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Charles II: January 1670

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Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1670 With Addenda 1660-70. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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CHARLES II.

January 1670

Jan. 1. Account of the entire receipts of the Exchequer, from the different branches of the revenue, as specified, for the year 1669; total 1,791,315l. 0s. 9d. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 1.]
Jan. 1. Account of interest and rewards paid for procuring moneys for the King's service from 1 Jan. 1669, beside rewards for moneys lent on the 11 months' aid, additional aid, &c. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 1. Draft of the above, giving the total 59,721l. 4s. 2d. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. 1. Warrant granting 10s. a day extra to the Secretary of the Forces, as granted to the clerk to the late General, who is now appointed to that duty; to commence from 7 Jan. next. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Jan. 1.
Glentworth.
Viscount Fanshaw to Jos. Williamson. I am glad you told me the reason of the King's displeasure to Harry Coventry, as it enabled me to set right several reports, one of which was that Coventry has been turned out of his place, and Lord Buckhurst made a Bedchamber man. I agree with you that our greatest concern is first to settle the King and Government, that being the bottom we must build upon, and I shall use my best argument to persuade others to be of the like opinion; it will be much easier to do so now, than six weeks since, as the King is believed to have done some things since the prorogation much to his advantage. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 2.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. The stormy north-east winds and snow prevent news reaching here. Two vessels were wrecked on the Goodwin Sands. The violent winds killed many lobsters, and drove hundreds on shore dead, a thing not heard of before. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Jan. 2.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to James Hickes. There are in the port 40 sail of ships from Cadiz and other parts of Spain and Portugal, and others from New England, the Canaries, &c., nearly 100 in all, which have been riding 3 weeks in the Channel before they could get to some port; they report that they were chased off the Southern Cape by 9 Turkish men-of-war, but protected by Sir Edw. Spragg with 3 frigates; a Dutch man-of-war, and 120 sail of merchant ships homeward bound, are in the port waiting a wind. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 2.
Plymouth.
Same to Charles Perrott. To the same effect as the preceding. A ship that touched at Tangiers reports that Sir Thos. Allin intends to go for Cadiz to careen, and that hostages from the Emperor of Morocco have arrived at Tangiers, for the safety of Lord Howard, who is gone forward on his embassy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 8.]
Jan. 2. Abstract of the above [by Williamson]. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Jan. 2. M. Wren to Sam. Pepys. His Royal Highness has ordered that the Navy Board be directed to hire a vessel to transport Lord Fauconberg's horses to Calais, his lordship intending to go from Dover the end of the week. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 1.]
Jan. 2. Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. I repaired to Reading and Newbury, chose the timber required for the new ship at Woolwich, and proffered 4l. a load; but they refuse to sell and deliver it under 4l. 5s. Noted that he was ordered to make the best bargain he could for it. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 3. Account of the old Navy stores bought at Woolwich, Deptford, and Chatham dockyards by James Pearse, surgeon, and of his losses thereon; also of the sums due to him; balance due by him, 153l. 9s. 3d. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. 3.
Chatham.
John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Nothing of importance has happened since my return. Before the Adam and Eve hoy could get unloaded of her timber, the wind shifted and frosty weather set in, and the river being full of ice, she could not proceed to Stockwith, and cannot go until supplied with victuals, having only sufficient for 3 weeks on board. The victualler's agent here was to have furnished her, but he has not got the victuals. Pray order two months' provisions from London, or let the vessel be sent back to Deptford for another freight of plank, which is much wanted.
So much snow having fallen, the men are unable to work on the new ship or otherwise. Mr. Moorcock has tendered some knees and compass timber, and asks 3l. 10s. a load, but I expect he will take less if treated with. I discharged Capt. Moorcocke, [John] Moore, and the rest of the men employed on the wrecks, to ease the charge, the wrecks being all blown to pieces; 2 or 3 more chests will clear the river, and when better weather comes, I shall employ the 2 chests [of gunpowder] left, and hope to put the King to no further charge. Boatswain [Thos.] Smith of the Dunkirk being restored to his employment by his Royal Highness, what is to be done with [Fras.] Coleman and [Thos.] Woodyard, the buyers of the rope sold by Smith ? Are they to be prosecuted ? [Ibid. No. 4.]
Jan. 3.
Portsmouth sloop, Portsmouth.
Wm. Buck to the Navy Commissioners. I send, by order of [St. John] Steventon, clerk of the cheque, a book of the entries and discharges of men of the sloop. With note that the book was taken by Lord Brouncker. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Commission to William, Earl of Craven, to be colonel of the regiment of Coldstream Guards lately under command of the Duke of Albemarle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 10.]
[Jan. 3.] Draft of the above. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 3. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 205.]
Jan. 3. Commission for Sir Phil. Howard to be captain and colonel of the Queen's troop of Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 3.
Wells.
J. Hall to [Williamson]. I always considered I was out of the reach of such a mischief as that of being sheriff, having so good a title to his Majesty's favour by expending a considerable sum towards his restoration. When I petitioned Lord Arlington to be relieved, his lordship said that his Majesty was sensible of my service, and would gratify me for it, if he could find out anything in the King's gift; yet notwithstanding this, and being his servant in ordinary for 7 years, besides the mean condition my fortune is reduced to, through my family's loyalty in the late rebellion, I have been made sheriff of Wiltshire, a county where the perquisites are so inconsiderable that no person who consults the King's honour but must sit down a loser of 1,000l. After I had submitted, made my officers, and given a grant of the place of keeper of the county gaol to Mathew Best, [Hen.] Sadler brings me a King's letter and a recommendation from Lord Arlington, to turn out Best, and admit him on account of his loyalty. Although Sadler may not want loyalty, yet I fear he may sobriety, and as the place is one of great trust—the charge of the gaol being 30,000l., for which I am liable if any escapes happen through his want of care—I desire the King may be moved not to impose Sadler upon me, unless he can give security. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 12.]
Jan. 3.
Musgrave.
Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. I performed my long journey without any disappointment, though I tugged with my coach through a very deep snow, and was forced to leave it, and pass over Stainmore on horseback. I could not have done this had not 30 or 40 of my tenants and Westmoreland friends come 10 miles to meet me, and tracked out a passage through the snow drifts. I received, at Brough, your letter and the proclamation, which I will attend to. The narrative of your aged servant's journey to these cold parts will gain your pity. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 3.
Norwich.
Rob. Scrivener to Perrott. I will observe directions as to future addresses. I have appointed Rich. Fassett, living with Counsellor Turges, near the Pump in Chancery Lane, to pay Hen. Ball, the clerk, 20 shillings. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 3.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. There has been a false report of an uproar in Dublin, and of an attack on the Lord Lieutenant. The Concord of Rotterdam has arrived laden with wines from Bordeaux, where freights are low, on account of a report of war. The Francis frigate reports the chase of the squadron of merchant ships by the Turks. She has on board some soldiers from Tangiers, who say that Lord Howard is still ill, but his coach and horses are at Sally, waiting for passports. An East Indiaman has arrived laden with salt petre. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Jan. 3.
Falmouth.
Same to Perrott. Copy of the above, with note that there has been no post this week, on account of the great snow. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 4.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I want an order to the purveyor for 18 loads of knees, 2 breast hooks, a strait piece of timber, and six pairs of standards, for the deck of the London, which cannot be finished without them. If they are supplied, I doubt not but to be able to launch the ship next May. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 6.]
Jan. 4.
Portsmouth Dockyard.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. I request a warrant to the storekeeper to issue provisions for the rigging-house, and for laying up the Portsmouth sloop; also orders as to fitting out the Holmes, formerly the Albemarle, sent in by Sir Rob. Holmes. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 4.
Shadwell.
Thos. Melmoth to Thos. Hayter. Has any order been received about Chas. Kirke and Chas. Montague, extra midshipmen to Sir Thos. Allin ? Pay day is near, and I wish to carry it with me to Portsmouth. Excuse my not waiting upon you, not being well. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Jan. 4/14.
London.
Case of the will of Isaac Pleuvier; that he settled as a clockmaker in London in 1641, but was not naturalized; that he died 1 Oct. 1665, leaving his goods, which were personal, to parties in the Low Countries, but that Rob. Bishop, 23 June 1668, obtained a grant of the said goods, on the ground that Pleuvier dying during the Dutch war, his goods are forfeit; this is illegal, as the subjects of either country were not banished from the other as enemies. The executors request a stay of the proceedings of Rob. Bishop. [3 pages. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 17.]
Jan. 4. The King to the President and Fellows of St. John Baptist's College, Oxford. You have a local statute forbidding your butler to marry, although your other officers and servants are not so forbidden, and divers butlers have been married without the least prejudice to the college, the butler bringing the keys of the college to the president every night at 9 p.m. We wish this favour to be extended to George Barrett, your present butler, without incurring any forfeiture, he having given testimony of his fidelity and good behaviour. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 154.]
Jan. 4. Warrant for a licence to Sir Walter Hendley, Bart., and 5 others, to hold a weekly market at Cuckfield, Sussex, for the benefit of the inhabitants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 141.]
Jan. 4. Notes of commissions to 6 captains, 10 lieutenants, 12 ensigns, a chaplain, adjutant, and marshal in the Earl of Craven's regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 2. All printed in Dalton's Army Lists, Vol. I., pp. 108–110.]
Jan. 4.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Perrott. The 120 ships still remain wind-bound, and another has arrived from Cadiz; 2 East Indiamen have reached Falmouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 18.]
Jan. 4. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Jan. 4.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Twelve vessels have come in. One from Barbadoes reports the colony quiet and flourishing. The French vessels talk much of a war with Holland. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Jan. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to [Williamson]. Several vessels bound for Newcastle, driven here by stress of weather, have sailed again. The wind has brought in the Dutch packet, with an express from Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 21.]
Jan. 5.
Norwich.
Thos. Corie to Williamson. Remember my application of 24 Dec., for a letter from the King limiting the stay of players at Norwich. The small pox still rages, and poverty increases, so that want of health and wealth make us in no condition to entertain such guests. I beg despatch, as the time approaches when they threatened to visit us. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Jan. 5.
London.
James Hickes to Perrott. I saw your desires on the post label, relating to the Swedish Resident's letters, but can say little, it being out of our office; Mr. Williamson may write to Ellis on the point. I will wait upon you when I come to your end of the town, or I may be seen here on Tuesday, Friday, or Saturday, if you will partake of such commons as God sends Mr. Ellis and me. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Jan. 5.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Hampshire frigate has arrived, having been 4 months from the Straits' fleet, and come from Kinsale in Ireland. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Jan. 5.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. There are no ships in the harbour, either outward or inward bound. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Jan. 5.
London.
M. Evans [Secretary of the Levant Company] to Dr. Joseph Taylor. The company hears through Jo. Joliffe, one of their members, that you propose an amicable settlement of the business, and supposes it means by arbitration; if so, you are to appoint one or two persons, and the company will join one or two more, to whom the whole matter may be referred. [S.P. Foreign, Levant, Vol. 5, p. 228.]
Jan. 5. Warrant to Sir John Howell, recorder, and the sheriffs of London, to release and insert in the next transportation pardon, Tobias Wright, falsely accused and condemned at the Old Bailey, on the charge of a felony and burglary, for which — Aldridge has since been executed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 30.]
Jan. 6. Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. I find in Sherwood Forest 4,000 trees which may produce 4,500 loads of serviceable timber, out of which sufficient may be obtained for the frames, &c., of 4 third-rate ships, and rebuilding the Royal Oak; the ships being built at Hull will save the extra charge of transportation to London. By hewing the frames and bringing the timber to proper scantlings in the wood, all defects will be discovered, and ⅓ of the land and water carriage cut off, which in 1,000 loads to Hull is 325l., and to London 1,500l.; what is not worth sending to the yards can be sold in the wood to the best advantage; 2,000 trees will suffice for the first year's fall, out of which the frames of a third-rate ship and of the Royal Oak may be taken; the conversion of the frames in the wood, and transporting them to the yards, will cost 2,800l.
Jan. 6. Particulars of materials required, and persons necessary to be employed, with estimate of the probable cost, amounting in the whole to 9,375l. I suggest that 1,000l. of that sum ought to be paid in hand to the person appointed to the chief command of the work, to enable him to buy provisions and materials, and pay wages, and the residue paid him at 500l. a month, or as the service shall require it, the first payment to be made in April—the season for felling oaks, if the bark must be preserved—but the timber would be better for being felled in winter, as the trees having stood long past their growth, they are now decaying, and will be utterly lost to his Majesty if not timely made use of. [3 pages. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 9.] Annexing,
Same to the Duke of York. I viewed Sherwood Forest according to your commands, and then went to Kingston-upon-Hull, to inquire as to the convenience of that place to build ships of war, and the advantages or disadvantages that might accrue therefrom. I am of opinion that 3,000 or 4,000 trees may be had out of the forest, and that the garrison side of Hull may be made a convenient building place.
Amongst several parts of the forest well stocked with trees, I found Birkland and Billhay, which are 3 miles in length, with many thousand, which promise well at a distance, but 6 or 8 to one were wind shaken, arising from the nature of the soil, which is of light sand, and the trees slender rooted, and much the worse for standing beyond their growth. I believe timber may be picked for the frames and inboard work of 3 or 4 third-rate ships; there will be little for plank, treenails, and knees, but they may be had in those parts at a cheaper rate than the London market price; deals, pitch, tar, and ironwork may be had there also at moderate rates, but masts, yards, sails, cables, and anchors must be supplied elsewhere; the transport of them by light ships bound for Hull, Newcastle, or Norway will not cost much.
The trees to be felled ought to be chosen and marked out before the fall of the leaf, and when felled, all the unserviceable timber ought to be delivered to the surveyor, and disposed of on the place; the useful ought to be hewed and framed in the wood; this will expedite the work, and save a third of the carriage and wharfage, which will be 6s. 6d. a load to Hull, and 26s. 6d. to London, so that in 1,000 loads 1,325l. (sic) will be saved to the King. Out of that sum 250l. will have to be deducted for extra charges, as transporting necessaries from London, and impressing shipwrights and workmen; as there are but few good workmen in those parts, 20 must be sent from London. Also 300l. will be required for preparing the building place, fencing in the yard, making and setting up a crane and sheds to work in, in wet weather, so that in the first 1,000 loads 775l. will be saved. The 300l. serving for everything, and being abated out of the next charge, there will be saved out of every 1,000 loads made use of 1,075l.; the charge of a master builder and a clerk, which will be sufficient for officers, will be but 200l.—17 Dec. 1669. [Copy. 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 91.]
Jan. [6 ?]
Woolwich.
Wm. Sheldon and 3 other officers of the dockyard to the Navy Commissioners. As to regulating the watch, we think that for the better security of the stores, all the old watchmen ought to be discharged, and new ones entered, partly composed of seamen, as being more wakeful than landsmen; also that there should be 2 watches instead of 1, which will be only the same expense. Mr. Sheldon found Thos. Morrice, keeper at the gate, deputy for Luther who was sick, asleep, and pricked him for negligence; the other 2 watchmen were awake; we are not sure whether that was the night that the hawser was stolen. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Jan. 6.
Portsmouth Dockyard.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. Sails are wanted for the St. Michael and other ships in the harbour, which the stores cannot supply. Shall I deliver some canvas to Mr. Harris's instrument, as the weather is suitable for making them ? [Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 6.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. I received your order about the Holmes frigate and her 80 men, stating that you had directed the victualler to supply her with 6 months' provisions; but as it has been the custom not to enter private ships, taken up to serve his Majesty, into pay and victuals until they are ready to sail, and as your order is large enough for entering her men into pay, but too scant for allowing them harbour victuals, I beg further directions as to issuing warrants to the victualler, or whether the owner is to find them until she is ready to sail; also an order for payment of the Portsmouth sloop, which can be despatched tomorrow, if the treasurer's instrument has an order. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 6.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory and J. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. Being directed to state in our weekly accounts the value of the provisions received into the stores from purveyors and others under agreement, we request a warrant authorising some person on the place to value such goods, when the purveyors neglect sending an invoice with them. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 6. Commissions for Dan. Collingwood to be lieutenant and major, and Fras. Watson cornet and captain, in the Queen's troop of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 206.]
Jan. 6.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Particulars of ships. A Rouen vessel is wrecked, but the men saved. Several ships that were wind-bound in the port have put to sea. The East India men still remain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 26.]
Jan. 6. Same to Perrott. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Jan. 6.
Ednall. [Edenhall ?]
Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. I am rejoiced at his Majesty's proceedings, which are grounded upon such prudential reasons as may satisfy all equally, and it is undoubtedly our interest to keep up that reputation. The Nonconformists were more numerous, and met more openly, during the sitting of Parliament than at any other time, and it is supposed the hope of indulgence had this effect. I beg the Gazette may be sent to me at Penrith. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 28.]
Jan. 7.
Eastwell. [Kent.]
Earl of Winchelsea to [Council ?]. I am very sensible of the great honour and confidence his Majesty and you have shown me, which I shall study to merit. I went to Canterbury, and sent for several persons to meet me and the Customs' officers at Dover, and have advised with several of the most knowing persons of this country how to put in execution your lordships' commands. Some proposals have been made to me, one of which is enclosed. I send the packet by [Wm.] Dickinson, who is very knowing in the affair, and has been present at many of the consultations to redress the growing evil, so that your lordships' time will not be ill-spent to hear him.
The persons transporting wools have found out new ways, insomuch that force cannot suppress the evil, but it must be effected by spies, and some of their confederates, which will require great dexterity and secrecy in the management. If your lordships will punish the offenders, I question not but in a few days to transmit many that are very notorious, with such proofs as will give satisfaction that they merit to be made examples of, though by the strict letter of the law, the justices of the county know not how to proceed against them. If your lordships—after perusing the paper, which chiefly aims to put the affair into a regular course, and so make the charge and trouble light to the informers, and heavy to the offenders—will give me any further commands, I will act upon them; but it is possible that his Majesty may give the whole management to some other person, or divide it into several provinces. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 29.] Enclosing,
Walter Braems and 6 others to the Earl of Winchelsea. We send 12 proposals for preventing the exportation of wool, which we conceive cannot be so much broken and prevented by force, as by spies and secret correspondence, to be carried out as suggested. Noted as read in Council 12 Jan. 1669–70. [5 pages. Ibid. No. 29I.]
Jan. 7.
Resolution.
Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson. I send particulars of the proceedings of our fleet, from 24 Dec. 1669 to 7 Jan. 1670. On 28 Dec. I heard of the arrival of our herring fleet at Cadiz. Dec. 31 we chased 5 Dutch ships, but could not speak them, the sea being so outrageous.
3 Jan. we chased and fetched up a French tartan from Carthagena, who reported that he saw 47 Turks and Moors there, which are all that remain of 200 cast away 14 Dec. off Cape de Palos. The French tartan was a new ship of 16 guns, commanded by Mustapha, a Genoese renegade, and was forced so near the shore by a storm that she could not get off again. On the 6th we met the herring fleet, which Capt. Holmes joined. He has been parted from us since 19 Dec., and in great extremity for provisions. To-day I sent the Portland to strengthen the convoy of the herring fleet as far as Leghorn, and the Milford and Pearl to Malaga, to recover a prize laden with masts which is sunk there, and swimming by the decks. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 30.]
Jan. 7.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. I send an advertisement for the Gazette. I will see that the fee incident thereupon is satisfied. [Ibid. No. 31.] Annexing,
Notice that John Lindsay, goldsmith, has removed from Broad Street to Lombard Street. [Ibid. No. 31i.]
Jan. 7.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Perrott. Most of the merchantmen have sailed, but some still wait a fairer wind. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Jan. 7. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Jan. 7. Certificate by John Potts that he seized several sheets of a book entitled, "Divers Titles of the letter K," in the house of Sam. Symmons, a printer, who said he printed them for Peter Parker, which the latter afterwards confessed. [Ibid. No. 34. See Calendar 1668–9, p. 130.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Commission to Hen. Moncke to be lieutenant and major in the Queen's Guard under Sir Phil. Howard, Colonel. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Jan. Minute of the above, dated 6 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 206.]
Jan. [7 ?] Commission to Wm. Upcott to be quarter-master in the abovenamed regiment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 36.]
Jan. 7. Warrant for a commission to William, Earl of Craven, to succeed the late Duke of Albemarle as Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, and the borough of Southwark. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 188.]
Jan. Docquet of the above, dated 15 Jan. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 124.]
Jan. 7.
Chatham.
John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will hasten the Adam and Eve hoy to Stockwith, as soon as her provisions come down. I discharged 10 bricklayers and 12 labourers on account of the frost, and 8 house carpenters for not doing their work. I send the master shipwright's demand for timber, hemp, and tow required for the Newcastle and the new ship. As the timber to be obtained from Sir Roger Twisden and [John] Mason will not make 5 loads, unless a further supply is obtained within two months, the new ship will not be built this year, and I shall have to discharge a number of men. I will inquire and send the reasons for not taking up the moorings laid for the hulk at Sheerness, and will take care that Coleman and Woodyard are prosecuted next sessions. I send an account of Mr. Moorcock's timber, and will treat with him for the knees. [John] Wilson, the storekeeper, scruples in signing the weekly accounts of the clerk of the comptrol, and promises to give his reasons in writing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 14.] Encloses
Particulars of certain timber belonging to Mr. Moorcock. [Ibid. No. 14I.]
Jan. 7. Major Thos. Beckford to the Navy Commissioners. I have drawn up, as you ordered, the particulars in which I think myself injured. When [Rob.] Waith made up the books in Sir Geo. Carteret and the Earl of Anglesey's time, he did not allow me so much by 4,000l. as I had bills for, signed by your Honours. According to his Royal Highness's order, I was to have received my money at the pay of every ship; but that was not done, although I gave constant attendance. Waith knows that I left my bills for 12 months together, so that upon making up the books, he might set off the clothes, which he has neglected to do, although any other man would have done it for half the salary I allow him. There are tickets to a considerable value which had clothes charged upon them, but never defalked, beside clothes which have been set off upon the muster books, and never brought to account in the pay books.
Waith has returned me debtor to the King in 200l. If, upon examining the books, it is found that I have received more than the books make out, I will refund it, but I desire that the rest concerned may do the same, so that all does not lie upon me. There are several large sums due by me to pursers for their credit, and to poor people for dead men's clothes, which I am not able to satisfy, from being kept out of my money, and my reputation is much impaired by their clamours. I desire, before the Earl of Anglesey's account is closed, and the money in hand is disposed of, that you will order me payment of what may be found to be due by the clerks, and that they may be directed to prosecute your former order. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 15.] Enclosed,
Account of bills for ships named, amounting to 15,476l. 12s. 7d., with other sums added on 8 May 1668. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 15i.]
Jan. 7.
Holyhead.
Capt. W. Fasby of the Monmouth yacht to the Navy Commissioners. I want sails, the mizen having blown away, and the main and fore sails being expected to go every day. There have been great storms, 4 ships having been cast away last week coming into Dublin, and 2 the week before; if this yacht stays upon the coast, she will be quite spoiled, as she will not take the ground, and has no beams to hold her together. The Mary yacht is still at Dublin. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 8.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I spent Thursday morning answering the sudden commands of Sir John Mennes, so could not give an account how we fared. The wind keeping southerly and easterly all last month, the storms have been very violent, and much shipping has been destroyed. On Thursday there was such a violent thunderstorm that the tiles, glass, and paper walls of our house were destroyed, and the rain came in, in several places. The house has not been repaired for many years, and is out of order, but the greatest want is a stack of chimneys, which are rotten. I have now the opportunity of procuring a good pennyworth of bricks, if it is thought expedient. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 8.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. The Trent is now open, and I have got the Tinker, which lay at Bawtry, down to the water side, ready to bring to Stockwith at spring tide. As I have been promised 100 loads from the woods, if the weather continues dry, pray send down 3 hoys. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 18.]
Jan. 8. Capt. John Kelsy to the Navy Commissioners. Having brought the Fanfan to Woolwich, by his Royal Highness's order, I want a new mainmast and boat, the latter being staved. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Jan. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The ships bring rumours of war from Holland. I would be glad to have my intelligences on a Saturday: I receive Gazettes the other two post days. With note from Jas. Hickes to Perrott, requesting his compliance therewith. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 37.]
Jan 8.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Although the winds have been for 60 hours very violent, we hear of no harm done to the shipping. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Jan. 8.
Plymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A vessel has arrived from Bordeaux, and 2 from the Canaries, both belonging to Topsham. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Jan. 8.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Frances Lignere, granddaughter of Sir Thos. Merry, one of the late King's clerks of the Greencloth, to the King. When my sister and I were children, our grandfather put out for use, and in our names, 800l., by lending it to the Farmers of Customs, and took their bond in 800l. each for its repayment with interest. After 21 years, my sister put her bond in suit, and obtained judgment for 800l. with costs, whereupon the obligors preferred a bill in equity to be relieved, and paid her 400l. to have an injunction to stay her proceedings; but upon hearing of the cause, the Court saw no reason to relieve either against damages or costs. But I, not being stored with money to contest, agreed, on payment of 450l., to deliver up my bond, and sign a release, on condition that I should be no sufferer, and that whatever my sister recovered should also be paid to me. The remaining 400l. and damages were paid to my sister by the executors in December, but I cannot prevail upon them to pay me, although they have upwards of 1,000l. in hand, allowed by your Majesty out of your own stores, for payment of these debts.
My grandfather was a great sufferer for his loyalty to your royal father while at Oxford, and furnished him with large sums of money, which are still unpaid, and was thereby disabled from making such provision as he intended for me, who am poor and distressed, and unskilful in matters of law. I beg your letter to the executors of the Farmers of Customs, to pay me 450l. and costs, out of what may be remaining of 200,000l. allowed by you to Sir Paul Pindar, Sir John Harrison, and the rest of the Farmers of Customs. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 40.] Annexing,
Affidavit of the petitioner, made before Sir Thos. Tyrell [Justice of Common Pleas], that the substance of her petition is true. [Ibid. No. 40i.]
[Jan. 8.] Petition of Patrick Archer, merchant, to the King, for an order to Lord Robartes, Lieutenant and Governor-general of Ireland, to send John Preston into England, to answer his contempt of a decree of the Court of Chancery, made in a suit instituted by the petitioner for the recovery of certain lands. His Majesty upon a former petition, and upon the recommendation of Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Keeper of the Great Seal, directed a similar letter on 28 May 1669, to the Earl of Ossory, then Lord Deputy of Ireland, but the petitioner received no benefit therefrom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 41.]
Jan. 9. Petition of Lady Fanshaw, relict of Sir Rich. Fanshaw, to the King for the next reversion, after those already granted, of a tellership in the Exchequer for her son Sir Richard. Her husband's sudden death left her in low condition, which was impaired by the money due to her being kept 3 years after due; it cost her 1,400l. to receive it, and 1,000l. which was accounted for and promised her was kept back. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Jan. 9. Warrant to the Chancellor of the Duchy [of Lancaster] for a grant to the Earl of Chesterfield, on resignation of Walter, Lord Aston, of the office of steward of the honour of Tutbury, cos. Derby and Stafford, also of constable of the castle of Tutbury, Lieutenant of Needwood Forest, and master of the game in all forests except High Park, co. Derby; and also of the keepership of all parks as they become void. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 187.]
Jan. 9.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory to the Navy Commissioners. I send Commissioner Pett's warrant, authorising me to allow my messengers 4s. a journey. The boat hire is as dear now as it was when the order was made, which is a public grievance, and the cause of my continuing the extra allowance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 20.] Annexing,
Warrant by Peter Pett to Edw. Gregory, to allow 1s. extra to all messengers sent to London by his order or privity, for their extraordinary boat hire while it continues so dear. —11 Aug. 1665. [Copy. Ibid. No. 20i.]
Jan. 9.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory and J. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. We acknowledge that we have not warrants for every particular repair done or article received, and did not know they were required; but we have your Honours' warrant to receive such things from Rich. Burton, locksmith, as occasion required, and to employ him; this has been done ever since July 1660, and though a great part of the work and goods mentioned in Burton's bills sent were had by Commissioner Cox's verbal order, yet we can give an account of the whole, and hope it will manifest the endless work of making a warrant for everything. We shall be liable to the same objections with regard to the anchor smith's and blockmaker's bills, which for time past is out of our power to remedy; it has been done by virtue of a long uncontrolled and unavoidable custom, but, if required, we will render all due obedience in our particular stations for the future. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Jan. 10. Order on the petition of M. Nipho for the reversion of the Comptrollership of the Customs at Chester, for a grant thereof, the King remembering his long and faithful services, at hazard of his life, as intelligencer from Holland and Flanders during the late war. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 88.]
Jan. 10. Grant to the Earl of Sandwich of a pension of 2,200l. a year for life from 1667, in lieu of the fees and perquisites belonging to his office of Keeper of the Great Wardrobe, suspended since 1667, with power to defalk the same from moneys received for the Wardrobe. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 123.]
Jan. 10.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Many vessels homeward bound have left the port; there are 20 sail now in harbour bound for the Straits, France, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 43.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Wm. Wardour. The Lords of the Treasury desire an account of moneys issued out of the Exchequer, from Jan. 1668 to Jan. 1669, for payment of interest or reward for procuring moneys out of the Customs, or any other branch of the revenue, by virtue of any warrant from their lordships for repayment of principal and interest. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Jan. 10.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Particulars of ships in harbour or just put to sea. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 10.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. The people have had little society together, from the weather being so extremely cold. I find a general discontent amongst them, and the zeal of the Royalists has become lukewarm, so that they give credit to any wild discourses, one of which is that his Majesty prorogued Parliament in favour of the Nonconformists, and to prevent the passing of an Act against conventicles.
A ship of Yarmouth is reported to have been taken and carried to Algiers, which puts the town in great fear for the herring fleet, gone for the Straits, as the interest they have there in shipping and merchandise is estimated at above 60,000l. Several ships are waiting a fair wind to sail for places named. Thanks for assistance while in London. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Jan. 10.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Several vessels were cast away in the late storm, and chimneys and parts of houses in the town blown down. I am sorry for the death of the Lord General. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Jan. 11.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Ships have arrived from the East Indies, the Straits, and the Canary Islands, but they sailed on with the fair wind and gave no news. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 11.
Malaga Road.
Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson. I send a duplicate of mine of 7 Jan., as the Spanish posts are uncertain. I made for this road, and have taken care of 2 prizes left. I find here several fishermen, and one merchant ship valued at 100,000l., all which the Sapphire should have called for, but did not, so I am necessitated to send the Milford and Pearl to Alicant, with orders to Captains Helling, Coleman, and Hayward, and to the lieutenant of the Mary, whose captain is dead. I intend going to Cadiz with the Nonsuch, Little Victory, and the ketch, to take up the remainder of our money, and that due for wine at Tangiers, and also to be nearer the victuals expected from England. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Jan. 11. The King to Hen. Howard and Sir Cecil Howard, CommissariesGeneral, and the other Commissaries of Musters. The late Lord General Albemarle gave a warrant that the pay of one soldier out of each of the companies in Berwick should be allowed to Dan. Collingwood, Deputy-Governor of Holy Island, and that the Commissaries of Musters should muster one man in each, though not present, or disband one if the number were full, on his behalf. You are to continue the said allowance. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 207.]
Jan. [11.] Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a bill for the King's signature to pass the Great Seal, containing a grant of the offices of keeper of the Middle Park and Bushy Park, and of paler thereof, and of mower or cutter of the brakes therein, and of the herbage and pannage, and of wood called browsings, windfall, and deadwood therein; and also a grant of the custody of the hare warren of Hampton Court, and of keeper of the game therein, to Barbary, Countess of Castlemaine, to hold the same from the determination of the previous grants thereof to Thomas Jermyn, Henry Seymour, and Silvius Titus respectively during pleasure.
Also a grant of the offices of keeper and chief steward of the mansion and honour of Hampton Court, and of ranger of the said parks and warren, and of collector of the rents of the manors of Teddington, East Moulsey and Imber, and of keeper of the new garden in the orchard of the said honour, and of keeper of the new park of Hampton Court, and of the herbage and pannage thereof, and of the wood called browsings, windfall wood, and deadwood therein, and of the office of steward of all the lordships and manors within the chace of Hampton Court, in the county of Surrey, and of the lordships and manors of Byfleet and Richmond, with the members of Ashted and Redderith [Rotherhithe]; and also of the offices of lieutenant and keeper of the said chace, and of collector of the rents of the lordships and manors of Oatlauds and Walton Leigh, and of the lands in Waybridge, Walton, Esher, Chertsey, and Cobham, and of bailiff of the lordship of Byfleet and Ashted. Also of bailiff of Bagshot bailiwick, in the forest of Windsor, and of steward of the lordships and manors of Worplesdon, Chertsey, Hardwich, Egham, and Thorp, to the said Countess, to hold the same during pleasure, in reversion after Edw. Progers and [John] Lightfoot. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 50.]
Jan. 11. Entry of the second part of the above grant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 1.]
Jan. 11. Warrant to Col. Legg, Lieutenant of Ordnance, to pay 100l. to Capt. James Archer, towards his expenses in surveying the several fortifications in the Island of Jersey. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 189.]
Jan. 11. Warrant for a pension of 120l. a year to Sir Charles Windham, in consideration of his services as page of honour. [Ibid.]
Jan. Docquet of the above, dated 26 Jan. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 127.]
Jan. 11.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon and Hugh Salesbury to the Navy Commissioners. Being informed that, on request of Fras. Lucas, you have granted him a letter to Col. Rich. Norton, to take the examinations of witnesses concerning his late information against us, we desire a similar letter directing Col. Norton to take our evidence. It has been no small trouble to us to lie under so foul a scandal, and for so long a time, and as we have been taxed in the country, we beg our answer may be taken there, so that the matter may appear as it is. This done, we beg licence to come to London in order to our further justification. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 22.]
Jan. 11.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. My dwelling is not so far from the storekeeper but he, or some of his many attendants, might have ascertained that it was by my order the Minion was delivered to Capt. [Stephen] Sartan, who bought her, and that there was a warrant for her delivery, which the clerk omitted to give to the storekeeper. The King has been no sufferer, as although the ship was given up, her sails and other things are still in store. She was ordered to be made to swim at the King's charge, but the calkers not having done it effectually, Capt. Sartan had her calked at his own expense before taking her to Gillingham, and so freed the King of further charge. He has been twice to pay the money, but I told him he was to pay it in London, and will hasten him to do so. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Jan. 11.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner to Col. Thos. Middleton, Surveyor of the Navy. There is a quantity of junk picked into oakum in store, the account for picking of which, together with a bill to clear my 60l. imprest, I have sent up. Ten tons of old junk came from Chatham when you were there on the survey, which is only fit for oakum, and if you will order the picking of so much as the master attendant and clerk of the survey think fit, it will be a great help to the poor of the town, who are daily calling for work to buy bread these hard times; for this I shall want an imprest of 30l. or 40l.; 108 white ensigns and 45 white flags have also been received from Chatham, which would be of use, and save the King's money, if they were dyed into colours; otherwise they will be rat-eaten. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Jan. 11. Account by Thos. Pointer of his receipt between 1664 and 1667 of certain books for the issue and receipt of stores from Thos. Harper and 7 other storekeepers named, belonging to Deptford, Portsmouth, Woolwich, Chatham, and Harwich, and the dates when he delivered them to the Commissioners of Parliament for Accounts in 1668 and 1669. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Jan. 11.
Hampshire, Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. Rich. Beach to the Navy Commissioners. I have, as ordered, made the greatest haste to get to Woolwich, and hope to be there in two or three days, and receive further orders. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan. 12.
Kinsale.
Wm. Penn to the Navy Commissioners. I send the muster-book of the Hampshire frigate, commanded by Capt. Rich. Beach. I answered your letter concerning masts and other materials, and enclosed copies of letters from those concerned, but I fear my letter has not come to hand. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Jan. 12.
Emsworth sloop, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. I have had a disagreement with [Phineas] Pett, clerk of the cheque, about his entering himself and servant on board the sloop as muster-master at Gravesend, Pett having made out tickets for himself from 1 Jan, and demanded provisions from that time. When Fras. Hosier was there, he never put his name to our book, nor demanded provisions, and I shall not deliver Pett any until ordered, as I should run short for my men. I send a muster book, from which I have omitted Pett and his servant, and desire instructions. Noted that Pett being present on 22 Jan. was directed to state his demand in writing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 28.]
Jan. 12. The King to the Duke of York. You are to order the captains of ships about the Straits to restore to Sir John Frederick and Nath. Herne, merchants of London, the ship Punny of Plymouth, taken by Sally men-of-war, and retaken by one of the King's frigates, taking only salvage for the ship and goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 142.]
Jan. 12.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Perrott. Several vessels put to sea, but were driven back again. The Swan of London, bound for Ireland, is come to load fish for the Straits. Notes of ships that have put into the harbour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 51.]
Jan. 12. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Jan. 12.
Talbot, 11 p.m.
Christopher Wase to Williamson. Notwithstanding this disgraceful occurrence, I would have much rather seen you than written to you, but am prevented by sore bruises and a torpor in my face, which gives me time and occasion to reflect how stupid and insensible I have been in the conduct of my life, and how easily exposed to every insult. [Greek: Mideis blaotetai ei mi oar eautou] Nemo lœditur nisi a se ipso. I have no other apology than to desire such a place in your esteem as my future conduct may merit, and to stand redeemed in Mr. Evelyn's opinion, the loss of which would be a far greater wound than any I feel. I appeal to you whether I have not always behaved inoffensively towards your domestics, and rejoiced as much at any good that has befallen them, as if it had been to my own advantage. I trust I may be supported in my endeavours to discharge what is required, that those who will not be my friends may have no advantage of acting their enmities. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 53.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Petition of Rob. Bird of Tong, Shropshire, to the King, for an allowance from the Privy Purse. Served his Majesty during the usurpation, and was many times plundered and imprisoned; is now aged, and deprived of all means of subsistence, both for himself and children. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners, to make some provision for him suitable to his loyalty "in that great occasion of his Majesty's blessed escape." [Ibid. No. 54.]
Jan. 13. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 69.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
News-letter to Rob. Aldworth, Town Clerk of Bristol. The Lord Chamberlain has given crders for the fitting up of such rooms at Somerset House as are to be made use of in the funeral solemnity. They write from France that the Catholic cantons of Switzerland have so far devoted themselves to the French interest as to promise the French Resident not to enter into any confederacy that may thwart their concerns, and particularly not to enter into the Triple Alliance; but the Protestant cantons have not given in their resolution. Prince Ausbenge, mentioned in the news-book to have been turned out with disgrace by the Emperor, betrayed Cabinet secrets to the Ministers of France, and yet had confidence to write to the Emperor to know his crime; the reply was that his best course was not to solicit an answer, lest he knew it with the loss of his head.
The corpse of the Lord General has been removed from the Cockpit to Somerset House. The Lieutenancy of Middlesex is conferred on the Earl of Craven, and the Earl of Bath is appointed to manage the Lieutenancy of Devonshire, until the Duke of Albemarle is of years to undertake it himself. Viscount Fauconberg, his Majesty's Ambassador to the States of Venice, intends to begin his voyage to-day or Monday. The apprehensions that the Swedish Resident's removal out of France was in order to making a new agreement between them and France, seem to be taken away, that Resident not returning home, but coming to England for Holland, and he would have gone in the yacht appointed to bring Sir Mark Ognate, the Spanish Resident, from Ostend, had it not gone away. It is expected that when he arrives at the Hague, he will receive satisfaction as to the subsidies, the Spanish scruples being ended, and the Queen of Spain having sent fresh orders for payment of the Swedes, upon which the Spanish Minister in Holland has given the States some assurance that they may suddenly expect an effectual answer to their demands thereon.
We are informed by Capt. William Poole from Leghorn, that those of Tripoli hold very fair with the English with regard to a peace, the Bashaw having used the captain sent there by Sir Thos. Allin with very great kindness. While the captain was there, their Vice-Admiral and two other men-of-war came in, very handsomely battered by a Holland man-of-war, which they attacked in the Levant. Two English men-of-war had pratick at Messina, but were not allowed it at Leghorn, until answer was received from the Grand Duke; their stay was judged to be 10 days, when other ships would have the benefit of their company, in one of which the Earl of Castlemaine goes from Rome to Spain.
They write from Malaga that the Algerines have 25 sail abroad. The Genoa convoy got home on 28 Dec., leaving the remainder of their Newfoundland fleet under convoy of 4 frigates, but none had got thither on 1 Jan. The Senate have nominated a Consul or Resident at London, being desirous of his Majesty's assistance. Several companies of soldiers have been sent down to the confines, to appease the late broils created by the Savoyards, and officers are gone to Germany to raise soldiers there for the Republic.
Thanks have been sent to Dr. [Peter] Mews, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, for suppressing conventicles at the late Dr. Rogers' house, and also at Kinge's, a house in the High Street, and order has been sent to the Vice-Chancellor to pull down the school of Mrs. Davies, a teacher of young women, and not to permit her to teach without licence from the bishop, she having attended their meetings. The French King's intended progress to Flanders is looked upon by the Spaniards there as importing more than a visit. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 55.]
Jan. 13. Wormley Martin to Williamson. Hearing that Mr. Hall's fellowship of Bennet's [Corpus Christi College, Cambridge] would be void within 6 weeks, I delivered my mandamus to the Master, Dr. [John] Spencer, who gave me a more favourable answer than I expected, which I attribute either to your interest, or to the knowledge that the Earl of Manchester will get it retracted. My tutor has waited on him since, and finds him more dubious than he was to me; but I hope, as you procured the mandamus on my behalf, you will also endeavour to frustrate any attempts by the doctor or Fellows to revoke it. [Ibid. No. 56.]
[Jan. 13.] Certificate by Susanna Platt and 4 others, that Major John Choke, licensed physician, has cured them of the gout, &c. [Ibid. No. 57.]
Jan. 13.
Deptford.
Thos. Turner and Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. We received your order to send 200 spruce deals to Portsmouth, and to fill up the vessel with tar, but have not 40 deals in store, having sent some lately to Portsmouth, Chatham, and Woolwich, and used many on board the London in dock. Mr. Shish will, however, spare 30, in hopes of a further supply. We intend completing the lading of the vessel which lies at Deptford quay with spars, shovels, pitch, and train oil. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 29.]
Jan. 13.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Col. Thos. Middleton. According to your order, I have sent a demand of stores required for fitting ships. If some spruce deals, knees, and timber are not sent, I shall be forced to take off some of the men on the new ship, and put them upon the old work. I have fitted the hulk, and wish her in the single dock, to give her a new coat against summer. The masts for Sir Thos. Allin were ready three days after order. I have made the Fanfan's mast, and am in hand with her boat. Noted 22 Jan. that Mr. Mayors was directed to look out for spruce deals. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Jan. 13.
Dover.
Walter Braems to the Navy Commissioners. I have hired 2 vessels to transport Lord Fauconberg's horses and baggage to France. There will be 15l. charges for tonnage on each vessel, besides freight, which must be paid before they go. Shall I pay all the expenses and render an account, or will his lordship discharge them himself ? [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 31.]
Jan. 14.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I cannot help the delay in my letters, as I send them to the post-house the same night they are written. The Adam and Eve has sailed from Sheerness, and might have been at Hull, but by the victualler's not having sea victuals, 8 days were lost. The timber will be very welcome.
The Newcastle's plank on her bilge is so much worm-eaten that it is doubtful if she can be sheathed, so I desire an order for having her bottom made good with elm plank. Mr. Wilson, the storekeeper, will attend you, and explain his scruples with the clerk of the comptrol; he affirms he shall never be able to balance any account with you, and will not undertake it. I have examined the master of attendance as to whether the moorings of the hulk at Sheerness were ever taken up and brought into store since the Dutch were in the river; also Mr. Moore, who was commanded to Sheerness to sweep for anchors, or what else he and Capt. Moorcock could find; and I also sent for the lieutenant and coxswain of Sheerness Fort, and send papers relating thereto.
I delivered your warrants for hemp, tow, &c., to the clerk of the cheque and the storekeeper, who showed me your letter commanding them to observe the instructions of the Lord High Admiral, which I doubt not all concerned will obey; but if nothing must be done but what passes by warrant of two or more of the principal officers, I appeal to you whether the service will go on; for instance, the chain by which the hulk rides having broken in a storm, men were set immediately to work to get up both ends and re-join it with a new link; would it have been better to let it go undone, and stay for a warrant from two or more of the principal officers, for a new link ?
I send an account of prices charged by the locksmith for various articles. Must there be a warrant to the officers concerned for every trifling thing therein mentioned ? One of the warrants sent ought to be returned, if we are to act according to such instructions, there being no contract for the reaming irons, which we ought only to receive by contract attested by the clerk; but I apprehend your Honours well know that part of his Royal Highness's instructions is too difficult to be performed, and it is beyond my weak judgment how it will ever be done, if the service is to be carried on as it ought to be. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 32.] Encloses,
Account by John Brooke and Wm. Rand of their proceedings on the river, from the time the Dutch burnt the ships there until 31 Dec. 1669, stating that they were engaged with the ordinary in carrying ships named to and from their moorings, lading or unlading them with ballast, and rigging or unrigging. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 32i.]
Memorandum by the same. In 1667, after the Dutch had burnt Sheerness, Capt. Ansley being master of attendance there and living at that place, he had the command of the Helverstone, which we fitted for him, and she being lost, he then had the Guild De Ruyter, which we also fitted and carried down; as he was employed some time, and had provisions and men to weigh the wrecks, and also the charge of the Ness, we expected he had looked after the hulk's moorings, and therefore would be able to give an account of all things there. [Ibid. No. 32ii.]
Memorandum by John Moore, that on going down to sweep the river, he found 2 anchors, which he delivered into the stores, but not finding any belonging to the hulk, he went ashore at Sheerness, and was informed by the lieutenant, coxswain, and men of the fort, that certain colliers lying there wind-bound had the moorings up at their bows, and that after they were gone, the coxswain clapped a buoy upon the moorings of 30 fathoms long; that 2 smacks dredging came foul of the moorings, and were forced to heave them up to clear their dredges, and that they were seen by Wm. Hilliard and others of Stroud. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 32iii.]
List of the prices of naval stores supplied by the blacksmith to the yard at Chatham, alphabetically arranged; e.g., bars for windows, &c., 4d. per foot; casements under 12 inches square, 1s. 6d. each, &c., &c. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 32iv.]
Jan. 14. Commissioner John Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. Although you have commanded the officers to permit me to employ men to get the wreck out of the dock, I am informed it will be at my own charge, and the men in that yard will not work for me except the master shipwright commands them. I hoped to have her delivered clear, as is usual in other sales; as she will not swim, I ask an order for 2 or 3 calkers or carpenters to be employed upon her at the King's charge, for 2 or 3 days. If they spend more time, it shall be at my own cost, otherwise I cannot meddle with her until she is out of dock. Boatswain Rudd will serve, and will return materials mentioned, which I am anxious to borrow for the work. I would rather have 200l. for my bills than give you this trouble, and put myself upon such hazards and inconvenience as are sure to follow. [Ibid. No. 33.] Enclosed,
Order by Col. Thos. Middleton to the clerk of the cheque and stores at Woolwich, to lend Capt. John Taylor an old hawser, a warp, and an anchor for securing the bottom of the James on her way up the river, he undertaking to return them in good condition at his own charge.—Navy Office, 10 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 33i.]
Jan. 14.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory and J. Wilson to Lord Brouncker. We confess we have no contract extant as a guide, with regard to the prices of the anchor smith, blockmaker, and locksmith, which are the same now as they were in the time of our predecessors. We did not acquiesce therein without endeavouring by applications to be better informed, but with little satisfaction, and have now received an unexpected reprehensive letter from the Board. We hope the present occasion will produce a new contract with those tradesmen, whereby the like misconstructions will be prevented for the future, and by our strict adherence to the letter of the prescribed law, " we may be no longer acquainted with such harsh and unpleasing dialects." [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 14.
Deptford.
John Tinker and J. Uthwat to the Navy Commissioners. We compute the tonnage of the stores on board Mr. Bond's vessel, bound for the Monmouth yacht on the coast of Ireland, at 6 tons. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Jan. 14.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Two ships have come from France, laden with wine, brandy, and salt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 58.]
Jan. 14. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Jan. 14.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. Guernsey ships report a league between the Great Turk and Emperor of France [sic]. A fleet of ships for London lies weather-bound in the Channel. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Jan. 14. The King to the Duke of York. Thos. Band, merchant of London, represents that his ship James, with its goods, was taken by an Algerine man-of-war, but re-taken by the Dartmouth frigate, whose company took several of the ship's goods, and that she is now in custody of Sir John Harman, about the Straits. You are to order restoration, on payment of salvage of the said ship, of the goods on board, and of those wrongfully taken from her. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 142.]
Jan. 14. Account of French and Spanish wines allowed to the Spanish, French, and Venetian Ambassadors, free of custom, from 6 April 1667 to 14 Jan. 1669, viz., to Coande de Molina, Spanish Ambassador, 30 tuns, 60 pipes; to Sieur Colbert, French Ambassador, 15 tuns 30 pipes; and to Signor Moccinigo, Venetian Ambassador, 15 tuns, 30 pipes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 61.]
[Jan. 14.] Petition of Alex. Bining to the King, for leave to return to Scotland instead of being transported. Was accused of robbery, but on petitioning his Majesty, the capital punishment was commuted to transportation. [Ibid. No. 62.] Annexing,
Certificate by Edw. Skelton, clerk of the peace and gaol delivery in Newgate, that Alex. Benny (sic) was convicted of felony, and ordered to remain in gaol without bail, till his transportation.—14 Jan. 1670. [Latin. Ibid. No. 62i.]
Jan. 15.
Mote.
Earl of Winchelsea, Lord Lieutenant of Kent, to [Council]. I sent a post to the Mayor of Dover on receipt of your commands, and will serve the King as faithfully as possible. I send information of a worthy person who desires his name kept secret. Sandwich, one of the strongest places in the county, is ill-affected to Church and King, and deserves attention. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Jan. 15. Dr. [Thos.] Gumble to Williamson. I am informed that several stationers are endeavouring to scribble out some imperfect pieces of the life of the late Duke of Albemarle; it is the request of all his friends and servants that nothing shall be published until it has been maturely advised by eye-witnesses to those actions, who can give a satisfactory account of them. I entreat your assistance in the matter, of which the gentlemen, the bearers, will give particulars. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Petition of George Snelling to the King, for a pardon. Having occasion for some suits at law with Mr. Stagg, he prosecuted me for a common barrator, and I was found guilty. Being a person of much dealing, this misfortune has been of great prejudice to me. I am willing to submit to any fine imposed by the court, so as to restore my credit.
With reference thereon to Attorney-General Palmer, and his report, 17 Jan., that the petitioner having been fined 500l., and promising to discharge the same before the pardon passes, his Majesty may grant his request.—17 Jan. 1669. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 65.]
Jan. 15. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 69.]
Jan. 15. The King to the Attorney General and others concerned. We revoke on further information our order of 25 Sept., forbidding Wm. Warren to proceed against Charles Cornell and his wife on indictments for barratry, according to a report on a petition of the said Wm. Warren. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 143.]
Jan. 15. The King to the Duke of York. Having appointed certain goods and household stuff of the late Queen Mother to be brought over from France, we wish you to order a convenient vessel to be sent to Rouen to transport them hither, to be disposed of according to further directions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 42.]
Jan. 15. Grant to Nath. Bird of the office of yeoman pricker to the harriers, in place of Gregory Granger; fee 40l. a year. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 3.]
Jan. 15. Grant to John Richardson of the place of yeoman pricker to the harriers, in place of Wm. Bell; fee 40l. a year. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. Docquets of the two preceding grants. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 128.]
Jan. 15.
Portsmouth.
Fras. Lucas to Pepys. I attended Col. Rich. Norton and John Stewkley, justices of the peace at Alresford, with my witnesses, and the justices examined all things touching the embezzlement of the King's goods seized on board the Hope flyboat, belonging to Messrs. Salesbury and Steventon. I will be in town at the time appointed, and doubt not but that it will be discovered that Salesbury and Steventon have been unfaithful to their place. I paid the 3 days' expenses of myself and witnesses, and desire it may be allowed. I would have written earlier, but they would do nothing until after Christmas, and there have been some hindrances on account of the great frost and snow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 36.]
Jan. 15.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the Navy Commissioners. I hope you are satisfied that I am ready to pay the balance of my account to the Treasurer, at an hour's warning, and that it has often been tendered to Mr. Littleton. I must apologise for sending an attestation enclosed, but having prepared copies of my accounts for the Lords at Brooke House, (fn. 1) though not asked for, upon re-examination I found some errors and omissions, and have therefore ordered John Hill to pay this in with the rest. Noted that the enclosure was given to Sir John Mennes, to examine and report. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. I hear by Capt. Beach that it will be necessary to bring the Hampshire up to Woolwich, according to his Royal Highness's first order; as the pilot who brought her into the Hope is discharged, I desire you will give directions for having her brought up, and what is necessary done to her, with all despatch. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 38.]
Jan. 15.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. I will use all diligence to procure some knees for the new ship at Chatham. I am sure there are none at Lord Lumley's, as only 7 trees have been felled besides beech, and the timber in Beare Forest has been bought by Mr. Clements of Southwick; so that unless Mr. Scattergood of Newgate Market affords some out of that bought of Sir Cecil Bishop, it is doubtful if there can be a supply before the spring; this will be the only want for perfecting the old and new ships in hand, unless we get some out of the New Forest. I send a contract for Mr. Newland's deals and another for broom, a former one made by Commissioner Tippetts having been previously supplied. Pray hasten down Mr. Eastwood, the purveyor, so as to get the timber down to Redbridge, as it lies in the lanes near the forest; it is much wanted, and will enable me to clear up my halfyear's account. Particulars of the progress made in the new ship building. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 39.] Encloses,
Contract whereby Ben. Newland, jun., agrees to deliver to Capt. Ant. Deane at the stores at Portsmouth, and free of all charge, by 22 Jan., 3,000 deals of sizes mentioned, now standing at Cowes, Isle of Wight, at 5l. 5s. the 100, and 1,000 more of a different size at 5l. 10s. the 100, ready money.— Portsmouth, 10 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 39i.]
Contract whereby Rob. Abbott agrees to deliver to Capt. Ant. Deane, at the same stores, free of charge, by 30 Jan., 5,000 well-seasoned broom, 30 inches in the band, andfeet long, at 3s. 3d. the 100, ready money, and 5,000 of the like size on 20 Feb.—Portsmouth, 14 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 39ii.]
Jan. 17. Warrant to the Board of Greencloth to pay to Col. Thos. Napier and Dorothy his wife a pension of 100l. a year, on his resignation of a grant made to him in 1664, of the profits of an agreement with the shipping adventurers of the towns in Suffolk trading to Iceland, Farrey [Faroe ?], Westmonia, and other places in the North Sea, as the fish due by the said agreement is to be delivered to the yeoman of the acatry, for the diet of the Household. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 8.]
Jan. 17. Levant Company to William Hedges at Constantinople. We send you a list of 9,500 dollars, subscribed for supplying your occasions, which you are to receive gradually, and distribute equally to every man, and charge the same on the Treasurer in London, by 4 months' bills, at the rate of 4s. 6d. the lion dollar. [S.P. Foreign, Levant, Vol. 5, p. 228.]
Jan. 17. Levant Company to Rich. Langley at Smyrna. We have subscribed 16,000 dollars, in case you want money; directions for its distribution, similar to the preceding. [Ibid. p. 229.]
Jan. 17.
Swansea.
Capt. John Man to Perrott. A Plymouth vessel, laden with sugars and wool from Barbadoes, was driven on shore near Carmarthen, but the men and part of the goods were saved. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 66.]
Jan. 17.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. A ship from Morlaix brings word that the King of France has offered 5 livres per ton above 100 tons on every vessel built, to encourage the building of large ships; that he has forbidden his seamen to enter the service of foreign princes; that 3 large ships are fitted up at Brest, and others preparing; that he has bought 11 considerable towns in Flanders from the Spaniards for 4 million crowns, hangs slenderly to the Dutch, and will invade them next summer. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Jan. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. Some timber hoys have come in, and 10 or 12 collier vessels gone by. The Holland packet is in, but brings few passengers and little news. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Jan. 17.
Bridekirk.
George Williamson to Jos. Williamson. I have a desire for the collector's place at Whitehaven, vacant by the preferment in Ireland of William Kirbie. Mr. Christian and the young man Addison solicit it, but such persons should not be thought by the country to have such interest as to get a command over me in that employment, which will be a considerable addition to my place there. Pray speak to Sir John Shaw and Sir John Worsenam [Wolstenholme, farmers of customs]. I will give them as good security, as any formerly had. I trouble you lest a younger fellow should domineer over me. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Jan. 17.
Essex House.
Jo. Eddowes to Williamson. I would remind you of a former application for the grant of engrossing for the Great Seal, for which the client pays a fee of 19s. 6d. You will have noticed that few presentations have passed your hands of late, and that there have not been many by the Lord Keeper's grant, I am ashamed to be so importunate about such a small business, but it is all I ever petitioned for, and it is all the reward desired for 3 years' actual service in the war, the loss of two horses shot under me, and a broken leg into the bargain. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Jan. 17.
Staveley, Derbyshire.
Lord Frescheville to Williamson. I cannot doubt of success as to my right of presentation to the rectory of Eckington, as my suit is just, and Lord Arlington has engaged in it. I recommend my chaplain, Walter Blakeston, for preferment to the rectory of Langton, in the North Riding of Yorkshire, vacant by death. I have sent this letter by [Wm] Palmes, a man of good estate in these parts, and burgess for Malton in Yorkshire. [See Jan. 20, p. 27, infra. Ibid. No. 71.]
Jan. 17.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Wm. Wardour. I am desired by the Lords of the Treasury to request a certificate as to what moneys have been paid out of the Exchequer for interest or rewards, and to whom, from 1 Jan. 1668 to 1 Jan. 1669. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Jan. 17. Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. I had scarcely got warm after my long journey before I was called to attend the sessions at Appleby, through the illness of Sir John Lowther and Mr. Tarlton, with the assistance of a single justice of the peace; otherwise no sessions would have been kept. I am going for a few days to Westmoreland, and on my return, to Carlisle, but I shall not delay my attendance in London longer than is necessary. My son is gone to Berwick to attend his company. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 73.]
Jan. 17. Receipt by Thos. Roberts of Burleigh of 2l. 10s. from Fras. Tunstall and Edw. Christian for keeping Mr. Branch's cows 3 months. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Jan. Like receipt of 1l. 5s. for the charge of a felon's horse. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Jan. 18. Nath. Whitfeld and 3 others to the Navy Commissioners. In pursuance of your orders, directing us to examine the slop accounts relating to Major Beckford, we met him and Mr. Waith at the Treasury Office, but were unable to proceed for want of Waith's net books, and the tickets belonging to Sir George Carteret's account, which are with the Commissioners of Accounts at Brooke House. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 40.]
Jan. 18.
Southwick. [Hants.]
Col. Rich. Norton to the Navy Commissioners. I send the examinations of 5 out of the 6 witnesses named in your letter. I examined them only upon what Mr. Lucas put in writing, and conceive that I was confined to that, and to those persons, so I could not send for Perrin or any others to obtain a full discovery of the matter. Noted that the examinations were delivered to Counsellor Wright 5 Feb., and returned by him 2 June 1670. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Jan. 18.
Harwich.
George Roberts of the James hoy to the Navy Commissioners. I have put into the harbour, with several others bound northward, through contrary winds, but shall use the first opportunity that presents. The Adam and Eve is also here. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Jan. 18.
Eastwell.
Earl of Winchelsea to Lord [Arlington]. I forward a letter to the Duke of Richmond. At Canterbury there are 2 conventicles of Presbyterians and Independents of 600 or 700 each; one at Dover of 500 or 600; one at Sandwich of 600 or 700; they meet boldly and speak high; their numbers are great, and they like to show how considerable they are. I will send informations about the wools, having got one of the offenders to impeach, on promise of pardon; he should not be troubled, since he came in voluntarily, and does great service, and the King allowed a pardon to be promised in such a case. I will not spare rewards out of the confiscations, and hope to convict several offenders. I will propound persons to overlook the affair, the coast of Sussex being full of rogues, and as much wool sent to Dieppe as to Calais and Boulogne. Note that "Gurre, a slimy matter, whey colour, and sharp in taste, is found in your gold mines, and thrown away by the miners; to bring half a score more or less bladders filled with them." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, Nos. 76, 77.] Enclosing,
Declaration of John Matson, Mayor of Dover, about depositions taken before him of John Sturges of Folkestone, and 4 others, relative to quantities of wool which were exported at night from ports in Kent, by persons specified, since November last.—17 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Jan. 18. Reference to the Attorney-General of George Johnson's petition for a market to be kept at Ashburton, Devon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 90.]
Jan. 18. Warrant for a grant to — Dorrell of the office of falconer in ordinary, in the room of Bartholomew Bynan deceased; pension 50l. a year. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 146.]
Jan. 18. Caveat in favour of Mr. Palmes that nothing pass of the rectory of Langton, co. York. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 8.]
Jan. 18. Commission to John, Earl of Bath, to be Lieutenant of Devonshire and city of Exeter, in place of the Duke of Albemarle, deceased. Minute (bis). [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 2.]
Docquet of the above, dated 3 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 133.]
Jan. 19. Warrant to John Potts, messenger, to search for Sam. Symmons and Peter Parker. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 2.]
Jan. 19. Grant to Rob. Stewart of the office of auditor of the Exchequer, in reversion after the 7 present auditors, and Rich. Lightfoot, a reversioner. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 125.]
Jan. 19. J. F. [Dr. John Fell, Dean of Christ Church] to Sir Leoline Jenkins, Exeter House. When I can do anything worth printing, I will own it. My yearly trifles are for my friends or young people. I must confess our printing is not so good as might be wished, though it is an improvement, and considering the discouragements we labour under, " it may pretend to the mediocrity of being indifferently well." Want of stock is our fatal mishap; in a few weeks I shall be 150l. out of purse on the affair, yet I do not doubt, with competent assistance, not merely to print so as to give the University, but also the nation, credit by it. My little efforts may fail, but I shall have the satisfaction of doing my utmost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 79.]
Jan. 19.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. Arrival and departure of vessels. Those from Dublin speak much of the exact justice of the Lord Lieutenant to both English and Irish, so that he is well beloved, and none complain of his government. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Jan. 19. Same to Hickes. Two letters to the same effect. [Ibid. Nos. 81, 82.]
Jan. 19.
Edinburgh.
Rob. Mein to Williamson. A company of foot being sent into the north of Scotland, to gather in some arrears of assessments, some clans met and maintained a pass against them; the troops did not fight, their opponents being ten times their number, but the Lord Chancellor has sent a herald and pursuivant in the King's name, to charge them, on pain of fire and sword, to obey the laws. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Jan. 19. Reference of a petition of Richard, Lord Arundel of Trerice, for acceptance of the surrender of a lease of Sutton Pool, near Ply mouth, to the Treasury Commissioners, to hear any propositions of the petitioner, the King wishing to recognise his loyalty and good services. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 90.]
Jan. 19.
Portsmouth Dockyard.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. Povey (?), the Ordnance officers' instrument here, has demanded some old and broken guns, which have been put into ships from time to time as ballast. Shall I deliver them up, not having seen any order from the Lord High Admiral for it, although it is stated there is one ? The ships have more room in their hold for the stowage of provisions, by having such weighty ballast; that to be had here is only a light shingle, which will fill up their holds much. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 43.]
Jan. 20.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. I cannot proceed with the works on the decks, for want of the knees formerly demanded. I acquainted the purveyor where three or four loads might be had, and if you will give an order to agree for the price, they may be sent down. Noted that the purveyor was commanded to look after them speedily. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Jan. 20.
Edinburgh.
News-letter. The Earl of Lauderdale departing, the senators of the college and several advocates and clerks waited on him at Holyrood, to kiss his hands, but could do no more, it being sessions time. At the outer gate of the palace, he took leave of the Archbishop of St. Andrews and other bishops, and entered his coach with the Lord Chancellor, Duke of Hamilton, and Earl of Tweeddale. He was cheered by the troops and spectators, and attended by trumpets and kettledrums, and followed by twelve coaches of nobles, the city officers, and a numerous train of gentlemen; the guns fired, and the people wished him a happy journey to London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 84.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Pass for Sir Wm. Jennings beyond seas, he having served as a captain at sea during the wars with much valour and fidelity. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 85.]
[Jan. 20.] Draft of the above. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Jan. 20. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 2.]
Jan. 20. Presentation of Walter Blakeston, M.A., to the rectory of Langton, diocese of York, void by death. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 1.]
Jan. 21. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 126.]
Jan. 21.
Court at Whitehall.
Order by the King that the present establishment of the troops of guards, regiments, and garrisons, with all their officers and charges, be continued, and no alterations offered for the King's signature, unless approved first by the Treasury Commissioners and one of the principal Secretaries of State. With note that orders of this tenure were signed 26 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 87.]
Jan. 21. Draft of the above. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Jan. 21. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 1.]
Jan. 21. Pass for 6 horses for Sieur Bruneau. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 3.]
Jan. 21. Information of Thos. Wood, of Wincheap, Canterbury, before the Earl of Winchelsea, that between 25 June 1669, and 21 Jan. following, 186 bags of wool, some raw, but the chief combed and dressed, were shipped off privately; with the names of the delinquents. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 89.]
Jan. 21.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Arrival of ships from Ireland, laden with tallow, hides, and butter, and from Lisbon with lemons, oranges, and salt. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Jan. 21. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Jan. 21.
Resolution.
Sir Thos. Allin to [Williamson]. On the 12th, sailing out of Malaga Road, we joined the Mary, Bristol, Foresight, and Spread Eagle, with a convoy of 15 merchant ships from Alicant, whereupon I made a remove of several commanders, putting Capt. Helling in the Mary, Capt. Holmes in the Bristol, Capt. [John] Berry in the Nonsuch, and Capt. Page in the Pearl. I ordered the Milford to follow me, and the Foresight and Pearl to convoy the merchants bound for Alicant. On the 13th we went through the Straits with a great many merchant ships, and left the Nonsuch and two others at Tangiers to bring such victuals as the garrison could spare to Cadiz.
The 14th we came to anchor in Cadiz Bay, and purchased provisions, the Nonsuch bringing none from Tangiers; I sent her with the Milford and ketch, as convoy to 30 sail of merchantmen, as far as Cape St. Vincent, leaving the Mary and Bristol to careen, and the Spread Eagle and the fireship to attend on them, the ViceAdmiral of Spain having promised to lend necessaries from the King's stores for the purpose.
We heard a report at Cadiz that the French had made peace with Algiers, but it turned out false. The 19th we sailed, and the 21st got sight of Cape St. Mary's, and I put my letters on board the Milford. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 92.]
Jan. 21.
Woolwich.
Wm. Acworth and Wm. Sheldon to the Navy Commissioners. Sir Wm. Warren declared that the colony of Massachusetts in New England had presented his Majesty with the two best masts received from thence in Feb. 1666–7, and he desired us and the shipwright to choose out two of the best, the remainder being passed to Sir Wm. Warren. The shipwright and the late Christopher Pett pitched upon one 100 feet long and 38 inches in diameter, and another 99 feet long and 36 inches diameter, ourselves and others being present. Notwithstanding one of the other masts left on the merchants' account was longer by 2½ feet, and ½ an inch more in diameter than those made choice of, the reason was that 101½ ft. long and 36½ inches in diameter was not proportionable to the length, for which there was an abatement made, and by that means his Majesty received no wrong. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 45.]
Jan. 21.
Woolwich.
Wm. Acworth to the Navy Commissioners. I have had a fire in my house, occasioned by a hearth of one of [Edw.] Byland's chambers next door. The main-beam through my dining-room has been burnt in two, and other damage done; but 20l. will cover it. Pray grant an order for its speedy repair, and send a plumber to repair the cisterns and pipes damaged by the frost, as the house lies open to the weather, which is sharp, and I and my wife and servant have only just recovered from sickness. I have been forced to shore the house up, and thank God the fire did not happen in the night; otherwise, for want of water, we should have been burnt in our beds. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 46.]
Jan. 22.
Navy Office.
Col. Thos. Middleton to the Navy Commissioners. I viewed the Treasurer's house in Broad Street, and found it defective in several places; I will have an estimate of the charge for repairing it ready by next court day. Perceiving a new gallery erected, I ascertained that it had been done by a goldsmith who had it in possession, and on going to him to ask by whose authority he had built it, and what had become of some lead missing, I found he was from home. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Jan. 22.
Deptford.
John Tinker and 3 other officers of Deptford Yard to the Navy Commissioners. Five cantspars, which cost 5s. each, have been stolen out of the yard. We have examined the 4 watchmen and the look-out man, whose names are mentioned, but cannot discover the culpable party. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 22. Grant to Thos. Whitley, in reversion after Maurice Wynne, of the office of Receiver of North Wales and Cheshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 3.]
Jan. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to [Perrott]. The Danish man-of-war that attended the Danish Ambassador to England ran aground near Landguard Fort, with some of his retinue on board who were returning, but got off at high water, and some of them came on shore to buy provisions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 93.]
Jan. 22.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. A ship from Jamaica brings news of the good condition of the place, and of peace proclaimed with the Spaniards, but that privateers still continue to rob, and sell their goods in the further parts of the island. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Jan. 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Flanders packets report great dread of war and much talk of preparation, but nothing done. "The Quaker meets often, and carries away great partys." [Ibid. No. 95.]
Jan. 22.
Cambridge.
Wormley Martin to Williamson. I am informed that the Master and Fellows of Bennet's [College] have pre-elected one into Mr Hall's fellowship, and therefore take little notice of the mandamus. I have not heard from Dr. Spencer since delivering him the mandamus. Our master will not appear for me, lest it should be a precedent to other masters to stand up for their scholars, and my tutor will not concern himself in the business; so I fear that I shall lose it, unless Lord Arlington and you stand my friend. Pray write to Dr. Spencer, requesting an answer to the mandamus, and asking whether, if a person is designed for the fellowship, it is allowed by their statutes to proceed to an election before the fellowship is actually void, as pre-election will frustrate the King's letters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 96.]
Jan. 22. Rough notes by Williamson of proceedings at the [Council ?] Board with reference to the report of the misapplying of supplies granted for carrying on the war. Speakers: the King (frequently), Duke of York, the Lord Keeper, Lords Brouncker and Ashley, and Col. Thompson. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 97.]
Jan. 22.
Old Jewry.
Sir John Frederick to Williamson. I ask your assistance on behalf of Rob. Holmes, who formerly lived with me for some years. He left two years since, and the Farmers [of Customs] observing his abilities, took him into their service. As he was always an honest and sober person, I hope he is not guilty of what is laid to his charge. [Ibid. No. 98.] Enclosing,
Rob. Holmes to Sir John Frederick. I have been informed about to the Farmers of Customs, for speaking against the King and Government, and am to be carried before Lord Arlington for examination. As it is merely a design of some malicious person, to cast me into prison, and deprive me of my employment, I request a letter to his lordship, to be allowed to put in bail to answer my accusers.— Theving Lane, Westminster, 22 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 98i.]
Jan. 22.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Chas. Perrott. There was a meeting on Monday last at the county court, held in the castle, for the election of a knight to serve in Parliament, in the room of the Baron of Kinderton, deceased, when Sir Phil. Egerton of Owlton, and Thos. Cholmondley of Vale Royal, were nominated; but they not agreeing which should stand, went to poll, which continued until Wednesday, when Sir Philip desisted, and Cholmondley is returned. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Jan. 23. Rachel Hascard to Williamson. I beg you to request Lord Arlington to remind the King of a promise made a year ago, to grant a prebend at Windsor to my husband. Two prebendaries have died since, but the places have been disposed of, and one is dying now. [Ibid. No. 100. Gregory Hassard was installed May 9, 1671.]
[Jan. 23.]
[Whitehall.]
Petition of the Lord Mayor, &c., of London, to the King, for direction to stay the suits brought against the city by several lenders, who in 1643, advanced money by ordinance of Parliament, under the common seal of the city, for maintenance of armies, &c.; otherwise they will beget incessant vexation of the petitioners, and hasten the ruin of the city. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Jan. 23. Reference of the above petition to the Lord Keeper. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 91.]
Jan. 23.
Southampton.
Capt. Emondes Greene to the Navy Commissioners. I went to Alresford, and found that Col. Norton and Mr. Stewkley had examined the business concerning the flyboat seized by me at Portsmouth, upon Mr. Lucas's information. I seized 33 pieces of timber, with the King's mark upon it, in the yard of John Ockliford, a carpenter in Southampton, and took him before the Mayor, who bound him over to answer at the sessions. Adam Cardonnel, a Customs' officer here, acknowledged that he sold the timber to Ockliford as his own property, and procured Hugh Salesbury, of Portsmouth Dockyard, to order his assistant, Mr. Eastwood, to put the King's mark upon it, so as to prevent its being seized by Cardonnel's creditors. But although Salesbury has owned to this, yet it being contrary to the proclamation of Nov. 1661, I have sent to Capt. Ansley, the master of attendance, to send a hoy for its removal to his Majesty's stores, and have since secured 12 pieces more with the same mark upon it, lying close to his Majesty's timber at Redbridge, which has also been challenged by the same party, and upon the same account.
I beg that I and my assistant, Mr. Wharton, may be secured from daily danger and insult, by some exemplary punishment on the offenders, as Wharton, having seized on eight long bolts belonging to his Majesty, at the shop of Thos. Lambe, a blacksmith at Cawsham, and endeavouring to search for more, Lambe flew upon him, and took away the bolts and also his warrant, and by help of his sons and others, secured him and his horse for two hours, after which, he struck at him with a bolt, called him one of Greene's rogues, threw his warrant at his head, and threatened, if he came there again, to beat out his brains. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 49.]
Jan. 23.
London.
Michael Ballard, purser, to the Navy Commissioners. I have waited 4 years next June to pass my accounts, but cannot get them despatched, because I entered on my sea book impressed men and soldiers sent on board the Happy Return from several ports, for supply of the fleet; by waiting so long without employment, I have spent the savings of 20 years, and ruined myself and family. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Jan. 24.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I have received no answer to my former letter, asking directions as to the repair of the Newcastle, and as to the moorings of the hulk at Sheerness; respecting the latter, I expect to be able to give a further account, and to find somebody who will supply things cheaper than Burton, the locksmith, who, as well as the anchorsmith and blockmaker, have no contract; but I will satisfy myself further as to their rates.
I send 3 contracts for lime and timber, the latter of which cost 3l. a load, and is fit for the new ship. Capt. Sartan has 20 elm trees at Gillingham, for which he asks 16l. as they lie, to be fetched away at the King's charge; as they are near the water, it will not cost much. I sent [Jos.] Laurence to see them, and he reports that there are 14 loads; I believe they may be had for 14l., and as they will be useful for the carved work of the new ship and the Newcastle, I desire instructions about this also. I want 2 cwt. of thrums and other necessaries for the calkers. We shall shut the gates of the single dock this spring [tide] and see to the bottom of it, and hope it will not be so bad as is supposed.
It will encourage the workmen if you will send down their money so as to make up their pay to Christmas, they being willing to receive it quarterly for the future. The Little Lion and Francis have been some time in the river, and their men have not had their money as promised; the ships might be had on shore and calked within a month, not having been cleaned since they have been in the river. I have caused their rigging to be overlooked, and needful repairs done. Mr. Boyle has sent a ship to fetch away the rakings bought by him, but [Thos.] Gould has not removed his ground tow, and as its lying here gives much trouble and charge, as it gets mixed with the rakings, I request they may be directed to send ships and take them both together. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 51.] Encloses,
Contract whereby Rob. Moorcock agrees with Commissioner John Cox to deliver free of charge into the stores at Chatham 14 loads of timber and knees, at 3l. a load ready money. —20 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 51i.]
Jan. 24.
Portsmouth Dockyard.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. The Mary yacht, commanded by Capt. Sharland, has arrived at Spithead from Dublin, with orders from his Royal Highness to come into Portsmouth harbour, which he will do to morrow. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Jan. 24.
Woolwich.
Will. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. I saw your letter wherein you seem to blame me that I should make complaint against the labourers, and then go about to excuse it. [Wm.] Acworth was the person that complained of a hawser being taken away in the watch, but on examination, he could not make out whether it went in the watch, or in the intervals of time allowed according to custom. I will follow your instructions, as I, with the builder, have the sole command of the men, although no order has come wherein I was made concerned for the engaging or discharging of them. The Hampshire has arrived, and we are endeavouring to save the spring [tide]. Shall I continue the buoy of the wrecks, as I cannot find the anchor I laid ? We are progressing with the work of adding the masthouse to the storehouse. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Jan. 24. Chr. Coles, jun., to the Navy Commissioners. I have a vessel arrived at Woolwich with plank and timber, for which I will take from 3l. to 4l. 5s. a load. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Proclamation fixing the prices of wines for the ensuing year, as valued by the Lord Keeper and others. [S.P. Dom., Proc. Coll., Vol. III., p. 275.]
Jan. 24. Notice from the Royal Company to Williamson, that a General Court has been appointed to be held at Whitehall on Friday 28 Jan., at 9 a.m., for choosing 3 governors and 36 assistants, for the management of the affairs for the year ensuing, and he is to bring in his votes before noon, at which time the scrutiny will be made. [Printed form, filled up. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 102.]
Jan. 25.
Billing.
Lord O'Brien to Williamson. I enclose a letter for my Lady, asking her assistance towards clearing off that part of my debts which you and I agreed of, amounting to 650l. I have received 400l. of it from Lady Cullen; 250l. is still to be got, and 150l. more must be had to clear off Hart's bargain next Easter. I have pointed at all this in my letter to her, and how she may supply me with much ease, and that if the 100l. due from Sir Bernard [Gascoigne ?] is not soon obtained, it will be lost, as he is now receiving the money for his estate, and owes more than the amount he sells it for. Pray make her open the letter before you; I shall not doubt of your assistance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 103.]
Jan. 25.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Lord Fauconberg, Ambassador to Venice, has set sail. Two Dutch merchant ships were cast away near Calais in the late storm. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Jan. 25.
Margate.
John Smith to Williamson. The East India ship has gone up the river with a fair wind. Many of the gentry are gone to see the launch of a vessel, the first built at Grove Ferry, between Sandwich and Fordwich. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Jan. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The Dutch packets have come in, and an English gentleman who travelled from Hamburg to Holland reports that in the Bishop of Munster's territory, there is no appearance of war. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Jan. 25.
The Holmes, Portsmouth Harbour.
Capt. Hen. Clarke to Thos. Hayter. I return a warrant, and desire another for the man therein nominated. Our ship is ready, and is taking in her beer and other provisions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 55.]
Jan. 25.
Portsmouth.
Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. Since the receipt of your letter as to procuring knee timber from Chatham, I have viewed that belonging to Mr. Clements & Co., and find that a handsome parcel of knees may be procured from it, if it is prudently converted, so I have been careful to put them in the right way of felling it. I judge there will be 70 loads of knees out of 140 trees, but they will not part with them unless 140 loads of timber are taken, which although short, will be useful for repairs; they will offer no lengths until it is all felled, not wishing to lose the bark, There will be another fall in the spring at Tichfield and also at Wickham, and there are 20 loads ready felled at Emsworth, all of which I will view.
[Ben.] Newland has sold his tar at 12l. a last, so has none to offer, but his deals are almost all delivered, as are also the plank and broom, for which I beg you will order [Rich.] Ridge to pay on delivery, according to contract; it will amount to 614l.; instruct him as to Hasler's timber, otherwise it will check the delivery and also the credit, from which his Majesty receives great benefit, we being also very strict with the contractors, so that his Majesty has the benefit of each good payment. [1¾ pages. Ibid. No. 56.] Encloses,
Tender by Nicholas Clements and Cuthbert Archer, to deliver 80 loads of timber at the water side by the end of May, and 120 loads more by 29 June, the knee timber at 50s. and the other at 40s. a load, ready money. [Ibid. No. 56I.]
Jan. 26.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I will see to the new planking of the Newcastle, and have acquainted the master attendants that it is their duty to look after the moorings, and give a better account of what becomes of them. I sent some men down to sweep for the moorings, who brought up an anchor of 8 or 9 cwt., and as they assured me they had hold of the hulk's cable, which is cut, they will go down again in fair weather. I hear that the coxswain of (Sheerness) Fort was often absent from duty, and was very flush of money when laying the buoy rope, of which I will make further inquiries, as also concerning the provisions delivered into the stores by the anchorsmith, locksmith, and blockmaker, and whether anything can be saved.
I will buy the 20 elm trees of Capt. Sartan as cheap as I can, and have sent to [Wm.] Burroughs for thrums. I found some hard wood which will answer the calkers' occasions, and will have the fireship ashore and cleaned. The clerk of the cheque is ready with his books, when you think fit to send down the money; the 500l. imprest to [Edw.] Gregory for provisions being expended, I desire you will imprest 300l. more, so that it may be brought down with that to be sent for payment of the yard. Gregory is ready to pass his account, but as travelling is expensive and his allowance but small, he would fain save a journey, and supposes it will be sufficient to send up his account if I also give one. I have received 32 loads of timber from the Ordnance officers, who have spared it for us, and expect to be paid for it here, which with the carriage amounts to 65l. I endeavoured to load [Rich.] Boys's ship with rakings, but cannot muster more than nine tons, so that the vessel is but half full. A ton or two of tallow having been offered at 34s. the cwt., let me know whether it may be bought.
I presume that Thos. Fowler, labourer, in presenting his petition for 14 years' service, did not acquaint you how carelessly and idly he served that time; ancient servants think they have the privilege of walking about the yard with their hands in their pockets, but he being a young fellow, ought not to be allowed to do so. When I first came to the yard, I put an order up at the gates that no workmen were to absent themselves without leave, and that if they did so, after 4 days they would be made run; nevertheless I did not make Fowler run until he had been absent 16 days. [Edw.] Homewood, whom Fowler attended to row his boat, said he was an idle fellow; he could give no account of himself after being absent 10 or 12 days. I could instance many other cases, although not quite so bad; I will do as well as I can with them, and see that such fellows do not idle away their time, but do their duty, being confident it is what you expect of me. [2¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 57.]
Jan 26./Feb 5.
Calais.
— Dodington to [Williamson ?]. Our vessel on entering the port rode with the King's flag in the main-top, and so remained whilst Lord Fauconberg was on board; I saluted the castle, which answered again. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 106a.]
[Jan. 26.] Joshua Bowes to Williamson. I have waited two years like a dog for a crust, and fed myself with nothing but hungry expectations, but I may now fatten my thin jaws with the crumbs from Lord Berkeley's table if you would but vouchsafe me a line from your hand. Pray do so, as it will not only make me everlastingly happy, but will also be a comfort to my father and others. Your hand commands the hearts of all the nobility, and of this honourable lord. Endorsed [by Williamson] "Bowes' letter to me the evening that he robbed my house." [See Hickes' letter 28 Jan., infra. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 107.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council—on a letter of the 24th from the Mayor of Gloucester, about treasonable practices intended to be exercised there— that Lord Arlington is to thank the Mayor for his care and vigilance, and say that his Majesty does not believe Mr. Cleypoole intended any such design; but the Mayor is to try to secure John Hall, and is to continue his vigilant circumspection. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council, on petition of Thos. Martin of London—that in July 1667 he sent a small pink, the Hope, Chris. Tugwell master, from Dublin, laden with goods of great value for Jamaica; that in Nov. 1667, it was seized and made prize near Hispaniola by a French man of-war, contrary to the 16th and 17th articles of the Treaty of Breda, though the captain was advised of the peace; that the men were in great extremities for want of victuals, and were sent by Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica, to the Tertudos—a French island whither their vessel had been carried— in hope of satisfaction for the loss, when the vessel was restored, but damaged and pillaged of most of her goods to the value of 6,465l.— that Lord Arlington treat with the French Ambassador thereon, and procure the petitioner satisfaction for his losses. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council, on petition of Arthur, Earl of Anglesey—that as the quit rent charges on his lands in Ireland exceed double the annual value of the lands, they may be reduced to ½d. an acre, or that the King would grant him and his heirs 674l. 7s. 6d. a year, being the quit rent reserved to his Majesty, on which he will surrender his title to the lands—that the petition be referred to the Treasury Commissioners, chief Secretaries of State, and Committee for Irish Affairs, to consider and report. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of Elizabeth, Lady Dacre, wife of David Walter, to the King, for a grant to her trustees, Sir Peter Ball, Sir Rich. Chaworth, and Thos. Cressy, of concurrent leases for 50 years, reserving the old rents, of certain marsh lands, parcel of the manor of Pevensey and Pevensey Level, Sussex, belonging to the Duchy of Lancaster, and late part of the jointure of the King's mother. The executors of her late husband, Francis, Lord Dacre, being interested in certain leases mentioned, in one of which there is 15 years to run, and in another 24, are about to sell the same for payment of the debts, and petitioner is desirous to buy the present interest therein, and obtain concurrent leases of the rest.
With reference thereon to Sir Thos. Ingram, Chancellor of the Duchy, to consider the value of the particular desired, and his report, 21 Feb., that he caused the particulars to be examined and inquired into by the surveyor and auditor of the duchy, and finds the quantity of land to be 394 acres, and the value, besides a rent of 16l. 5s. 8d., to be 200l. a year; and that the unexpired term is 25 years in one lease, and 15 years in the other. As it is his Majesty's instructions that no leases are to be granted in reversion or made up to exceed 31 years, he cannot advise a departure from the rule so prudently set for regulating the revenue. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 111.]
Jan. 26. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 91.]
[Jan. 26.] Request by John Eddowes and Thos. Clayton, for a grant with survivorship of the office of writer to the Great Seal of grants of spiritualities, a grant to be surrendered in their favour by Mr. Smith. Eddowes having long served the Lord Keeper, and being made by him secretary for the clergy, would find the place convenient, and it has no pension belonging to it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 112.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Petition of John Eddowes and Thos. Clayton to the King, for a grant of the said office. Charles I. granted it to Neh. Smith for life, in reversion after Hen. Hastings, and the latter dying a year since, Smith became possessed thereof, and assigned his interest to petitioners, the youngest of whom is almost as old as Smith. The office is very inconsiderable, being confined to the writing of presentations and other spiritual promotions, bishoprics excepted, and no pension is payable to the same from the Crown. Petitioners served in the wars, and being in the employ of the Lord Keeper, have a dependency upon the Great Seal. With reference thereon to the Lord Keeper. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Jan. 26. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 92.]
Jan. 26. Warrant for a charter of incorporation to the Tinplate workers or wire workers of London; first master, Thos. Aries, giving also the names of 2 wardens, 15 assistants, and a clerk. Annexing,
Heads of the charter granted to the said company. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 144.]
Jan. 26. Warrant to [John] Sumner to apprehend Cogha, alias Capt. Power. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 3.]
Jan. 26. Grant to Henry, Marquis of Worcester, of the advowson of Chalton, Hants. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26. Grant to Sir Algernon May of the office of Keeper of the Records in the Tower of London; salary 500l. a year. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26.
Court at Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry, Earl of Northumberland, to preserve the game in the manors of Sion and East Bedford, Middlesex, which belong to him, as the said office has been held by his ancestors. [S.P. Dom., Case C., Car. II., No. 12.]
Jan. 26. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 4.]
Jan. 26. Grant to Anthony, Bishop of Exeter, to hold in commendam the deanery of St. Burian, in his diocese, as long as he holds the bishopric. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 1.]
Jan. 27. James Houseman to the Earl of Winchelsea, Eastwell. I was told by John West, officer of Customs at Rumney, that 12 bags of wool were ready for export; I sent officers to seize and bring it to Dover, but Wm. Ward, the proprietor, and one of the greatest exporters of wool, arrested and imprisoned them. I beg assistance to bring away the wool, and a letter to the Secretary of State about the 3 prisoners, who are all at Lydd. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 114.]
Jan. 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Perrott. The ship with the Danish Ambassador's attendants sailed out, but after having struck once or twice, returned again. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Jan. 27.
Dover.
John Carlisle to Williamson. The Osborne lies weather-bound; I will do what I can to forward her. Fifteen Ostend captains, who went in a bravado on one of their boats to the King's yacht Katherine, to be merry with Capt. Crow, were overturned near the shore on returning, and 14 of them drowned. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Mary pleasure boat, long employed on the coast of Ireland, has come to be laid up, and reports all quiet there. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Jan. 27.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The storm has not injured the vessels in the Downs, but prevents several ships from getting away. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to the Navy Commissioners. I was solicited by Adam Cardonnel of Southampton, 3 or 4 years since, to ask Col. Middleton, then Commissioner at Portsmouth, to buy a parcel of timber for the stores; we ordered [Roger] Eastwood, the purveyor, to view it, but it was found of too small a scantling; yet Eastwood, at Cardonnel's desire, branded it with the King's mark. Cardonnel was subsequently much troubled with suits at law, and has just returned home, having been in prison in London. Capt. Greene has seen the timber, and knows it was Cardonnel's timber. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 58.]
Jan. 27. Rice Freeman to the Navy Commissioners. The Hampshire, of which I am purser, being again designed for the Straits, is ordered to take in 6 months' provisions; but her bread-room, being so small, will not hold above 17 cwt. of bread, which is not much more than half the proportion, and a large quantity was damaged in her last voyage. I beg therefore that the bread-room may be enlarged, or that what cannot be stowed away may be put on board one of the victualling ships, to be convoyed by her to Sir Thos. Allin. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. Concerning the moorings at Sheerness, you will see by orders enclosed that after the enemy destroyed the yard and hulk there, I had nothing to do there, but went to Chatham and attended on Lord Brouncker. I was at the taking up of the Victory, and afterwards went to the Musselbank, to weigh the Hind and another ketch which I brought into dock, and then went up and down from Chatham to Sheerness, attending the engineer's motions with the Prince, but never had any command of the Guild de Ruyter or the 8 men borne on her. I was waiting on the Prince at Sheerness when she was sent down, and got soldiers aboard to moor her, where she remained for 6 months after my discharge. I discoursed about the moorings with the masters of attendance, who resolved they should be taken up after their work was over, which was great. Blewet, the boatswain of the hulk, who is a rigger at Chatham, and can find where they lie, offered to go, and the horse boat was to have gone, but no men were to be had, they being employed on the London and James.
When discharged, I was asked at the Board what became of the hulk, and replied that she lay sunk at her moorings, and that the anchors were there; the Board said they would write to have them taken up. I believe the anchors to be still there, as after the enemy was gone, I saw one of the buoys riding, and on the enemy's return, I caused it to be cut away, so that they might not attempt to take them up, which cannot be done easily by a private person, or stolen without the knowledge of the fort, as one of the anchors weighs 40 cwt. and the other 30, and they lie within pistol shot of the fort, and in 12 fathom water. I had nothing from Chatham while serving at Sheerness, but an anchor with one fluke of 30 cwt., which I left on shore, it being useful for fastening vessels to; I judge it lies there still. I discharged myself of it with the surveyor at Chatham. I beg return of the orders sent, as they show that I was one day a soldier, and the next a sailor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 60.]
Jan. 27. Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. I am directed by his Royal Highness's warrant to reside at Portsmouth for one year, and while there to execute the duties of my office as a Commissioner; the officers of the yards are required, by his Royal Highness's instructions, neither to receive nor issue stores, nor proceed upon any work, but by warrant under the hands of two or more of the principal officers. How far may I, being a Commissioner, diverge from such instructions, in supplying the stores or ships at Portsmouth with such provisions as may be wanting on any sudden emergency, without such warrant, seeing my distance from the Navy Board ? In exigencies 3 days' delay might much prejudice the service. I beg your advice thereon in 3 cases named, relating to the supply of ships in emergency. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 61.]
Jan. 27. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. I can give no further account concerning the quantity or quality of the goods and household stuff to be brought from Rouen, but have spoken to Sir Thos. Bond, who understands the affair, and will send him if necessary, to give information for your guidance in hiring a vessel for the service. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Jan. 28.
Chatham.
Rich. Burton to the Navy Commissioners. The supplying of small ironwork wrought and served into the stores at Chatham by me, under His Royal Highness's warrant, being attempted to be wrested from me by others, I ask that if any proposal is made by others for doing any of my work under the rates formerly allowed me, I may be permitted to stand in competition with others, being in a better capacity to do it, from having a stock already on hand for the supply of the service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 63.] Encloses,
List of the iron articles made and supplied by Rich. Burton, locksmith, to the yard at Chatham. [Ibid. No. 63i.]
Jan. 28.
Woolwich.
Will. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. I spoke to [John] Rudd concerning Young's petition, and think if you allow him 5l. more, which you would have done if you had had the money in hand, he will be satisfied. The Hampshire is graved and afloat. Shall the hulk be repaired, this being much needed, and the dock being free ? [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 28. Warrant for payment of 50l. a year to the poor in the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 4.]
Docquet of the above, dated 3 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 132.]
Jan. 28.
Court at Whitehall.
Order for a warrant for an allowance of 50l. a year to King Charles's Hospital for fatherless children, out of the 100l. given yearly by the King to the poor of St. Margaret's parish, Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 119.]
Jan. 28. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 3.]
Docquet of the above, dated 3 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 132.]
[Jan. 23.]
[Whitehall.]
Petition of Sir Sam. Barnardiston, Bart., to the King and Council, that he may receive discharge of the 1,095l. due on his being created a baronet, the former discharge being lost before it passed the Privy Seal, and therefore an extent issued against him for the money. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 120.]
Jan. 28. Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 93.]
Jan. 28.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. There came no letters from Mr. Muddiman last night, and I cannot understand the reason. I hear that you have been visited by thieves; I hope you may find them out. Pray remember my former letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 121.]
Jan. 28.
Norwich.
[Thos. Corie] to Williamson. I solicit, for the third time, an order from the King, limiting the time of stage players in Norwich, being moved by the importunity of those who addressed Lord Arlington for it. Thos. Gill, a person answering to the description in the Gazette, has been apprehended on suspicion of being one of Duval's gang. He says that he lives at Faversham, in Kent, and is a gamester, and that he came from thence to Gravesend, crossed the Thames, and has been to Chelmsford and other places named. He was advised to send into Kent for a certificate of his conduct, and to repair to a Secretary of State for a letter exonerating him; but neglecting to do so, and continuing his dissolute way of gambling and debauchery, he has been committed to prison till he gives security to answer at the sessions. If you would make inquiries as to whether he is a highwayman, or one of those accused by Dudley and Widdrington, you would oblige the magistrates of this city. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 122.]
Jan. 28.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council for setting at liberty Teige Coahe, chaplain to the Queen, her Majesty having been instant with Lord Arlington about it. [See p. 41, infra. Ibid. No. 123.]
Jan 29.
Saturday.
Sir Thos. Bond to Williamson. In the translating of the French petition about which Lord Arlington spoke to you into English, the name of Henriette de Vantelet is to be added after that of Monsieur de Chappelle. Also pray to remember the order for me to send away the goods to Rouen, and have them shipped there by the first vessel bound for London. The freight agreed upon with Mr. Wilkings shall be paid on their arrival. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Jan. 29.
Coventry.
Ralph Hope to Williamson. I beg a continuance of the news, having been informed that Perrott is unwilling to continue me as a correspondent without your orders. Several in the town receive constant news from Muddiman, whom I left in favour of your newsletters. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Jan. 29.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. The Calais packet, in which was Lawrence Osborne, has sailed. Lord Fauconberg remains at Calais waiting for weather. Last week an English ship, laden with rare Canaries [wines], was cast away on the Goodwin. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Jan 29. Contract by John Peirse, master of the Love of London, with the Navy Commissioners, to go to Rouen, and bring away to the River Thames all such household goods and other effects belonging to the late Queen Mother as shall be brought to him by order of Sir Thos. Bond, or such other person as shall be concerned in the shipping thereof, for 25s. a ton ready money, together with such primage and average as is usually allowed in the river of Rouen. If any dispute shall arise, it shall be determined by two persons, one to be chosen by the Navy Commissioners from the Trinity House, and the other by Peirse. Noted on 7 April 1670, that Peirse never having attended to sign, the goods were brought over by a vessel belonging to Capt. Gibbs, who demanded freight according to a certain bill of lading, and acquitted the Board from this contract. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 65.]
Jan. 29.
Portsmouth.
Abr. Ansley and St. J. Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. As to the cook of the Yarmouth doing the duty of the purser while the ship was in harbour, we can only say that the cook was con stantly aboard, but whether he or any other officer can do his own and his fellow-officer's duty too, we must leave to your consideration. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 66.]
Jan. 29. Rob. Mayors to the Navy Commissioners. I send note of a tender by Wm. Wood, of 288 spruce deals at 11s. and 12s. each. I have viewed them, and consider them fit for present use, if you will treat for them. [Ibid. No. 67.] Annexed,
Calculations on the difference in the prices of timber, as charged in [Wm.] Wood, [George] Body, and [Wm.] Harrington's tenders, to the Navy Board. [Ibid. No. 67i.]
Jan. 29. Recommendation to the Treasury Commissioners of the petition of Patrick MacGinn for compensation for his pains about securing the tin lost at Ostend, the King wishing him to be satisfied for his great skill in securing and managing the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 92.]
Jan. 30. Privy seal for 400l. to Capt. Philip Howard, as the King's free gift. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 4.]
Jan. 30. Warrant from Lord Arlington to John Sumner, messenger, to discharge from his custody the person of Captain Teige Coahe, the Queen's chaplain. [Ibid. f. 6.]
Jan. 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Nine notes, dating from 9 to 30 Jan., reporting that nothing has happened in the port worthy of notice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, Nos. 127–135.]
Jan. 30.
Resolution.
Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson. I send you an account of our proceedings, from 12–30 Jan., and beg to hear oftener from you. Capt. Poole, commander of the Jersey, saw a fleet of 16 sail at Juice, which he judged to be French men-of-war. Taffaletta has made good his promise to the Lord Ambassador, in restoring all the English taken by Sally men since the truce lately made with him. [Ibid. No. 136.] Encloses,
Copy of his letter of the 21st. Also, On the 22nd we convoyed the merchant ships 50 leagues to the westward of Cape St. Vincent, and then took leave and returned. On the 25th we anchored in Lagos Bay and sent ashore for some wood, which the crew were obliged to cut in the night. The Governor there, Conde de Val de Reys, Captain-General of the Algerines, refusing to return an equal number of guns, I did not salute. I delivered to him a Portuguese negro renegade slave, for whom his Lieutenant-General, an Irishman named Dungan, gave me a receipt, and a promise that the prisoner should be proceeded against according to the laws of the country. The 28th, doubting whether the victualler from England had gone by, I sailed for Cadiz, and anchored in the bay, where I found the Jersey and Centurion with a convoy of merchants bound homewards. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 136i.]
Jan. 31.
York.
Jonas Mascall to Williamson. I send a letter from my friend Mr. Pett, who wished it conveyed to you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 137.] Enclosing,
Phineas Pett to Williamson. I intend to wait upon you and give particulars of my proceedings on my arrival in England. I have been detained in the Highlands of Scotland, getting in readiness the remainder of the masts and timber which was found out in the time of the Dutch war, beyond expectation.—Alnwick, 22 Jan. 1670. [Ibid. No. 137i.]
Jan. 31 ? Joshua Bowes to Williamson. If you will send Thos. Williamson, or any other person, I will inform him how I obtained and disposed of the standish, and if I lie, I hope justice will overtake me. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Jan. 31 ? Same to the Same. I took the standish myself from Lord Arlington, and sold it in four pieces, namely one part at Moorfields, one at Barbican, as you know, one at Holborn Bridge, and the cover of it at a silversmith's in Hosier's Lane; I told you that I had the disposing of part of it from another, to make you believe that I was not so bad as I am. I am informed these two indictments will take away my life, or at least cause me to be transported, both of which are bad enough; as I can protest that I had no confederates, I implore you for my wife's sake to help a poor penitent thief, who has not now a hardened heart. "It is otherwise with me than when you last saw me. Blessed be the Lord for it." [Ibid. No. 139.]
Jan. 31.
Gatehouse.
Same to the Same. I hope the unfeigned tears of a poor penitent will soften your displeasure. I have neither money nor money's worth, and both myself and wife are ready to starve, which is the fruit of covetousness. I pray pardon for the offence my vile hand committed, which has caused me to be punished by the law, made me a reproach to my relations, and ruined my fortune. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Jan. 31. Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson. I am now ready for another journey to London, but the snow lying so thick on the mountains here, I judge it impossible to pass over Stainmore with my coach, until there is a thaw. If my absence is taken notice of at the Court or Westminster, pray explain the reason, as I fear I shall not be in time to attend the first day of the Parliament's meeting. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Jan. 31.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Perrott. Particulars of vessels to or from Protugal, Virginia, New England, &c. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Jan. 31. Commission to John Fortescue to be Captain of Upnor Castle, Kent, with its two adjoining batteries; obeying the directions of the Lord General and those of the Master or Commissioners of Ordnance in what relates to the Ordnance stores. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 36.]
Jan. 31. Warrant to pay to the churchwardens and overseers of the poor of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 100l. as the King's free gift, for relief of the poor there. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 128.]
Jan. 31. Warrant for an order to pay to Sir George Carteret 1,304l. advanced by him by order of the late Lord Treasurer to Rich. Russell and others, for services relating to the late war. [Ibid.]
Jan. 31.
The Spy, Dover.
Giles Bond to the Navy Commissioners. We could not eat the meat or peas had from Dover, and have only 16 days' provisions on board. Our bower anchor is broken, we are out of carpenter's stores, and want several repairs done about the vessel. Noted 3 Feb. that Sir Jeremiah Smith undertakes to rectify the business of the victuals. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 68.]
Jan. 31. Lord Brouncker to the Navy Commissioners. You are to furnish his Royal Highness with the names of the 2 ships, a fourth and fifth rate, that you think the most fit to be sent to the Straits. Noted with the names of 3 fourth-rate and 5 fifth-rate, where they are lying, and the amount it will cost to repair each. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Jan. 31.
Mary yacht, Portsmouth.
Capt. Jas. Sharland to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. Ansley reported my arrival at Spithead before I could, since which the Mary has come in and unrigged, got her necessaries ashore, and the order for fitting her again. I hope I shall be allowed to wait upon you, to thank you for supplying me with the necessaries I so often wanted in Ireland. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Jan. 31.
Portsmouth Dock.
Abr. Ansley to the Navy Commissioners. [Sam.] Knight, clerk of the comptrol here, died this morning. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Jan. 31.
Woolwich.
Wm. Bodham, clerk of the ropeyard, to the Navy Commissioners. I received an order from Lord Brouncker for the speedy clearing of my imprest, or else to give a reason for the delay; the latter I have done, but fearing you may think me deficient in my duty, I assure you that between May and August, I made 7 or 8 journeys at my own cost to the Treasury Office, and with a sufficient balance to have taken out the imprest bills for which I stand accountable, but could never effect it, because they said those bills were not in their power to deliver to me.
As my revenue is small and slow, I resolved to save expense, and wait until I could get a quick despatch. If I have not 150l. due to me when all is cleared, it will very badly answer my purpose, having been forced to draw that sum out of the country. Whether I live or die, I know I shall not be found an injurious debtor to his Majesty. I have been ready two years for some part of this work, and as soon as could be expected for the residue, and hope next week will put a period to all of it; but if you command it sooner, it will hasten my quiet. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Jan. Petition of Sam. Martin, purser of the Yarmouth, now in harbour at Portsmouth, to the Navy Commissioners, for an order granting him his usual allowance on board while passing his accounts, and for leave that his duty there may be discharged by deputy during his absence. Was similarly employed in several ships during the war, and at the end of every voyage, passed his accounts with the victualler. In one of such voyages, he disbursed 100l. for fresh provisions, &c., and by that means became a creditor, and is forced to attend their Board, to his great prejudice, being pricked out of wages and victuals. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 282, No. 73.]
Jan. ? Petition of John Francis, mariner, to the Navy Commissioners, for the command of a victualling ship, understanding that they are fitting out several prize ships as victuallers, to wait upon the fleet. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Jan. ? Petition of Sir William Boreman to the King, showing that he intended, on the next vacancy, to present Wm. Rolfe to Stoke Bruern, co. Northampton, of which he is patron, but the vacancy being likely to occur by promotion of Dr. Gunning to the Bishopric of Chichester, he begs his Majesty's presentation of Rolfe. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 143.]
Jan. ? Petition of Thos. Gumble, D.D., to the King, to take him into his service. Was 15 years chaplain to the late Duke of Albemarle, Lord General, employed by him in many important services for his Majesty, was with him at his death, and administered to him the last rites of the Church of England. [Ibid. No. 143a.]
Jan.
Whitehall.
Note by Lord Arlington that the King wishes the present Governor of Gravesend Blockhouse to obey directions prefixed, given 18 July 1669, in answer to queries of Sir John Griffin, as follows:—No foreign man-of-war to be allowed to pass above the forts at Gravesend and Sheerness without orders from the Lord Admiral, nor in any other harbour without leave of the governors of the forts. All foreign ships of war to strike the flag on approaching a fort, and to remain with the flag down whilst in sight thereof; any refusing to be forced to do it. All merchant ships to strike to the forts. All foreign ships of war to be answered gun for gun; other ships with 2 guns less. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 188.]
Jan.
Whitehall.
Pass for John Anley to and from the Island of Guernsey. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 144.]
[Jan.]
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to William, Viscount Stafford, and Mary his wife, of a weekly market and two yearly fairs at Thornbury, co. Gloucester, the same appearing on inquisition not prejudicial to the neighbourhood.[Ibid. No. 145.]
Jan. Pass for Hugh Chamberlain, King's physician in ordinary, to France, to stay for six months and return. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 186.]
Jan. Confirmation to the bakers of Chester of their former charters and liberties. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 130.]
Jan. Grant to Wm. Young, in reversion after Edw. Progers, of the custody of the Middle or North Park, and the hare warren at Hampton Court, also of Bushy Park in reversion after John Lightfoot, also of the keepership of the chief mansion and honour of Hampton Court and stewardship of the manor, void by death of the Duke of Albemarle. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 131.]
Jan. Grant to John Neale of the office of bailiff of the bailiwick of Burley, in the New Forest, co. Hants, also of the herbage and windfall of the woods for 31 years, on rent of 5l. 3s. 4d., and on his surrender of former grants of the premises. [Ibid.]
Jan. Grant to Sir Rich. Otley of a moiety of some treasure trove said to be hidden in Middlesex, with power to recover the same, on his paying the other half into the Exchequer. [Ibid.]
Jan. ? [C. Cratford?] to [Lord Conway]. I am enjoined by Mr. Rogers to tell you that Mr. Church (the King) is resolved to recall Mr. Blewett (Lord Robartes), but has engaged himself to Mr. Gorgis (Duke of Buckingham) that neither Mr. Carrig (Lord Ormond) nor Mr. Buller (Lord Ossory) shall succeed. I believe [it will be] Mr. Johnson (John, Lord Berkeley) who tugged hard with the men. Mr. Church is so fully persuaded by Mr. James [Duke of York?] that his party only will do the business, if he wholly depends upon them, which Church (the King) believes and acts accordingly. I doubt (the Parliament) will soon show him the error of that mistake.
Messrs. Bridge [Sir O. Bridgeman ?], Rogers, and Thomas have taken leave of Church (the King), intending to go into the country, which he has taken offence at, and desired them not to do so till he sees what (Parliament) will do. Mr. Bence [Lord Arlington ?] is very intimate with Mr. James, which has offended Lord Townshend. All James's old friends are using their best industry to make Mr. Gorgis (Duke of Buckingham) and Mr. James friends, which might have been done 12 days since, had Mr. Church (the King) gone on as he began with Harry Coventry, who is now engaged against Mr. Bence, and is setting the Parliament on him. Mr. Welsh [Bishop Wilkins?] has wholly left Mr. Bence, and joined with Bridge, Gorgis (Buckingham), Rogers, and Thomas. Mr. Edwards [Lord Conway?] is happy to be out of this confusion, and God only knows where it will end. [2 pages, partly in cipher, only partially deciphered; the names printed in italics are deciphers given in the MS.; those with (?) are supplied conjecturally. Damaged. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 146.]
Jan. Dr. Ralph Cudworth [Master of Christ's College, Cambridge] to Williamson. I have not been wanting in my endeavours to promote [Chris.] Barker's interest, but the meetings of the Heads have been less frequent, through the smallpox being so rife in the colleges and town. I find the majority of them are against anyone coming in by mandate, and in favour of [Marm.] Urlin, and a free nomination, for the next vacancy, as Urlin lost it the last time by only one or two votes. Barker has made interest with the Vice-Chancellor and Dr. Fleetwood, but I conceive it will not be sufficient to move the obstruction. Dr. [Peter] Gunning has been very fair, both here and at London, and a little thing might engage him further. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 147.]
[Jan.] Portion of the pleadings, pp. 148–191, on a legal case referring to the King's right of presentation, with summing up by Lord Chief Justice Vaughan; numerous other cases are cited, e.g. Dr. Lees, Archdeacon of Rochester, on a writ of privilege to be discharged from the office of expenditor, to which he was appointed by the Commissioners of Sewers, in right of some lands held by him; trial of George Reynell and others for depriving Jane Lutterell of 32,000l. Milton's Case is referred to on p. 154. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 272, No. 148.]
Jan. Account of sums paid into the Exchequer by the new Farmers of Customs since 28 March 1668, being between 6,000l. and 8,000l. their agreement being for 8,000l. a month. With notes of payments made on tallies therefrom. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Jan.
Deal.
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the state of the wind, &c.
Vol. 272. No. Date. King's. Merchants'. Wind. Remarks.
150 Jan. 1 1 S.E.
151 " 2 1 S.E.
152 " 4 1 5 S. Four more not spoken with. Stormy weather.
153 " 5 1 2 S.
154 " 7 1 5 N.N.W. Six others not spoken with. Stormy weather.
155 " 8 1 17 N.W.
156 " 9 1 6 S. Two others went through, and stopped not.
157 " 10 1 5 S.W.
158 " 11 1 14 W.S.W.
159 " 12 1 7 W.N.W.
160 " 13 1 9 W.N.W.
161 " 14 1 20 W.S.W.
162 " 16 1 13 N.N.W.
163 " 17 1 8 S.W.
164 " 19 1 6 N.E. Stormy weather.
165 " 22 1 7 N.W.
166 " 25 1 3 S.W. by W. One went through, not spoken with.
167 " 26 1 10 E.N.E. Stormy weather.
168 " 27 1 3 N.E.
169 " 30 1 N.E. Capt. Gutteridge, commander of the Diligence, is cast away going up, and broken to pieces. A Deal boat has taken up 3 butts of Canary wine, supposed to come from the wreck.

Footnotes

  • 1. The Commissioners for auditing the Accounts of the whole Kingdom.—ED.