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Volume 25: November 1652

Pages 463-516

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Interregnum, 1651-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1877.

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November 1652

Nov. 1. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
2. Mr. Jackson to attend the Irish and Scotch Committee tomorrow, at 7 a.m.
3. To write the Navy Commissioners, enclosing Capt. Willoughby's letter from Portsmouth, concerning the Hamburg ship brought in, and desire them to set a reasonable price on his commodities, to be delivered merchantable, and to make out his bills, to be paid by ready money.
4. To write General Blake to order all the ships in the service to make stay of all ships and other vessels which they meet with belonging to the King or people of Denmark, and to send them to the first convenient port, free from embezzlement, to be there kept until further order by Parliament or Council.
5. To write the Navy Commissioners that the great ships now at Portsmouth, except the Sovereign, are to be again fitted out to sea, and to desire them to consider how they may be done with most expedition, and by what time they may be ready, and to certify.
6. A copy of Capt. Bonner's letter to be sent to the Commissioners for Prize Goods.
7. The petition of Sir Jas. Foulis, of Colintown, Scotland, referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to bail him if they see cause, or report.
8. That of Owen Lloyd referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
9. That of Major Alex. Sterling and Capt. Rouge Mackenye, as also of Jno. Bulnevis, Lieut. Malcolm Read, and Lieut. Jno. Stewart, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine them, and take their bail if they see cause.
10. That committee to examine the business concerning the contriving, printing, and publishing the "Faithful Scout," and send for those who have had any hand in it; also for Geo. Wharton, the supposed author of an almanac containing something prejudicial to the commonwealth, and examine him thereon, and secure any of the above parties, if they see cause, until they have reported the whole matter to Council, and received their resolution.
11. The appointed committee to meet the Portuguese Ambassador on Tuesday at 4 p.m., and deliver him the paper of demands agreed to by Council, and treat with him thereon, as well at this meeting as at any other, according as they shall find it necessary, and report the whole to Council.
12. The said paper to be translated into Latin, to be delivered to him.
13. To write him that Council cannot give way to his desire as to admitting the persons mentioned in his letter to come to the audience with him, in the quality he desires, Council not understanding, by anything which has yet been produced by him, that those persons have any public character.
14. The information against Capt. Millard referred to the Admiralty Committee.
15. That committee to consider how the small vessel taken by the Falmouth frigate, in company with the Dutch ship taken coming from Brazil, [shall be disposed of].
16, 17. Mr. Hastings to attend the Committee for Examinations to-morrow by 7 a.m., for examination on matters objected against him, and the committee to sit then.
18. The petition of Edm. Custis, merchant, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to consider what should be done for his relief.
19. The letter and estimate from the Navy Commissioners, with Mr. Willoughby's letter from Portsmouth, to be sent to Sir Hen. Vane, to use on Thursday morning next, when he shall acquaint Parliament with the condition of the naval business. [I. 35, pp. 10–15.]
Nov. 1.
Leghorn.
29. Charles Longland to the Navy Committee. I have shown your instructions as to convoy to Capt. Appleton, will send them to Capt. Badiley, and will confer with both which way may be most advantageous to your ships. I think no kind of motion will be good for either squadron, their numbers being so inferior, but the Peregrine has entered the service, the Lewis will do the same at Genoa, and others may be got from Venice, if men are not wanting.
The Dutch, that were but 14 sail, have nearly doubled, so that if we should pick up what we hope for, three or four more ships would not enable your ships to go to sea against so many. The Dutch lately came away from before Porto Longone, whereby we were in hopes our ships might have an opportunity to come thence, but they have since returned, and lie again before that port; they brought a fire-ship with them, which the Governor of Longone commanded thence.
Although the Dutch have many ships, they are but ill manned; every one has 30 soldiers, who they confess are the safety of their ships, as they dare not trust their common seamen. If you took the same course, and put soldiers into all our ships, they would be of far greater strength, and you would have an advance of seamen for merchants' occasions. I have bought some fish at Genoa for all your ships, and hope some more will soon come in, to victual them for six months, for flesh is very scarce and dear. [1½ pages.]
Nov. 1/11.
The Leopard, Leghorn.
30. Captain Hen. Appleton to the Navy Committee. Upon the death of Capt. Witheridge, I placed Capt. Cox in the Bonadventure, but finding his carriage intolerably proud,—never owning me in anything he did, but daily acting to the prejudice of this port, and having also, without my order, placed his purser in the frigate,—I ordered him, Cox, to quit the ship and return to the Constant Warwick, but he replied that he would not stir; thereupon I sent for him, and acquainted him that I could not any longer endure his contempt of authority. I gave Lieut. Lyme a commission to be commander until further order, and directed Cox to return to Porto Longone, but he said he would stay in despite of me, and so will force me to keep him a prisoner on board, until I bring him to give me a writing to carry himself better for the future. He has done several things for which he must be responsible, and of which, for quietness' sake, I have not as yet advised you. I shall give him leave to depart, and so long as he shall be your real servant, I shall be his faithful friend.
Capt. Cox, in presence of all the men in the Bonadventure, made a speech so as to raise a mutiny, and endeavoured to procure the company to solicit him to stay with them as their commander, but both officers and men were more civil. I have since been on board, and required the company to give respect to Lieut. Lyme, which they willingly embraced, and I hope Cox will return aboard the Warwick without further trouble, though he has abused me to the whole company. [2 pages.]
Nov. 2. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The petition of Thos. Day, carpenter, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
2. That of Joachim Doncke, from Lubec, to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
3. The book published by Mr. Culpepper referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to send for and examine him thereon, or any other persons who have had any hand in its contriving, printing, or publishing, and secure them if they see cause.
4. The letters and papers which have been sent or shall be sent to Council from the Resident at Hamburg, concerning some disobedience to the orders of Council made in reference to the English there, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
5. The Admiralty Committee to consider as to speedily dispatching a sufficient fleet to the Straits, to convoy the merchant ships thither, and relieve the ships of war in those parts.
6. To signify to Mr. Bradshaw, in the next letter, that it is not Council's intention, by sending him to Denmark, to remove him from his employment at Hamburg, but that he is to return thither, as soon as he has done the business with the King of Denmark.
7, 8. The petitions of John Hool, and of Ralph Slee mariner, referred to the Committee for Examinations.
9. Order on the report from the Admiralty Committee—containing a report from the Admiralty Judges, in the case of John Bathurst, desiring Council's favour in releasing the sugars he claims, being under seizure in the Admiralty, on suspicion of being Portuguese goods,—that the said committee confer with the Admiralty Judges concerning that particular, and know from them on what grounds they conceive Council may give order for release of the sugars, and report the whole matter.
10. The letter from Capt. Thos. Penrose to Mr. Coytmor, mentioning the taking of certain ships pretending to be Hamburghers, but supposed to be Dutch, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are to confer with Dr. Walker and some merchants of London, concerning the discovery of pretences of this nature, and the preventing of them for the future, and report what should be done.
11, 12. Dr. Walker, Maurice Thompson, Capt. Ryder, and Samuel Wilson, to attend that committee to-morrow, at 8 a.m.
13. To write Capt. Hosier, of the Magdalen, to convoy two ships of Yarmouth and the Thomason, Supply, and Hopewell, of Hull, with provisions for the State, to Yarmouth and Hull.
14. Order on the report from the Ordnance Committee concerning the repair of Dover Castle, that 500l. be paid out of the exigent money of Council to Lieut. Kelsey, Governor, 200l. now and 300l. in 3 months.
15. The desire of Mons. Barrière referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are to make the report on that business tomorrow.
16. The petition and papers of Henrie de la March referred to the said Committee, to consider how he may be put in a way of proceeding in his business according to justice, and report.
17. Hen. Hastings to attend the Committee for Examinations, from day to day, until this day week, and all persons whatsoever required to permit him to do so, and to return to his habitation without molestation or hindrance, on any pretence whatever. [I. 35, pp. 16– 19.]
Nov. 2. Committee of Parliament to confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
1. Several orders of Parliament, including two on confiscation of estates in Scotland, read.
2. Order on reading the Bill for the Union, that it be transcribed without the preamble (which is postponed), and given to the deputies at the next meeting, as a ground of conference.
3. Order on a Parliament order of this day, that Commissioner Lisle and Major Salwey prepare a Bill, giving the names of persons in Scotland whose estates are to be confiscated, and the rest pardoned, and report it to this committee.
4. The clerk to attend Lisle with all the papers needful for his perusal in drawing this Bill. [I. 138, p. 26.]
Nov. 2.
Excise Office.
31. Thomas Bulstrode and three others to the Excise Committee. The farm of the excise for the city and county of Chester, formerly let with approbation of this committee to Jas. Smith, of Nantwich, expiring 25 December next, we have proposals from Smith for renewing it for ¾ of a year more, and he having offered 1,000l., being an advance of 108l. 6s. 8d. a quarter, we have contracted with him for the farm rent of all exciseable commodities, salt, soap, hats, and tobacco pipes excepted, under the usual covenants, except for the 60 days usually given after the expiration of the farm, for collecting arrears. We enclose the contract for your allowance. Noted as agreed to. [¾ page.]
Nov. 2.
* * * wel.
32. H. H—to Lady Molineux. I never stood so much in need of a pardon as the impudence in venturing on the enclosed, on so short warning, has reduced me to.
'Twas 10 o'clock last night before my thoughts were fired with an ambition of this nature, and I could not rest till I had arrived at what you see. I need not have told you this, for if you have the patience to read it, you will discern it to be the unadvised production of a few minutes. But since all the deliberation in the world can never furnish me with sacrifices suitable to your merits and my devotion, let your acceptance give life, if not to the lines, to their author, who not only begs your own pardon, but even your intercession for that of your noble lord. [2/3 page.] Enclosing,
32. i. An epithalamium on the happy marriage of Lady Frances Seymour and Lord Molineux, privately solemnised at Essex House.—October 28, 1652.
1.
Now when the royal blood is voted down,
And 'tis thought dangerous to be near a crown,
When those alliances true nobles knit
Threaten the commonwealth as if 'twould split,
When Seymour does with Molineux entwine,
Two of the greatest names unite and join,
'Twas wisely done to debar common eyes
From violating the solemnities;
'Twas wisely done to hedge those glories in
Which they who see irrevently sin.
2.
'Twas well it was not heard at Westminster,
The bans had surely been forbidden there;
But 'tis too late now; the conjunction's past,
And its most happy influence shall last.
Was it not hence that Lilly did foresee
Such peril to the State ? O ! no, for he
Converses only with a lower sphere
Sees no such glories as we mention here:
His stars are governed and obscured by these,
For if his be stars, these are deities.
3.
Let us erect an altar then, and pay
Such offerings as become us, and the day:
They must not be wishes of happiness,
For you, great pair, already do possess,
Nay are so much, so true essential bliss,
That 'tis by you we come to know what 'tis.
And when hereafter we wish any two
Happy to th' height, must wish them such as you.
But for ourselves, since you're above't, we may
Wish, and although not for, yet to you pray.
4.
True honour, noble love, are drawing on,
And but for your protection, would be gone.
Therefore vouchsafe to bless this mortal state
(Though higher glories do your change await),
Till it be grown in fashion to be good.
Then leave us some examples of your blood,
Who may, while they to noblest things aspire,
Confess their native glorious active fire,
Kindled from Molineux' and Seymour's breast,
Two names the greatest, and of both the best.
[2 pages.]
Nov. 3. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The letter to the King of Denmark now read, to be translated into Latin, and signed by the Speaker; the Lord President to offer it to him.
2. Order to be given to the Governor of Windsor Castle to send Jas. Wemys, late General of the artillery of Scotland, to the MarshalGeneral of the army, at Chelsea College, that he may have his liberty on bail for six weeks, for recovery of his health.
3. To write the Commissioners for Dutch Prize Goods to send down one or two trusty persons.
4. Order on report from the Commissioners for Examinations, in the case of Major Sterling, Lieut. Jno. Balnevis, Capt. Rorie Mackenny, Lieut. Malcolme Rede, and Lieut. Jno. Stuart, referring it to the said committee to take their bail.
5. The Admiralty Committee to consider how the ships hereafter built for the coal trade between London and Newcastle may be so built that, on occasion, they may be serviceable as men-of-war.
6–8. The appointed committee to meet the Portuguese Ambassador on Saturday at 9 a.m., Fleming giving him notice, and to receive what he has to offer, and confer with him thereon; also, if they find it necessary, to acquaint him that Council has sent to the Admiralty Judges for an account, in relation to the goods mentioned in his paper delivered on 9 Oct., and has ordered that no further proceedings should be had thereon, until further order from Council. Notice to be given to the committee of this meeting.
9. Sir Arthur Hesilrigge and Col. Wauton to speak with Col. Thomson to-morrow, concerning the business mentioned in the petition of Capt. Wm. Billers, the service being very much concerned therein, and to report to Council to-morrow what they have done.
10. To write General Blake that Council have been informed of several great miscarriages committed by Capt. Neale and his ship's company, and to desire him to order Capt. Neale to come to him with his ship, and then dismiss him and his company, and put some other fit person upon her as captain, and also to new man her, and order Capt. Neale to come up to Council, to answer matters objected against him.
11. The report from the Irish and Scotch Committee, concerning a commission for a High Court of Justice in Ireland, to be read tomorrow. [I. 35, pp. 20–24.]
[Nov. 3.] 33. Petition of many thousand clothiers and woollen manufacturers to the Council of State, to consider their petition and reasons, as also a Bill for redress of their grievances, occasioned by the forestallers, ingrossers, and transporters of wool.
Having long groaned under an intolerable burden, through the ingrossers and transporters of wool, and fullers' earth, petitioned Parliament in 1646 for redress; the petition was read and referred to a committee, at which Baron Thorpe took the chair, and where the counsel for those complained against were heard at each meeting, for more than a year, when the committee agreed upon a report to Parliament, but it was never heard.
Petitioners understanding that Parliament had referred matters of trade to the Council of State, presented a petition to them, which was referred to Sir Wm. Masham to report to the House, but on account of business there, it could not be heard, and Parliament having erected a Council of Trade, they presented a petition to them, who heard both sides and ordered some of their members in a committee to draw up and state petitioners' desires, but their time of sitting having expired, and matters of trade being committed to the Council of State, petitioners have now presented this petition to them. [1 page, 21 signatures.] Annexing,
33. i. The clothiers' reasons against ingrossing and transporting wool, and fullers' earth. Their answer to the assertion that they desire a monopoly or are against free trade, and their reasons against the pretence of ingrossers sorting wool for the manufacturers being beneficial to the poor tradesman. [3½ sheets.]
[Nov. 3.] 34. Petition of the clothiers and other woollen manufacturers to the Committee of Parliament for Trade and Foreign Affairs, that all ingrossers of wool may be put down by Act of Parliament, and none be permitted to buy wool but those who convert it into some manufacture, except such fellmongers as buy it upon the skin, and sell it to the clothiers, or others that alter the property of it. Also that the like care may be taken against the unlawful washing, winding, and branding wool, and that all transportation of wool and fullers' earth may be prevented by a strict law, to which end petitioners beg to present a Bill which has been examined and approved of by learned counsel.
Wool of English growth is the staple commodity of this nation, and the most fit to be improved upon by manufactures, in which are employed the greater part of the poor. The manufacturers buy and use all the wool of this nation, in their several trades, and can sort it best for themselves, and bring goods better and at less cost to the market and the merchant. [1 page.]
[Nov. 3.] 35. Arguments by the fellmongers to the Committee of the Council of State for Trade, showing that the buying and selling of wool within England and Wales is not only a part of their trade, but also necessary to be continued for the common good. [1 sheet.]
[Nov. 3.] 36. Petition of the fellmongers in co. Oxford to the Council for Trade, that their trade may be secured to them, for the good of poor clothiers, growers, and fellmongers, and that they may continue to purchase wool, otherwise it will tend to the ruin of many thousand poor families. Have served their time, and been brought up to the trade of buying and selling sheep skins and wool, one being as incident to their trade as the other,—which has never been denied except in the little time of the staplers' patent,—but they have time out of mind been used to the buying of wool, wherein they have judgment and understanding to buy up, divide, and convey into each county such as the respective trades call for, to the ease and benefit of many poor clothiers, and to the support of many poor families, both fellmongers and growers, who buy the wool in small parcels, and are supplied with money to carry on their business, which if deprived of, they will be utterly undone. [1 page, with original signatures.]
[Nov. 3.] 37. Petition of the fellmongers of co. Bucks and parts adjacent to the Committee of the Council of State for Trade, that their ancient privileges may be restored, as they tend to the good of many poor who otherwise would be ruined, should the trade of wool buying be monopolised by a few rich clothiers, and an inconsiderable company of staplers.
Petitioners have served their time in buying sheep skins and wool, and neither they nor their forefathers nor masters were ever denied the right of buying and selling wool. For the last 60 years, they have bought fleeces as well as skins, and thus thousands of families have been preserved, as well as the growers, who are poor tenants, and whom petitioners supply with money to pay their rent, as also poor fellmongers who are not able to have above 60 pounds of wool, but they are forced to sell it to trade again; and there are many poor clothiers in other counties to whom petitioners send wool upon credit, who otherwise could not subsist, having no money to buy, much less to spend, until they find where it is to be sold. [1 sheet, numerously signed.]
[Nov. 3.] 38–40. Petition of the Earl of Westmoreland, and other landowners in co. Northampton, to the Committee of the Council of State for Trade, for time to present their objections to the endeavours of certain so-called clothworkers to monopolise the trade of buying wool, the staple commodity of the commonwealth, and to hinder that freedom therein which, from time out of mind, has been used in buying and selling thereof.
This would be a great disadvantage to many who live by buying and selling wool, and also to the wool growers, who raise most of their rents upon their wool, but if the buyers were few, they would combine, and only buy at their own times and prices. [3 Copies, one sheet each, with numerous original signatures.]
[Nov. 3.] 41. Petition of the inhabitants of Romney Marsh and the places adjacent in Kent to the Committee of the Council of State for Trade, that the selling of wool may be a free trade, as formerly, and that care may be taken to prevent its being exported.
Their sole subsistence depends upon breeding cattle and selling wool, which has always been a free trade, and is not limited to particular persons; but lately some, under colour of doing service, would engross all the trade to themselves, to the great prejudice of the State, and the ruin of the petitioners, and many thousands beside. [1 sheet, numerous signatures.]
[Nov. 3.] 42, 43. Defence of the Mayor, Constables, and Society of the Merchants of the Staple of England, to the Report of the Committee for Trade in London, concerning the disadvantage to the commonwealth by continuing the said Society of Staplers, the transportation of wool being now forbidden, e.g.,—
They are an ancient society, were incorporated in the reign of Edward III., and have continued ever since, Alderman Kenrick being the present Mayor. They have had many special privileges granted them, and a constant allowed trade to buy and sell wools in England and Wales, though not to ship them.
The staplers from the first were both merchants and artists, as merchants to buy and transport, and as artists to sever and sort wools, and persons employed to wind and pack up wools were and still are or ought to be sworn before the Mayor of the Staple.
The charters of 3 Eliz. and 15 Jas. were chiefly declarations of their former privileges, save that they were formerly incorporated as the Merchants of the Staple of Calais; there they were incorporated as the Mayor, Constables, and Society of the Merchants of the Staple of England.
As to the opinion of the said committee that the staplers are not necessary, but disadvantageous, as being the principal cause of the dearness of wool, and consequently of cloth, they deny that they are destructive to the clothing and woollen trade, or the cause of any of those evil effects, but are a necessary party both to the wool grower and clothier, and have a legal right to their trade, having been brought up as apprentices to it, and it being their means of livelihood, and therefore they pray that they may enjoy their trade, so confirmed to them by Acts of Parliament and the charters before alluded to. [1½ sheets, closely written.]
Nov. 3. Committee for Trade And Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
1. To report to Council that the four ships taken by Capt. Penrose should be brought into the Thames, with all the papers and writings taken aboard them, and referred to examination and process in the Admiralty Court.
2. Note to send to Gen. Blake for the letter of the States General lately taken by him.
3. Nathan Wright, Mr. Baker, and other Spanish merchants to attend this committee to-morrow at 8 a.m., when it is to meet again.
4. The desires of the clothiers and woollen manufacturers referred to the Sub-Committee for Trade, before whom the whole business of the clothing now is. [I. 131, p. 50.]
Nov. 4. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The list of the last summer and winter's guard, and estimate of the charge, presented by the Navy Commissioners, with the letter of General Blake from Stokes Bay, and the list of ships enclosed, to be presented to the House by Sir Hen. Vane.
2. The late orders of Council and the Admiralty Committee, directing what security shall be given by the gunners of ships or others, upon their receiving gunners' stores abroad, suspended until further order.
3. The St. John of Lubec, stayed at Dover on pretence of being a Danish ship, to be released, and this to be signified to the persons who have her in custody.
4. The Admiralty Judges to certify to-morrow what proceedings have been had in their court, upon certain goods pretended to belong to the Portuguese and taken in Dutch ships, and the proceedings suspended until further order.
6. The order of Parliament referring the disposal of the posts and that business to the Council of State, and all other orders of Parliament concerning that matter, to be considered on Wednesday next, with the petition of Mr. Hill, and any other that shall be offered.
7. To write Col. Stapley, acknowledging his letter as to the running on shore of a Dutch vessel on the coast of Sussex, and his care in preserving the same to the use of the commonwealth, and that some person will be sent from the Committee for sale of Dutch prizes, to take care of the ship.
8. The said Commissioners to be informed of the Dutch ship run ashore at Brighton, and desired to send some person to take charge of the ship and goods.
9. The petition of the President and Governor of the Corporation for the poor of the city of London referred to the Admiralty Committee, to confer with them as to the value of the vessels desired by them, and report.
10. The petition of the Company of Merchant Adventurers referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to consider that and all other papers formerly delivered, concerning that business.
11. The order of Parliament as to the state of the treasuries referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, to confer with Mr. Allein, the Commissioners for Prize Goods, and Mr. Jackson, and give an account to Council, that a report may be made to the House thereupon next Tuesday; the said committee are to meet on Saturday at 8 a.m. on this business, and Aldermen Allein and Dethick, Col. Thompson, Mr. Blackwell, and Mr. Jackson to attend.
12. The letter from John Barker, Jno. Cole, and — Russell, recommended to the Navy Committee.
13. The petition of Rich. Pight, clerk of the irons belonging to the Mint, recommended to the Revenue Committee.
14. Rich. Fanshaw to have the liberty formerly granted to him enlarged for 6 months, his security having been renewed.
15. The petition of Eliz. Wetton, widow, referred to the Committee for Examinations.
16. The proposals of Edw. Rowland, goldsmith, concerning farthings, referred to the Mint Committee, to confer with him, and report their opinion; Sir Jas. Harrington to take care hereof.
17. The letter to Lord Bradshaw from Saml. Kersh, surgeon of the Falcon, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to use for the advantage of the service.
18. The petition of the Governor, deputy, assistants, and fellowship of Merchant Adventurers, on behalf of Alderman Gore, and the case presented therewith, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
19. Col. Wauton to report to the House the proclamation against priests and Jesuits.
20. The Lord General to give order for removing from James's House the inferior officers of Col. Ingoldsby's regiment and their families, quartered there.
21. The Irish and Scotch Committee to appoint a fit proportion of match, powder, and bullet for the use of the Lord General's regiment for the present, and to consider how they may be speedily furnished with beds, and how supplied for the future with ammunition, and have some of their muskets changed for snaphances.
22. Sir Jas. Harrington to make his report from the Mint Committee this day week.
23. The letter from the Netherlands, mentioning an order given from the States General to the captains of their ships of war to convoy all Hamburg ships, to be sent to Dr. Walker.
24. Sir Oliver Fleming to acquaint the Portuguese Ambassador with the information given to Council, as to the resort of English people to his house to hear mass.
25. The petitions of Eliz. Marten and Thomasin Poole, widows, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to consider what may be done for their relief.
26. Order on this day's report from the Committee for Examinations, that they take the petitioner's bail.
27. Order on the report concerning Mr. Hastings, that such of his writings as were lately seized by warrant of Council, and which contain nothing of public concern, be restored to him.
28. The petition of Capt. Reeve Williams referred to the Admiralty Committee, who are to confer with the Admiralty Judges thereon.
29. That of Peter Williams referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to examine the petitioner.
30. That of Rich. Alford to the Admiralty Committee.
31. That of Capt. Hen. Packe to the said Committee, to consider of his fitness for the command desired by him.
32. That of Thos. Alexander, Jno. Horn and others, to the said committee, to consider what may be done for their relief. [I. 35, pp. 20–32.]
Nov. 4. Committee of Parliament to Confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
1. The deputies at the door called in, and acquainted with the orders of Parliament concerning confiscations.
2. The Bill for the Union, without the preamble, read to them; they beg a copy, which is refused, but the committee will read it as often as they please, that they may take notes; this is done, and they withdraw to confer.
3. Order to repeat this answer, in case they again press for a copy of the Bill.
4. They are re-admitted, and propound 3 queries,—
(i.) Whether as they are admitted to treat, it is as trustees.
(ii.) To have a sight of the Bill concerning confiscations, and be
heard upon it.
(iii.) Whether the commissioners communicate the Union Bill to them only for debate, or to involve their consents thereon.
5. The replies are,—
(i.) That they are admitted as trustees by Parliament.
(ii.) That when the Bill for confiscations and general pardon is prepared, the committee will confer with them thereon, and that it may probably be a clause in the Bill for Union.
(iii.) They are referred to the orders and declaration of Parliament, appointing them to be treated with as deputies.
6. Further conference on the Union Bill appointed to be held on Tuesday at 2 p.m., on which the deputies withdraw.
7. The committee to meet at 9 a.m. to prepare for the conference, and notice of both meetings to be sent to those not present. [I. 138, pp. 27, 28.]
Nov. 5. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. To write Capt. Hatsell to acquaint the Mayors of Falmouth and Plymouth with the miscarriage of the persons he mentions, that examinations may be taken before them on oath, which he is to send up to Council, so that the parties may be proceeded against.
2. The Ordnance Committee to contract for some chase pieces for frigates, they being much wanted.
3. To acquaint the Admiralty Judges with the miscarriages of several private men-of-war, in exercising cruelties upon such as they take, which is much to the dishonour of this nation, and to desire them to take good security of all such persons as have letters for private men-of-war, by taking as security inhabitants, and not the captain and master, as usually.
5, 9. The petitions of James Stainer, merchant of London, and of Sarah Maple, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
10. Mr. Crompton and Mr. Bradley, two of the deputies to the Serjeant-at-arms, to carry the despatch to the Resident at Hamburg.
11. Some of the captains of the ships in the Downs to be written to, to transport them to Hamburg the first opportunity.
12. To write Mr. Bradshaw of their coming, and that he may carry them with him to Denmark if he sees cause, and if he makes use of them, supply them with money, and return the charge thereof to Council.
13. The money for defraying their charges to be advanced them on account, from the exigent money of Council.
14. The petition of Gratian de Perenant referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
15. That committee to sit to-morrow at 8 a.m., and the Navy Commissioners to attend them. [I. 35, pp. 32–38.]
Nov. 5. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
2. The petition of Edm. Custis, merchant, to be sent to the Admiralty Judges, who are to report to Council how the business stands in the Admiralty Court.
3. To report on Council, on the petition of Sam. Busfield, merchant, that the penalty of the Navigation Act should be suspended as to the goods named, till Parliament give order thereon.
5. To report to Council that Col. Diego Geraldine, prisoner at Chester, should be released, on parole to the Governor of Chester to appear within 14 days at the Council of State; that a letter should be written to the Governor of Chester, and the Ambassador of Spain informed of what is done herein.
7. Mr. Thurloe to buy for Council's use Peter Heylin's Cosmography, in 4 parts.
8. Mr. Thurloe to draw up 2 papers,—on Council's reference as to what should be done on the justice done to the State's ships in Porto Longone—and bring them in to this committee, one to be sent to the Ambassador of Spain here in town, and the other to the Governor of Porto Longone.
9. The Admiralty Judges to certify to this committee the case in their court against 2 ships pretending to belong to Sweden, taken coming from Portugal laden with salt; also against 2 others bound for France, pretended to be Swedish. [I. 131, pp. 51–54.]
Nov. 5/15.
Leghorn.
44 Capt. Rich. Badiley to the Navy Committee. I received yours, with the order to take in charge the ships that formerly related to Capt. Appleton, as also an order to him and his subordinates to conform to my directions, which they promise to observe. I shall use my utmost endeavour for the accomplishment of the trust reposed in me.
Being advised from Leghorn that the enemies' men-of-war were gone to the westward, and only 6 sail left in the road, and also that the commanders of the ships in this place were at difference, I got leave from the General of Porto Longone to land, and plant some of our ordnance, for better security of the English ships against 10 of the enemies' men-of-war which lay at the entrance of that port; and otherwise took the best care I could for the safety of the whole. I then embarked for this place, and on arriving, found so many of the enemies' ships of war had come in again as made them 13 sail, besides as many merchantmen in the Mould and road, which disproportion between the enemies' strength and our own has diverted me in my intentions of taking passage back, with the Leopard and Bonadventure, and the merchant ship Peregrine, lately taken into the service, either for the port of Longone, or port of Feraio, that our ships of war might be near together. But although, by report, there was a time when a conjunction between the English ships in this place and them at the Island of Lilboa was feasible, that time being past, it seems now almost impossible, the enemies' ships of war being increased to 30 sail between those islands and this place, whereof two are going for Zante, and two others for Smyrna, with ships under convoy.
I long to hear that the ships designed for our succour are upon the way, for the longer it is delayed the worse it is likely to be. It seems the enemies' months water after the great estate on our merchant ships, and letters from Amsterdam say 15 of those men-ofwar which are come out with Tromp are to come and join with these, who give out their State will outvie us, and make their number always two to one. The arm of flesh and numbers is what most of them look to, but I hope God will learn them another lesson ere long.
Since my coming hither, Mr. Longland, myself, and the other commanders have considered what is most necessary to be done to accomplish our trust; for what is done therein I refer to Mr. Longland's relation. Since the ships of the navy here have only been victualled from day to day, care is taken to put two months' victuals on board, that they may be ready for service.
As to the displacing of Capt. Cox from the Bonadventure by Capt. Appleton, after 40 or 50 days, he has been re-established. I cannot interpret his pretended fault to any other cause than his zeal to do the State service, in regaining the Phœnix by a stratagem, and that beyond the range of the Grand Duke's ordnance. I suppose it could not be accounted such an affront to the Great Duke and his port as to incur his displeasure, but rather he would have commended the diligence of the English to come by their own again, although in such a way. [1½ pages.]
Nov. 5/15.
Leghorn.
45 Capt. Rich. Badiley to Mr. Blackborn. Thanks for sympathising with your friends at such a distance, and praising God by whom this squadron was miraculously preserved in our engagement with the Dutch. He has many times been pleased to do great things by small means, in our late war with the royalists, yet I believe there was never more of God and less of man apparent in any disputes with the enemy. After this ship had been engaged with all the Dutch fleet single-handed for almost half a day, they, on the night of 28 Aug., strove to get from us, except the one that surprised the Phœnix, and towed away with their boats; and the mariners of our ship, being then called together, individually promised that if the enemy had any stomach to meddle with us next morning, they would stand by me to their death. But when the time came, our mainmast broke down, the Flemings following afar off, to see what we would do, having, as they have confessed, no intention to meddle with us again; yet the mariners' resolutions were changed, and one and all would have left the ship and fled away on the frigates; and to such a height was this their humour that although, after a speech I made amongst them, 20 or 30 held up their hands to stand by me, no sooner did I turn from them than some of the commanders of the merchant ships told me I strove in vain to keep the ship; that those men who held up their hands had changed their minds, that there were none to stand by me, and that I had better resolve to give up all, and before this ship was fired, theirs should be either burnt or sunk.
To this I replied, "now is God's time to work like Himself," and so it was; although the sun did not stand still, yet the wind suddenly died, and it fell stark calm, so that the enemy could not come near us all day, and the men could not for shame but rally again to their business, their distemper being caused chiefly by this; 30 of the Phœnix's men ran away, with their boat, and having lost many men, I thought good to entertain them here; but those wicked fellows,—as if it had not been enough by their cowardice to lose so good a frigate,—raised a report among our men what giants the Flemings were, and how they would give no quarter if we stood out any longer, and so caused that lowness of spirits in them; but some of them will be trussed up, if ever God sends us home. Finally, it is worth observation that the Almighty saved the English ships at Porto Longone, whether the men would or not.
Those who sit at the stern take well their servant's endeavours in this dispute, which is an encouragement, although it was but my duty. The oldest of those west countrymen you recommended to me was slain outright, and the other was wounded, but almost recovered. [1½ pages.]
Nov. 5/15.
The Leopard, Leghorn Mould.
46 Capt. Hen. Appleton to [the Navy Committee.] Capt. Badiley, on his arrival here on the 12th inst. from Porto Longone, delivered me your order of 17 Sept., to receive instructions from him, and I have obeyed with readiness, and will send my accounts with speed, having leisure now. You will find I have not abused your trust.
I told you in my last what passed between Capt. Cox and myself, and find now that he had some pretence for what he did; knowing I should not long be his commander, he thought he was not obliged to own me; whilst I, little thinking so soon to lose that power, resolved to make him do it. I hope Capt. Badiley will prevail upon the merchant ships, which neither I nor Mr. Longland could, so that we may join, and endeavour, with God's assistance, to sail homewards, to which I always was and am extremely ready; for as nothing made me undertake your service but the great affection I bear to my nation, so all the undervaluing I can receive, with other disadvantages I have met with, shall neither make me repent nor neglect the same. [¾ page.]
Nov. 6. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. To signify to the Navy Commissioners that such of the ships as are come in to be fitted out for the winter guard should have six or eight months of their pay, as the Navy Committee shall direct.
2. To write Mr. Willoughby at Portsmouth that money is coming down for paying off the ships there, and that he is to thoroughly examine into the mutiny which occurred in those ships, take the examinations in writing, and certify them to Council.
3. The frigates now launched to be called the Kentish, Sussex, Essex, and Hampshire frigates. [I. 35, p. 39.]
Nov. 6. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
1. Order on the petition and papers of the Pinmakers' Company, —that they having a petition depending before Parliament for regulating their company, which they fear will be long before it can be considered, on account of other weighty affairs, and therefore they desire Council would, in the interim, issue a warrant to all justices, &c., to assist them—to report to Council that such a warrant should not be granted, the business being before Parliament.
5. The Admiralty Judges to examine the losses of John Evans by the Portuguese, and certify their amount, on due proof in that court. [I. 131, pp. 54–56.]
Nov. 6.
Portsmouth.
47 Capt. Fras. Willoughby to the Navy Commissioners. The General having received an order from the Council of State to send into this harbour all the Danish ships he meets with, has sent in one laden with deals. I desire the Council's pleasure about her, as well as about the pitch and tar which came in before; we have great need of them; pray second my letter to Council thereon. The caulkers you mention have arrived, and I have sent to Portsmouth, Gosport, and the Isle of Wight for cordage, but can only hear of two tons, and we are so peeled by daily supplying the fleet, that if we are not speedy supplied by you, I know not what we shall do. [Damaged, 1 page.]
[Nov. 8.] 48, 49. Petition of the clothiers of Essex in the new drapery to the Committee of the Council of State for Trade. Five years since, petitioners presented their grievances, and after several disputes with the opposite party, the propositions made to Parliament for relief of the petitioners and others of the trade were ordered to be sent to the several circuits, and were remitted to the judges, to report to the House the sense of the respective grand juries. That report being made, the House referred the petition to a committee, to draw up conclusions thereon, and to report, which was also done, and the same were committed to Serjeant Thorpe to report thereon in 1647. The last report has not yet been made, and on account thereof, the grievances formerly complained of have not only continued, but increased, and thousands of clothiers with their wives and families have been utterly ruined. They request—
1. That the export of wool, now secretly practised, may be made felony.
2. That all jobbers and broggers, who by engrossing wools forestal the market, may be suppressed.
3. That no fellmonger that uses the trade of wool upon the skin may be permitted to buy and sell wools, as they thereby forestal the market, engross the trade, and deceitfully mix divers sorts, which is destructive to the manufacturers.
4. That the traders in the new drapery may be established as a trade, and none be permitted to intrude, except they have served a seven years' apprenticeship.
5. That all clipped money may be called in and recoined, as the abuse therein is great, by such as buy the light money, and force it upon the public again, whereby many of the poor are forced to lose 2d. or 3d. in the 1s., when they have not bread to eat.
6. That the alnage, being only used to exact money from the petitioners, and for no benefit, may be abolished. [2 Copies, both numerously signed.]
[Nov. 8.] 50. Another copy of the preceding, suggesting as means of redress—
1. That merchants may have convoys to foreign parts.
2. That the export of wool, yarn, and fullers' earth may be restrained; and all false winding of wools punished.
3. That the multitude of jobbers and broggers, who gain between the growers and clothiers 2s. or 1s. a tod, and mix wools injuriously to the trade may be suppressed, and the abuses of fellmongers punished.
4. That none may use the said manufacture who have not served a 7 years' apprenticeship, according to the statutes for the old drapery.
5. That the alnage, if continued, may be regulated, and moneys not unjustly extorted. Also that particular towns and persons may distinguish their manufactures by cloth marks or seals, the counterfeiting of which should be prohibited. [1 page.]
[Nov. 8.] 51. Petition of the clothiers of Coggeshall, Essex, to the Council for Trade, to expedite the prayer of their general petition, as the ingrossers of wool are now as active as ever in buying the same as soon as it is shorn, or before it is off the sheep's back. Also to grant power to petitioners to elect officers amongst themselves, for regulating the making of manufactures in their town, and to have a seal with a cock on it, to distinguish their make, but not to prohibit other towns or places from making the like sort, they having also their particular seal, or from enjoying the same seal, they observing the same rule and government with petitioners. [1 page, Copy, 20 signatures.]
[Nov. 8.] 52 Petition of clothiers at Coggeshall, co. Essex, to the Council of State. Many thousands of poor people are employed in the making of Coggeshall bayes, which have hitherto been exported to the Straits, but of late this has been wholly prevented, by Holland having turned against us; and unless strong convoys are granted, the merchants will not adventure, whereby the petitioners for the last six months have had no sale, and by not being able to proceed with their trade, the poor are likely to starve. The charge of collection at Coggeshall exceeds any other place, every 20l. a year paying 5l. yearly to the poor. In their ardent affection to the Parliament, they in 1642 lent great sums of money upon the public faith, and by joining in bonds for that purpose, beyond their ability, they have been unable to pay their debts, and the 10 years limited for repayment having expired, they are necessitated to represent their sad condition, and ask for speedy relief, viz.:—
1. That the merchants for trade may have all encouragement, know what nations are friends, and not have their estates suddenly surprised and seized, as in Portugal, Holland, and Denmark, by which hazards they have been necessitated to abandon merchandising, and to purchase lands.
2. That they may have sufficient convoys to the Straits and other countries.
3. That they may be speedily repaid the 6,000l., which they have lent on the public faith, before they are wholly undone, they having set out forces to assist Parliament far beyond their abilities. [1 sheet, 71 signatures.]
Nov. 8. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The petition of Ralph Allen, merchant of London, and others referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
2. That of Ellen Lindsay, on behalf of Thos. Lindsay, clerk, a Scotchman, prisoner in the Tower, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to bail him if they see cause.
3. The Admiralty Committee to name the ports wherein the 4,000 men's victuals last declared for, for 6 March, are to be provided, and report to-morrow afternoon.
4. To write the Navy Committee that Council having declared for 1,000 men's victuals more, for six weeks for the winter guard, they are to contract for the same.
5. Order on the petition of Ambrose and Hen. Smith and others, that they are to be satisfied for their labour in taking up some great marble stones lately cast away in a Dutch bottom near Brighthelmstone, as also for any others they shall hereafter recover.
6. The petition of John Lord Grandison referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to examine him and report.
7–9. The petitions of Liddah Adams, of Wm. Clayborne, and of Jonathan Blackwell, and others referred to the Admiralty Committee.
10, 11. The Admiralty Judges to attend the Committee for Foreign Affairs on Wednesday, by 8 a.m., about the silver lately taken by Capt. Penrose; the committee to acquaint the judges with what they have received concerning this business, and to desire them to examine it, and acquaint Council with the state thereof.
12. The said committee to prepare an answer to the letter of the Spanish Ambassador read to Council.
13. James Hobbes to be boatswain of the —, and this to be signified to Capt. Chapman, her commander.
14. The Admiralty Committee to consider how the English seamen taken by the Dutch in the Mediterranean Sea or elsewhere, and detained, may have their liberty, and report with speed.
15. So much of Mr. Longland's letter from Leghorn as relates to furnishing gunpowder referred to the Ordnance Committee.
16. To write Gen. Blake the desire of some English merchants for a convoy to Flanders, and to request that the ships he appoints to go thither to fetch home those there may convoy the merchant ships to Flanders.
17. The letters from Capt. Appleton and Mr. Longland referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
18. The petition of Capt. Wm. Penn referred to the Admiralty Committee, to take care that Capt. Wm. Purefoy may repair to London, to finish his account with Capt. Penn.
19. The petition of the clothiers of Essex referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
20. That committee to hasten their report as to sending a squadron to the Straits.
22. To add to the letter to General Blake, that he is to order the ships which he shall appoint for the convoy to Flanders to make inquiry for such English seamen as have been taken prisoners by the Dutch, and are in those parts, and to bring them home.
23, 24. The treasurers at Goldsmiths' Hall to attend the Irish and Scotch Committee to-morrow at 8 a.m., and bring a state of their treasury, and the trustees for sale of delinquents' estates to attend.
25. Sir Hen. Vane to report to the House a state of the several treasuries of this nation, as represented to Council.
26. Power to be given to the Committee for Examinations to send for the Earl of Worcester, and receive what he has to propound, he having intimated that he had something to offer of public concernment.
27. The letter from the Mayor of Plymouth, with the book entitled Advice from Heaven, referred to the Committee for Examinations.
28. The appointed commissioners to meet with Signor Amerigo Salvetti, Resident from the Great Duke of Tuscany, on Wednesday next at 4 p.m., receive what he has to propound, and report; Sir Oliver Fleming to give him notice hereof, and bring him to the audience, and notice to be also given to the commissioners.
29. The Committee for Examinations to give order to Mr. Dugard to print 400 copies of a book translated out of Dutch into English at the charge of the State, and deliver them to the clerk of Council.
31. The letter of Col. Bingham, from Castle Cornet, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
32. Mr. Carter having given in an estimate of the defects of James's House, and a report having been made thereon to Council, he is to proceed with the necessary repairs.
33. Mr. Dugard to bring to the clerk of Council, for the members' use, 200 copies of the translation of Mare Clausum.
34. The Committee for Examinations to consider of a fit reward to be given to the person who translated Mare Clausum out of Latin into English.
35. To write Capt. Browne, commander of the Hercules at Portsmouth, to hasten with his ship to General Blake, and observe his orders.
36. The petition of the Antelope's company referred to the Admiralty Committee.
37. The letter of Robert Gooch from Yarmouth, referred to the Admiralty Judges.
39. That of Capt. Hatsel from Plymouth to the Admiralty Committee.
40. That of the commissioners in Ireland, dated from Kilkenny, 21 October, to the Irish and Scotch Committee. [I. 34, pp. 31–49.]
Nov. 8. 53. Robert Longe to Capt. John Pearce, commander of the Providence. Pray pass by my offence, and as we have lived in love these three years past, so let us continue as long as life lasts. [¼ page.]
Nov. 9. 54, 55. Order in Parliament that 12,000l., part of the 14,446l. 15s. 6d. in the hands of the treasurers upon the first Act [for sale of delinquents' estates], be forthwith issued by them for the use of the Navy, by warrant from the Navy Committee, which warrant with the receipts shall be a sufficient discharge. [2 Copies, ½ page each.]
Nov. 9. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. So much of the petition of Don Melchior d' Arangusen as is proper for the cognizance of Council referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
2. The biscuit now shipped at Plymouth, and formerly designed for Waterford, appointed for Limerick.
4. To answer to the petition of Jno. Besbeech that Council leaves him to proceed in the business mentioned according to law.
5. The commission lately granted to Capt. Guilson, to be commander of the Speaker frigate, withdrawn, and he is to pursue General Blake's directions concerning that ship.
6. Major Martin to confer with the Admiralty Committee concern ing the state of the ships lately belonging to Sir Geo. Ayscue's fleet.
7. The Fairfax, Loyalty, and Hannibal to hasten to General Blake, and a letter to be sent to the commanders, to hasten them away.
8. The petition of the biscuit bakers referred to the Navy Commissioners.
9. The letter and papers from the Navy Victuallers referred to the Admiralty Committee, to confer with them thereon, and consider what is fit to be done.
10. The petition of Major Geo. Symmer and Capt. Robt. Johnston referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine, and if they see cause, discharge them on bail, or otherwise report.
11. The paper last delivered to the commissioners by the Portuguese Ambassador referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to consider of an answer thereto, confer with the English merchants trading to Portugal concerning the losses they have sustained there, and consider what is fit to be insisted upon on their behalf, and hasten a report to Council concerning the whole business.
12. Note for Mr. Kilvert to attend Mr. Thurloe to-morrow morning.
14. The petition of Jas. Stocall and Phil. de Carteret referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
15, 16. Those of Capt. Edw. Curtis, commander of the Guinea frigate, and of the wives of the captives at Tripoli and Algiers, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
17. The order of Parliament, referring the paper concerning Weavers' Hall Bills to Council, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, who are to send for the persons concerned in the bills, and confer with them.
18. The report concerning Sir Wm. Hart to be respited for a fortnight, and a letter to be written to Col. James, to enclose to him his examination, and to certify what he knows of him.
19. The Committee for Prize Goods to attend the Committee for Foreign Affairs to-morrow, and give them an account of the condition of the ships lately brought in, as to their leakiness, as also of the condition of the fruit and wines on board, that necessary orders may be given, which the said committee are authorised to do, for prevention of inconvenience.
20. Order upon the report from the Committee for Foreign Affairs in the case of Samuel Busfield, that Council concur in their opinion.
21. Hen. Hastings to be discharged from the restraint lately laid upon him by warrant of Council. [I. 35, pp. 50–53.]
Nov. 9. Committee of Parliament to confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
1. The petition of Rich. Ward to be considered at a convenient season.
2. The deputies are called in, the debate resumed, and the Union Bill read to them.
3. They propound, on the first paragraph, that the incorporation clause may run in the same words as in the declaration concerning the settlement of Scotland, viz.:—
That Scotland be incorporated into and made one commonwealth with England, that there may be a joint union, joint arms unblazoned that may signify the common interest of both entire, and one common name. Debate thereon.
4. On the second paragraph, they propound that the number of Scotch members of Parliament and the time of their election, be inserted in the Bill. Debate thereon.
5. The conference to be resumed on Thursday; deputies withdraw. [I. 138, pp. 29–30.]
Nov. 10. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
2. Thomas Harrison, minister of St. Dunstan's-in-the-East, London, to bring to Council the commission lately granted by Chas. Stuart, eldest son of the late King, to Wm. Davenant, to have command in some English plantations in America.
3. To write Capt. Becke to send up to London the ship taken by him, and to put such persons aboard of her as may preserve her and her lading from embezzlement, until delivered into the keeping of the Commissioners for sale of Dutch prizes.
4. Notice to be given thereof to the said Commissioners, desiring them to appoint fit persons to take charge of her and the goods.
5. Mr. Thurloe to prepare an answer to the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in pursuance of the order of Parliament.
6. An extract of the intelligence from Holland to be sent to General Blake.
7. The paper from the Navy Victuallers, as to the delivery of proportions of victuals in several ports, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
8. Mr. Cooke, minister of Drayton, Shropshire, to be discharged on his own security, and the Committee for Examinations to take it.
9. The letter from Leon d' Aisma referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
10. The petition of Reymer Baggert to be sent to the Commissioners of Customs, to certify the matter of fact mentioned therein.
11, 13, 14. The petitions of Claes Alderson, gunner, of Wm. Newman, mariner, and also of Hester Cordwell, widow, for relief, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
12. That of Rich. White, for command of one of the State's ships, referred to the said committee, who are to ascertain nis fitness, and consider of some command for him.
15. The petition of Col. Alex. Forbes, taken at Worcester, and since kept prisoner, referred to the Committee for Examinations.
16. To write the Mayor of Dover to speak to the master of the packet boat between that place and Flanders, to take on board all such English seamen as come thither to pass into England,–as well those who have left the service of the Dutch, in obedience to the Act, as those taken prisoners by the Dutch and released, who repair to Dunkirk for passage to England,—and to relieve such of them as shall want it upon their landing, and place the sum to account, and to signify to the master of the packet boat that he shall have, for every person he shall so bring over, the same rate as for other passengers.
17. The petition of Geo. Bissett and Wm. Legate referred to the Committee for Examinations.
18. That of Lord Poincy, French Commander General of the Mericque Islands, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to report.
19. The order of Parliament referring it to Council to bring in an estimate of the charge of the army and fleet for the next year, with their several incident charges, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, who are to confer with the Army Committee, and prepare the estimates.
20. The Committee for Foreign Affairs and the Admiralty Committee to consider speedily what should be done for hastening the squadron to the Straits.
21. Also to prepare a paper to be delivered by the commissioners to the Spanish Ambassador, at the conference on Friday next, wherein it is to be insisted that satisfaction may be given concerning the murder of Mr. Ascham in Spain, by doing justice upon the murderers.
22. The appointed commissioners to meet the Spanish Ambassador on Friday at 4 p.m., and deliver to him some papers from Council; Fleming to give him notice, &c.
23. The letter from the Navy Commissioners, as to erecting a house in Deptford yard for Christopher Pett, master shipwright there, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to cause a survey to be taken of the charge of the work, and on return thereof, to consider what should be done. [I. 35, pp. 54–59.]
Nov. 10. Order in the Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs, that the Collectors for Prize Goods give an account next Friday of the net proceeds of all ships and goods taken from the Portuguese and sold, as also of such as remain unsold. [I. 131, p. 57.]
Nov. 11. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. Mr. Frost to pay out of the exigent money of Council, to such persons as the Committee for Examinations shall appoint, such sums as they shall send for, not exceeding 20l., for carrying on a service of importance.
2. Order on the petition of Benjamin Proud,—stating that in his absence, Andrew Wilcocks, his apprentice, received several sums of money of his, and was gone aboard some ship to avoid being seized, —that licence be given him to search all ships for his apprentice, and on finding him, the captain or master of the ship is to deliver him up.
4. Order on the petition of Jno. and Edw. Bushell, merchants—that the ships' companies of some vessels set forth by them as private men-of-war may be free from impress—that a warrant be given accordingly, provided none of the men employed in the ships be in the pay of the commonwealth, or have enlisted in any of the State's ships.
5. The petition of Lieut.-Col. Jno. Rede referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, to cause the account mentioned to be perused, to see what is due to him, and to report out of what treasury the money may be paid.
7. The petition of Major Fras. Hay referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine him as to the reason of his going to Scotland, or what else they think fit.
8. The petition of Thomas Ford of Exeter, and Rich. Ford of London, merchants, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
9, 10. The choice of a Commander-in-Chief for the ships going to the Straits to be considered to-morrow; also the sending for Major-General Deane to come to these parts.
11. The report to Council by Sir James Harrington from the Mint Committee to be made this day week.
12. The letters from the commissioners and officers in Ireland referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, to receive from Sir Hardress Waller, Col. Lawrence, and Dr. Carteret what they have further to offer, and to report what should be done.
13. The petition of Thos. Watson, and other merchants of Berwickupon-Tweed, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to take care of the business therein mentioned, and give order as is desired.
14. The Committee for Foreign Affairs to examine the business of the Dutch ship lately cast away at Brighthelmstone, co. Sussex, as to the goods taken out of her, and by whom, and to consider how to regain them for the commonwealth.
15. The Committee for Woods to consider what proportion of wood is fit to be cut in Windsor Forest, for the use of the Council Chamber, and to report.
16. The business of discovering mines, formerly referred to a committee appointed for that purpose, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
17. Council having ordered that 20l. should be paid to a person who is to make a discovery on behalf of the State, of a design carried on by some malignants in the West, such sum is to be first delivered to the Committee for Examinations and Discoveries, to be disposed of for the benefit of the person so employed.
18. Declaration,—on report from the Committee for Examinations of a letter signed by Jno. Williams, and sent privately to some of the members of Council, pretending some miscarriage of trust of Mr. Rowe, Secretary to the Irish and Scotch Committee—that there appears nothing of unfaithfulness or miscarriage in the said Mr. Rowe, and that the allegations are false and scandalous. [I. 35, pp. 60–64.]
Nov. 11. Committee of Parliament to confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
1. Conference with the deputies on the 1st and 2nd paragraphs of the Bill continued.
2. The debate adjourned till to-morrow, 8 a.m. [I. 138, p. 30.]
Nov. 11/21
The Paragon, Porto Longone.
56. Capt. Rich. Badiley to [the Navy Committee]. On my departure from Leghorn, I affirmed Charles Longland's bills of exchange upon you for 4,000 dollars, which with the other 10,000 make 14,000; enclosed is his account of its expenditure, which I will digest into form at my leisure. I have not presumed to make use of the State's money to my advantage, nor shall dare to do so. I was a debtor 103 dollars on the balance of my last account current, and since then I have drawn a bill of exchange for 600 dollars, and have received 3,926 dollars, all disbursed at this place in carpenters, ironwork, building forecastles to the Elizabeth and Paragon, careening, victualling, &c., of all which I will send an account.
Having returned to my charge here, I found seven of the enemy's men-of-war riding before the port, and seven or eight more are plying at sea, so that there is no likelihood of our effecting a conjunction with the ships at Leghorn, until additional strength comes out of England. [1¼ pages.]
Nov. 11.
Excise Office, London.
57. William Parker and three others to the Excise Committee. Having let to farm the excise of cos. Glamorgan, Carmarthen, Pembroke, and Cardigan to Griffith Bowen and Robt. Williams, for one year at 270l., expiring 25 Dec. next, we have now contracted with Capt. Jno. Wood for the excise of all native inland commodities, salt, soap, hats, and tobacco pipes excepted, for ¾ year commencing 25 Dec. next, at the rent of 330l., 60l. more than was given before for the whole year. [¾ page.]
Nov. 12. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. Note that Mr. Hartlib, who lately attended the Council of Trade, to deliver to the clerk of Council such papers as he has, in reference to the tanners and skinners of London.
2. The petition of Saml. Hartlib referred to Lords Commissioners Whitelock and Lisle to consider what should be given him for encouragement in his public undertakings.
3. Order on the petition of Major Humphrey Boseville, that liberty be granted him for two months, on security to render himself prisoner to the Lieutenant of the Tower at the expiration thereof, or sooner if required.
4. Order to be given to the officers of the port at Plymouth to stay all Danish ships, and particularly that lately come in laden with deals, and to order the freighter of the ship to detain the money due for freight, until further order.
5, 13, 22. The petitions of Thos. Twiddie, of Pat. Craigingelt, and of Thos. Gordon prisoner in Chelsea College, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and discharge them, if they see cause.
6, 27. Those of Jno. Helmes, citizen of London, and of Mario Searle referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
7, 8. Those of Doucibell Arnold, and of Sarah Noddes, widows, to the Admiralty Committee, to consider what should be done for their relief.
9–11. The paper to the Portuguese Ambassador read to be translated into Latin, and sent to him on Monday, and Sir Oliver Fleming to give him notice that some members of Council will bring it to him; the members to be Alderman Pennington, Mr. Burrell, Mr. Neville, Mr. Martin, and Col. Morley.
12. The letter of Jno. Tooker from Barnstaple referred to the Admiralty Committee.
14. To write General Blake the resolution of Council for sending 20 ships to the Straits, and to furnish him with a list of their names, and that it is not the intention of Council (by taking them) to disable him from waiting upon the service in those parts, as they doubt not their place will be supplied by the coming out of others appointed for the winter guard. That they thought fit before they came to any positive resolution, to acquaint him therewith, so that if he had anything to offer, it might be considered; and if he conceives any other ships more fit for this service, in lieu of any now nominated, and which may be speedily fitted, he is to return the list so altered, and order the ships to go to Stokes Bay, to be there fitted out for this service, by 1st Dec.; he is to send the convoy to Flanders, which is also to convoy some ships hence, now ready to go.
15. The state of the navy to be considered next Wednesday, and the nominating a commander of the squadron designed for the Straits.
16. To write Mr. Willoughby at Portsmouth, that order has been given to the Navy Commissioners to contract with the master of the Danish ship for the goods which she brought in, and to suspend payment until further order; also that the ships at Portsmouth are to be victualled, as far as that port will afford, and the rest they are to expect in the Downs.
17. The Admiralty Committee to consider the procuring exchanges for such English seamen as have been taken prisoners by the Dutch, and are still detained in the Straits or elsewhere, and to report to Council with all speed.
18. The Admiralty Judges and Dr. Walker to attend the Committee for Foreign Affairs to-morrow by 8 a.m., to give an account of proceedings in that court, on the Samson and St. Salvador.
19. The Committee for Foreign Affairs to sit to-morrow at 8 a.m. and Council at 10, and summonses to be issued accordingly.
20. The petitions of Jno. Baldwin and Geo. Porter referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine the business of the arrest made in the Tower on Mr. Porter, examine him, and report next Monday.
21. Lieut.-Col. Mill, a Scotchman, prisoner in the Tower, to be discharged.
23. Order on the report from the Committee for Examinations concerning Lord Grandison, that he be dismissed on such security as he can procure, on the usual conditions.
24. The Admiralty and Navy Committees to meet next Tuesday, to settle the providing of victuals for 4,000 men for the winter guard.
25. To acquaint the Navy Commissioners with what is alleged by Capt. Reynolds, concerning the defects in his vessel at Tilbury Hope, and to desire them to give order for search of her, and if they find her to be as alleged, to order her speedy repairing.
26. The Commissioners for sale of Dutch prizes to dispatch trusty persons to Tilbury Hope, to take charge of the three ships brought in there by Capt. Reynolds, which pretend to be Hamburghers, and to direct them to be very careful that no bulk be broken, and that all things belonging to them be preserved from embezzlement, until further order.
28. The petition of Hen. Symbal, messenger, referred to Mr. Thurloe, who is to examine the extraordinary charge which he alleges he has been at, in riding post journeys in the service of Council, and allow him for them as he shall see cause.
29. The petition of Gideon Carne referred to the Admiralty Committee.
30. That of Wm. Francklyn, warder of the Tower, for payment of disbursements in keeping Lieut.-Col. Reinking, formerly prisoner with him, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine what allowance has been made to him or the lieutenant, for keeping Reinking.
31. The petition of Robert Yeomans and Co. referred to the Admiralty Committee, to consider what salvage should be paid by them for the rescuing of their ship.
32, 33. The petitions of Capt. Geo. Maxwell and of Jno. Hume referred to the Committee for Examinations.
34. The petition of the Earl of Eglinton and Lord Montgomery, his son, referred to the said committee, to consider what has been done by Council concerning them, and what should be further done. A late letter to the Governor of Berwick, and his answer concerning these persons, to be sent to the said committee.
35. The petition of Jno. Durie, minister, referred to Lords Commissioners Whitelock and Lisle, to report.
36. That of Josias Ladd and others to the Navy Commissioners, to report.
37. To write the commander of the Entrance, and Capts. Houlding and Thorogood, to repair with their ships to General Blake forthwith.
38. The commissioners appointed to meet the Spanish Ambassador to deliver him this day the 35 articles agreed on by Council to be given to him, and acquaint him with what they have done concerning the ships he lately wrote about.
39. The Commissioners of Dutch Prize Goods to take care that none of the plate and goods remaining aboard the Samson of Lubec and St. Salvador of Hamburg, be unladen or removed out of the ships, until Council shall give order therein, and that there be no embezzlement meantime.
40. The plate and goods that have been already removed out of the said ships to be preserved in safety, without embezzlement or disposal, until Council shall give order therein, and the papers delivered to Council by the Spanish Ambassador referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are to speak with the Admiralty Judges and Dr. Walker thereon to-morrow at 8 a.m., and present their opinion, at 10 a.m., what should be further done, on the representation of the said Ambassador.
41. Council,—having considered the condition of the islands of Jersey and Guernsey, and several grants and patents from the late kings, licensing the export thither of a quantity of wool, leather, and other commodities, customs' free, and divers petitions presented for licences to export part of the limited proportion,— is of opinion that, for settling that affair in a more clear and regular way of execution than at present, Parliament should be moved to declare that corn of all kinds, malt, biscuit, bread, beer, or any other victuals except butter, may be exported to Jersey and Guernsey, free from customs or stint, as was lately declared in the case of Ireland, on good security being given at the custom houses by the exporters, to return a certificate from the Governor or chief magistrate in the said islands, that the same is delivered and disposed of there, for the use of the inhabitants or forces in the said islands only.
Likewise that the House should declare that 1,000 tods of wool, 400 dickers of leather, and 60 firkins of butter be allowed to be yearly exported to Jersey, and a less quantity for Guernsey, customs' free; and of other wares and commodities, such proportions as the Commissioners of Customs find reasonable and give license for.
And that if the House approve this, the patents granted by the late King in these particulars may be nulled and vacated.
42. The Commissioners for Dutch Prize Goods to attend the Committee for Foreign Affairs to-morrow at 8 a.m., and give an account of their proceedings on the Samson of Lubec, and St. Salvador of Hamburg. [I. 35, pp. 65–75.]
Nov. 12. Order in the Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs, that the proposals for furnishing Eastland commodities by some ports of the Duke of Holstein be considered on Wednesday. [I. 131, p. 58.]
Nov. 12. The Committee of Parliament appointed to confer with the deputies of Scotland continue the conference on the matters debated yesterday, and adjourn to Tuesday the 16th. [I. 138, p. 30.]
Nov. 12. 58. Robert Longe to Capt. John Pearce, of the Providence. My answer to your desire is, that I will not prejudice you either in your good name or person for the time to come, and if you will send a boat to shore, I will come on board to my charge. [½ page.]
Nov. 13. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The Committee for Foreign Affairs to review the paper given in to Council from the Spanish Ambassador, concerning the Samson and St. Salvador, and prepare an answer; also to confer with the Admiralty Judges, or such others as they think fit, concerning the matter of fact in taking and bringing in the said ships.
2. Copies of the papers given in last night by the Spanish Ambassador to Council to be sent to the Admiralty Judges.
3. The petition of Rich. Arnold, merchant, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
4. The representation made by the Spanish Ambassador last night to Council, offering security that neither the plate nor any of the lading on board the Samson and Salvador shall suffer detriment by remaining aboard, as also the other papers from him, referred to the Admiralty Judges, to consider such security, and proceed in that and the whole affair according to law and justice. [I. 35, pp. 76–77.]
Nov. 13.
Kensington.
59. Anne Conway to Edward Conway, at Ragley. You must impute it to the negligence of the carrier that you had no letter last week, as I sent one with the news books to the gravel pits, before I received yours by Darby. Excuse my being now so short, as you intend being here suddenly. Your shirts are bought, and being made. I think you have done well to free yourself from a business of that trouble and perplexity which the reconciliation of those parties you mention must needs prove, to any that shall undertake it. Present my duty to my lady, your mother, and my service to my Lady Vere and my sisters. [¾ page.]
Nov. 15. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 16. The petitions of Capt. Rich. Ingle, of Jno. Figg, gunner, of Roger Corbett, mariner, of Stephen Buzart, of Edmond Edgar, shipwright of Yarmouth, of Judah Witheridge, of the merchants of Great Yarmouth, and of the merchants of London, adventurers in the Fens, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
5. Mr. Thurloe to consider of a fit reward to be given to Mr. Durie, for translating into French the book written by Mr. Milton, in answer to that of the late King, entitled his Meditations.
7. The petition of the widow and heirs of Giles Silvester referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
10. Those of David Foulis and Hen. Spurway referred to the said committee, who are to consider both at the same time, as they relate to the same matter.
14. That of Ralph Slee referred to the Committee for Examinations.
15. That of the Lieutenant of the Tower, desiring beds for his soldiers, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
17. The Marshal-General to bring in a list to Council by Thursday, of all the prisoners he has in his custody, whether in Chelsea College or elsewhere, with the time of their commitment, and the cause.
18. The petition of Patrick Gurdon, Major Collen, McKenrie, &c., and Jas. Sayer, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine the petitioners, and dispose of them according to the directions given in cases of a like nature.
19. The appointed commissioners to meet the Portuguese Ambassador at 4 p.m. to-morrow, at Whitehall, according to his desire, and Fleming to signify the same to him.
22. The Irish and Scotch Committee to consider where 4,000l. may be had for paying off all moneys ordered by Council to be paid out of their contingencies, and due to several persons employed by Council, and to report on Wednesday.
23. The letter of Robert Vessey referred to the Admiralty Committee.
24. That Committee to consider of going in hand with the building of as many of the 30 frigates ordered as may be, and to confer with the Navy Committee as to an advance of money for that service.
25. The 25,000l. lent to the Navy Committee by Council, (to be repaid out of the first money arising by the sale of the lands of the 30 delinquents,) to be applied towards the building of the new frigates, and the Admiralty Committee to be acquainted therewith.
26. To write the Navy Commissioners that of the great ships now at Portsmouth, only the Andrew is to be put forth to sea, but that all the rest should be put into a state to be soon ready for service.
27. The letters of Mr. Longland and Capt. Appleton read this day to be considered next Wednesday.
28. The Committee for Examinations to send for the Scotch ministers, now prisoners in the Tower, examine them, and if they think fit, discharge them on reasonable security, or report.
29. Council—having considered the order of Parliament as to building 30 new frigates, and conferred with the master shipwright and others, touching the rates they are to be of, the places of building, and the charge,—find that the charge of building, victualling, and setting them forth to sea for six months, will be 300,000l., to be paid one-fourth in hand, and the rest at three and three months; Col. Wauton to represent this to the House, that a certain way may be assigned for furnishing the money as it shall grow due.
30. Col. Wauton to remind the House to provide for the pay of the mariners, and other pressing occasions of the navy. [I. 35, pp. 77– 82.]
Nov. 15.
Leghorn.
60. Charles Longland to the Navy Committee. Capt. Badiley arrived at Leghorn this week from Porto Longone very seasonably, as some discontent had possessed Capt. Appleton against Capt. Cox, insomuch that after 50 days' command of the Bonadventure, he would have put him out in disgrace, and sent him back to the Warwick, had not Capt. Badiley prevented. I doubt not Capt. Cox will much advance your service. The squadron at Leghorn has been put into better order by Capt. Badiley. I received your instructions to acquaint all the captains of convoys not to disturb this port of the Grand Duke, but suppose you do not intend this restraint should extend to any other ships but those that are now here, or that may come in the like capacity hereafter; for if the fleet we expect for these ships' redemption should have their hands bound, and not have liberty to fall upon them in this road, or any other, I conceive it no breach of friendship to the Grand Duke or this port, that your own ships of war should raise the siege of this port, and make way for the coming forth of your ships, which this Prince is not able to do. I am writing to Venice for the Northumberland and Freeman to enter your service, if they can be procured. [1¼ page.]
Nov. 15. 61. Statement by Fras. Rous. I have known Major Rous from a child, and that he has always been employed at sea. He was with his father, who was both a soldier and a preacher, in the Isle of Providence, where his father died, and since then he has served Parliament in the late wars, and borne office. He is valiant and expert both in land and sea employments, and faithful to Parliament, and of his abilities for a command I would have given personal testimony, but am hindered by infirmity. If I thought him unable, I would not recommend him, notwithstanding his name or relationship, as there have been some of that name for whom I would neither write nor speak a syllable. [¾ page.]
Nov. 16. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
2. The petition of Reynold Jenkins, prisoner at Cardiff, referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to confer with Col. Jones thereon.
3. Order on the petition of William Spittlehouse, appointed doorkeeper of the door in the orchard leading into Channel Row, that the committee for Whitehall be conferred with concerning the keeping of that door, and that Spittlehouse be confirmed in the keeping of the orchard, according to the order of Council of 11 March last.
4. Capt. Peacock to be considered for a command, when another frigate is ready.
5. The petition of Wm. Ross, Robert Scott, Duncan Menzis, Capt. Hen. Shaw, Alex. Forbes, Thos. Twiddie, Alex. Strathan, Gilbert Campbell, and Wm. Stuart referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and dispose of them according to former directions.
6. The Admiralty Committee to consider whether the Assistance is fit to go to the Straits, in lieu of the Dragon.
7. 100 marks to be paid to Caspar Johnson, in token of Council's good acceptance of what he has written on behalf of the commonwealth, and a pass to foreign parts to be granted him.
8. The letter of Capt. Dakins referred to the Admiralty Committee.
9. The Lord General, Lord Commissioner Whitelock, and Lord Chief Justice St. John to be a committee to consider of a fit en couragement to be given to Mr. Pell, for remaining in England to read lectures on mathematics; also to consider of something to be done for him, in consideration of the time he has stayed in England, and from places in foreign parts to which he has been invited, out of good affection to his native country, and to report on the whole matter with speed.
10. The petition of Thos. Penrose and others referred to the Admiralty Committee.
11. That of Capt. Jno. Bartlett to the Committee for Examinations.
12. To write the Navy Commissioners to contract for the pitch and tar and deal boards lately brought to Portsmouth.
13. The letter of Col. Willoughby from Portsmouth referred to the Admiralty Committee.
15. The petition of Nath. Markes, merchant, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to prepare a letter to the commissioners in Ireland, as to releasing his estate there, and report.
16. The proposals by way of report from the committee for wood and timber referred back to them, to consider which of them they think should be adopted, for the preservation of timber.
17. Order upon the case touching the arrest of George Porter in the Tower liberty, while a prisoner of the Serjeant-at-arms by order of the Council, that he be discharged, and all further restraint concerning the same taken off, and he re-delivered to the Serjeant-atarms; the bailiff of the Tower liberty, his officers, and all parties concerned to conform to this order.
18. Capt. Brandley to have a commission as commander of the sternmost frigate now building at Deptford Dock. [I. 35, pp. 83– 87.]
Nov. 16. Committee of Parliament to confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
1. On debate on the Bill of Union, the deputies renew their request about ascertaining the number of the members of Parliament for Scotland.
2. They acquaint the committee of the exigency of the country for want of money, having only royals and cross dollars, which are generally counterfeit, and beg that this may be represented to Parliament, that some expedient may be taken for their relief. They withdraw.
3. The committee to meet in the afternoon to consider their desires.
4. Rich. Ward's petition referred to the Commissioners for administration of Justice in Scotland, to whom his case properly belongs.
5. Whitelock to report to Parliament the request of the deputies about the election of Scotch members.
6. Mr. Scott and Col. Fenwick to report their complaint of want of money.
7. The committee to meet on Thursday, to consider a Bill drawn up by Commissioner Lisle, for ascertaining whose estates shall be confiscated in Scotland, and who pardoned. [I. 138, pp. 31–33.]
Nov. 16. 62. Thomas Bulstrode and three others to the Excise Committee. The term of the farm of the excise of co. Salop expiring 25 Dec. next, we have again contracted with Rich. Smith, Edm. Pierce, and Bold Boughey, the present farmers, for ¾ of a year for the excise of all inland commodities, salt, soap, hats, and tobacco pipes excepted, at 1,800l., an advance of 125l. per quarter. [½ page.]
Nov. 17. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
4. The business of the winter guard to be considered on Friday.
5. To report to Council that the petition of Alex. Bence and others concerning the Hopeful should be referred to the Admiralty Judges to report to Council.
6. Col. Morley to move Council to appoint a day for hearing the draft of the Act for opening trade to some ports in France, now depending before them, on a report of this committee.
9. Order on the petitions of Thomas and Rich. Ford and Capt. Rob. Johnson, that Thurloe look over the orders of Parliament empowering Council to dispense with the penalties of the Navigation Act in some cases, make an extract of what the powers are, and in what cases, and report the same, with the petitions, to Council.
10. The paper from the Committee of Advice to be considered on Friday, and the committee to attend. [I. 131, pp. 59–61.]
Nov. 17. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The Admiralty Committee to present to Council a list of the ships appointed to guard the northern coast.
2. To write the Ordnance officers to hasten aboard the Kentish frigate, now launched, and the other frigates as they are launched, the guns and gunners' stores necessary, so that no delay may be given to the service through want of them.
3. The committee appointed to speak with the trustees for sale of the King's goods to be a committee to confer with the trustees for sale of Deans' and Chapters' lands concerning the houses in Windsor Castle belonging to the late Dean and Chapter, so that they may not be disposed of to the prejudice of the castle or garrison.
4. Wallingford Castle to be demolished, and the works effectually slighted, and the doing thereof committed to Major Evelyn, Edw. Jennings, of Long Wittenham, co. Berks, and Jno. Rusden, who are hereby empowered to put it in execution. For defraying the charge, they are to sell the huts, magazine house, drawbridges, and whatever else was built there by the late King's party, while they possessed that garrison; if any money is left after defraying the charge of demolishing, it is to be disposed of amongst such of the poor thereabouts as had any wrong done them by the King's party from that garrison.
5. Lord Commissioner Whitelock, Mr. Holland, Mr. Neville, and Mr. Martin to be a committee to examine the account of Major Evelyn, and make him fit allowances for his charges about the castle.
6. Lord Commissioner Whitelock, Mr. Holland, Col. Purefoy, and Mr. Neville to confer with the trustees for sale of the late King's goods, as to their proceedings against the executor of Patrick Young, for books belonging to the library at James's House, which were found in his custody, and to desire them to forbear proceedings until further order, as the books belong to the library, which is reserved by Act of Parliament, and was committed to the care of the Council of State.
7. The consideration of a commander for the Straits to be taken up to-morrow.
8. The paper sent to Council from the Portuguese Ambassador referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are to consider how the treaty with him may be speedily concluded, and in order thereto, to confer with the merchants concerning the satisfaction they desire for damages sustained by the Portuguese; also to consider the account of prizes taken from the Portuguese, lately brought to Council from the Collectors for Prize Goods; the merchants trading to Portugal and the Collectors for Prize Goods to attend the said committee on Friday.
9. Mr. Martin, and the rest of the committee appointed to consider the letter from the Duke of Vendosme, to prepare an answer, and bring it to Council on Friday.
10. The petition of Alex. Turner, deputy to the Serjeant-at-arms, referred to the Committee for Examinations.
11, 14. Those of Christian Santen, merchant of London, and of John Harris, merchant, to the Admiralty Committee.
12. The petition of Jas. Forbes, Capt. Thos. Meldrum, Gilbert Grierson, and Alex. Crux, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and dispose of them according to former directions.
13. That of Ralph Slee and Edw. Postit referred to the said committee, to consider what should be done with them.
15. To write General Blake that Council have resolved to send the 20 ships mentioned in his list to the Straits, and that he is to give directions for fitting them out, and see that those that remain here are put in a proper state for service.
16. To write the Navy Commissioners Council's resolve to send 20 ships to the Straits, and that they are to use their best endeavours to get them ready, and supplied with four months' beer and six months' other provisions, and to speak with the Navy Victuallers and the owners concerning them and the merchant ships, and to have them all ready to sail from Stokes Bay by 1 Dec.
17. The Admiralty Committee to give effectual directions concerning the fitting forth of the squadron for the Straits.
18, 20. The petitions of Jno. Arthur, of Weymouth, and of Elizabeth Taylour, widow, and others, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
Nov. 17. 21. Also the petition of Capt. Stevens, — Temm, and —Noke for license to send a ship to the East Indies, and that of the East India Company against such license; to hear both parties, and report.
22. That of Alex. Bence and others, concerning the Hopeful Adventure, referred to the Admiralty Judges. [I. 35, pp. 87–91.]
Nov. 18. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The report from the Irish and Scotch Committee, as to the estimate of the charge of the land forces and the navy, and the present debate thereupon, to be resumed on Monday.
2. The business of the Mint deferred until to-morrow.
3. The information concerning some Hamburg ships referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to consider and report.
4. The list of 14 ships lately brought into the Downs to be considered to-morrow, after the Committee for Foreign Affairs have made their report upon the information.
5, 8, 10, 11. The petitions of Thos. Day, shipwright, of Jno. Penny, of Ralph Barlow, and of the owners and freighters of the John and Isaac of London, referred to the Admiralty Committee. [Also Vol. XXV., No. 63.]
6, 7. Those of Laurence Chambers, merchant of London, and of Col. Thos. Ellice, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
9. That of Lady Marie Cockayne referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to send for Mr. Cockayne and Mr. Mordant, as also Mr. Walsh, one of the seconds in the intended duel between them; examine them on the whole matter, and report.
12. The petition of Jas. White, Capt. Robt. Stuart and others, Chas. Hay, Col. Graham, Col. Wm. Keeth, Capt. Maky and Lieut. St. Clare, Major Jno. Humes, Col. St. Clare, Lieut. Clarke, Lieut. Wall, Col. Geo. Keeth, Col. Campbell, and Lieut. Dundas, all referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and dispose of them according to former directions, unless they see cause to the contrary.
13. Capt. Peacock appointed commander of the squadron of ships going to the Straits.
14. Capt. Badiley appointed Commander-in-Chief of the fleet of English ships in the Straits, when they shall be joined there, as well of those which shall be carried thither under Capt. Peacock, as of those which are there already.
15. Order on the report from the Committee for Examinations,—in the case of Capt. Robert Waldron and Thos. Fisher, concerning a jewel and pearl necklace,—that the jewel in the hands of Capt. Bishop be delivered to Capt. Waldron, and the necklace in possession of Col. Sexby be brought to the said committee, and that then Col. Sexby's charges, while employed at Dover and other ports in searching packets, be considered. [I. 35, p. 92–94.]
Nov. 19. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The business of the Mint to be reported to Council by Sir Jas. Harrington, next Wednesday.
2. The Marshal-General to bring in a list of all the prisoners in his custody, at Chelsea College or elsewhere, and to insert the cause and time of their commitment.
3. Major Jno. Harling, prisoner at Coventry, to be permitted to come to London, on parole to the Mayor of Coventry, to appear before Council within 6 days after his dismissal from thence, and to attend them until dismissed.
5. Major Evelyn to make sale of the biscuit and salt remaining in his hands, belonging to the garrison of Wallingford Castle, and dispose of the proceeds therefrom, and from the sale of the materials and fortifications of Wallingford Castle, and of the houses erected therein by the late King's party, as also of the money in his hands advanced by the Army Committee for buying provisions for that castle, towards the demolishing of the castle and fortifications; and to charge it to his account, which he is to bring to the committee appointed for that purpose.
6. David Jenkins to be removed from Wallingford Castle to Windsor Castle, by Major Evelyn, the present Governor there.
8. The petition of Major Erasmus Purling referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee, to consider what should be done, and meantime his going over to Jersey is to be suspended.
9–11. The paper now read, in answer to that delivered to Council from the Portuguese Ambassador, to be translated into Latin, and delivered to the Ambassador on Monday at 9 a.m. by the appointed commissioners; Fleming to give him notice and attend him.
13. The petition of Major Robt. Cobbett referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
14. To answer the petition of Richard Chambers, late Sheriff and Alderman of London, that Council have no power to grant what he desires.
15. The petition of the Earl of Worcester, prisoner in the Tower, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to consider what should be done, and report what papers they have received from him.
16. To answer to the petition of Capt. Nicholas Read,—for examination of some reports which have been raised of him, that the calumny cast upon him may be removed—that there is nothing before Council to his prejudice.
17. The letter from the Navy Commissioners referred to the Admiralty Committee.
18. Order on the petition of John Lord Sinclair, late prisoner in the Tower,—for enlargement of the liberty of the city, granted to him for a month for recovery of his health—that 2 months' longer time be given him, he with his sureties renewing their bond.
19. The letter of Fras. Bethun from Chester referred to the Ordnance Committee.
20. To answer the petition of Anne Washwhite that Council have no power to grant relief in such cases.
21. The petition of Jno. Symonton and others, Andrew Authinleck and Jno. Robertson, Geo. Montgomery and Jno. Innis, and Wm. and Lodowick Drummond, Scotch prisoners, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to dispose of them according to former directions.
22. The letter of Capt. Pearce, from aboard the Providence, near Cape Clear, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
23. The petitions and account of Hen. Sefton to the Committee for Examinations.
24, 28. The petitions of Michael Dortridge and of Thos. Gilbert and the owners of the Cullen referred to the Admiralty Committee.
25. Order on report from the Committee for Examinations—that the Scotch prisoners dismissed from hence on bail should also give bail on their arrival in Scotland, for their appearance and good behaviour, —that the bonds of sureties here for such prisoners shall, on sufficient testimony from Scotland that the prisoners have given such security there, be delivered up, if they desire it.
26. The account for Parliament of the disbursements for the service to be hastened, and made ready to give in 1 Dec. next.
27. The Irish and Scotch Committee to provide bedding for the 200 soldiers that keep guard in the Tower, so that the charge thereof does not exceed 80l., and the Ordnance officers to deliver to the Lieutenant of the Tower 6 barrels of powder, with bullet and a double proportion of match, for the use of the guards there. [I. 35, pp. 95–99.]
Nov. 19. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
2. The paper from the Committee of Advice, appointed to be read to day, postponed to Wednesday, and the committee to attend.
3. The Collectors for Prize Goods to review their account of the net proceeds of Portugal goods, and make a strict search whether it be complete and perfect.
4. Order to report to Council, on the petition of Gratian de Perenant, that on his giving in the cargo of the St. Stephen of St. Jean de Luz, on oath, and swearing to the truth of the petition, a protection should be granted, to free her from being taken prize by men-of-war or privateers.
7. The petition mentioned by Mr. Bohun to be brought to Mr. Thurloe, who is to peruse it, state the fact, and report. [I. 131, pp. 63, 64.]
Nov. 19.
The Leopard, Leghorn Road.
64. Capt. Hen. Appleton to [the Navy Committee]. The Phoenix frigate and another of the Dutch men-of-war have brought in the Samuel Bonadventure, Mr. Piles, master, with 200 pieces of lead, and laden with fish from Newfoundland, and have distributed the men amongst their ships, but the surgeon and one man, whose legs are broken, they sent to me.
The Two Brothers arrived at Naples with fish. We are trying to regain the Phoenix. There are 8 Dutch men-of-war at Porto Longone, and 9 in Leghorn Road. Mr. Longland, with a notary, is going aboard the Sampson, Mary, and Levant Merchant, to protest against them if they do not discharge their goods, and enter the service. [1 page.]
Nov. 20. Order in the Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs, that the committee sit again this day to consider the business of the clothiers, who are to bring in such additions to and alterations in the draft of the Act now read as, considering the several papers now read, and the debate had, may render the business more passable. [I. 131, p. 65.]
Nov. 22. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. Sir Wm. Constable to be President of the Council, during the time of the sitting of this Council.
2. Sir Gilbert Pickering to move the House to order some allowance to Thomas Cooke, whilst kept in restraint in the Tower.
3. Also to report to the House that there are several persons committed to the Tower and other prisons by Parliament and Council, who have not wherewith to maintain themselves, and to move the House to make allowance for their subsistence during imprisonment.
5. Mr. Thurloe to draw up a letter to the Duke of Vendosme from Council, according to the substance of a paper brought in from the committee appointed for that business.
6. The Committee for Examinations to examine Col. Geraldine, late prisoner at Chester, and now come up to Council, and report his examination, and what they think fit to be done.
7. The letter informing Lord Commissioner Whitelock of the arrival of a small French vessel in the Thames referred to the Admiralty Committee, to report.
9. To write the Sheriff of county Gloucester, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Wade, Col. Barrow, Jeremiah Buck, and Hen. Rudge, concerning the spoil made in the Forest of Dean, by cutting down timber to a considerable value, and to desire them to examine the business, and discover the actors, and transmit the examinations to Council; also to secure the timber that has been felled, for the use of the State.
10. The propositions given in to the Council from Col. Barrow, for preserving wood and timber, referred to the Committee for Woods.
11. The estimate of the account of the public charge to be considered next Wednesday.
12. The Committee for Foreign Affairs to confer with the Admiralty Judges concerning the three ships lately brought in, and 17 more since, all of which pretend to be Hamburghers.
13. The Admiralty Judges and Dr. Walker to attend that committee on Wednesday, by 8 a.m.
14. The letter from Venice referred to that committee.
15. So much of the letter from Gen. Blake as relates to men and victuals referred to the Admiralty Committee.
16. The Committee for Examinations to send for Andrew Kerr, prisoner in the Tower, and examine him.
17. The petition of Saml. Moyer, Gilbert Keate, Capt. Thos. Ewen, and other owners of the Marmaduke, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
18. The letter from Leith referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
19. The petition of Hen. Mason, commander of the Fortune fireship, referred to the Admiralty Committee. [I. 35, pp. 100–104.]
Nov. 22. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
4. To report to Council that the books and papers mentioned in the petition of the workmen skinners, which are in the hands of Sam. Hartlib, lately employed by the Committee for Trade, should be brought into this committee.
5. The business of the winter guard to be considered on Wednesday.
6. The petition of Joachimi Douke to be sent to the Commissioners for sale of Dutch prizes, who are to certify on the case of the ship named, if they have anything before them, and what has been done on its seizure.
7. Lord Bradshaw and three others to consider the letters and papers from the Resident at Hamburg, as to the disobedience and disorders of some persons there, to state the matter of fact, and report.
8. Order on the petition of Hen. de la March—desiring Council to appoint some persons to do him justice in a case at law depending in Jersey—to report to Council this Committee's opinion that Council can do nothing till Parliament has given orders for the administration of justice in that island.
11. Lord Bradshaw to speak with the Admiralty Judges and Dr. Walker about Longland's letter, and if needful, to appoint them a time to come to Council or this committee thereon.
13. Order on reading Longland's letter from Leghorn, to suggest to Council whether, for the reasons therein mentioned, they will not send some land soldiers aboard the ships of war now fitting forth for the Straits.
14. The clause in Capt. Appleton's letter, touching the English ships in the Venetian service, to be considered on Friday, and the Act for calling home English mariners from foreign service to be then produced.
15. The petitions of Stocall and Carteret, and their proposals for establishing a court of justice in Jersey, referred to the counsel-atlaw on this committee, to report.
16. The business of the mines referred to Mr. Scott, and the other members of this committee who are on the Committee for Mines, to consider and report.
17. Mr. Pelling, searcher at Gravesend, to come to this committee on Wednesday, and Mr. Thurloe to speak with him on what is alleged against him in John Helmes' petition, and acquaint the committee with the state of the business complained of.
21. The petition of Don Melchior d'Arangusen to be considered on Friday.
22. The petitions of Spurway and Foulis referred to the subcommittee on the complaints of disorders in Hamburg.
24. To request Council to write to Maj.-Gen. Deane, to inquire into the proposals made to Council for furnishing masts from Scotland, and report what he finds, and his opinion of the forcibleness of it.
25. The petition of John Arthur, of Weymouth, to be considered on Friday.
27. The letter from Leon de Aisma, on the privileges of the inhabitants of the Stilyard, referred to the counsel-at-law of this committee. [I. 131, pp. 66–73.]
Nov. 22./Dec. 2.
The Leopard, Leghorn Mould.
65. Capt. Hen. Appleton to [the Navy Committee]. In our design on the Phœnix, the Lord showed himself, as in all our undertakings, giving it us back, though for a while a cloud hung over us. It was agreed that Capt. Cox should have 80 men out of our ship, to be sent in three boats, one whereof he commanded with 14 men; another my Lieutenant Young, with 33 men, and the third, Lieut. Lynn of the Bonadventure, with 33 more. After their departure from our ships, in the dark, the two lieutenants lost sight of Capt. Cox, and returned twice aboard our ship, which spent the greater part of the night, so I commanded them to return without further loss of time to their former order, which they cheerfully did, and met Capt. Cox also returning, when they immediately went on their design with much courage, and the Lord showed himself in that victory, to whom be all the glory. At the appearing of the morning stars, they entered and possessed the frigate in a short time, so that I hope there is little or no loss on our side. They cut the cables, set sail, and away, at whose motion two men-of-war slipped or cut their cables, and made sail after them, but to little purpose, they being too nimble for them; one of their commanders was aboard the Phœnix, ending their Andrew's feast with Van Tromp, who escaped out of the cabin port, but received a great wound by one of our men, who told him, with the blow, it was for wearing our colours under his stern. I hear he swam on board the Butter Pot, and is now there in the road. One of these ships, named Red Hair, has returned from the chase; being a heavy sailer, she remained much astern of the others, so there follows the frigate belonging to the imprisoned captain, which I hope to hear has scaped as well as her commander.
A Flemish merchant ship bound for Smyrna, and very richly laden, may be overtaken, as she left this road not above 12 hours before the surprisal of the Phœnix. I found the surgeon Van Tromp sent me very useful in this business, and sent him aboard with fresh provisions for his imprisoned master. Mr. Piles, who was there, with 14 of his men, returned in a short time, with advice that there were not above 40 Flemings aboard, who in general were distempered, which makes me imagine there was great facility of our men's obtaining possession. We advised Capt. Cox to go for Porto Longone if the wind favoured, otherwise for Naples; but the wind was contrary for both places. [2¼ pages.]
Nov. 23. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The petition of Col. David Ross to be laid aside.
2. That of Robert Hammon, merchant of London, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
3, 4. Those of Thos. Cockerill of Hull, Seth Haly, and Wm. Garrat, of Lynn, and of Rich. Hinksman and others, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
5. That of the mariners of the Reformation referred to the Navy Commissioners, to examine such of the company as come to them and the captain, concerning the business mentioned.
6. The depositions given in by Sir Jno. Dryden and Mr. Harvey, as to a miscarriage in co. Northampton, referred to the Committee for Examinations, who are to prepare a letter to the justices of that county on this business, and bring the draft to Council with speed.
7. The report from that committee concerning Col. Geraldine recommitted for further examination, and to be reported on Friday.
8. The draft of a letter to the Duke of Vendosme to be presented to the House by Mr. Martin.
9. The paper from the Portuguese Ambassador to Council, with such other papers as have passed between them concerning the treaty now in hand, to be reported to the House by Sir Hen. Vane.
10. The draft of a letter now read to the Duke of Tuscany approved, and to be sent to the Speaker for his signature, and then sent to the said Duke.
11. 280l. to be allowed from Council money to Mr. Dizney, for disbursements for intelligence and discoveries by Council's direction, and the Irish and Scotch Committee to confer with Mr. Allein about charging that money, and bring in a warrant therefor.
12. John Thomson, draper, to appear before the Committee for Examinations, to be examined on what is informed against him.
13. The representation of Clement Oxenbridge, both in relation to himself and the paying of Dutch prisoners 6d. a day, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to report.
14. Also his letter and affidavits concerning the Samson, for delivery to the Admiralty Judges to-morrow morning, when they attend that committee according to former order of Council.
15. Col. Marten to report to the House that Council,—having in pursuance of their order, considered the Duke of Vendosme's letter, and the matter of fact of the taking of the ships therein mentioned, —find that General Blake being with the fleet in the Narrow, on 5 Sept. last, after some hours' chase, part of his fleet took some French men-of-war, the King's own ships, going, as the commander said, with other ships to the relief of Dunkirk, and think that the letter already prepared should be sent in their name to the Duke, in answer to his.
16. Order on the petition of Hen. Sefton, relating to debts contracted in the service of the State, and to indemnity, that it does not appertain to Council, but to the Indemnity Commissioners appointed by Parliament, to whom the petitioner is left to make his address. [I. 35, pp. 105–109.]
Nov. 24. 66. Note that Parliament has nominated the following persons to be of the Council of State for the year ensuring, viz., Lieut. Gen. Cromwell, Lord Commissioner Whitelock, Lord Chief Justices St. John and Rolle, Sir Hen. Vane, Sir Arth. Hesilrigge, Thos. Scott, Herbert Morley, Dennis Bond, Wm. Purefoy, John Bradshaw, John Gurdon, Lord Commissioner Lisle, Valentine Wauton, Sir Jas. Harrington, Nich. Love, Sir Wm. Masham, Thos. Challoner, Robert Wallop, Sir Gilbert Pickering, Sir Peter Wentworth, Robert Goodwin, Fras. Allein, Col. Thomson, Walter Strickland, Sir Hen. Mildmay, Major-General Skippon, Lord Grey of Groby, Col. Algernon Sidney, Attorney-General Prideaux, Sir John Trevor, Col. Norton, Thos. Lister, Col. Ingoldsby, Sir Jno. Bourchier, Earl of Salisbury, Wm. Cawley, Sir Wm. Brereton, John Feilder, Wm. Say, and Major-General Harrison. [1 page. Endorsed by Sec. Nicholas.]
Nov. 24. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
3. The account of Mr. Carter, for his disbursements in the repair of the public houses (except Whitehall), referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
4. The petition of Gilbert Adderley, marshal in Coventry, referred to the Committee for Prisoners, to report with speed.
5. Order on the examinations taken by the Committee for Examinations in the case of Major Cobbett, that Council do not find any ill dealing in his furnishing the soldiers' clothes for Ireland.
6. To write the commanders of the Fairifax and Swan to fall down to Gen. Blake in the Downs, and receive his orders.
7. The Commissioners for sale of Dutch prizes to take care of nine vessels, pretending to be Hamburghers, brought into the Thames by Capt. Robt. Sanders of the Assurance, to put trusty persons aboard them that bulk may not be broken, and to take care that proceedings be had in the Admiralty Court against the ships.
8. To write the Navy Commissioners to send in the Assurance frigate, and supply her defects, and speedily fit her for service, and to that end, to order her captain to bring her in to such place as they think fit.
9. The petition of Hendrick Martens, master of the Hope of Hamburg, referred to the Admiralty Judges, who are to proceed with the ship according to law and justice.
10, 11. The carrying of inland letters and of foreign letters to be managed by such only as Parliament, or any authorised from them, shall appoint.
12. The Committee for Irish and Scotch Affairs, in pursuance of the order of Parliament and votes of Council, to consider how these offices may be managed, meet to-morrow morning thereon, and report with speed.
13. Col. Purefoy, Mr. Bond, Mr. Corbett, and Mr. Carew, to be a committee to examine Mr. Scott's account for intelligence, and report.
14. Audience to be given at Council to the Spanish Ambassador to-morrow at 5 p.m.; Fleming to give him notice, and attend him.
15. Order on the two reports of the auditors of imprests, of the accounts of Nich. Bond, for entertainment of the Danish, Dutch, and Portuguese Ambassadors, amounting to 784l. 4s. 10d., that Council allow the accounts, and discharge him of that sum accordingly.
18. The charge of the horses of the Portuguese Ambassador, during the time he was entertained by Parliament, to be defrayed out of the exigent money of Council. [I. 35, pp. 109–112.]
Nov. 24. Committee for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Day's Proceedings.
1. To report to Council that the paper from the Advice Committee, of 8 September 1652, should be referred to the Navy Commissioners, to return their opinion to Council.
3. Mr. Oxenbridge and the Commissioners for Prize Goods to acquaint Dr. Walker with the probability named by Oxenbridge in his letter to Council that some Holland ships are freed as being Hamburghers, and Walker to acquaint Council with the state thereof. [I. 131, p. 74.]
Nov. 25. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. Note that the final resolutions of Parliament, upon the treaty between Parliament and John Guimarais, are to be put into Sir Hen. Vane's report.
2. The Lord General to be desired to order some foot forces to march to Dover, Sandown, and Deal, to be ready to go on board the ships when ordered by Gen. Blake.
3. To write General Blake to give order for such men to go on board as he shall think fit.
4. The letter from Hamburg, concerning the business of Holstein, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
5. The two letters from General Blake to be reported to the House, and they informed that as Blake's commission determines on 4 December, their pleasure is desired thereon.
6. The letter from the Navy Commissioners to Council to be reported to the House by Col. Wauton, as also the former order of Council.
7. Mr. Scott to report to the House the intelligence read this day to Council.
8–10. The paper given in by the Spanish Ambassador referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to consider an answer, and report it to Council to-morrow; also to confer with the Admiralty Judges, Dr. Walker, and the Commissioners for sale of Dutch prizes thereon, who are to attend them to-morrow by 7 a.m., Walker bringing with him the papers which he received from the committee, and the committee to report on the whole to-morrow.
11. The information concerning priests and Jesuits referred to the Committee for Examinations.
12. The letter of Mr. Appletree from Oxford, informing Council of a robbery committed in that county, under pretence of a warrant from Council for searching a house for Col. Massey, referred to the said committee, who are to take a further account of that business, and prepare a warrant for searching for and apprehending the robbers.
13. — Chester, late prisoner at Deal, and now brought up to Council, referred to the said committee, to examine him, and report.
14. That committee to examine witnesses in the case of Mr. Cockayne and Mr. Mordant, and send for any person who can give testimony therein.
15. Mr. Cockayne, prisoner in the Tower, to be discharged, Council being satisfied, on the report from the said committee, with his acknowledgment of his offence against the law, by accepting a challenge to fight a duel, and his submitting himself to Council.
16. The letter of Lieut.-Col. Hunkin, from the Sorlings, with his petition and representation, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
17. Major Edw. Broughton to have his liberty on bail extended for two months longer. [I. 35, pp. 113–116.]
Nov. 25. 67. Order in the Committee for Irish Affairs,—on the reference to them by Council on 24 Nov. of the business of the Post Office,— that it be proposed to those treated with concerning the inland post, that the rates shall not exceed, for single letters, to Ireland, 6d., to Scotland, 4d., to remote parts of England and Wales, 3d., and within 100 miles of London, 2d., and so proportionably for double letters.
That all public packets on extraordinary dispatches, letters of members of Parliament and Council of State, secretaries, clerks, or officers employed in public service under them, or their committees, or in any other service of public concernment, shall be carried free, and all incident charges for carrying and conveyance of letters through England and into Ireland and Scotland be defrayed by the persons who shall engage in this office.
That none shall be employed as postmasters but such as have manifested their good affection to the Parliament and commonwealth, and respect shall be had to those that are at present employed, to have the refusal of the employ, and that the committee will sit again to-morrow and Monday on this business. [1 page; with several earlier orders relating thereto prefixed, all duplicates.]
Nov. 25. Committee of Parliament to confer with Deputies from Scotland. Day's Proceedings.
2. Order that—as for the better discharge of their trust, they should know the state of affairs in Scotland, and the practice and deportment of the people,—Mr. Scott request Major-Gen. Deane to correspond with him, and send him advices, which Scott is to communicate to the committee.
3. Order on Major Salwey's reporting the draft of the Bill for general pardon of the people of Scotland, and concerning confiscations, after debate thereon, that Whitelock peruse it, make such alterations as on this debate he thinks expedient, and report it on Wednesday at 8 a.m.
4. The committee to communicate to the deputies to-morrow the order of Parliament concerning false coins in Scotland, and to have a general conference with them on that business. Notice to be given to them and to the members of the committee, and to the latter of the Wednesday's meeting. [I. 138, p. 34.]
Nov. 25.
Chelsea.
68. Sir Theodore de Mayerne to Viscount Conway. Advice touching treatment for the gravel, and for a sick horse. Receipt for red ink. As to the chances of war, I believe what Juvenal says, "Nullum numen abest si sit prudentia; nos te, nos facimus, fortuna, Deam, cæloque locamus."
I should be glad to be with you, but not to the prejudice of your health. In conversation one must fly all subjects of melancholy. A sick man cannot be gay; we cannot hinder children from growing, nor people from talking, but in these times, one should leave the mouth shut and the ears long and wide. If you have done with my Fiaravanti, please return it, as I want to refer to my marginal notes in it. Tell me how you are. [French, 2 pp.]
Nov. 25.
London.
69. Myles Woodshaw to Viscount Conway. I have a dining room and 5 chambers on the same floor, which are ready to receive any person sent to me by you, and over them very good accommodation for servants. Mr. Baldwin came last Saturday, but as soon as Mrs. Martom knew of his being here, she came and got him to her house. I wish I could have had him, as I could have accommodated him almost as well as they. Mr. Savage has come to London; he is not so willing to oblige you as he was when he went out, but I will do my best endeavour to furnish you against the time. Any of your friends can make use of my house, so that you give me notice of it. [1 page.]
Nov. 26. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. Sir Hen. Vane to present to the House to-morrow the estimate of the charge of the land and sea forces in the service.
2. To answer the petition of Col. Alex. Forbes that his desires are not proper for the cognizance of Council, the business now lying before the commissioners of Parliament in Scotland.
3. The Law Committee to confer with Council and Dr. Walker concerning the business of Hen. Shuter, and to put it in a way of effectual prosecution.
4. The letter from the Senate of Hamburg referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
5. The petition of Eliz. Heatlie, widow, referred to the Irish and Scotch Committee.
6. That of Nath. Manton, merchant, to the Admiralty Committee, who are to examine whether his desires be not contrary to any Act of Parliament, and give him license, if they see cause.
7. So much of the Dutch letters as gives the state of the Dutch fleet to be signified to Gen. Blake.
8. The letters of Capts. Daking and Purefoy, from the Humber, to be sent to Blake, and also the order of Parliament appointing him one of the Generals of the fleet for the year to come.
9. The Committee for Examinations to take bail of Mr. Fanshaw and Col. Grevis, for their appearance at Council 20 days after summons given them, at a place to be nominated in their bond.
10. The Admiralty Committee to prepare a commission for Gen. Blake, and bring it to Council next Monday.
11. The Committee for Examinations to take Capt. Bishop's accounts of his disbursements for gaining intelligence.
12. To send Appleboon's letter to be translated.
13, 15. The petitions of Joan London, and of John Freeman and Adam Jennings, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to report.
14. That of Thos. Peers to the Irish and Scotch Committee, to report.
16. That of Sir Thos. Thomson to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and release him on security, if they see cause.
17. The proposals for the apprehension of some priests and Jesuits about town referred to the said committee.
18. Also the petition of Capt. Alex. Baine, Gilbert Moncraff, Lieut.-Col. Geo. Montgomery, James Lord Pasley, Lieut.-Col. Jas. Ogleby, Sir Wm. Keith, and Lieut.-Col. Patrick Johnson. [I. 35, pp. 116–119.]
Nov. 26. Order of the Council for Irish Affairs, that all public letters outwards, or public ministers' letters inwards, be carried free.
That the persons who will give in propositions for the inland and foreign letters shall present them in parts, one for the inland, another for the foreign, and a third for both jointly, and that this committee will receive such propositions on Monday next. [Vol. XXV., No. 67, supra.]
[Nov. 26.] Statement by Mat. Hale of the case of the postmasters:—Thomas Witherings and Wm. Frizell are, by grant from the late King Charles, foreign postmasters of England for their lives. Frizell, in consideration of 500l., assigns his interest therein to Witherings, who afterwards assigns his interest in the office to Wm. Ellis and Mr. Jessop in trust, and makes his will, leaving issue one son, Thomas, and one daughter, Dorothy. By this will he gives all his lands, leases, and personal estate to Thomas, who died at the age of four years.
Query, whether the office is included in such gift, and if not, in whom the interest has been since the death of the testator?—Opinion, it includes the profits of the office.
Query. If in case his son dies before age, he appoints the whole estate to descend to his eldest brother's son William, whether the word descend does not make a fee simple in his eldest brother's son? Opinion,—It is an absolute inheritance in William.
Query, whether an office of trust be devisable, or whether Mr. Witherings having assigned his interest therein to others, had power to devise it?—Opinion, though the office be not devisable, yet being assigned in trust, the profits are devisable. [Copies, 1⅓ pages, Vol. XXV., No. 66, supra.]
[Nov. 26.] 70. Reasons presented to the Committee for Postmasters, why the office should not be farmed:—
1. What is of public interest, if farmed, often becomes a great public grievance.
2. The postmasters who have served faithfully, and others who run post to Lynn, Yarmouth, &c. must be restrained, and will complain, as they did in 1642 to the late Parliament, which ordered them redress.
3. By farming, the pay of postmasters will be made so inconsiderable that they will grow careless.
4. The expectations of the people, now at this juncture so highly raised to hopes of ease and freedom, will be disappointed when they see new monopolies.
Suggestions for reducing the office into one channel, for easing the people, encouraging the postmasters, and raising money for the public:—
1. To declare it unsafe for private persons to erect post stages without licence.
2. To choose faithful persons on all the roads, and appoint a supervisor on each road.
3. To declare that you have appointed them postmasters, and give power to their controller only to sign labels for speedy conveyance of mails, and give them writs of assistance. Signed by Rob. Girdler and seven others. [1 page.]
Nov. 26. Committee to confer with Scottish Deputies. Day's Proceedings.
1. The deputies being called in, Whitelock acquainted them with the report made to Parliament about the proportion of members for Scotland to sit in Parliament, and the time of their sitting, with Parliament's intentions thereon.
2. The Parliament order about false coins in Scotland was read to them, and a conference had thereon, and the deputies heard in what they had to offer for redress thereof; they then withdrew.
3. Several proposals made to the committee about the redress of false coins in Scotland were read and considered.
4. Order on a petition of the English merchants and other inhabitants of Leith, that it be considered when any application shall be made to this committee concerning Edinburgh. [I. 138, p. 35.]
Nov. 26.
Westminster.
Committee for meeting the Scottish deputies to the Commissioners for forfeited and confiscated estates in Scotland, at Leith. By the Parliament order enclosed [of 29 Oct. 1652], you will perceive the reference to us of the petition of [Alexander] Earl of Leven about his estate. For our better execution thereof, we desire you speedily to state the fact about that estate, and its disposition, according to the tenor of the order. [I. 138, p. 33.]
Nov. 27. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. To inform the Navy Commissioners that Capt. Peacock remains at Harwich for want of a bowsprit, and that Council has ordered him to the Lee Road, where they are to take care he is supplied with what he may want.
2. To write Capt. Peacock to repair to Lee Road for a bowsprit, and bring with him what colliers are there, and also to order the Oak, Gillyflower, and Paul to come with him.
3. To write General Blake acknowledging his letter intimating his intention of going to sea, with which Council is satisfied, and has written for the State's ships at Portsmouth to repair to him immediately.
4. To write Mr. Willoughby at Portsmouth to hasten out the Speaker and other ships there to General Blake, and enclose him a warrant to all captains of ships, to repair forthwith with their ships to Blake. [I. 35, pp. 119.]
[Nov. 29.] 71. Petition of Hen. Truelove, mariner of Ipswich, to Council, for the command of a good frigate in this war with the Dutch, being able to bring trusty seamen to man her, and to give security for performance of his trust. Has served as master of Ipswich ships 16 years, but sincerely desires to serve the public. [2/3 page.]
Nov. 29. 72. Reference thereon to the Admiralty Committee. [½ page. Also I. 34, p. 122.]
Nov. 29. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
3. Mr. Love and Mr. Burrell added to the committee appointed to receive Mr. Scott's account.
9. The extract of a letter from Mr. Hayward, clerk of the survey at Chatham, referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
10. To write the Navy Commissioners approving of their committal of the two mariners of the Reformation, and to give them power to release them; also to desire them to take the same course with any other refractory persons, and particularly with the chief of those of the Reformation, who still remain refractory, and refuse to go to their ship.
11. The Navy Commissioners to command the company of the Golden Fleece to repair on board, when they receive their money, for which Council has written to the Navy Committee.
13. The letter of the Navy Commissioners, and their account of the ships appointed for the winter guard, referred to the Admiralty Committee, to give directions for their speedy fitting out.
14. The petition of divers English merchants and others referred to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, to report.
15. To write the Lieutenant of the Tower, recommending Wm. Tasbrough as warder, in the room of the one turned out for Massey's escape.
16. The petition of Thos. How, &c. referred to the Admiralty Judges, who are to use such force as the law allows, to make the parties perform the contract.
18. Lord Commissioner Lisle to present to the House the report of the committee appointed by Council, on an order of Parliament of 30 March 1652, to inquire into the state and condition of the family of Gualter Frost, late secretary to the Council of State. Annexing,
i. Report of the said committee. He left a widow, four sons, and two daughters; three of the sons are married, and have each a child, and one of the daughters is married, and has a son and four daughters, all living; the other son and daughter are in a marriageable condition, making 15 in all, and his own mother being 100 years old, died six weeks since.
His estate, according to particulars brought to Council by Gualter Frost, his son, consisted of 2,000l. on the excise, which will not come in for some years; 2,000l. in the East India Company; 1,100l. in the Guinea Company; and 800l. in the Fens, in all 5,900l., of which sum some friends got him by way of trade, since he served the State, 2,500l., so that what he has cleared for 11 years, the time he was employed in the affairs of the State, amounts to 3,400l., and at his death, he did not leave above 20l. to bury him. The family can have no present relief out of the aforesaid sum, and the care for its improvement is taken away by his death.
As commissary of provisions in Ireland in 1642, he incurred a debt on the State's behalf of 4,490l. 2s. 6d. to Robert Inglish and Alex. Finlaw, merchants, which is chargeable upon his executors.
His administratrix is sued in Chancery by Wm. Rouse, and Anne his wife, administrators of Wm. Westerby, for 320l. 14s., debt and damages due to Westerby for freight of the Endeavour of London, and for demurrage, primage, and average, while laden with provisions in 1642, and likewise by one Crowley, for freight of goods carried to the same service.
As there may be other debts contracted by him for the State, of which his relict knows nothing, the committee think Parliament should indemnify his relict, not only from these engagements, but from all contracts by him for the use of the State, and make provision for payment of such debts.
ii. State of the debt owing by Archibald Hamilton, deceased, to Alex. Finlaw and Robert Inglish, for which the executors of the late Gualter Frost stand engaged in a bond for 4,000l., in behalf of the commonwealth. Archibald Hamilton, late of Milburne, near Edinburgh, deceased, according to a contract made in August 1642 with the late Gualter Frost, then commissary of provisions for Ireland, delivered into the custody of Wm. Whittaker, deputy commissary of provisions for the north of Ireland, oatmeal, rye, and peas, value 2,964l. 6s. 6d., and laid out 15l. 16s. for landing and cellarage, and 50l. for demurrage, total 3,030l. 2s. 6d., of which Frost paid 540l., and entered into a bond in 4,000l. to make good the said contract. A warrant was issued by the committee then concerned upon the treasury at Guildhall for the balance, 2,490l. 2s. 6d., but before any part was paid, Parliament commanded all the treasuries at Guildhall to be employed for other uses, notwithstanding any warrants thereupon. The 2,490l. 2s. 6d. having been due since 1642, the single interest to March 1652 amounts to 2,000l., and the whole debt, 4,490l., is called upon by Inglish and Finlaw, and is recoverable from Mr. Frost's executors, but is in right due from the State. for whose use it was contracted, and having been long owing, it is humbly expected by the creditors, who are much impoverished through the want thereof.
iii. Order in Parliament that Mr. Frost, commissary for Ireland employed by Parliament, shall have the protection and privilege of Parliament, be free from the arrest laid upon him, and discharged of the meane process.—10 May 1643.
19, 20, 22. The petitions of several of the commissioners for stating the accounts of the soldiers in Ireland, of Mathew Ryder, and of Lancelot Tollson and Patience Ward, merchants of London, referred to the Admiralty Committee.
21. That of Lieut. Jno. Graham, &c., referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine him, and do therein as in like cases.
24. Robert English, merchant of London, having in Aug. 1651, had two trunks and books seized by the Militia Committee of London, which were brought to the Council of State, and thoroughly examined, and nothing having been found prejudicial to the State, Council have caused such trunks and books to be redelivered to him, and declare that there is nothing before them to render him obnoxious to law. [I. 35, pp. 120–127.]
Nov. 29.
Leghorn.
73. Charles Longland to the Navy Committee. I have taken bills of Capts. Badiley and Appleton upon you and the Commissioners of Customs, payable to Geo. Smith, for the victuals and ammunition supplied to their squadron, which, with my expenses, amount to 383l. 3s. 8d. I have freighted six ships at Leghorn, Genoa, and Venice, and hope to get as many more, all of which must have two months' pay, and as this will amount to 1,000l. each I shall draw 4,000l. or 5,000l. upon you next week. [1 page.]
Nov. 29.
Leghorn.
74. Order by Charles Longland to Capt. Gilbert Roope, to fit out his ship the Mary with 100 men, and with victuals, arms, and ammunition, to be employed as a man-of-war in the service of the State for 6 months, commenceing 14 days after his commission enclosed, at 3l. 15s. 0d. a man monthly. If his company is under 100, the pay will be abated 45s. a man, but if he can make up the number to 140, the pay will be no less than 3l. 15s. 0d. As he serves the public, he must look upon the State as his paymasters, except for a month or two's pay which may be anticipated. [2/3 page.]
Nov. 30. Report made to Council by Mr. Bond of the committee appointed for taking Mr. Scott's account. We find that he has produced vouchers and acquittances for every payment, and that on the balance he is debtor to the State 22l.; but because several agents employed by him, and now sending or sent forth, are in arrears, and are to receive sums due on the issue of their engagements, the whole sum of his account of 2,400l. for the last year being paid, it is offered to Council that Scott be discharged of this 22l., and authorised to issue it to agents, as there is most cause, their acquittances given in to the clerk of Council testifying the receipt. [I. 35, p. 130.]
Nov. 30. Like report of the committee appointed for taking Mr. Frost's account. The total of his receipt for the Council's contingencies for this year is 64,071l. 9s. 10d., but as the last 4,000l. is not actually received, but will be in a few days, the accountant cannot bring his account to an exact balance, or show his acquittances; but upon perusal of the warrants of Council directed to him, we find that when they are paid off, there will be little or no money in his hands; and as he has produced warrants for payment of the rest of the money, and receipts, it is offered that the Lord President sign his discharge for this year, which he may sign, though it be some days after the expiration of this Council, as it will require some time to pay out the last 4,000l. when received, and thereupon to balance the account, which we will take care to see performed. [I. 35, p. 130.]
Nov. 30. Council of State. Day's Proceedings.
1. The Mint Committee to consider the proposition of Col. Downes for farthing tokens for the use of Chichester.
3. The Irish and Scotch Committee, in pursuance of an order of Parliament of 2 Jan. 1652, to consider where 200l. a year may be charged, to be paid to Wm. Ryley, for his employment in the office of records in the Tower.
4. The petition of Jas. Wemys, late General of the artillery of Scotland, referred to the Committee for Examinations, to examine and bail him if they shall see cause.
5. The Lord General to give order that—Cranston, prisoner at Morpeth, be sent in safe custody to Edinburgh.
6. The letters of Mr. Stannier to some of his friends in Flanders, reflecting upon Government, to be reported to the House by Col. Morley.
7. Mr. Stannier to be enjoined to attend the House to-morrow.
8. Order on report from the Committee for Examinations, of the cases of Robt. Douglas, Jas. Hamilton, Mungo Law, Jno. Smith, Andrew Authenlike, and Jno. Robinson, Scotch ministers, prisoners in the Tower, as also of Andrew Kerr, that they be discharged, and have liberty to repair to Scotland, demeaning themselves inoffensively towards this State and Government; warrants to be issued to the Lieutenant of the Tower for their discharge.
9. Order passing and approving the report on Mr. Scott's account.
10. Like order passing the report on Mr. Frost's account. [I. 35, pp. 128–131.]
Nov. 30.
Phœnix Naples Road.
75. Capt. Owen Cox to the Navy Commissioners. The Phœnix is arrived with a Dartmouth ship, laden with Newfoundland fish. The men plundering and drinking, at a feast held ashore, gave me an opportunity to man 3 boats, get aboard her, take possession of the steerage, cut the cables, and put to sea; 2 or 3 ships followed and fired, but we had only three men slain, one of whom was lieutenant of the Leopard, and five wounded, while the Dutch had 8 slain and 13 wounded, and some of the latter have since died of their wounds. Their men maintained their gun deck, plying small shot, 2 hours after we were under sail. [1 page.]
[Nov.] 76. Petition of John Shipley, master, and the wardens and corporation of the Pinmakers' Company of London, and of the pinmakers of England and Wales, to the Council of State, to recommend their sad condition to Parliament, which, for the preservation of trade, constituted a committee to examine and report on all grievances occasioned by evil-disposed persons who, from the distractions of the times, took occasion to do things destructive to the commonwealth.
On the publication thereof, petitioners, with many other trades, addressed the said committee, when all the objections and oppositions against petitioners were cleared, and the report of the committee transmitted to Parliament, but nothing has since been done for their relief. Understanding that power was given to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, petitioners addressed them, but cannot obtain any answer, nor can they be satisfied by their counsel that such committee is the proper one for the settlement of inland trade. [1 page. See 6 Nov., p. 481, supra.] Annexing,
76. i. Petition of the pinmakers to Parliament for confirmation of their charter; that the statute of 5 Eliz. cap. 7., against the importation of foreign pins, may be revived; and that power may be given to the company to search for and seize them.
The pinmakers' art has been anciently used, and is of great consequence, many thousands being employed therein. In 10 Eliz. the pinmakers were incorporated with the wireworkers and girdlers, but for want of knowing governors, the company then consisting of merchants, mercers, silkmen, &c., the artizans suffered exceedingly; for remedy thereof, the pinmakers were incorporated by themselves 3 Jas. I., and the charter confirmed 16 Jas. I.
Divers evil disposed persons left the jurisdiction, and made deceitful wares, and vended them out of the survey of the company, and a great quantity of foreign pins were imported and sold here, contrary to the Act, whereby the manufacture was almost lost, and the native artizans were ready to perish for want of employment, and the haberdashers and shopkeepers made a prey of them, by reason of their poverty, refusing to buy their pins but at their own price, which being so low, the pinmakers could not subsist.
For redress the late King, by his charter, 11 Charles, enlarged their jurisdiction to all England and Wales, and gave them power to make ordinances for the better governing their art,—which, being made with all care for the public good, were perused by the Lord Keeper, Treasurer, and Chief Justice of the Upper bench, and ratified under their hands and seals, according to the statute of 19 Henry VII.,—whereby the company were granted a seal to seal all papers of pins made here, so as to prevent the making of bad pins, and power given them to seize foreign pins. Notwithstanding this, the haberdashers and shopkeepers still connive at foreign trade, and by that and other indirect means (through the want of a confirmation of their charter by Parliament,) the commonwealth is daily cozened, and many thousands ready to perish. [1½ pages.]
Nov. 77. Inventory of furniture, linen, &c. belonging to Capt. John Pearce, and acknowledgment by John Perrington that he has in his possession the said effects, and that he is engaged to deliver them up to such person as the captain shall appoint. [2¼ pages.] Annexing,
77. i., ii. Acknowledgments by Geo. Upsum that he is indebted to Capt. John Pearce 3l. 12s. 3d., and by William Perrier that he is indebted 1l., both sums payable on demand.— 12 November 1652. [½ page each.]