for ordinary, and 35s. the cwt. for extraordinary ironwork, but I understand the masters pay from 36s. to 37s. 4d.[Ibid. No. 77.]
Feb. 1.
Portsmouth Ropeyard.
G. Peachy to Col. Middleton. Having as much white yarn in the by stores as will take 50 lasts of tar to tar it, and fearing it will spoil lying so long without, I wish some tar sent, that we may embrace the cold season for laying cordage, it being more suitable weather for that work than the summer. I received 6 lasts a month since, which is all expended. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Feb. 2.
London.
Capt. Edm. Chillenden to the Navy Commissioners. Having passed the account of John Page, late purser of the Happy Entrance, who gave a bond to Mr. Hayter, I beg its delivery, as Mr. Beaumont, attorney of the Exchequer, refuses to give it up without your order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 79.] Annexing,
Certificate by Thos. Pointer that he has examined the disbursements of Mr. Joanes, and cannot find any money disbursed by him upon the account of John Page.—1 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 79i.]
Feb. 2.
Deptford.
F. Hosier to the Navy Commissioners. I sent an account of the receipts and issues of stores at Deptford, but have to balance my ledger, which I cannot do without your directions to the storekeeper and clerk of the Survey, there being many errors, as mentioned, in their surveys. I foresee the impossibility of doing my duty, when it depends upon the care of others who are imperfect in their accounts, even in a time of little business. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 80.]
Feb. 2.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The St. Katherine of Southampton has arrived from Lisbon, with sugar for London, and reports that before she came away, the Katherine of London and a Portuguese came into Lisbon, who were attacked at sea by 7 Turkish men of-war. The Turks shot at the Portuguese; the English made up to assist them, and the Turks thereupon boarded the English several times, but were always cleared, insomuch that the Turks had very few men left, and were forced to leave the English. The Portuguese took advantage while the English were fighting to leave and run into port, but the Katherine afterwards came in safe, bearing the marks of that day's encounter. Her captain was rewarded with the honour of knighthood by the King of Portugal, but the Portuguese captain was turned out of his place. Lisbon is much infested by Turks, and the ship was detained 3 weeks from fear.
The John's Adventure of Salem in New England, from Maryland with tobacco for London, reports the shipping at New England to be increasing, and 30 sail upon the stocks ready to be launched. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 175.]
Feb. 2. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Feb. 2. Warrant for a licence to Jacob Hall, master of the King's rope dancers, to use rope-dancing, tumbling, vaulting, and other feats of activity, in any town throughout the kingdom. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 145.]
Feb. 2. Warrant to Sir John Howell, recorder, and the sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to insert Charles Corfield, Margaret his wife, and Charles Legree, condemned at the Old Bailey for murder of Matt. Seale, bailiff, into the next pardon for convicts of Newgate, but without the proviso for transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 30.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Passport for Colonel Andrew Reusner and family, of Neustadt, to come to England. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 146.]
Feb. 3. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Chichester Cathedral. We request you to elect Dr. Zachary Cradock, chaplain in ordinary, and prebendary of Chichester, to a canon residentiary's place, in lieu of the late Dr. Ballow, to enjoy in person or by proxy; also as Dr. Cradock is forthwith to go into Portugal, and remain some time on public service, his non-residence during that time is to be dispensed with. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 15.]
Feb. 3. Warrant to pay to Phil. Howard 400l. as the King's free gift. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 132.]
Feb. 3. Congé d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Chichester to elect a Bishop to that see, void by the death of Dr. King. [Ibid.]
[Feb. 3.] Petition of Sir John Warre to the King, for the office of comptroller of customs at Bridgewater, void by the death of — Pinkney. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 177.] Annexing,
Sir John Warre to [Francis] Lord Hawley, M.P., Scotland Yard, London. Pinkney, comptroller of the customs at Bridgewater, died last Monday; I wish for a grant of the place, worth 50l. or 60l. a year, as I could sell it for 300l. or 400l.; if there is any hope, I will come to town, but would not come needlessly, for so small an affair. I will send the name of the person who will execute the office.—3 Feb. [Ibid. No. 177i.]
Feb. 3 ? Petition of René Petit, King's agent in Picardy, Normandy, and Brittany, to the King, for relief and protection against Justice Bridges, who on ill information sues Margaret Green, now his wife, for calling him a fool and knave, though on submission, he promised to stop proceedings. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Feb. 3.
Essex House.
C. Cratford to Viscount Conway. I will give a further account as soon as the bill for 300l. is received. I have lent 1,000l. of your lordship's money at interest to Sir Edmond Pye of Bradenham, Bucks, on land there which I think you will approve of when you see it. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Feb. 3.
The Savoy.
Miles Smyth to Williamson. Dr. Joseph Beaumont, Master of Peter House, Cambridge, is the person for whom the King's letter for the [Regius] professorship is to issue, and it is to be directed to the Vice-Chancellor and six electors of Cambridge; the Bishop elect will wait upon you with their names and style. No haste is needed; the King having promised that the Bishop shall hold it for some time longer, and that Dr. Beaumont shall succeed, it cannot be void until the Bishop has relinquished or resigned. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Feb. 3.
Serjeants' Inn.
Sir Wm. Morton, Justice [of the King's Bench], to Williamson. I know Gill, confined at Norwich, to be a great cheat, having had him on my list; he has been confined in Salisbury, Reading, Newbury, and other gaols, and it is therefore fit he should not be admitted to bail, until he has been viewed by one that knows him and [Humble] Ashenhurst. I suspect he is Thos. Hill, the great and notorious cheat, and Granger's right hand, whom I fetched by Lord Arlington's order from Exeter, and committed to Newgate, and afterwards to the King's Bench for trial, for cheating the Bishop of Winchester of 600l., Mr. Milbankes of Newcastle of 1,000l., and divers others to the value of 10,000l.; from thence he broke prison—as 'tis said by the connivance of the deputy marshal—and has since been cheating in Norfolk. I want an order to Mr. Corie, to keep him in prison until I have been to see him, which I will do immediately on order from Lord Arlington. I send a copy of [Joshua] Bowes' examination before me, by which it will be seen he makes no discovery of any other robbery in Whitehall, save of Lord Arlington's standish, and your goods, and so I am apt to believe that neither he nor his wife knows anything of the robbery of the King's plate, nor of that of the Duke of York. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 181.]
Feb. 3.
Deptford.
W. Fownes to the Navy Commissioners. Are the artificers and labourers of the yard to be allowed 5 days during the year ? They pretend that it has been usual, since the Restoration, to work but half the day on 30 January, Shrove Tuesday, 23 April, 29 May, and 5 November, and yet have allowance for the whole day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 81.]
Feb. 3.
The James, Harwich.
Geo. Roberts to the Navy Commissioners. I am still lying here wind-bound, as are also 20 other vessels bound northwards, some of which have been forced in without cable or anchor. I want provisions. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Feb. 3.
London.
Isaac Stockman to the Navy Commissioners. The lowest price I can take for the 34 masts 16½–23 hands tendered and brought from Riga in the Angel Gabriel is 2,000l., and 300l. for the other 54 of 9½–20½ hands; I cannot sell them in parcels. [Ibid. No. 83.] Annexing,
List of the sizes of the masts tendered, and the prices of each; also particulars of others offered. [Ibid. No. 83i–83iii.]
Feb. 3.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and 2 others to the Navy Commissioners. There have been many petty embezzlements from the yard in the night time; the watch does not come on until 7 p.m., and goes off at 5 a.m., but there are three men to look out in the interim. When anything is missing, they all affirm it was not lost in their time, so that we are at a loss to find out what is lost, or to discover the connivance or neglect, although we may know who was on duty when when the things were taken. To prevent such inconveniences, it will be better to offer some encouragement to the watch, and direct them to leave work at 4 o'clock when it is their turn to watch, and come again when the men leave, and stay until the men return in the morning, so that whenever anything is wanting, we shall know whom to charge with it. They have only 8d. a night, and most of them would rather be discharged. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Feb. 3.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley and Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. A servant of the late clerk of the comptrol having removed some of his books since his death, we thought it necessary to secure his ledger for the King, and have put a lock on his office door until your further order. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Feb. 3. Account by Thos. Forrest of the value of clothing supplied by Major Thos. Beckford to 30 ships named in the Straits, under Sir Thos. Allin, total 5,855l. 5s. 3d.; besides which he has 2,000l. more in my hands and at Portsmouth. With note by Major Beckford to the Navy Commissioners. Cotton suits cannot be made for the price set down in the instructions; I beg they may be rated at 4s. each, canvas suits at 5s. 6d., and other articles as mentioned; the rest I will comply with according to the prices named. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 86.]
Feb. 4. Earl of Anglesey to the Navy Commissioners. As you were constant witnesses of my diligence and impartiality as Treasurer of the Navy, I doubt not, now that the Commissioners at Brooke House have pressed me for my account, that you will give it a quick despatch, with such allowances as have been granted to my predecessors without scruple. Since my last attendance at the Board in a frosty season, I have been confined to my bed with gout, otherwise I would have waited upon you; but I have commanded [Rob.] Waith and [John] Fenn to attend you and observe your commands. I beg you to spare me a little more time, that my account may be perfected before the meeting of Parliament. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Feb. 4.
Greenwich.
John Clements to Mr. Hayter. Let the bearer, Hatton Hughes, have some ruled paper for our pay books. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Feb. 4. The petition of Sir John Robinson, concerning the Wardenship of Farmingwoods, with the report of the Attorney-General thereon, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 93.]
Feb. 4. The petition of Ralph Darnall and his son, stating that they have a farm of the lease of Shaw farm, in New Windsor, for 23 years, but Mr. Bagnold pretends a grant of the reversion, referred to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. p. 94.]
Feb. 4. Petition of the African Company trading to the north parts of Guinea, to the King, for licence to export 3,000 or 4,000 lbs. of cruell on paying customs therefor, notwithstanding an ancient statute to the contrary, although it is a manufacture of this kingdom; unless the natives can obtain it from England, they will go to the Hollanders, to the great prejudice of the company. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 182.]
[Feb. 4.] Petition of Lady Kath. Morley to the King, for payment out of the Queen Mother's revenue, settled for payment of debts, of 1,000l., part of her portion, lent by her father, [Francis Leke, first] Earl of Scarsdale, to the Queen in 1643. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Feb. 4. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 93.]
Feb. 4. Petition of Joshua Bowes, prisoner in the Gatehouse, to Jos. Williamson, J.P., secretary to Lord Arlington. Repents his offences which have merited punishment, and begs that his 2 indictments may be made into one; that he may live to glorify God by a holy conversation; and that his wife may be set at liberty, Judge Morton having desired the gentleman that brought the examination to entreat her release, she being entirely innocent of anything the petitioner has committed, and being deprived of everything she possessed, and almost starved. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 184.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Rich. Lightfoot, keeper of Bushey Park, to enclose 30 acres and plough and sow it for 3 years, and then lay it down for grass, sowing it with saint foin, the lawn and a greater part of the park being poor and barren, overgrown with rushes and molehills, and not having been broken up for many years. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 185.]
Feb. 4. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 5.]
Feb. 4. Petition of Wm. Palmes to the King, for a grant of the tolls and profits of a yearly fair and weekly market to be held at Malton, co. York, which prove on inquisition to be of no prejudice to other fairs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 185a.]
Feb. 4. Warrant for a grant to Wm. Palmes of the said fair and market. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, p. 5.]
Feb. [4.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 144.]
Feb. 4. Letter to the executors of the old Farmers of the Customs for the payment of 450l., a debt appearing by affidavit due to Frances Lignere. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 43. See p. 11, supra.]
[Feb. 4.]
Court at Whitehall.
The King [to the Lord Keeper]. Benj. Mildmay having clearly made out his right to the barony of Fitzwalter, from Rob. Fitzwalter, 23 Edw. I., a writ is to be issued under the Great Seal, summoning him to the House of Peers for 14 Feb. next, as Benj. Mildmay de Fitzwalter, chevalier. [See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 288, S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 185b.]
Feb. 4. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 5.]
Feb. 4. Presentation of Nicholas Only to the rectory of Cottesmore, co. Rutland, void by promotion of Dr. Peter Gunning. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 1.]
Feb. 4. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 186.]
Feb. 4. Presentation of Wm. Rolfe to the rectory of Stoke Bruern, co. Northampton, void by promotion of Dr. Gunning. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 1.]
Feb. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 144.]
Feb. 4. James Hickes to [Williamson]. Pray read an enclosure to Mr. Perrott, concerning Ralph Rope of Coventry. He declined Muddiman by my means in your interest; he is honest and ingenious, I am confident. I do not know that he keeps a coffee house, but he is a baker. I am confident that what news is worthy of notice he will give clearly and handsomely. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 187.]
Feb. 5.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Bad snowy weather and cross winds hinder all commerce, and no packet-boat has gone over since Mr. Osborne went last Saturday. Ships come in daily for shelter, and we expect to hear of more shipwrecks, as pieces of plank and other materials have been picked up. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Feb. 5. Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, to Williamson. I would have waited on you about entering a caveat in your office, but have a cold. If you will do the favour required, let me know, so that I may enter it at the other offices. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 189.] Enclosing,
Memorandum that Lady Wentworth desires a caveat to be entered in both the secretaries' offices, to prevent any man from obtaining a warrant from his Majesty for a presentation to the parsonage of St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, Middlesex, for simony or any other title pretended to be in his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 189i.]
[Feb. 5.] Petition of Philadelphia, widow of Thomas, Lord Wentworth, to the King, for his influence with the Bishop of London, that his Majesty's late grant to Ralph Davenant of the parsonage of Stepney—a sinecure worth 100l. a year—may not prejudice herself and her child; but that she may renew her lease thereof on expiration of the present lease, although Davenant, on pretence of simony in Dr. Johnson, the parson, has obtained institution thereto, wishing to defeat her of her interest in the lease. The estate was injured to the value of 5,000l. by his Majesty's grant to Lady Belhaven, and petitioner spent 2,000l. to clear it therefrom, so that the estate to descend to her child is in wasted condition. [Ibid. No. 189a.]
[Feb. 5.] Like petition, for stay of proceedings, and reference of her cause to fitting persons. The Earl of Cleveland, and Thomas, late Lord Wentworth, granted the next avoidance of Whitechapel parsonage, after the death of Dr. Johnson, parson there, and also of Stepney parish church, to Ant. Etherick, who procured his Majesty's presentation for Mr. Davenant, on pretence of Dr. Johnson's simony, alleging it was only for quiet enjoyment thereof; they leased it to her for 20l. a year, being the old rent, on condition of the taking off his Majesty's title; has performed her part of the agreement, but they fail in theirs. [Ibid. No. 189b.]
Feb. 5.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. John Tillotson, chaplain in ordinary, of the prebend in Canterbury void by promotion of Dr. Peter Gunning to the bishopric of Chichester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 14.]
Feb. 5. The King to the Mercers' Company, or their committee appointed to manage the affairs of the hospital of Greenwich. Roger, Earl of Castlemaine, is your tenant of some houses near Charing Cross, granted to his ancestors by the Earl of Northampton, founder of Greenwich, whereof you are governors and overseers. The lease is nearly expired, and the Earl, being abroad, fears lest some other person obtain it. We recommended him before for renewal of his lease, but it could not be then done, as the lease was not within 3 or 4 years of expiring. We hear that you are now treating with the Earl's agents, and therefore request you to gratify him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 44.]
Feb. 5. Petition of Sir Thos. Peneystone, Bart., Cornwell, co. Oxon., to the King, for licence to enclose 3 footpaths on his estate there, on condition of laying out others as convenient, the same being pronounced not prejudicial by the juries on 2 inquisitions of ad quod damnum. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 189c.]
Feb. 5. Licence to Sir Thos. Peneystone to enclose the said footpaths and also a highway. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 6.]
Feb. 5. Warrant for a congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of St. Asaph to elect a bishop to that see, void by the death of Dr. Hen. Glenham, and recommending Dr. Isaac Barrow. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 2.]
Feb. [5.] Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 144.]
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Petition of the Mayor, &c., of Winchester to the King, for release of the payment of 50 marks yearly fee-farm rent, part of 100 which they formerly paid, but reduced to 50 because of the decay of their town; were never in so low a condition as now; the late castle was turned into rubbish during the troubles, many houses burned, and the city treasure exhausted through loyalty; the citizens presented their plate and a large sum of money raised on credit to the late King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 190.] Annexing,
Account of remissions of fee-farm rents granted by former sovereigns to the city of Winchester, and note that the houses which paid most of it were burned in the late war. [Ibid. No. 190i.]
[Feb. 5.] Petition of the Mayor, &c., of Winchester to the King. Similar in effect, uniting the substance of the 2 preceding papers. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Feb. 5. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 94.]
Feb. 5. Capt. Rich. Beach to the Navy Commissioners. My surgeon being very ill, desired me to clear his account, which I did, when [Jas.] Pearse appointed the bearer, Rich. Plaw, and ordered him to take care of some medicines for the fleet. I beg your compliance therein, and that he may have time to despatch his business before we sail. I cannot attend you from illness. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 89.]
Feb. 6.
Portsmouth.
Thos. Eastwood to the Navy Commissioners. I marked 5 or 6 years since a parcel of timber belonging to Mr. Cardonnel, lying near Redbridge, which was intended as piles for the dock, but having some such timber brought into the yard, this was refused, and has since lain there so long that it is of little worth. Capt. Greene having now seized it on behalf of the King, I am ready to take oath before the Mayor of Southampton or any other magistrate,—as can several others—that it never belonged to the King. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Feb. 6.
Milford.
John Powell to Williamson. The harbour is destitute of ships. I have not received the usual correspondence which, if continued, is to be sent to John Coursey at Pembroke, who will report all the news in return. I have written you by each post. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 1.]
Feb. 6.
Milford.
Same to Hickes. To the same effect. Also; Your Gazettes are frequently opened by the postmaster here, so I have them only at second-hand. My letters to you may have been opened, as yours to me have been. During my absence, direct to John Coursey. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Feb. 7.
Board of Greencloth.
Board of Greencloth to the Duke of Ormond [Lord Steward of the Household]. The above agreement was made by Col. Thos. Napier with the officers of the Board, and the surrender of his patent will be convenient for the service of the Household with salt cod, and ling. It would be better to grant the 100l. a year for the lives of Col. Napier and his wife, than for the 26 years yet unexpired of his grant. [7 signatures. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 3.] Prefixing,
Order by the Board of Greencloth, that Col. Napier be allowed 100l. a year for surrender of his patent to serve salt fish for the Household, to be payable by the cofferer from the profits of the fish.—25 June 1669. [Ibid. No. 3i.] Affixing,
Request by Napier that the salt fish due by contract to his Majesty from the shipowners of Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk, be collected as it was last year, and promise that he will not interfere with the collection, but give up his patent in 30 days.—6 Aug. 1669. [Ibid. No. 3ii.]
Feb. 7.
Loddington.
Dr. J. Bentham to Williamson. Mr. Spelman, Registrar of the Charterhouse, has found the Queen's letter in favour of my son Godfrey, and has promised that it shall take its right course. The archdeaconry of Huntingdon, which was vacant by the death of my cousin, Dr. [Hen.] Downhall, and offered by the Bishop of Lincoln to Dr. [Rich.] Perincheif, being again free by his absolute refusal to accept it, I beg you again to recommend me to the bishop. Although the profit is not great, yet I should have an opportunity to serve the Church, and I hope, by constant attendance at the visitation and the principal court, to give his lordship satisfaction. [Perincheif was collated 2 April 1670. Ibid. No. 4.]
Feb. 7.
Ednall.
Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. The snow having increased and blown into such great drifts, I am not able to travel 5 miles, which is no little trouble to me, having purposed to attend the meeting of Parliament. If his Majesty or the House should take notice of my absence, pray explain the reason. I will not delay one day after there is any probability of a passage. I have not received the news-letters or any others the last post. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Feb. 7.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Wm. Wardour. I ask, on behalf of the Treasury Commissioners, for a certificate or account of moneys paid into the Exchequer, from 1 Jan. 1669 to 1 Jan. 1670, on the Fire Hearths and Customs, and of what has been paid out upon debentures, pensions, and salaries. [Ibid. No. 6.]
[Feb. 7.] Laurence Arbilleur, doctor in surgery, native of Besancon in Burgundy, to the King. I have served in the armies of his Catholic Majesty [the King of Spain] 16 years as surgeon, in Flanders and Italy, and also in Burgundy, where I was surgeon-extraordinary of the Governor, and ordinary of the Condé de Molina when he resided in this court. I have lived here 8 years, and have a wife and child, and being like an Englishman born, I have given proofs of my zeal to your Majesty, having risked my life for preservation of your subjects in the last plague, and proved my science in the relief I have given. I beg the post of surgeon-extraordinary to your person. [2 pages. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 7.] Annexing,
Certificate by the Earl of Craven in favour of the petitioner, that during the plague in 1665, he was ready to venture his person, and to apply his medicines and plasters to all who desired his assistance. Signed and sealed.—7 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 7i.]
Feb. 7. Dispensation for Sir Ralph Bovey, Bart., High Sheriff of Bedfordshire, to repair to London or elsewhere, as his occasions require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 147.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Sec. Trevor to Sir John Kelynge, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. The King wishes him to grant a writ of certiorari, to have the five Frenchmen, apprehended at Hatfield for a robbery in Bedfordshire, tried at the King's Bench bar next term. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 31.] Annexing,
Lord Holles to Sec. Trevor. I request you to obtain me a writ of certiorari. The judges have power to grant it, but I think they will not unless the King desire it. I believe they would hang or condemn these men if they could; though their innocence is manifest, those butchers will still swear it, though three of the real thieves have confessed the robbery; and then a country jury will easily find these innocent persons guilty, and have them hanged before anybody knows it. They ought to be tried in London, because being strangers, half the jury should be strangers, which could not be in the country, and it would be expensive to carry down 30 or 40 witnesses, who can prove that they were in London when the robbery was committed in Bedfordshire.—6 Feb. 1670. [2 pages. Ibid.]
Feb. 7. Warrant to the Chief Justice of King's Bench and the recorder or sheriffs of London, to release Henry Wright, condemned to transportation at the Old Bailey for picking a pocket, on his giving security to transport himself at his own charge to the foreign plantations, he being a tailor and having 4 small children. [Ibid.]
Feb. 7.
Portsmouth Ropeyard.
G. Peachy to the Navy Commissioners. I have received 5 lasts of Bergen tar, which has been expended on the ropeyard account. I send an account of tar received since December, of which 11 lasts and 2 barrels have been used. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 91.] Annexing,
Account of tar received from Deptford between 29 Dec. and 4 Feb., amounting to 16 lasts, 1 barrel. [Ibid. No. 91i.]
Feb. 7.
Dover.
Walter Braems to the Navy Commissioners. I have discharged the 2 vessels, paid 75l., and accepting of your Honours' kindness, have drawn a bill upon you for 80l., payable to Rich. Mounteney, for the use of the Farmers of the Customs in London. Noted, "For carriage of Lord Fauconberg's horses to Calais." [Ibid. No. 92.]
Feb. 7.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. You are to attend the Treasury Commissioners on Wednesday, when they and his Royal Highness intend considering the estimate presented by the Navy Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 93.] Annexing,
Account by Surveyor Thos. Middleton, of provisions judged necessary to complete the hulk; to fit out for sea service all the ships at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, and Portsmouth; to finish the new ship building; to repair the docks, wharfs, and buildings of the yards, and to supply stores; together with an estimate of the charge thereof, and the ordinary and extra charge of salaries and wages of the said ships and yards; also of Upnor Castle, and rent of ground, for the year 1670; total 224,848l. 11s. 8d. [5¼ pages. Ibid. No. 93i.]
Feb. 8.
outhampton.
Capt. Emondes Greene to the Navy Commissioners. I hope to be able to give a good account of the great trust reposed in me by his Royal Highness. I attended Justice Stewkley myself, in order to the prosecution of several offenders, my assistant—although active in making discoveries—being a young man, and likely to fail. I caused several persons to be bound over to answer their defaults at the Winton assizes, and hope some of them will be made an example of, so as to deter others. Mr. Stewkley informed me of the substance of the commission entrusted to him and Col. Norton by you, and stated that some grand abuses had been proved by several witnesses. I replied that you were resolved, when proofs were to be had, to communicate them to his Royal Highness.
What am I to do with the timber I seized at Redbridge and Hampton, with the King's mark upon it, amounting to 18 tons Adam de Cardonel claims it, and alleges that he procured the King's mark to be put on it, so as to prevent his creditors seizing it for debt; but if such a thing is suffered, no officer will be able to make a discovery. My assistant has taken 3 cross-bar shots at the house of Malachi Horner, at Bishop's Waltham, but as they had not the King's mark, and as there was no one to swear they belonged to him, the justice was at a loss what to do. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Feb. 8.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. Through the promise of punctual payment, I have effected the contract sent, and hope it will be approved, as a similar bargain is not to be found in these parts. I went to Emsworth and viewed the timber there, but there are not 14 knees in the whole parcel, and nothing will be abated of 5l. a load. I have set the mast of the Advice, and shall give all possible despatch to the Mary yacht, and the other works in hand. [Ibid. No. 95.] Enclosing,
Contract with Nich. Clements and Cuthbert Archer, to deliver at Portsmouth 40 loads of knee timber by 28 March, and 40 similar loads by 28 May, at 48s. a load ready money on the delivery of every 40 loads; also 120 loads of straight and compass timber by 30 June, at 38s. a load.—Portsmouth, 2 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 95i.]
Feb. 8.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. I want 2,000 yards of French canvas, for making the sails of the Advice and Mary yacht. It was formerly demanded, but none has been supplied since the 1,000 yards for the Queen ship. The making of sails by the King's sailmaker proves tedious work: it is a month since I gave him a warrant for making them, and I cannot get any, for want of men and materials mentioned. The Advice will be in good forwardness in a few days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 96.]
Feb. 8.
Deptford.
W. Fownes to Thos. Hayter. Pray move the Board as to how many men are to be borne on the Queen frigate, and what wages are to be allowed the master, while she is in harbour, as Lord Brouncker expects an account of the ordinary and extra every week. Is the watch to be increased, or remain as it is ? [Ibid. No. 97.]
Feb. 8. John Moorhouse to the Navy Commissioners. There are 1,000 oaks standing in Aliceholt Forest, which if felled, would produce a great deal of serviceable timber; but if allowed to stand, will soon come to nothing but fuel, as they are continually being chopped and hacked about in the night by the inhabitants, until at last they fall, when the keepers take them for logs.
In Whittlewood Forest there are 3,000 oaks already lopped and headed by the keepers which, had the heads been allowed to grow until the body had come to maturity, would have produced many good knees; but the cutting not only destroys the knee timber, but the body also; if some speedy course is not taken, they will also be fit for nothing but logs. The lops are sold in the spring for 6s. a tree to the men of the country, which is the keeper's work; the oaks are felled under pretence of browse for the deer.
There are 4 coppices named in Whittlewood Forest where a deal of timber has been felled, and if the rest and the underwood were felled together, and the coppices enclosed, in 9 years there would be more fore shoots of oaks than all the trees removed. In both forests also there are many pollards, which are only fit to lop to make browse for the deer. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Feb. 8.
Margate.
John Culmer to Col. Middleton. I have satisfied the men at Margate for weighing the anchor and cable left in Westgate Bay by the Anne yacht, and have sent them up with the buoy, ropes, and topsail yard, and paid the carriage, an account of which I will give when I come up. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Feb. 8. Sir Wm. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letter desiring a tender of Gottenburg masts for ready money, giving the number, and the time in which I could deliver them. I informed you, on 9 Feb. 1669, that there were 360 masts at Gottenburg, properly belonging to his Majesty, and 259 in New England; and in March last, I proposed fetching them home, all of which I will undertake to deliver into the stores by the last of June, if you will enter into a contract to pay for them within 2 months after delivery. If you come to a full contract with me for the masts, I will quit my claim to 755 rix dollars, or 1,889l. sterling, which I have disbursed for you about these masts the last 3 years.
I beg leave to remind you of 259 masts remaining in New England, and give their dimensions as well as of those at Gottenburg, together with the prices, varying from 36l. to 7s. per mast in those at Gottenburg, and from 135l. to 15l. each for those in New England, for which prices I will deliver them, free of all other charges, at Deptford and Woolwich the ensuing summer—danger of the seas excepted—unless some of them have gone adrift and been lost, having bought the whole of them for the service 3 years since. I beg your early determination, as the spring is the best and cheapest time to hire ships, and as yet there is no great fear of any enemy at sea, to prevent their coming home in safety. This will not only conduce to his Majesty's supply, but be a means of determining the long account which I have depending in the office. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 100.]
Feb. 8.
Dover.
Capt. John Kelsy, of the Fanfan, to the Navy Commissioners. Shall I victual at Dover or elsewhere ? My provisions will be expended in 8 days. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Feb. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. Count de Guldenlew's gentleman of the horse, with the rest of his attendants, has gone in the packetboat for Holland, fearing his stay for the sailing of the Danish man-of-war from Harwich would be deemed too long. The weather being so severe and the frost so hard, I believe they are all frozen up in Holland, as none of the packet-boats have come in from thence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 8.]
Feb. 8. Sir George Downing to Williamson. I send a return of what the Treasury Commissioners think fit to be done in Mr. Parry's business, who is to be appointed receiver of the remainder of the Queen's portion. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Feb. 9.
Rydal.
Dan. Fleming to Williamson. Although some stop is put to my intelligence, and I am directed to make my addresses to another, yet I must now and then trouble you. A great conventicle of 200 Independents was lately held at the house of George Archer, a stiff Nonconformist, who was very active in the late rebellion; whereupon I drew out warrants against as many as I could discover, and got the Mayor of Kendal and some other justices to join, though some refused, which gives encouragement to the fanatics. We have ordered the offenders to be brought before us at Kendal next Saturday, and intend to examine and bind them over to the next Quarter Sessions, where they shall be indicted, if order is not received to the contrary.
The fanatics have grown bolder of late, and several Nonconformist ministers ride about and make a bustle, as if they were designing more mischief, which is probable from the reports. I am confident the late clashing between the Lords and Commons, and the General's death have much encouraged them, and am assured if the King ever trusts them, he will be decived. Knowing well their disaffection to the Government, and their number and boldness in the county, I intend, while in authority, to watch their actings, and to help to punish them, and hope to receive encouragement from above. Valentine's Day drawing near, I shall wish the two Houses of Parliament so to pair as that there may be no more disputes about privileges, or anything else good for King or kingdom.
I observe that our neighbours are strengthening themselves at sea, and that our back-friends grow bolder at home. I wish the penalties for not going to church, and not observing the sacrament, holy, and fish days, were all put in execution, and were taken by Act of Parliament from the poor and others, who are little better for them, and given to the King, namely, 4/5 to the use of his Navy, or herring fishery, and 1/5 to the use of the train bands in each county, to be divided amongst the officers (who have now no pay) and the soldiers, for encouragement; if all conventiclers were punished as rioters, and their fines so disposed of, it would strengthen the King at the charge of his enemies.
I wish also, as a means of checking the great exaction of fees by attorneys, solicitors, and proctors, that it was enacted that the judges of each court should be obliged to agree on a table of moderate fees in their respective courts—which table should be enrolled in each court, and in the Sessions Roll of each county— and that if any person should exceed the table, he should be well punished. I could likewise wish that there were a law for obliging all persons to pay their just proportion towards the repair of churches and chapels, and the paying of ministers' ancient stipends; and that the Statute for tithes of 2 and 3 Edw. VI., c. 13., were extended to personal and mixed, as well as predial tithes, and to the County Court as well as the Courts at Westminster, and gave costs as well as damages at common law; that the heralds were empowered to supply the defect of not taking inquisitions, and that land banks and registers were erected in every county, which would increase his Majesty's revenue and trade, would raise the value of land, and decrease suits and frauds. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 10.]
Feb. 9.
Dover.
Jo. Carlile to Williamson. I understand that Lord Ambassador Fauconberg has made complaint of the incivilities of this port, but I judge he had no cause, as the payment of the droits of the harbour was left to his pleasure, and he only paid 2s. 6d. per horse, which is collected by Mr. Houseman, Sir John Bennet's deputy, for the use of Mr. Lightfoot, master of the horse to the Duke of Buckingham, which his lordship seemed disgusted at; as to the droit belonging to the water bailiff, which office I farm, though I waited upon him 3 days, as also did Squire Breames, chief officer in the Customs House here, he did not pay a penny. The Mayor also tendered his service at church, and intended waiting upon him at his lodgings, but he did not require it. The 2 packet-boats which went with the mails to Nieuport, but could not get in for the frost, have returned. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Feb. 9.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The long northerly winds have carried several vessels to Morlaix, St. Malo, and other places abroad, and many are expected home the first southerly wind. Thanks for the news-letters; I beg a continuance of them. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Feb. 9.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Thanks for the Gazette, as it often speaks at large of that which the letters scarcely hint at. The enclosed (missing) will show that John Ketchrell of Deal is 300l. in arrear for his ketch, and if you are acquainted with those concerned, he will give you 40l. to get it paid, and send you the bills signed. I could get you money apace, by seamen's tickets, if you and the clerks of that office are acquainted. The wind is at south-east and blowy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 13.]
Feb. 9. James Hickes to Williamson. Will you supply Mr. Hope of Coventry with the written news, as Muddiman supplies Throgmorton there, which tends to Hope's prejudice and yours ? [Ibid. No. 14.]
Feb. 9.
Custom House, London.
Sir Rob. Vyner and 2 other Farmers of Customs, to Lord Arlington. We have made inquiry into the cause of the detention of 2 French shallops, and find they are not the same as were recovered in the Exchequer, but one was brought into Dover by a King's frigate plying on that coast, and proceeded against in the Admiralty Court there; the other was detained at Rye by Lightfoot, an officer there, upon account of some French tonnage, which we cannot inquire into, being no part of our concernment. [Ibid. No. 15.] Enclosing,
John Martin, collector at Rye, to the Farmers of Customs. Particulars of the cause of the imprisonment of one Lucy, master of the Prophet of Calais, for refusing to pay tonnage; also of the capture of a French vessel by Capt. Kelsy, commander of the Fanfan, for landing passengers at the light near Lydd, which vessel the Duke of York has ordered to be detained, as the master brought a passenger for England, with a great packet of letters from an unknown hand. —Rye, 5 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 15i.]
Feb. 9.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Duke of York be authorised to give directions for setting free the said 2 shallops, and the masters and mariners belonging to them, and for restoring all their goods, merchandise, tackle, &c., if any have been taken away. [Ibid. No. 16.]
[Feb. 9.] Petition of Morrice Dilladale, page of the Bedchamber, to the King, for a grant of the goods, lands, &c., of John Massey of Briggate, Leeds, who destroyed himself. [Ibid. No. 16a.]
Feb. 9. Caveat in favour of Mr. Deladale, that nothing pass of the estate of Jo. Massey, late of Briggate, Leeds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 8.]
Feb. 9. Grant to Charles, Lord Buckhurst, of a pension of 1,000l. a year as Gentleman of the Bedchamber. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 7.]
Feb. 9. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 17.]
Feb. Docquets of the above, dated 19 and 28 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, Nos. 136, 143.]
Feb. 9. Warrant to John Webb to use all lawful means to preserve the game under his charge within 10 miles of Whitehall, as also the ducks and fowls in St. James's Park, many persons presuming to destroy the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 7.]
Feb. 9. Declaration that Sir Algernon May shall hold and enjoy the office of Keeper of the Records in the Tower during pleasure; fee 500l. a year. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 134.]
Feb. 9. J. Sotherne to Pepys. I send the indent of the purser of the Warwick, for victuals furnished to her by Sir Edw. Spragg, which should have been sent you with his Royal Highness's letter for paying the money to Capt. Cocke. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 102.]
Feb. 10.
The Emsworth, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. Coming up the river on Saturday night, a fishing vessel of Barking ran foul of our stern, and broke the rope attached to the boat, which was lost; upon finding what she had done, she made off. The Custom House smack last year lost her boat in the same manner, which sank outright. I have been from Gravesend to Sheerness making inquiries, and left instructions with several persons, but cannot hear anything of it, and cannot say whether it was sunk, stolen, or drifted. It was very old, and not worth 30s., but nevertheless answered my purpose; as I shall be put to inconvenience for want of one, I beg another, together with the things lost in her, viz., a mast, sail, oars, grapnel, and rope. I informed you that the [clerk of the] cheque [Phin. Pett] had made out tickets for himself and servant on board, and demanded victuals till 31 Jan., which I have refused until I have your orders, as it will bring me supernumerary men. I have only 15 days' provisions on board. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Feb. 10.
Deal.
John Culmer to the Navy Commissioners. To the same effect as his letter to Col. Thos. Middleton of 8 Feb. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Feb. 10.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. Pray send down a master for the Advice, she being ready to receive her provisions and men. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Feb. 10.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Wildman of Harwich has arrived from Waterford, bound for Holland, laden with beef, tallow, and hides. She reports Ireland to be well-affected with the government of the Lord Lieutenant; there was a talk there that, on his first coming over, the English presented him with a large sum of money, with the hope that he would be kind and favourable to them, which he rejected, and told them that he had come to do justice and right to all people, and that they were not to expect any more favour than the others; this gave satisfaction to all parties. The Beckoroffe of Amsterdam has come in from Bordeaux with wines, and says she came out in company of 100 sail of Dutch and English, but left them at sea. The Prosperous of Dover has also come in, with 4 or 5 more from the Downs bound for France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 18.]
Feb. 10. Same to Hickes. To the like effect. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Feb. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The English and Dutch packet-boats arrived yesterday, and report that the frost is very great in Holland, and the like scarcely remembered. Some English merchants have come over in them from Hamburg, who say that the Hamburghers threaten that the English shall not abide there, or enjoy any privileges, if his Majesty forces them to make satisfaction for the loss of the English ships they turned out of the Boom, at which these merchants seemed to be not much concerned. The Danish man-of-war still remains at Harwich. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 20.]
Feb. 10. Sir George Downing to Wm. Wardour. I ask, on behalf of the Treasury Commissioners, for a certificate as to what is in arrear to the Earl of St. Albans for creation money. With certificate by Wardour that 80l. is due for 4 years' arrears at 20l. a year. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Feb. 10. Warrant to Sir Thos. Morgan to deliver up Edw. Salmon, a prisoner at Jersey, to be conveyed to Guernsey. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 7.]
Feb. 10. Warrant for conveyance of Salmon, and for his delivery to the Governor of Guernsey. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 10. Warrant to Sir Jonathan Atkins to receive the above Salmon prisoner for dangerous practices. Minute. [Ibid.]
[Feb. 10.] Draft of the above 3 warrants. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 22.]
Feb. 10. Licence for Rich. Berney, sheriff of Norfolk, to be absent from his county as his occasions shall require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 45.]
Feb. 10. Licence for Hector Phillips, sheriff of Cardiganshire, to live out of his county. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 11. Dispensation to Haines Barlee, High Sheriff of cos. Cambridge and Huntingdon, to repair to Essex or elsewhere. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 147.]
Feb. 11. Like dispensation to Sir Rob. Dryden, Bart., High Sheriff of Warwickshire, to repair to Northamptonshire or elsewhere. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 11. Warrant for denization of Eliz. Hodgekin. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 11. The petition of William, Lord Widdrington, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, the King inclining to gratify him in his suit, and they are to report on his proposition of contenting Mr. Ricaut therefrom. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 98.]
Feb. 11. The petition of Major Beckford, for payment of the interest at 6 per cent. of 3,000l. charged on the hearth money, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, as the privy seal from which he was to have been paid does not warrant the payment. If payment cannot be made from any privy seal now in being, they are to draw a privy seal on purpose. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 98.]
Feb. 11. Reference of Lady Sanderson's petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. p. 99.]
Feb. 11. The petition of Col. Thos. Howard of Berks, for assistance in obtaining a debt of 300l. due from the Queen Mother, referred to the Treasury Commissioners, who are to inquire from the Earl of St. Albans the state of the debt, as the King is disposed to gratify him if the matter be as alleged. [Ibid.]
Feb. 11. Commission to Thos. Windham to be cornet to Major Fras. Windham's troop, in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book, 35a, f. 1.]
Feb. 11.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Ellis, chaplain to the late Bishop of St. Asaph, to the King, for a presentation to corroborate his title to the prebend of Llanyfidd in the cathedral of St. Asaph, to which he was collated by the late Bishop; being then with the Bishop in the south, he could not go to St. Asaph to be personally installed, but sent his proxy, whereby he fears he is not legally invested. With reference thereon to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, and his report in favour of the petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 24.]
Feb. 11.
Plymouth.
Sebastian Pennicott to Hickes. Excuse Mr. Clarke's not writing, on account of his weakness. The Newfoundland ships sailed two days since, but it is expected they will be forced back by the winds. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Feb. 11.
Deptford.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. I request you to grant a warrant to Wm. Bryant to be master of the Advice, under my command. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 106.]
Feb. 12. Papers relating to a contract with Mr. Ruffhead for the smith's work at Chatham, viz.:—
Feb. 1, 1670. John Ruffhead to the Navy Commissioners. To put an end to my chargeable attendance, I am ready to sign a contract to serve his Majesty with articles mentioned at 4d. a lb.; the ordinary and extraordinary ironwork at 30s. the cwt., and all priced work at rates to be fixed by you, the Commissioner at the stores, and such person as he shall call to his assistance, I making patterns when required, which are to be kept by the Commissioners as samples.
If the price of Spanish iron shall exceed 16s. the cwt., you are to advance the price of all such things as I agree to serve in at 30s. the cwt., but no others, the price of the iron to be certified by the head purveyor; and if coals shall exceed 30s. per chaldron, then for every 5s. in the chaldron, you shall allow me 6d. the cwt., the price of coals being certified by the officers of the yard. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Feb. 3, 1670. Shipwrights' Hall.—Hen. Johnson and 6 others to the Navy Commissioners. The price of ironwork often rises and falls, but ordinary ironwork may at present be sold at 29s. the cwt., and extraordinary at 35s. the cwt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 108.]
Feb. 12, 1670. Contract between John Ruffhead of Chatham, anchorsmith, and the Navy Commissioners. Ruffhead agrees to deliver into the stores there, free of charge, and as they shall be required, certain articles of ironwork mentioned, proper to his trade of anchor or black smith, which have been usually made by his predecessors, and are not included in contracts about to be made with the ironmonger and locksmith, at 4d. a lb.; also all other ironwork whatsoever, formerly distinguished as ordinary or extraordinary, at 29s. the cwt., and all work formerly called priced work at such prices as may be set upon it by the Navy Commissioners, to be equal to pattern, and to be paid for in ready money at the end of each quarter.
In case the current market price in London for ready money for Spanish iron shall exceed 16s. the cwt., an advance is to be made to Ruffhead on all the ironwork mentioned at 29s. the cwt.; but if the price of such iron shall be under 16s., an abatement is to be made by him. All articles are to be made of Spanish iron, unless otherwise directed, or allowed by the master attendant or the master shipwright. [2 pages. Draft. Ibid. No. 109.]
Feb. 12.
Navy Office.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I have brought the Spy to Woolwich, and wait your order to have her repaired. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Feb. 12. Commission to Major John Osborne to be captain of Capt. [Arthur] Broughton's company. Minute. [S.P Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 2.]
[Feb. 12.] Petition of Joshua Bowes, prisoner, to Williamson, for forgiveness and for influence in saving his life. While in employment, lived honestly and soberly; but being out of employ, was tempted to commit wickedness. Is grieved for his offence, and for the sorrows of his helpless wife, his relations, and tender-hearted mother, whose grey hairs will be brought with sorrow to the grave. Would die rather than commit those monstrous acts again, even were he certain they would never be revealed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 26.]
Feb. 12. Petition of Ann Bowes to Williamson, for directions how to obtain possession of her goods, herself, husband, and daughter being ready to perish for want of necessaries. Thanks for her liberty. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Feb. 12.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Dover packet-boat met so much ice in going for Nieuport that she was forced to return; a vessel from the Flemish coast reports the sea to be frozen at least a league from the shore. We have not heard of any more wrecks. A moderate thaw has set in. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Feb. 13.
Deal.
Same to the Same. The Algiers prize from the Straits arrived in the Downs yesterday, and has sailed for London. A Dutchman from Borneof, which lies between Nantes and Rochelle, says the whole discourse there is of a war between France and Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 29.]
Feb. 13.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Sarah of Topsham, and the Nicholas of Dartmouth, both bound for Newfoundland, have come in. The St. Katherine of Southampton, a Dutchman or two, and several others have put to sea. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Feb. 13.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier, for Hugh Salesbury, to Williamson. The Holmes frigate sailed for the Downs with a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Feb. 13.
Holyhead.
Capt. Wm. Fasby to the Navy Commissioners. Going from Dublin to Holyhead, we met with a great storm, which split our sails and forced us back to Dublin, and we were very much put to it to get there. Two vessels went out with us from Dublin, one of which foundered, and 14 of her passengers and 10 seamen were drowned; the rest saved themselves in the boats, and are at Holyhead. I have had one of the sails repaired, but the cost is not known. I hope a supply of sails and other necessaries are coming. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 111.]
Feb. 13.
Southampton.
Capt. Emondes Greene to the Navy Commissioners. I will show Mr. Eastwood the timber I have seized, and swear him before the Mayor. It seems a very strange mystery, for Cardonnel, Eastwood, and Salesbury have all different tales concerning it. Cardonnel alleged before the Mayor and others, that he procured the King's mark to be put upon it to preserve it from his creditors, which Salesbury confessed to Wharton, my assistant, but I cannot see why a man so much indebted should let his goods lie so long dead by the side of the King's timber at Redbridge, when two years after the firing of the City, it would have fetched a much greater price than now. I will follow your directions, and apply to the Ordnance Commissioners at the Tower, and hope by next post to give you a fuller account. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Feb. 14. Capt. Argenton Alington to Lord Brouncker. I beg you and the rest of the Navy Commissioners to appoint Rob. Huchings master of the Guernsey; he can produce certificates from Rear-Admiral Kempthorne, and other commanders, of his capabilities, and as having well discharged that duty under them. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Feb. 14.
Chatham Dock.
Ph. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I need a press warrant for 30 joiners, 30 calkers, and 12 house carpenters, for carrying on the works of the new ship and the Newcastle, as well as the repairs of the docks, wharfs, &c. I also require 6 bricklayers and 8 labourers, but think they may be warned in. The provisions formerly demanded are also much wanted for the new ship, especially knees and treenails, as also Gottenburg masts and spruce deals. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Feb. 14.
Deptford.
W. Fownes to Thos. Hayter. Am I to act on the verbal order of my Lord, to bear the master, boatswain, and gunner on board her Majesty's frigate while in ordinary ? He told me an order was given to the clerks to draw a warrant for my doing so. What has been done with regard to our watch ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 115.]
Feb. 14.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. I received your order to enter on the Advice such men as you or the captain should send, but as he remains in town, no men can be entered that come from these parts, and several have appeared and been sent away; it is necessary that either the captain or a lieutenant should attend, to make choice of them. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Feb. 14.
The Revenge, Bay of Wares.
Sir Edw. Spragg to [Lord Arlington ?]. On coming in, I was ordered by our timorous Consul, at request of the Conde de Torre, to salute or lower my flag to their Admiral vessel, an old hulk, although they would not respond to the courtesy. I declined doing so, unless a message were sent in writing, and the Conde de Torre apologised for his error in making the request. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 32.]
Feb. 14. The King's speech to both Houses of Parliament. I sent forth my proclamation that there might be a good attendance, having most confidence in full Houses, where the well-being of the Church and all other interests of the Crown and nation are best secured. I asked for a supply at the last meeting, and I do so again with greater instance. The uneasiness and straitness of my affairs cannot continue, without ill-effects to the whole kingdom. Consider this seriously and speedily; it is yours and the kingdom's interest, as well as mine, and the ill consequences of a want of an effectual supply must not lie at my door. I have fully informed myself of the expenses of the last war, and affirm that no part of the money that you gave me for the war has been diverted to other uses; but a very great sum has been raised out of my standing revenue and credit, and a great debt contracted, and all for the war. I hope you will not suffer any occasion of difference to be revived, since nothing but unity can make the meeting happy either to me or to the nation.
I recommended the union of the two kingdoms at the last meeting, and did the same to my Parliament in Scotland, who have made a great step towards it, and so I seriously recommend it again to you. The Lord Keeper will speak to you more at large. [2¼ pages. In the King's own hand. Ibid. No. 33.]
Feb. 14. Copy of the above. [2½ pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 34.]
Feb. 14. The Lord Keeper's speech to Parliament, to like effect. [4½ pages. Printed. 2 copies. Ibid. Nos. 34, 34a. Both speeches are printed also in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., pp. 287–8.]
[Feb. 14.] Draft of the Lord Keeper's speech. [2¾ pages. Ibid. No. 34b.]
Feb. 14.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Jane of Lyme has arrived from Morlaix in two days, and reports that the French King has altered his intention of marching from Paris into the Netherlands, with 40,000 men and the Queen in his company, upon the reference given to the King of Great Britain and the King of Sweden; but that he continues building and fitting ships. A duel was fought at Morlaix, between the Lieutenant-General of the Castle and 2 of his seconds, who were considerable persons, and a Marquis of the county adjacent, and 2 other gentlemen; the last 3 against the first, which had the best of it, as they gave the others several wounds, but none were killed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 35.]
Feb. 14.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. A ketch bound for Jamaica, and a Dutchman for Amsterdam with wine and salt, have come in. The weather has been more severe for the last 2 months than was ever known. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Feb. 14.
Swansea.
John Man to Perrott. After a long and severe frost, the weather changed on Friday last, with a 3 hours' snowstorm, accompanied with thunder, lightning, and rain, and a sudden thaw. The weather is the only discourse, the like not being known to the oldest now living. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Feb. 14.
Cowes Castle.
Peter Gallois to [Williamson]. I have been hindered seeing after some wine for you, through taking account of the ships, but will appoint some one to do it. There are many more ships in the Channel, which must soon come in through the southerly wind. A vessel of Horne, with 300 tuns of wine, has run aground and upset, but her men were saved. [1⅓ pages. Ibid. No. 38.] Annexing,
List of 21 ships in the road at Cowes, laden with wine, fruit, &c., with an account of their tonnage, men, boys, and guns. [Ibid. No. 38i.]
Feb. 14. Warrant to pay to the Earl of Sandwich 5,528l. 15s. 8d., for defraying the charge of the funeral of the Duke of Albemarle. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 135.]
Feb. 14. Warrant to Lord Chief Justice Kelynge and others, forthwith to set at liberty Edw. Maddox. He complains that the 2 months allowed him by his pardon to prepare for transportation have elapsed, and he is still detained; he is therefore to have 2 months from the day of his enlargement, giving security for good behaviour, and for his transportation and continuance abroad. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 32.]
Feb. 15. Memorandum by William, Earl of Craven. New commissions are desired for 3 staff officers named of the late Duke of Albemarle's regiment of Foot Guards, now under Craven's command, the date of whose former commissions are given. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 39.]
[Feb. 15.] List by the same of 29 commissioned officers in the same regiment, with the dates of their commissions, and a note that on their renewal, the dates are to be observed as set down in this list. [Ibid. No. 39a.]
Feb. 15. Memorandum [by Lord Arlington, corrected and enlarged by Williamson] of money expended in carrying on the war, the sources from which it came, the amount due to the King, and what was objected to by the Commissioners of Accounts. It will appear by the accounts of the Commissioners, that the total amount applied by the King to the war, over and above the sums given by Acts of Parliament, was 1,620,636l., besides other losses and expenses mentioned. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 40.]
Feb. 15. William, Bishop of Gloucester, to Williamson. Pray procure a living which has fallen vacant in my diocese, and is in the gift of the King, for the bearer, who is my friend and neighbour, as it is not of sufficient value for any of his Majesty's chaplains to have an eye upon. I will wait upon you to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Feb. 15.
St. Alban's Hall.
Dr. Thos. Lamplugh to Williamson. I send by the carrier a collection of the articles and constitution of our church, which is bound up with a tract called "Reformatio legum Ecclesiasticarum," and as it is commended by Dr. Langbaine, it is worth your reading. Your friend Cheles, the Steward of Magdalen College, being fearful of cross usage from the Principal, will send you his case. If you do not like the wording of it, please to alter it. The Principal has been very sour of late, and not knowing what he may do, Cheles would fortify himself to preserve his livelihood, and if you can obtain a King's letter, the fees will be paid faithfully. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Feb. 15.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. Twelve sail of Hamburghers and two English ships from Bordeaux are waiting a fair wind. I am forced from weakness to make use of another hand. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Feb. 15. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Feb. 15. Caveat that no grants pass the Signet of certain places in the Household, of which a list is given, without warrant from the Lord Chamberlain, they being in his disposition. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 72, p. 69.]
Feb. 15. Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. I have bought [George] Body's Dantzic and Quinboro' oars, of from 15 to 19 feet long, at 2½d. a foot; 100 more from 27 to 30 feet at 3d. a foot, and 100 small spars. Also Mr. Greene's 8 loads of knee timber, &c., at 4l. a load, all of which are to be delivered at Deptford. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 117.]
Feb. 15.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. Bodham to the Navy Commissioners. Sam. Bartram, foreman of the yard, being dead, leaving a widow and 5 children in a poor condition, I recommend Thomas, the deceased's brother, a single man, to succeed him, so that he may help the widow and children, and also that the servant may not be put out by a stranger coming in. He is a good workman, and served his father, who was master ropemaker when he died, so I think you might give him a trial. The foreman receives 1s. 10d. a day, being 2d. a day more than any other ropemaker. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Feb. 15.
Southampton.
Thos. Eastwood to the Navy Commissioners. I have taken affidavit before the Mayor that the timber seized by Capt. Greene never belonged to the King, and that I was prevailed upon by Salesbury to put the King's mark upon it years since, after which it was found young and sappy, and fit for nothing. I am sorry I did not erase the mark, but will be careful for the future. I am offered some compass and knee timber which is fit for the service, and will be hard to be got in a short time. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 119.]
Feb. 15.
Southampton.
Capt. Emondes Greene to the Navy Commissioners. I took Eastwood, your purveyor for timber, before the Mayor, and had him sworn; he refused to answer the queries sent, but said he would do so in a letter to you. I seized a piece of timber at Headley Heath, near Southampton, but although it had the King's mark, it was claimed by Edw. Knowler, shipwright of Southampton, and Eastwood has undertaken to clear it, as not belonging to the King. As I have no other way of distinguishing the King's timber but by his mark, I have been put to much charge and trouble, and hope those in fault will be made to pay the charges. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Feb. 16.
Southampton.
Same to the Same. I send some interrogatories which Eastwood refused to answer; also an affidavit made by him, omitted in a former letter sent by my clerk, I being then ill abed. Eastwood being about some more timber belonging to Fusard—who has a timber-yard at Redbridge, near to where the King's timber lies— I fear the King will be wronged, if there is not some check put upon him. [Ibid. No. 121.] Encloses,
Queries put to Eastwood, on his taking the oath before the Mayor of Southampton, viz.:—
1. Where the timber claimed by Cardonnel came from, when brought to Redbridge, and whether it grew on the King's ground, or ever belonged to him.
2.Whether it was bought for the King when his mark was put on it, and why the mark was not struck out after it was found not fitting.
3.Why it was allowed to lie at Redbridge 2 or 3 years, when Cardonnel was in debt, and timber was fetching a greater price after the fire of London.
4. Why Cardonnel and Eastwood have two tales respecting it, the former affirming that he got Salesbury and Eastwood to put the King's mark upon it to keep it from his creditors, while Eastwood affirmed that he put it on as being bought for the King. [Ibid. No. 121i.]
Deposition of Thos. Eastwood of Gosport, shipwright, made before John Winder, Mayor of Southampton, that the timber lying in the yard of John Ockliford, carpenter, at Southampton, and also at Redbridge, and seized by Emondes Greene of Southampton for the King's use, does not, nor ever did, belong to his Majesty. [Copy. Ibid. No. 121II.]
Feb. 16.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to James Hickes. A ship of Weymouth has arrived from St. Malo, and a ketch of Brighton from Sherrant [Charente ?], bound for London. The latter reports that 30 men-of-war were in that river, but are not to be fitted until they see how things go between them and Flanders; that they have 5 new frigates of 50 and 60 guns on the stocks ready to be launched, and that 5 great ships are being fitted up for the East Indies. The Traveller of London from Bordeaux, 2 from Cherbourg, and another from Croisic, have also come in, and 6 Newfoundland men have sailed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 45.]
Feb. 16.
Coventry.
Ra. Hope to Hickes. Thanks for the King's speech. I beg you to prevail upon Mr. Williamson to continue sending the news, which was a great check on the extravagant reports at times blown about, and undeceived the abused. With note by Hickes again desiring a positive answer as to Hope's desires. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Feb. 17. Notes by Williamson. Endorsed, "Points directed to be insisted upon, on Thursday, 17 Feb."
1. To vote the reading of his Majesty's speech.
2. To vote a supply without naming a sum.
3. To put the House into a grand committee, to vote the nature and manner of a supply, by the Wine Act, &c.
4. To continue from day to day till it be finished.
Upon the whole, not to suffer anything of the Commissioners of Accounts, or difference with the House of Lords, to intervene. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Feb. 17. Dispensation for Sir Rob. Dycer, Bart., High Sheriff of Suffolk, to live in Hertfordshire, his settled abode, he being too much indisposed to attend the execution of his office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 147.]
Feb. 17.
Whitehall.
Order on the petition of Rich. Downes and John Tyler, that they be permitted to proceed in their buildings on the east side of Emperor's-head Alley, Thames Street, the city surveyors having found it impossible to enlarge the alley; the petitioners applied to the King thereon, because the power of the Commissioners for rebuilding the city had expired before they gave orders about the said passage, and he referred the case to Sir Sam. Sterling, Lord Mayor, who certified that the petitioners should be permitted to build, on satisfying Jonathan Smith—who set back his building on the west side 1½ feet to widen the alley—for the loss of his ground, which they are accordingly to do. [Ibid. f. 147.]
Feb. 17. Letter to the Charterhouse for Mr. Rawlins to be chosen a scholar of that foundation, on account of his father's loyalty and sufferings. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 44.]
Feb. 17. The King to the Mayor, sheriffs, and aldermen of Norwich. You have represented to us that by the frequency of stage players, mountebanks, lotteries, &c., the meaner sort of people are diverted from their labour, and tempted to vain expense. We therefore authorise you to determine the time during which the said players shall stay in the city, and they are to remain no longer, any licence from us or the Master of the Revels notwithstanding; the lotteries for indigent officers only to be excepted from your power. [Ibid.]
Feb. 17. Pass for 3 horses for M. de Waert to Holland. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 8.]
Feb. 17. Warrant for a grant to Henry Bronker of the place of chief ranger of Phoenix Park in Ireland, void by the death of Lord Dungannon. [Ibid.]
Feb. 17. Commission for Capt. Arthur Broughton to be captain of Sir Godfrey Lloyd's company. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 2.]
Feb. 17. Presentation of Wm. Robson to the rectory of Stonehouse, co. Gloucester. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 1. See his petition, Calendar 1668–9, p. 649.]
Feb. Docquets of the above, dated Feb. 21 and Feb. 28. [Docquet, Vol. 24, Nos. 137, 142.]
Feb. 17. King to the Provost and Fellows of Eton. We recommend Dr. Thircrosse for his good service to King and Church, and especially for the disappointment he lately suffered of a place in the college, to the fellowship void by promotion of Dr. Barrow, Bishop of Man. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 1.]
Feb. [17.] Two drafts of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, Nos. 48, 94.]
[Feb. 17.] Note of the above, and also of the election of Barrow as Bishop of St. Asaph. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Feb. 17.
Chapter House, Chichester.
Nath. Crew, LL.D., Dean, and the Chapter of Chichester to the King. We hereby signify our election of Dr. Peter Gunning to our bishopric, void by death of Henry King. [Ibid. No. 51.]
[Feb. 17.] "Memorial of what has been done in former times concerning the making and repairing of Dover harbour," giving its past history, showing its decay, the grants that have been made for its support, and its commercial importance, and recommending the charge to the wisdom of Parliament. [Printed. Ibid. No. 52. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 123.]
Feb. 17.
Advice, Portsmouth.
Capt. Ben. Young to the Navy Commissioners. The works on the ship are progressing, and the provisions ready; I only want seamen, for whom I have caused the drum to be beaten. The master attendant talks of taking off the ordinary men when the topmast is set, but I beg that they may help us until we get to Spithead, unless we have sufficient of our own men to do the work. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 122.]
Feb. 17.
Woolwich.
Wm. Bodham to Surveyor Thos. Middleton. We left off working by your order in November, but the days are now long enough to recommence. The men are much discouraged for want of better earnings, and some have returned to their, old masters in London, which is no damage to the King, it being task work. The stores are so plenteous, there being 219 tons of hemp, 148 tons of yarn, and 69 lasts of tar, that we shall all sweat with working (and telling our arrear money) before a day and a half can exhaust them. I desire an answer by bearer. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Feb. 17.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. I send a contract for timber for the great ship, and also one for some oars, &c. I require an order for some of the timber, when delivered, as Hasler, Clements, and Archer will not furnish any more, their bills not being paid. The spikes and nails are contracted to be had of Dr. Perrin, and unless you like to alter the contract, the doctor will not lower the terms, and we can do nothing in it. We want 40,000 broom, and payment of the last; if I had not advanced the money for the last freight, we should have been standing still for want of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 124.] Enclosing,
Contract by Edw. Benson with Capt. Ant. Deane, to deliver into the yard at Portsmouth 20 doz. of ash oars 17 feet long, and none under 15 feet, at 18s. per 100 feet, ready money.—7 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 124i.]
Like contract to deliver into the yard at Portsmouth 30 loads of plank at 4l. a load, ready money; also at the water side at Emsworth, 16 trees fit for the gun deck of a first-rate ship building, at 11½d. per foot, girt measure. [Ibid. No. 124ii.]
Feb. 17.
Dover.
Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. I am constrained to lie in harbour, for want of an order to the victualler for provisions, although I hear of goods daily passing. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Feb. 18.
London.
St. J. Steventon and Hugh Salesbury to the Navy Commissioners. Having received copies of an information, and some depositions, sent to you by Fras. Lucas of Portsmouth, about the embezzlement of provisions out of the stores there, for repair of the Hope flyboat, we find that Lucas would make us guilty of it, as part owners of the ship, and that he swears to our partnership in it; this will be proved a great untruth, as the ship belongs to Bruncker and Newland, who have so declared before Col. Norton. We presume it is no crime to be part owners, and if not, we cannot be blemished by it, but we submit whether it is rational to suppose that we should run the great hazard such a crime would bring upon us, for other persons' advantage, considering our reputation, which we have ever studied to preserve.
If we had been as mean-spirited as Lucas would make us, we might have found more advantageous ways to benefit ourselves, and with less scandal, but we have always lived above anything that would stain our credit. It is not the first time that Lucas' malice has driven him to calumniate us, we having had to answer his information of 13 Oct. concerning the action of the town officers. [Ibid. No. 126.] Enclosing,
Answer of Hugh Salesbury to the information of Fras. Lucas, made before the Navy Commissioners, 13 Oct. 1669. The informant Lucas came to me at the Custom House, Portsmouth, and demanded satisfaction for damage done to the dock, on launching the Good Hope; I referred him to Bruncker and Newland, the owners; whereupon he said, "I would have it from you"; and seized me by the throat, tore the ribbons from my shoulder, the cravat from my throat the hair from my head, and dragged me into an outer room, tearing down the wainscoat in doing so. A man and his daughter, living next door, hearing the noise, came in, and found Lucas upon me, and heard him use very foul language, and threaten that if he had me between the Custom House and the dock, he would cripple me. After this he left, but returned a second time, and repeated the same attack, and if it had not been for the same people coming to the rescue, he would have murdered me. Upon the oaths of Thos. Toomes, and Jane his daughter, the Mayor granted me a warrant against Lucas, and committed him to prison until he found sureties; but as he obtained them the same night, it is not true that he was put into a dungeon. When the Mayor and justices were holding the sessions of court leet, Lucas came and asked whether Salesbury and Steventon were justices, and upon being informed that they were, he stated that they had stolen a mast from the King, but upon being asked to take his oath, he refused, and walked away, although he falsely asserts it in his information.
The new mayor, being advised by Serjeant Peckham and Mr. Stroude that Lucas had forfeited his bond for good behaviour, he was thereupon rebound, and gave security some days after; but it is false that he was imprisoned purposely to prevent his coming to London to complain, and we do not sue him on any other account than for the assault and scandal. As to the rest of Lucas's information, we refer to the examinations before Col. [Rich.] Norton as an answer. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 126i.]
Answers of St. J. Steventon and Hugh Salesbury to the affidavits of Fras. Lucas of 1 and 4 Feb. 1670. We refer to the examinations of our witnesses before Col. Norton, as to the goods carried out of the stores at Portsmouth, and used for the repairs of the Hope flyboat. It will appear by Bruncker and Newland's evidence, that we were not part owners of the Hope when such goods were used, and are not guilty of the alleged embezzlements. Salesbury admits that he went to Dr. Perrin to bespeak some sheathing nails for the Hope, and that being desired by the owners to make agreements for supply of provisions, he agreed with Mistress Timbrell for all sorts of ironwork; but it is false that he, with others concerned in the Hope, prevailed with her to assert that the sheathing nails used were supplied by her, when they heard none had been had from Dr. Perrin, and refer to the evidence of the witnesses as to where they were procured. We were informed by Thos. Perrin, shipwright, that there was an account for iron and coals between Dr. Perrin and Newland, so we agreed with the doctor for sheathing nails, although none were had from him, but we did not see the account of disbursements until after Lucas' information was given. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 126ii.]
Feb. 18. Declaration by John Rocke, clerk of Butleigh rectory, diocese of Bath and Wells, of his surrender of Tenby rectory, co. Pembroke, diocese of St. Davids, of his own free will, and that it is now vacant. Attested by Barth. Backwell, public notary. With his appointment of the public notary as his procurator therein. [Latin, 1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 53.]
Feb. 18.
Barnstaple.
Wm. Wakeman to Williamson. The Bideford Merchant from Lisbon and the Royalty from Cadiz have arrived, with commodities from those parts. They were welcomed by the merchants, as they both went out with the ships from Newfoundland, and were supposed to have fallen into the hands of the Turkish men-of-war. [Ibid No. 54.]
Feb. 18.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Danish Ambassador has arrived with his suite; no other news. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Feb. 19.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Rainbow of Liverpool, from Dublin, with wool and other goods, sprang a leak and foundered at sea. The master with 6 men and 2 passengers escaped in a boat, but his brother and 14 passengers were left behind, and so perished. Several ships have arrived from Dublin, and report the quiet posture of that kingdom, and the satisfaction the generality have received by the intended alteration of the chief governor by his Majesty. Thanks for the correspondence. I would rather receive it by the post which leaves London on Saturday nights. Mr. Bury, late of Wadham College, Oxford, desires to be remembered to you. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Feb. 19.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Margaret of Lyme has come in from St. Malo, with canvas for London. The master reports the arrival of the galleons at St. Lucar from New Spain, to the joy of the merchants, who have ventured considerably in linens.
The fleet are fitting at Brest, the soldiers raised, and the seamen pressed to go for Madagascar or St. Lorence, and a list was taken of all marines and seamen in the town, and other places, to serve by turns. The King has commanded the payments arising by the linen market in the town, which are considerable, to be collected for himself, instead of for the heads of the Church; this they intend disputing with him. [Ibid. No. 57.]
Feb. 19. Dr. Ralph Cudworth to Williamson. We had notice of your intention to procure a mandate for Worts, and the Vice-Chancellor and other Heads agreed that the Chancellor should be desired to use his endeavours to stop it. Mr. Buck still holds up, but there is no likelihood of a vacancy. Dr. Spencer, of Bennet College, desires to join Mr. Barker's interest, there being a dispute about a fellowship to which the college has pre-elected a person; we have no preelections in our college [Christ's], but there are in others, and they are inviolably kept; if you satisfy Lord Arlington about it, you will oblige Dr. Spencer, and promote the other interest. I hope no dispensation will be granted in your office for any of the Fellows in our college to travel beyond sea, or to hold their fellowship beyond the time allowed by statute; there are but 13 Fellows, and it would prove the ruin of the college, and it is against their oath to accept of any dispensation. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 58.]
Feb. 19.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. The apprentices of Bristol took more than the ordinary liberty on Tuesday last, and at night met together with staves and clubs intending to fight, but were prevented by Sir Robert Yeamans, the Mayor, who went amongst them and persuaded them to depart. He prevailed with most, but some being abusive were sent to gaol, which caused some resentment, and about 50 or 60 were up on Wednesday and Thursday nights, threatening to force the others' freedom; but Sir Robert and some officers walking the city those nights dispersed them. Had it not been for his great vigilance, mischief would have been done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 59.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for presentation of Dr. Thos. Sprat to the rectory of Uffington, co. Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27,f. 15.]
[Feb. 19.] Note by Williamson that, for the King's supply, no sum is to be named, but instead thereof 7 years of the Wine Act, at half the duty, without exemption of particular persons. "Above all, not to be laid at the Custom House." [See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 124. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 59a.]
[Feb. 19.] Case of Thomas, son of Wm. Davison, who requests a bill in Parliament for permission to sell the manor of Langton-juxtaPartney, co. Lincoln, value 400l. a year, left him by his father, with certain charges, and which was settled on his wife Bridget, daughter of Thos. Ely, for herself and their children, on condition of compounding for the said charges, and settling land value 200l. a year on his wife instead. [Printed. Ibid. No. 60. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 124.]
Feb. 19.
Portsmouth.
Memorandum by Commissioner J. Tippetts of the rates at which [Paul] Cole's bills are to be filled up for timber delivered by him into the stores there, in Nov. and Dec. 1669, varying from 1l. 17s. 6d. to 4l. 2s. a load. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 127.]
Feb. 19.
London.
Wm. Harrington to the Navy Commissioners. Pray move the Duke of York with reference to my petition for leave to freight 4 or 5 foreign ships, to fetch timber from the Baltic, free from the penalties of the Navigation Act. I am under a contract with the Navy Board to deliver a quantity of plank during the year, and am much distressed by the extraordinary rate of freight in English shipping, as also by finding that few English ships are fit for the stowage of timber, and by the great enhancement of the price of plank in those parts, because the agents of the French King buy up all they can get. Noted that he was left to petition the King and Council. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Feb. 19. Petition of Mary, relict of Rear-Admiral Sansom, to the Navy Commissioners, for payment of 180l., out of 300l. about to be paid in by Mr. Lanyon of Plymouth, on account of provisions sold, belonging to the King. Five years since, his Majesty, in consideration of the good services performed by her late husband, and of her being left with 4 fatherless children, gave her 500l., whereof 320l. was paid, and the remainder promised; but although she has made many tedious journeys to London, living in a remote part of the country, she has been unable to obtain it. With recommendation by Sir John Mennes, and 3 other Navy Commissioners, to the Navy Treasurers, to comply with the request, provided they are reimbursed what they were formerly desired to advance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 129.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. His Royal Highness's yacht having gone to Harwich, to fetch a sergeant and 36 soldiers to be sent in the Coronation to Lisbon, as recruits for Sir Edw. Spragg's squadron, I desire you to give the necessary orders to the commander of the Coronation to receive them, and to hasten to the Downs, to be ready to proceed on her voyage. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Feb. 19.
[Deptford.]
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I formerly demanded elm timber and thrums, and have none left in the stores, but shall receive sufficient knees and standards from Mr. Graves and Mr. Glyde, for the main gun deck. If Mr. Mayors will look out at Bundock's Wharf, there are hoys constantly lying there, laden with elm brought out of Kent, which he might buy, worth his money. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Feb. 19.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to [Middleton.] I have unloaded Capt. Gibb's timber, and judge it worth 40s. a load; if you will agree with him for it, we can the better expend it, as there is no small timber left in the stores. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Feb. 19.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. The Kent and Swallow are in hand, and will receive all possible despatch, but must lie ungraved unless you order money for broom, there being none in store, nor any further credit. The Advice remains incomplete for want of the scuppers demanded; 50 loads of 4¼-inch plank have been delivered, and we have done with that thickness on the great ship; we want an order to the storekeeper to receive the other 10 loads in 3-inch plank, so as to complete the contract for the new ship; if we have to use the 4-inch, it will cost the King half its worth in sawing, &c., while by having it cut 3 inches out of the trees, it is a saving of more than 30s. a load, and the contractors are willing to do it. The great ship is planked up to her lower wale, and the small ship's floor is almost across. The Adventure has a new tier of top timbers; the shipwrights have nearly finished the Gloucester, and the Mary yacht is complete except her painting and rigging. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Feb. 20.
Southampton.
[Capt. Emondes Greene] to the Navy Commissioners. I perceived my mistake in omitting to send Eastwood's affidavit and the queries, but despatched them in another letter. When commander of the Scout, belonging to the Farmers of Customs, 4 years since, I seized some plank belonging to the King, and brought it to Col. Middleton at Portsmouth. Eastwood had offered me 2 pieces to quit the seizure, which I suppose are the 2 guineas mentioned by you. Jas. Parker, shipwright of Southampton, has viewed the marks on the timber, which appear to have been done 4 or 5 years since. I am preparing to attend the assizes at Winchester, to prosecute the persons who had the bolts and spikes, and hope to give a good account after the trial is over. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 134.]
Feb. 20.
Fanfan, Dover.
Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. I demanded 2 months' provisions according to your order, but Sir Denis Gauden not having instructed his deputy, I have been constrained to take victuals upon credit for present use, and cannot go to sea. Noted, that Ben. Gauden was sent for by the Board, and affirmed that the order was sent long since, and he promised that he would see to it. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Feb. 20.
Birmingham.
[Thos. Raymonds] to Williamson. Thanks for correspondence by Mr. Martyn's packet. As to Thetford, or elsewhere, I shall ever be ready with my little candle to attend your sun. I think, with regard to your proceedings in connection with that place, that you tread in the footsteps of that excellent person now in heaven, Sir Edw. Nicholas. I have some notes in MS. of the famous convention of Parliament in 1621, which I wish you to see, if you will give directions how the books are to be sent. I should like to know how affairs were since managed in that House, but such a petition would be unmannerly, if not unreasonable. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 61.]
Feb. 20.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Collier, for Hugh Salesbury, to Williamson. The Advice, Swallow, and Kent are fitting for sea. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Feb. 20.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Katherine pleasure boat, bound for Calais to fetch over a lord, has arrived in the Downs, and a young gentleman called Lord Savage came on shore, attended by one man, and dined here. Two ships have come in from Nantes, and report that the French are pressing there for land soldiers, hauling men from the plough and the vineyards. Another vessel from Bayonne also reports the same. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Feb. 20. Warrant for reprieve of Wm. Massie, should he be convicted of manslaughter at the Old Bailey. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 12.]
[Feb. 21.] Petition of the Mayor, aldermen, &c., of Stratford-upon-Avon, co. Warwick, to the King, for a letter of approval in favour of Abraham Bayly, elected town clerk, there being a clause in their charter making this necessary before he can exercise the office. [Parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 64.]
[Feb. 21.] Petition of John Finch to the King, for a beadsman's place in Christ Church, Canterbury. Has had 24 children, some of whom were slain in the service of Charles I. The petitioner was servant to the last Earl of Winchelsea and to Lord Keeper Finch, but is reduced by age and inability to labour. With the signature of Nich. Burges, Mayor, and 8 others, annexed. [Ibid. No. 65.]
[Feb. 21.] Petition of Nich. Butler to the King, for a mandamus to Cambridge University for the degree of Doctor of Physic. Has been in practice for years, and was licensed thereto by the Archbishop of Canterbury. During the pestilence, constantly kept his abode in the city, and besides other patients of better quality, gave medi cines, gratis, to 200 or 300 of the meaner sort daily, very few miscarrying under his hands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 66.] Annexing,
Certificate by John Jollife, and 7 other inhabitants of London, that Butler resided in the parish of St. Helen's, London, in 1665, when almost all other physicians retired into the country; and that during the mortality, he freely administered physic gratis, by which means great numbers of people were restored. Also certificate by Sir John Lawrence, that during his mayoralty in 1665, the above matter was reported to him for truth by some of the persons named, and that he then gave, and still gives, credit to it. —21 Feb. 1670. [Ibid. No. 66i.]
Feb. 21.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Expedition of Lyme has arrived from Cadiz. She came out with 30 sail of merchantmen, under convoy of Sir Thos. Allin's ships, the Nonsuch, Deptford, and Milford, the 2 former accompanying them 200 or 300 leagues, and the latter coming home, but the Expedition lost them in a storm near Madeira. She speaks of 6 sail of Turkish men-of-war being taken by Sir Thos. Allin, one having 24 guns, and says that he is continually cruising after them, and has a scarcity of provisions in his fleet; that Lord Howard is at Sicily, and is not yet to go up to Taffaletta, one or two of his relations having risen against him, with a considerable force; also that the new Spanish fleet had not arrived on their coming away. They also confirm the fight of Capt. Kempthorne with 6 Dutch men-of-war, and that he wounded their Admiral. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Feb. 21.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Several vessels have gone out, homeward bound; a ketch with passengers for Jamaica, and some ships for Newfoundland, France, and other places, are waiting a fair wind. A vessel from Marseilles gives an account of the good exploits of the English [Straits] fleet on the Algiers men-of-war. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Feb. 21.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The Milford has arrived from the Straits, having been 5 weeks from the fleet. She called at Cadiz, and reports all well in the Straits. The Eagle ketch has come in from Bordeaux, laden with wine for his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Phil. Roettiers, the King's chief engraver, to go to Italy, spend some time in perfecting his art by the study of the works of ancient and modern sculpture, and return. [Latin. Foreign Entry Book 12, p. 289.]
Feb. 21. Minute of the above pass. [English. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 149.]
Feb. 21. Privy seal for 3,000l. to Sir Stephen Fox for secret service. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 8.]
Feb. 21. Grant to William, Viscount Stafford, and Lady Mary Stafford, to hold a weekly market and 3 yearly fairs at Thornbury. Minute. [Ibid. See p. 44 supra.]
Docquet of the above, dated March. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 146.]
Feb. [21.] Proposal of terms of agreement, on the basis of the previous ones [See 7 May 1669], between John Starkey and Rob Clavell, relative to the publication of the catalogues of books, Mercurius librarius; if these proposals are refused, Starkey should be excluded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 70.]
Feb. 21.
London.
Advertisement by Rob. Clavell. As Mr. Starkey, my partner in the Mercurius librarius, insists on having either a moiety of the books, or certain names and signs of shops left out of the catalogue, which omissions are complained of, I shall in future print the catalogue myself, dispersing 400 copies; the charge for every book inserted value above 8s. is one book in quires, 2 books if from 8s. to 2s., 3 books under 2s., and 1s. each for all stitched books, &c. [Printed. Ibid. No. 71.]
Feb. 21.
Chatham.
J. Wilson to Pepys. You may have heard of the sale of brandy in the yard or stores, by persons called my instruments, although no more such that any labourer there; I beg, if it is moved at the Board, that you will not suffer it to pass with so slender a check as a bare discharge, that being rather a kindness than a punishment to some persons, but will bring it to a hearing, so that if the accused party is not found guilty, which I believe he is not, I may be the better obeyed by my real instrument, on his justification; otherwise I may have dirt thrown upon me hereafter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 136.]
Feb. 22. Abr. Parker to the Navy Commissioners. When last at sea, as muster master by commission, I had no conveniences allowed for performance of my duties, and was at between 30l. and 40l. expense in hiring boats from the shore to the ships; otherwise I could not have done anything for his Majesty's advantage, or cleared myself of a former scandal of negligence. I ask the usual bill allowed by you to officers and clerks for similar extra charges. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Feb. 22. Same to the same. After several months' imprisonment, 4 years' waiting, 500l. or 600l. expense, and all your promises, examinations, &c., I desire your consideration to the fact that your last report confirms my assertion that I sent books to the Navy Office, as the way of sending them is not expressed in my instructions. I have innocently and diligently performed my duty for his Majesty's advantage, and there was, therefore, no absolute necessity for the expressions in your report, and it was not desired or required in his Royal Highness's reference. I beg that you will be at least so just as to grant me my salary already earned, as directed by his Royal Highness 20 months since, and 3 years since by 5 of your own Board, who thereby justified my books, my actions, and my usefulness in correcting of tickets for pay, and of pursers' accounts for victualling. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Feb. 22.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I received your warrant for fitting the Fountain for an Iceland voyage, and find she is not fit for it, but the Success, Richmond, and French Victory are. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Feb. 22.
Deptford.
W. Fownes to Thos. Hayter. Pray move the Board that 6 or 8 labourers may be entered in the yard here, as I am informed by Mr. Shish that they are using shipwrights' boys for want of them, there being 3 ships fitting out, and much timber coming in. Also 2 bricklayers and labourers are wanted to tile the new rigginghouse, and instructions as to the Queen frigate. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 140.]
Feb. 22.
Portsmouth.
Ben. Johnson to the Navy Commissioners. I found some papers connected with Sir Wm. Warren's masts, received 4 years since, which agree with the bill and entry in my ledger; but the mastmaker, and 3 of his crew who assisted in the measuring of them, are all dead, one having died yesterday. I know that what is meant by "Hands at the Butt" in the bill is the girt measure of the mast above the scantings; as in a mast of 20 hands, the measuring place is 13 feet from the very end, as long as the mast will work, whereof the scantings may be about 5 feet from the end up into the mast, and so in proportion to other sizes. "Hands at the Hounds" is understood to be the measure round at the trussle tree place. The masts were all scanted away, as usually such masts are, without any defect or wrong to the mast, which the ablest mastmakers here inform me has been observed upon the expense in working. The clerk of the cheque, and the officers who certified the bill upon survey of the goods, are in London, and may know more about it. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Feb. 22.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abra. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. I need 2,000 yards of French noyals for making topsails for the Kent and Swallow, the English cloth not being fit for the purpose. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Feb. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The weather having broken up, I saw 12 or 14 ships sailing for the north. Two ships of Harwich have gone for Newcastle, and 2 others are ready to follow. The Flying Hart, a Danish man-of-war, is still at Harwich. I return the enclosed to show you the scarcity of the news sent, even when Parliament is sitting. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 72.]
Feb. 22. Corroboration of presentation of John Ellis to the prebend of Llanyfidd in St. Asaph Cathedral. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 2.]
Feb. Docquet of the above, dated 24 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 139.]
Feb. 22. Order on the petition of Lord Gerard of Brandon—showing that though his petition for certain particulars in the Duchy of Lancaster was referred, yet the Chancellor of the Duchy is going to grant some of them on a petition of Sir Thos. Slingsby—that no grant of any of the said particulars pass till his Majesty be informed thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 100.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
The petition of Rich. Castle, for a lease for 31 years of lands and rents at Haverfordwest and Molestone, with the lots of the markets at Narberth, and the reversion of a rent there of 52l. 11s. 10½d., recommended to the Treasury Commissioners, the King having a gracious sense of his loyalty and services. [Ibid. p. 101.]
Feb. 23. Warrant to pay to Sir Stephen Fox 3,000l. without account, for secret service, to be issued under his Majesty's directions. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 138.]
[Feb. 23.] Statement in favour of the bill for selling part of the estates of Sir Ralph Banks to pay his debts, the revenue of the estate being insufficient to meet the interest and other charges, and he having intended so to do, had he not been prevented by death. Printed. With MS. memoranda that if the bill pass, the widow will lose 100l. annuity left her by Sir Ralph. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 73. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 124.]
Feb. 23.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Truelove has arrived from Malaga in 6 weeks. Sir Thos. Allin, with 3 men-of-war, conducted 28 merchantmen as far as the Cape. The Sea Flower, with wine, brandy, and salt from France, has come into Bridgwater river. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Feb. 23.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Providence of Topsham, from the Canaries, has put in by contrary winds. She was long at sea, but meeting with a Frenchman, was happily supplied. She left Capt. Gardiner and several others loading, and came out in the company of Capt. Tracey, whom she lost at sea. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Feb. 23.
Norwich.
W. Oliver, stationer, to Perrott. I desire to be supplied with the intelligence, as ordered by some persons of quality, at what terms you think fit. I will transmit the money, and such news as is worthy of notice. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Feb. 23.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. The Trial of Chester has arrived from Sheron [Charente ?] in 10 days, with French wines, and reports that the French King has 32 men-of-war fitting up in that river, and great preparations made for war both by sea and land. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Feb. 23.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner, storekeeper, to the Navy Commissioners. I received an order from Mr. Uthwat for issuing oars for the Hampshire, but having none in store, I beg you to direct the purveyor to hasten them down, as also 2 dozen for the Advice at Portsmouth; there is a vessel here laden with provisions, which is bound there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 143.]
Feb. 24.
[Cadiz.]
Sir Thos. Allin to [the Navy Commissioners]. I have written several times about the shortness of provisions; when I arrived at Cadiz, I found the Pearl and Orange fireship without, and furnished them; the Nonsuch too, having a fool or a knave for her purser, also fell short, and he played away the money received for beverage wine, so that the men drank water until I met and furnished them out of the contingent money; as the ship is going to sea with me, I hope you have good security from him.
I gave you an account of Wm. Gascoyne, the victualler's agent at Tangiers, upon whom our credits were drawn for a supply of money; but he being a shuffler, would only pay for those 10 ships which Sir Denis Gauden gave me credit for in light gold, which, had it been weight, would have been a loss of nearly half a piece of 8/8 in every pistol, where we went to take in beverage wine, as at Alicant,
Feb. 24. Iversey [Ivica ?], Majorca, and Minorca, much loss has fallen on us by the lightness of the coin, some wanting from 11 to 13 grains a pistol.
The victualler, to affront me, sent bills privately to the pursers of ships, stating that they might provide themselves with vinegar, or any other trash, but with that kindness that he only allows them but 13 ½ pieces of 8/8 per butt, and bills upon Gascoyne, who refused to pay them when we got back to Tangiers, pretending he had no money of the victualler's in hand, nor any provisions; so I have been forced to provide for the Resolution, Mary, Bristol, Victory fireship, and Portland, out of the contingent money, for 3 months. Several of the ships wetted their bread by the foul weather, and ran short, but I have found plenty of provisions where I am, and at a reasonable price, considering the place, otherwise I should have been much necessitated.
It will greatly damage the service if I have to leave the Straits for want of provisions, so I entreat you, if his Majesty is pleased to continue the fleet here, that there may be a supply of both victuals and stores. I desire to be as good a manager of the contingent money as any before me, but what I buy here of ships' stores is extremely dear.
Having received notice from Squire Wren that provisions were coming, I put the Mary and Bristol to careen at Puntall, so as to be clean to receive them, and then to go to sea, instead of to Port Mahon. I left the Victory fireship with them, to take in what she could; also a Turkish man-of-war to receive their powder, and gunners' stores, lighters being very dear. Nine of the chief captains of the Vice-Admiral of Spain came on board on my arrival here, and proffered much kindness; so I laid hold of it to borrow various things for careening purposes, which were promised. I intend cruising with the Nonsuch ketch off the Southern Cape, so as to meet the victuallers; the rest of my division will be employed in convoying scattering ships, 8 or 10 together. I never saw so many vessels trading without convoy, and am surprised more have not been taken. We met the herring fleet in twos and threes, also the Sapphire and pilchard ships from Ireland.
We brought 25 ships from Alicant and Malaga, and will see them, with any others we may meet, beyond the Southern Cape, and the Milford will come over with them; she is in a bad condition, otherwise I could not have spared her, as she is the best sailer and has done the most service; if his Royal Highness will so order, I should like her refitted and sent back with all speed. I send particulars of stores required. I have bought 10 cwt. of 4d. and 6d. nails, at 8 pieces of eight the quintal, out of a vessel from Holland, otherwise they would have cost a ryall a pound at least. I paid two ryalls for ironwork at Port Mahon, where I left the Nonsuch's armorer, and a smith with iron to work up. The Pearl must be sent home in the summer, being very weak; and as the Foresight sails so heavily, I intend sending her into Sir John Harman's division, and receiving the Centurion or Dartmouth in exchange. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 144.]
Feb. 24.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I beg you to grant me a warrant to build a pinnace for the Guernsey, bound for the Straits, or to contract for one with Mr. Rayner; also an order to the purveyor for knees and standards for the gun-deck. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 145.]
Feb. 24. Victualler's computation of the tonnage of provisions named, shipped in the Coronation, for the Dragon and Constant Warwick at Lisbon; also in the William and Mary, for Sir John Harman's squadron at Minorca; totals, 83 and 299 tuns. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Feb. 24.
Resolution, Cadiz.
Thos. Melmoth to the Navy Commissioners. I send, by order of Sir. Thos. Allin, an account of the money expended of the 7,000l. ordered for the expedition, amounting to 6,332l. 18s.; also an account of provisions bought at Cadiz. I sent some muster books by the Milford and Mary Rose; the smallness of their number is occasioned by the fleet being so often separated, and the difficulty in mustering; but I will forward the musters of the absent ships the first opportunity. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Feb. 24. Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. I went to Woolwich and viewed the old storehouse, and the portion erected of a new one; but as the ground is loose, and it is too near the wharf, it ought to be removed, and set within 10 feet of the old one; if built as described in a plan drawn in the margin, there will be sufficient cover for making masts and boats. The additional charge, including materials, will be 125l. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Feb. 24.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. I think Clements and Archer's knee timber had better be brought into the stores here, and then shipped for Chatham; but we are in as great want of it for the new and old ships, as we can get nothing out of the New Forest until May, and the water carriage of it will be 23s. a load to Chatham, and 20s. to London, so I hope you will order it to remain here. I have provided, on my own promise of payment, sufficient broom to grave one ship this spring [tide], but I fear the Kent, which requires a great deal done, will have to remain until some more is procured from town; this I will endeavour to do, but the poor broom men will not contract, unless they are paid for that served in. I hope to despatch all the work soon, it being all in hand, as also 6 boats for the 3 ships. The Advice being calked, she may depart as soon as you please. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 149.]
Feb. 24. Royal assent to the election of Dr. Peter Gunning as Bishop of Chichester, in the room of Dr. Henry King, deceased. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 139.]
Feb. 24. The King to Sir Harbottle Grimston, Master of the Rolls. We request you to grant to Sir Algernon May the office of clerk or keeper of the rolls in the Tower, and the custody of the place where the said records lie, as amply as granted by Sir Edw. Phillips, late Master of the Rolls, to John Burroughs and Nich. Parker, and by yourself to the late Wm. Binne. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 45.]
Feb. 24. Licence for Ant. Favan, the King's harbourer, to use his gun within 10 miles of Court, wherever the same may happen to be. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 9.]
Feb. 24. Cover of a letter addressed to M. Jacques de la Garde, French merchant, London. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 78.]
Feb. 24. Charles Collier, for Hugh Salesbury, to Williamson. The Advice, Kent, and Swallow are fitting for sea for Newfoundland. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Feb. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The Anne has sailed with soldiers for the fleet; the Danish man-of-war is still here, and expected to stay a month, because Count Guldenlew is returned back again for London. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Feb. 24.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Within 40 hours, 80 sail of ships have arrived from Virginia, the Straits, and France; the Katherine pleasure boat has arrived from Calais, with the lord she went to fetch. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Feb. 25.
Hull.
Luke Bourne, for Chas. Whittington, to Williamson. Two ships have left for Bordeaux with lead, cloth, and butter, and one for Newhaven with lead; 3 vessels have arrived from Bordeaux with wine and prunes. [Ibid. No. 82.]
[Feb. 25.] Abstract of an additional Act, in minute detail, proposed for the re-building of London, and the cathedral and parochial churches in the city, and for uniting the parishes. [3 sheets. Ibid. No. 83. See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 127.]
Feb. 25.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council, that—as on complaints made of the violation of the patents granted 26 Jan. 1661 to the western ports, to prevent abuses in the Newfoundland fishery, by carrying over passengers and boat-keepers, letters from Council were issued on 4 Dec. 1663, ordering the observance of those patents, and appointing the officers of customs to enforce them, notwithstanding which, complaints are still made by Plymouth of the continuance of these abuses—more strict orders be given to observe the above laws, and the Custom House officers, especially of Exeter and Barnstaple, be commanded on their peril to enforce them, and to stay all offenders and report their names. [Ibid. No. 84.] Annexing,
Dan. Barker, Mayor, and 11 others of Plymouth to the Treasury Commissioners. We request that the officers of Customs in Exeter and Barnstaple may be ordered to enforce the laws made in 1661 and 1663, forbidding the Newfoundland fishing vessels to carry over passengers and boatmen, the numbers of seamen being so reduced thereby that ships are obliged to lie up for want of mariners; several hundreds are now preparing to go out in these vessels which are stored with Irish provisions, contrary to law.— Plymouth, 18 Feb. 1670. [12 signatures. Ibid. No. 84i.]
Feb. 25. Statement by Rich. Ellsworth that, on the petition of the merchants of Bristol, and certificates of numerous counties and towns of the west of England, against abuses in manufacture of cloth, the Council referred the case to the Attorney and Solicitor General, who recommend a Bill in Parliament for redress; with proposal to undertake the conducting of the Bill through Parliament, provided it may be done at the expense of the King, to whom it will prove greatly advantageous in customs. There being so little public spirit, the Bill is likely to be much opposed, and if it fail, our manufactures will be engrossed by the French and Dutch. Has been already at much trouble and expense to get the certificates,&c.,and will prosecute the whole business, if he may have 3 blank warrants for grants of baronetcies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 85.]
Feb. 25. The King to the Warden and Fellows of All Souls, Oxford. We request you to admit Peter Prideaux, student of Exeter College, on account of his father's loyalty and merit, to the fellowship in that college void by death of Fras. Talbot, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 46.]
[Feb. 25.] Notes of the above letter [by Williamson]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 86.]
Feb. 25. Pass for 15 horses to France for Sir George Hamilton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 9.]
Feb. 25. Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners for a grant to Sir Edward Sydenham, for life or 60 years, of the fee-farm rent of 260l. 18s. 4d., reserved in a grant to Rich. Sydenham and Edw. Smith by the late King, of the manor and park of Aldington, Kent, and now his by inheritance, he paying 10s. a year to the Crown. [Ibid. f. 10.]
[Feb. 25.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 87.]
Feb. 26.
Ordnance Office.
Jonas Moore and Edw. Sherburne to the Navy Commissioners. We send a list of stores shipped on board the William and Thomas, for the fleet in the Straits under Sir Thos. Allin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 150.] Enclosing,
List referred to, dated 21 Dec. 1669. [Ibid. No. 150i.]
Feb. 26.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. I send the bill of lading of the Post Horse and Mackerel hoys for 119 loads of timber. The James and Adam and Eve have not arrived, but their lading is ready. I have been forced to send 60 loads to Bawtry and 20 to Mattersey; the snow lying so deep at Stockwith made the ways very bad for the carriage of timber. [Chris.] Ousley, master of the Mackerel, has just gone to his vessel at Hull, having been compelled to stay for help through hurting his leg. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Feb. 26. The King to the Master and Fellows of St. Mary Magdalen College, Cambridge. We wish you to admit John Maulyverer, preceptor, of whose learning and piety we have good testimony, to the small fellowship held by Dr. Hezekiah Burton, and now void, or likely soon to become void, any clause in your statutes to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 154.]
[Feb. 26.] Warrant to pay to James, Duke of Monmouth, 9,200l. without account, for expenses made by him at the King's command, viz., 1,700l. to be paid at Lady Day, and then 1,500l. half-yearly till the whole is paid. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 88.]
Feb. 26. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 140.]
Feb. 26. Caveat in favour of Sir Ralph Wharton and Mr. Elliott, that no grant pass of a Customer's place in Hull, as it is given to Sir Ralph Wharton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 8.]
Feb. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. Several ships have passed northerly, and also some laden colliers bound for the Thames. Being in the company of the captain of the Danish man-of-war, and telling him of the death of the King of Denmark, and the proclaiming of his successor, he and another Danish gentleman replied that the succession must light upon Christian V., as Frederic III. had no son named Frederic. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 90.]
Feb. 26.
Oxford.
S. Chyles to Williamson. I doubt not but that you have received Dr. Lamplugh's letter concerning me, and you may wonder at the contents, but I can assure you that Dr. Pierce's actings in Magdalen College are so arbitrary that everyone relating to that body must either be a slave, or endanger his quiet, if not his being there; so I think it prudence to be beforehand with him, by obtaining a letter corroborating a good title, the fees and charges for which shall be honestly paid to the doctor. [Ibid. No. 91. See p. 69 supra.]
Feb. 26.
Whitehall.
News-letter to William Scawen at Molenack, Plymouth. Leave has been given to the Mayor and Aldermen of Chester, upon their petition, to bring in a bill to make the river navigable between the city and the sea. A bill for repairing Yarmouth Port was committed. Secretary Trevor acquainted the House of the King's desire that they should attend him at the Banquetting House, Whitehall, when his Majesty renewed his desires of putting an end to the difference between the two Houses, and suggested that the case of Skinner, referred by him to them, might be erased from the Journals of both Houses, as had been done from the Council Books, and in the Exchequer, which was agreed to; their ready compliance to his Majesty's speech was the occasion of much joy, and of several bonfires being made by the people the same night.
They write from Spain that the Conde de Molina is to go Ambassador for France, much against his will. The Queen Regent has quartered her new regiment of Guards 10 miles out of town.
M. Guldenlew, the Danish Ambassador, is reported to have returned to England with the ratification of the late treaty. Since the Triple Alliance has been perfected, several public ministers at the Hague have had conferences with Baron de Isola concerning the Emperor's entering into it, and they are making a league with the Emperor, and the rest of the Princes of Germany.
The Constable of Castile has returned his concurrence to his Majesty's letter, acquainting him of the French King having referred the arbitration of the differences in Flanders to his Majesty and the King of Sweden's decision, and has sent an express to the Court of Spain, to know their further pleasure.
The Grand Vizier will continue in Candia until April, and then make trial upon Malta. Though the treaty between Poland and Muscovy is adjourned until November, they have agreed to join together against the Turks and the rebellious Cossacks.
The Lords have committed the bill for preventing the transportation of wool, and the Commons have ordered the second reading of the bill for re-building of London, and entered upon that part of his Majesty's speech concerning the union of England and Scotland. Henry Coventry has been restored to his place as a Gentleman of the Bedchamber.
The Dutch news-books report the death of the Prince of Portugal, by a fall from his horse.
The Expedition of Lyme reports that Lord Howard has withdrawn to Seville by advice from Taffaletta, till he knows his success against a kinsman who is in arms against him. Sir John Harman is despatched up the Levant to bring down all the ships that are ready. On the 23rd, the Milford rode Admiral in the Downs, having given safe convoy to the Straits fleet, committed to her charge by Sir Thos. Allin.
A Falmouth vessel from Rochelle advises that 20 great vessels are fitting out there for Persia, to settle a manufacture for the French East India Company. The French King still keeps his resolution of going into Flanders, and will begin his journey on 15 April next, but will take no infantry with him, and will only stay 50 days. Monsieur and Madame are welcomed at Court, and are merry.
The misfortunes of the Venetians follow close on one another, 4 vessels which were conducting Chevalier Molina, being drawn by a tempest towards a port, the Admiral of Tripoli with 600 men, after a long fight, boarded and took them.
Particulars of further proceedings in the House of Commons, with regard to the Public Accounts, Imposition on Wines, and the management of prizes. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 92.]
Feb. 26. News-letter. Account of proceedings in the House of Commons, Monday and Tuesday, 21 and 22 Feb., as given in Commons' Journals [Vol. IX., p. 126], but after the King's speech to Parliament in the Banquetting House, Whitehall, there given, stating that the Houses complied with the King's request as to the settlement of their differences, and the erasure thereof from their journals, is added, "which his Majesty received with all demonstrations of satisfaction, and caused his wine cellars to be opened for their greater alacrity, whither Mr. Speaker with the mace went down, followed by all the members, and heartily drank to his Majesty's health, and returned full of content and joy for the good work of the day, in which his Majesty had so happily reconciled both Houses. The evening was celebrated with bonfires, and all other expressions of public joy for the union." [Ibid. No. 93.]
Feb. 27.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. A vessel has arrived from Holland with the report of the King of Denmark's death; two Virginian ships have arrived. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Feb. 27.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Collier, for Hugh Salesbury, to Williamson. The Advice, Swallow, and Kent are fitting for sea as quickly as possible. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 95.]
Feb. 27. Presentation of Thos. Gower to the rectory of Pitsford, co. Northampton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 2.]
Docquet of the above, dated March. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 157.]
Feb. 27.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I propose that [B.] St. Michel, or the clerk of the cheque at Portsmouth, shall send, in all ships bound for the fleet, a sealed book for the muster master, and that the muster master at sea shall send one home by all the King's ships that return; also that if the ship comes from one muster master to another, each shall send a book to the one at the next place the ship shall arrive at. Noted as read at the Board 3 March, when Lord Brouncker undertook to offer something on the subject, fit to be considered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 152.]
Feb. 27.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. It is true the Advice has been out of the dock 4 months, but she is as well graved and cleaned as the Swallow, although only done yesterday; for when she was graved in the dock, it was done after 7 months' dry weather, and the stuff lies on her like a coat of glass. We sent 30 men, who examined her down to her bilge, and found her perfectly clean; if you desire it, we will have this coat breamed off, and another put on, but I considered that it was not for me to fling away so much money without cause. Nothing can be added to her sailing, as she is new from the bottom upwards, and I never saw a ship better fitted, nor less regarded for want of a commander, nothing being done to her but at the charge of the yard, which a commander present would prevent; pray send him down, or much time will be lost ere she goes to sea.
When Capt. Young was here, he wanted many standing cabins and an awning for the quarter deck, but as you only directed that all should be done needful for her better sailing, and as the cabins would hinder it, I have put a stop to the building of any more, she having her roundhouse, cuddy, and 4 cabins completed, as also her steerage; if you give directions, I will set up as many as her commander desires; if commanders conceive their desires are shortened, I am liable to complaints that their ships have been slighted and ill-fitted. The Swallow is graved and nearly completed, but the Kent must lie for want of broom, and none can be had without I pay ready money, the people being quite discouraged by so many promises, and after waiting so long, not receiving it. I have engaged by contract with Rich. Flight for 20,000, at 3s. 3d. per hundred, to be delivered by March, and want a warrant to receive it. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 153.] Annexing,
Contract between Capt. Deane and William and Rich. Flight, for purchase of the broom alluded to. [Ibid. No. 153i.]
Feb. 28.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. I spoke to Mr. Ridge, who has not as yet received any directions for payment of materials; but at my request, he paid 10l. of his own money to procure broom, so I hope to get some by the time the Kent comes ashore. She being in a very bad condition, I have newly laid her gun deck, supplied a new mast, and done much work about her bows, so that she may be ready with the Swallow, and may take her provisions on board as soon as she comes off the ways. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 154.]
Feb. 28.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. The Mary yacht is ready to sail, and wants an order for her commander and provisions. The Swallow is graved, and will soon be ready for her' victuals; I desire an order to the victualler for them. The Kent will lose the spring [tide] for want of broom, and the Advice is losing time from there being no one to take her provisions, which have been ready 10 days. Nearly 30 men are entered on her, but there is no commander or lieutenant to keep them at work, so the service is neglected. The ordinary with our riggers are preparing the other 2 ships. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Feb. 28.
Dublin.
Capt. W. Fasby to the Navy Commissioners. Hearing from Sir Denis Gauden that I must go to Kinsale to victual, I have acquainted the Lord Lieutenant, who wonders I cannot do it at Dublin as well as others; he will give no orders for my going, and has desired me to acquaint you with this. If I go there, very little service can be expected, and I am not in a condition to go without new sails, &c., which I beg you to supply. I take provisions on my own credit. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Feb. 28. News-letter, repeating the contents of that of 26 Feb., with the following: M. Guldenlew hearing of the death of his master, the King of Denmark, has returned to Copenhagen.
Monsieur is fully reconciled to the Court, but comes suddenly from thence to live in Paris. Before he left, the King sent jewels, laces, perfumes, essences, diamonds, and garters to Madame, of the value of 20,000 crowns, together with 20 purses containing 100 louis d'or in each, and informed her that as she was not at Court during the carnival to draw at the King's lottery, he had put in four chances for her, and her fortune had won the purses sent. Proceedings in the House of Commons as printed in the Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 127–129. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 96.]
Feb. 28.
Coventry.
Ralph Hope to Williamson. I thank you for being continued a correspondent. The book of Dr. Bryan, the grand Nonconformist minister, lately put forth, entitled "Dwelling with God; or, a New Habitation," is making a great noise, and his six sermons therein seem to do the Church more right, by their vindication of the Liturgy, and acknowledging and maintaining the antiquity and authority of the Church and episcopacy, than he ever prejudiced it by his Nonconformity; so I hope that more may be induced to adhere to the Church by the Doctor's precept, than deserted it by his example, especially when it is considered that its greatest enemy has become its champion. The Doctor is still at Coventry, and is much exclaimed against by his disciples. The conventicles here are quite as numerous as ever, as besides having the grand one at Leather Hall, there are several others in different places, so that a man, if so disposed, may hear 6 or 7 sermons every Sunday, and make nothing of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 97.]
Feb. 28.
Hull.
Luke Bourne, for Chas. Whittington, to Hickes. We have little news here, as the ships have lain still this winter time by reason of the weather. Whittington is in London, and will have seen Mr. Williamson. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Feb. 28.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Perrott. Please to take care and prevent misrepresentations in the Gazette, lest its reputation be impaired. I find the relation of the loss of the Rainbow is contrary to the account I gave, she being reported to have been lost a league from Liverpool, bound for Dublin, whereas she was lost a league from Holyhead, coming from Dublin. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Feb. 28.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A vessel from St. Malo confirms the discourse that the French King has detained a quarter part of all the seamen there in his pay, and that they are not to go to any merchantman upon severe penalties. They say that 77 storehouses have been made at Brest for as many ships, and that masts have been found 3 feet through, and fit for the biggest of ships; also that by cutting a small passage, they have the benefit of a river which brings them down to the sea. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Feb. 28.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Weymouth Merchant and 3 or 4 more have sailed for Newfoundland, and the Prosperous of Dover and several others are waiting a fair wind. The Good Hope of Newport has been cast away upon the coast of Ireland and lost, with all her goods and some of the men. The Neptune of Amsterdam, with wine from Bordeaux, has also been cast away at Newquay, but her men and most of the goods were saved. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Feb. 28.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. The ketch has sailed for Jamaica, and 5 or 6 Newfoundland men have gone their voyage with her. Several vessels bound for France are still in harbour, waiting a fair wind. The loyal party in these parts are much troubled at the increase of the factious fanatics, who have frequent meetings with much uncontrolled insolency. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Feb. 28.
Swansea.
Jo. Man to Perrott. The Hester has arrived from Brest, and reports that the French King has 8 men-of-war there, and the same number at Sherrant [Charente] and Toulon, all being of the largest rates, and designed for the Straits; and that he has ordered the building of 8 others yearly at each port. We hear from Milford of the arrival of the Appeal of London from Bayonne with wine; the Anne of Bristol, from Cadiz for Cork, with wine, fruit, and salt; and the Lion of Liverpool, bound for the Barbadoes. Please to send the news-letters and Gazette, which have hitherto miscarried, to Francis Bowen, my deputy collector of customs at Milford; he promises such news as may offer in return. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 103.]
Feb. 28.
Thetford.
Rob. Tyrrell to Williamson. I earnestly desire you to use your influence for preventing further proceedings in a grand piece of villainy mentioned in an enclosure; otherwise his Majesty's letters patent will be of little advantage to those who had hopes of finding relief towards their great losses. I solicit your aid also in behalf of John Browne, a poor prisoner in gaol at the suit of the Hon. Hatton Rich. He petitioned Lord Arlington to persuade with Rich for his enlargement, but received no reply. I need not give you an account of the satisfaction your last letter gave to the town in general, as I doubt not [John] Kendall has done so verbally. The rogue mentioned in the enclosure has taken up several briefs in Suffolk, and subscribed himself by the name of Thos. Monday. [Ibid. No. 104.] Enclosing,
Examination of John Hodson, of Thetford, co. Norfolk, glazier, taken before Rob. Tyrrell, Mayor. Was employed by the Corporation of Thetford, as the only person to receive several sums of money collected in various parishes, by virtue of the King's brief granted to the corporation; but when he demanded the money of the churchwardens of St. Mary Overy, Southwark, and also of John Tyler, churchwarden of the parish of Redriff [Rotherhithe], Surrey, he was informed that it had already been collected by a person described, upon his producing a deputation, under the hands and seals of two of the trustees mentioned in the brief, and that he gave an acquittance for the same. [Ibid. No. 104i.]
Feb. 28. [John] Tasburgh to Williamson. I beg in this general jubilee to congratulate you on the happy union of the two Houses; the borough of Thetford ascribes a great share of it to your genius and endeavours, and although the universal joy may be extravagant, it is excusable by the motives from which it springs. As my interest miscarried in a former grant obtained by Lord Hen. Howard, I hope Lord Arlington will not oppose me, and solicit your influence in procuring me some employment; as the King intends erecting an office for 7 years for the new supply, and the persons to fill it are probably not all pitched upon, if any office should appear which is considered too big for me, or for which I am not competent from my religious views, I beg to remind you that I can sell it; and if not, I hope you will think of Sir Harry Bedingfield, as he and I will be sure to agree. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Feb. 28.
Sayes Court.
J. Evelyn to [Williamson]. I do not wish Mr. Oudart dead, but if it should please God to take him, he being reported irrecoverably sick, pray speak favourably in my behalf, that I may succeed in the character which he must leave. It is not a station to be envied for its emolument, but I would not refuse an opportunity which might render me any degree nearer to his Majesty's service. If this succeed not, be kind to me, and burn this paper. Endorsed by Williamson, "Sec. of Latin tongue." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 106.]
Feb. 28. Warrant to the Master of the Great Wardrobe to pay 6,602l. 9s. 1½d. to tradesmen, servants, &c., for work and allowances in the King and Queen's stables, from Michaelmas 1664 to Lady Day 1665. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 141.]
Feb. 28. Like warrant for 5,033l. 9s. 3d., for the half-year from Lady Day to Michaelmas 1665. [Ibid.]
Feb. 28. Declaration by Hum. Lloyd, Dean of St. Asaph, of his appointment of Robert Wynne, rector of Kerrigydridion, to act as his procurator—he being detained by illness—in the election to the bishopric of St. Asaph, void by death of Hen. Glenham, and in obtaining the confirmation thereof. [Latin. 4¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 107.]
Feb. 28. Declaration of Hum. Lloyd, Dean of St. Asaph, of the election by the Dean and Chapter of Isaac Barrow, S.T.P., to their bishopric, void by death of Hen. Glenham, S.T.P.; and procuration to Rob. Thompson and Rich. Newcourt, public notaries, to appear before Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, and obtain his confirmation of the same. [Latin. 4½ pages. Ibid. No. 108.]
Feb. 28. Like declaration of Rob. Wynne, as procurator of Dean Lloyd. [Latin. 4¼ pages. Ibid. No. 109.]
Feb. 28.
Chapter House
Hum. Lloyd, Dean, and the Chapter of St. Asaph, to the King. We certify our election of Dr. Barrow as bishop, and request your confirmation thereof. Signed by Rob. Wynne, as Dean's procurator. [Parchment. Latin. Ibid. No. 110.]
[Feb. 28.] Certificate by Rob. Wynne, M.A., procurator of Hum. Lloyd, Dean of St. Asaph, to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, of the election by the Dean and Chapter, according to the King's patents inserted, on Monday 28 Feb., of [Dr. Isaac Barrow] to their bishopric, void by death of Dr. Hen. Glenham. [Imperfect. Latin. 15½ pages. Ibid. No. 111.]
Feb. 28. Instrument by Rob. Wynne, public notary, procurator of Dean Lloyd, declaring the election of Isaac Barrow by the canons named, to the bishopric of St. Asaph. [Latin. 13 pages. Ibid. No. 112.]
Feb. Grant to Thos. Whitley, in reversion after Maurice Wynne, of the office of receiver of the revenues in North Wales and co. Palatine of Chester. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 144.]
Feb. Notes of proceedings in Parliament, 14–28 Feb.; all printed in the Commons' Journals [Vol. IX., pp. 121–129] under their respective dates. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, Nos. 113–124.]
Feb.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson, 3, 6, and 8 Feb., stating that there is no news in those parts. [Ibid. Nos. 125–127.]
Feb.
Court at Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Bennet College, Cambridge. On 12 Oct. last, we requested you to admit Wormley Martin, student of Jesus College, to the first vacant fellowship, but you elected another, who died before the fellowship was actually void. You have again lately, in high contempt of our letters, elected another to the fellowship. We require you to admit Martin forthwith, and we summon the Master, and two senior Fellows who consented to the said election, to appear before us and answer their contempt. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 273, No. 128.]
Feb. ? Petition of Christian Harell to the King, for the place of chemist and apothecary in ordinary to the household, as promised him after the death of M. Le Fevre, now deceased. [Ibid. No. 129. His salary began Lady Day 1670. See Entry Book 34, p. 56.] Annexing,
Request by Christian Harell that he may have a special grant of the office of chemist and apothecary to the royal household, as, his predecessor, Nicasius Le Fevre, had; otherwise the Lord Chamberlain opposes the passing of his grant, as prejudicial to his own right of nomination; promises not to interfere with the rights of "Maister Johns, apothecary of the household." [Ibid. No. 129i.]
Feb. ? Petition of Ann Holmes to Lord Arlington, for an order to Lady Broughton, keeper of the Gatehouse, to give her access to her husband, a prisoner there, and weak and sickly. [See Jan. 22, p. 30, supra. Ibid. No. 130.]
Feb. ? Petition of Ann, wife of Rob. Holmes, prisoner in the Gatehouse, Westminster, to Lord Arlington, to obtain leave to release her husband from prison on bail, as he has important suits to plead at Dover in Easter week, on seizures made in the Customs; the Attorney-General was ordered on a former petition to consult with Edmond Turner, on behalf of the Farmers of Customs, whether the accusation was vexatious, and he reported that bail should be granted by the Lord Chief Justice, but he is on circuit. Her husband is close prisoner, and as Lady Broughton will suffer no person or letter to come to him, he cannot defend himself. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Feb. ? Petition of Rich. Pight to the King, for the speedy reading and perfecting of a bill prepared by him, for the more effectual bringing in of 300,000l. due to the Crown, read in 1666, and again 28 March 1669, but postponed because all fresh business was prohibited, and many persons obstruct it; if not now read and perfected, great loss will ensue. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Feb. Notes by [Pepys], in shorthand, relating to provisions sent to Port Mahon, for the fleet under Sir Thos. Allin and Sir Edw. Spragg, and to their correspondence with the Navy Commissioners respecting the same, 23 Oct. 1669–24 Feb. 1670. With lists of masts and other stores required by Sir T. Allin, 23 Oct. 1669. [Ibid. No. 132A.]
Feb.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, and the state of the wind, &c.:—
Vol. 273. No. Date. King's. Merchants'. Wind. Mails. Remarks.
Arrival. Departure.
133 Feb. 12 1 S.W.
134 " 20 1 1 N.W.
135 " 22 1 7 S.S.W.
136 " 25 1 25 N.N.W.
137 " 26 1 20 S.W.
138 " 27 27 S.W.
139 " 28 1 17 S.S.W. Received the packets, but no ships have appeared bound for any of the places. Intends sending those for Lisbon by a ship bound for Oporto, if he does not hear to the contrary.