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William and Mary: December 1691

Pages 21-80

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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December 1691

Dec. 1. A State of the proceedings of the Committee on the Alnage Bill. [S.P. Dom. Will. and Mary 3, No. 85.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. The King has commanded the Attorney and Solicitor-General of England and Lord Chief Justice Reynell and the Attorney and SolicitorGeneral of Ireland to meet and consider of the capitulation [of Limerick.] The King does not think it fit the embargo should yet be taken off. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 275.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. The King has ordered the Treasury to direct the issue of money to the army when Lieut.-Gen. Ginckle has left Ireland, so the inconveniences will be prevented which you apprehend. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 276.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord-Justice Conningsby. What you desire in relation to the Ulster regiment is very reasonable; the King has already ordered two to be brought over. [Ibid.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the late Mayor, and divers of the aldermen of the borough of Warwick. Shows that the said borough is an ancient one having divers liberties, and privileges, &c. and having been incorporated, and enjoying many other liberties by grants of former kings; that by reason of an Order of Council, made the 26 of April, 1688, for discharging all the officers of the said corporation by their names pursuant to a power for that purpose reserved in a charter of King Charles II., the said officers looked upon themselves as displaced, and so ceased acting until the 13th of December following when Fulke, Lord Brooke, recorder there, and the last mayor and aldermen, resumed their several places, "to keep the inferior people in awe who were then tumultuous," expecting to have been settled by some general Act of Parliament. But the same not being done, and many questions and ambiguities arising touching their authority, they have been compelled for their own security to cease acting from the 13th of September last, since which time there has been "no face of a corporation" in the said borough, for want of which divers disorders do daily arise; and there being no remedy, as they are advised, but by a new charter, they pray to have one granted, incorporating them with the privileges to the said borough which may be for the good government thereof. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 216.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Henry Killegrew. Shows that Edmund Robinson of Bank End in the parish of Burton in Yorkshire, was executed at York in March last for coining, and that he had an estate to the value of 8l. or 9l. a year, of which there was no seizure made, as likewise a personal estate of about 50l. or 60l. which the sheriff seized. The petitioner thinks that if enquiry be made, Robinson's estate may be found of greater value, and he prays for a grant of the real estate of the said prisoner, not exceeding 20l. a year. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. 2, p. 274.]
Dec. 1. Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Kemorrick. Shows that he was, before the late rebellion in Ireland, "Weightmaster." there by letters patent, but being compelled to come to England for refuge, his house was plundered, and his patent lost; he therefore prays his said patent may be renewed, and that power may be added thereto for him to erect market places in all market towns of Ireland for the sale of hides. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 275.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Vicount Sydney to the Lords of the Admiralty. By the King's commands, I wrote to your Lordship out of Flanders on the 18/28 August last to give orders for the discharge of the ship the St. Claire, Capt. Michael Mansfelt, commander, but that letter not having the intended effect, or the owner of the said ship the full benefit of that favour which the King thereby designed him in regard of the property that was vested in the privateer who made her a prize, and the parties therein concerned being now agreed, the King is pleased to remit his tenth of the said prize, and therefore you are to give order that the said ship may be delivered to the owner. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 66.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance to cause certain metal and mortar-peices remaining at the Tower and at Woolwich found to be defective and unserviceable to be cast into new serviceable brass ordnance, and mortar-pieces, for the artillery. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 228.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Sharp, messenger in ordinary, to repair on board the Katherine, yacht, and with the assistance of the captain to go to, and search on board, the ship Treasure for all such persons as he shall have reason to suspect of any treasonable designs and for all persons going beyond sea without any pass, and having found them to apprehend, and seize them and their papers, and bring them in safe custody before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 231.]
Dec. 2/12.
Brussels.
Major-Gen. Everard Van Weede to the King. Touching the dispute between the Elector of Brandenburg, the Marquis de Castanaga, &c. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 96.]
Dec. 2/12.
Brussels.
Memorandum by Ferdinando Perez de Olmedo. Regrets that he cannot comply with the wishes of the King, as set before him by Mons. de Dyckvelt, with regard to the treaty with the troops of Elector of Brandenburg; states his reasons. [Ibid., No. 97.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Maria Hoffmans, and her three children, Andries Hermanse, his wife, and two children, and Anthony Harder, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 152]; and for Mr. William de Schuylenburg, and Dirck Koene, his servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 153.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Declaration requiring all officers and soldiers to observe strict discipline, and for the payment of quarters. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 6, No. 68.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anne Fitz-Harris, widow. Shows that, to the intent that she and her three children, might no longer be a burden to the Crown, she presented the Lords in Parliament, last session, with a bill for an Act to settle the estate of Sir Edward Fitz-Harris, bart.; but the House directed her to petition the King for leave to petition it. Prays for leave accordingly. Referred to the Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 275.]
Dec. 3.
Kensington.
Commission for John Carr, gent., to be ensign to Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Sandy's company in the first regiment of foot guards. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 97.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Andrew Mayer, to go to Falmouth, and embark for Spain; and for Philebert Perachon, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 153.]
Dec. 4/14.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Refers to the expected arrival of the four regiments of cavalry. He has spoken to the States General of the need of the Prince of Vaudémont for cannon and ammunition for Namur. The Spanish throw many obstacles in the way of Count de Solms. There has been a treaty concluded between the Spaniards and Brandenburg at Brussels. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 98.]
Dec. 4/14.
The Hague.
The same to the same. Has just received a letter from the Baron de Huy, saying that he is ready to join him directly he receives orders from Berlin. The instructions of the King have been carried out by the said Baron and Mons. Diest. Discusses the disposal of troops. [Ibid., No. 99.]
Dec. 4/14.
The Hague.
Count de Winditsgratz to the King. The Emperor, his master, wishes him to communicate what the Prince of Baden has written to him about peace with the Turks; it would be well to keep this letter a profound secret. Refers to the execution of certain designs. [Ibid., No. 100.]
Dec. 4.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Whereas George Talbot, esquire, has petitioned us that the indictment, and process thereupon, against him, for having been in arms against us, may be stopped, the matter was referred to Sir John Temple, AttorneyGeneral for Ireland, who reports that the said Talbot being an Englishman and a Protestant was made captain of a foot company in Ireland in 1681 by the late Duke of Ormonde, then Lord Lieutenant of that Kingdom, where the said Talbot continued in command till 2nd July 1690, the day whereon the late King James departed from Dublin, and then voluntarily surrendered himself and delivered up a quantity of firelocks to Capt. Farlo, then in possession of Dublin Castle. He has also been serviceable to several Protestants, as appears by certificate by the Bishop of Limerick. He has no estate either in England or Ireland and his outlawry can be of no advantage to the Crown, but may be a great prejudice to him; We, taking the said report into our consideration, order that a nolle prosequi be entered upon the indictment. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 399.]
Dec. 4.
Kensington.
Commissions for Joseph Rode, gent., to be ensign of that company, whereof Capt. Thomas Porter is captain in Charles Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot commanded by Lieut.-Col. William Norton [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 98]; and for Christopher Harrison, gent., to be lieutenant of that company whereof Captain Thomas Dore is captain in the same regiment. [Ibid.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the widows and other relations of the company of seamen lately belonging to the Coronation, Captain Skelton, commander. Shows that their husbands and relations had been cast away in the said ship, and they themselves left in a poor condition. Pray for some bounty money. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 276a.]
Dec. 5. Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Same steps have been taken here, during my absence in Flanders, towards the procuring of letters patent to incorporate several persons by the name of the Company of the Royal Fishery of Ireland. Before the grant could pass the great seal, there has been a stop put to it; upon which, I understand, the persons therein concerned, finding they are not likely to get it to pass the Great Seal of England, are endeavouring to get it under that of Ireland. Wherefore I desire that no such grant should pass if any application should be made to you to pass it. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 135.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords of the Admiralty. The King having thought fit to appoint a fourth packet-boat between Harwich and the Brill, called the Providence pink, burthen 120 tons, and carrying 50 men, his Majesty's pleasure is that you order that the said boat be forthwith furnished with firearms, and other stores necessary for her, according to the proportion usually allowed by the Board of Ordnance. [H.O. Admralty 3, p. 67.]
Dec. 5.
Kensington.
Warrant for the presentation of Gregory Hascard, D.D., Dean of Windsor and one of the chaplains in ordinary, to the rectory of Haseley in the county and diocese of Oxford, the same being void, and in the gift of the Crown by lapse. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 117.]
Dec. 6.
Dublin.
Sir Charles Porter to [Viscount Sydney]. Introduces Mr. Dennys Daley, who has been very serviceable to the General, and "always inclinable to the English interest, and to dispose the Irish to submit to their Majesties' obedience." He is comprehended in the articles of Galway and comes over to pray a confirmation of them by his Majesty, and to have his outlawry reversed. [S.P. Ireland 353, No. 101.]
Dec. 7/17.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. I encounter many difficulties. Brandenburg promises that the 6,000 men shall march according to the agreement at Maestricht, but he is exacting in the matter of forage. The lack of provisions has retarded the affair on the Meuse. The Prince of Vaudmont is with the Marquis de Bellemark at Namur. Count de Solms sends me news of the movements of Bouffleurs and Luxemburg. Refers to the arrival of three regiments of cavalry from England. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 101.]
Dec. 7/17. Extract from the Register of the Resolutions of the States General of the Netherlands, of a resolution relating to military preparations, artillery, ammunition, &c. [Ibid., No. 102.]
Dec. 7/17.
Namur.
The Duke of Lorraine to the King. Speaks of the ill conduct of the Marquis of Castanaga, who works against the King. Hears that the Elector of Bavaria seeks the post of Governor of the Low Countries. Since he has been at this place, he has done everything in his power to remedy defects, but has been much thwarted by the Marquis. Refers to what he has done with respect to various works, and the ammunition. Movements of the enemy The arrival of troops from England is anxiously awaited. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 103.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Offley, esq. Shows that by reason of the war with France, pitch, resin, and saltpetre, are raised to excessive rates, and that the plantations in North America abound everywhere with plenty of materials to make these commodities, near navigable rivers, and also materials from which salt-petre may be produced in such plenty, as to supply their Majesties' stores at much cheaper rates than heretofore. Prays for letters patent for the sole making of pitch, tar, resin, and saltpetre, within their Majesties' plantations in North America for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 217.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Letitia Bawdon, widow and executrix of Sir John Bawdon, late of London, merchant. Shows that her said husband consigned several parcels of goods, and merchandize for his account to Terrence Dermot residing then as a factor in the island of Montserrat, which the said Dermot sold and received money for part of it, of which he is indebted to the petitioner, and the other part remains standing in debts in the said island to the value of about 3,000l. sterling; and that since that time the said Dermot returned to Ireland, and executed the office of Lord Mayor under the late King James. An outlawry is sued against the said Dermot, and his estate in Montserrat is granted to Sir Michael Cole. Prays that she may not to be hindered in recovering her just debts from the persons intrusted by the said Dermot. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Stopford, widow of James Stopford, esq. Shows that the petitioner was possessed of several lands in Meath, by mortgages for 740l. in 1634; that the late Earl of Tyrconnel obtained from the late King James, the inheritance of the said lands; and that the petitioner's husband was forced to agree with the said Earl for a lease of 300 years at 100l. per annum. The said Earl's interest being forfeited to the Crown, the Revenue officers threaten to destrain the premises for the said rent and arrears thereon. Prays for a grant, by letters patent, of the premises at a quit rent. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. 2, p. 279.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Martin Clasen, and John Meyer, to go to Gravesend, and Denmark; and for John Renkinck, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 153.]
Dec. 8/18.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. The regiments of cavalry have arrived in good condition. Opinion of the Counsellor Pensionary on military matters. Speaks of the troops of SaxeGotha, and makes suggestions as to them. In the state of affairs existing at present, the enemy keeps them in continual alarm. The behaviour of the Marquis of Castanaga is far from satisfactory, and they anxiously await the news as to who is to be appointed in his place. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 104.]
Dec. 8.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Bailiff and jurats of the island of Jersey. We are informed by the petition of Philip De La Cour, of Jersey, that he being apprehended by the civil officers of the parish of St. Lawrence, in the said island, upon suspicion of stealing a goose and a sheep, was committed to prison, but that afterwards made his escape out of the custody of his keeper. He has prayed us that, he having a poor family to maintain, which has suffered much already, we would pardon his said offence, and permit him to return home. Pardon granted accordingly. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 38.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The King has resolved to remove the Bishop of Meath from the Council, and to admit the Bishop of Kildare; he has also given directions for the despatch of money into Ireland on Mons. Ginckle's departure. All possible care will be taken of the transport ships. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 277.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Bruen of Bruen Stapleford in the county of Chester, esq. Shows that his ancestors, time out of mind, have been owners of a certain common, or waste piece of ground, whereon an old tower or castle formerly stood, anciently called Bruen's Castle alias Kelsbrough Castle adjoining to the forest of Delamere in the said county, with the commons, privileges, and advantages, belonging thereunto, together with a certain quarry of stone there called Bruen's Quarry, and that they continued in the quiet possession thereof till the late civil wars. The title of the petitioner's family to the said premises appears by evidences exemplified under the seal of the County Palatine of Chester, and as that the premises are not granted nor in possession of any particular person, nor of any advantage to the Crown, being of very inconsiderable value, he prays for a grant thereof to him and his heirs, as his ancestors had the same. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 218.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir William Killegrew, knt. Shows that George Sawyer, esq., has obtained a judgment against him in the Court of Common Pleas, in an action of covenant, which was since confirmed in the Court of King's Bench, in which there is manifest error. Prays for leave to bring and prosecute a writ of error in Parliament. Granted. [Ibid.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Edward Carteret, knight. Shows that, in 1649, he was in Jersey, a sworn servant to King Charles II., and that he is one of the most ancient servants living, of Royal Family. In consideration of his long and faithful services, he had, in 1686, a pension of 8s. per diem which was paid to July 1, 1688; prays for a warrant for the payment of arrears. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. 2, p. 276a.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Pelet, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for John Duerman and Evert Janse, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 153]; and for Hermen Hermense to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 154.]
Dec. 8.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Recorder and Sheriffs of London, to forbear putting into execution that part of the sentence passed upon Matthias Browne (for spreading a false rumour of taking of the city of Limerick, which was not taken, when he made that report) which directed that he should stand upon the pillory. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 232.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Lord Lucas. Mr. Dorrington, now a prisoner in the Tower for high treason, having by his petition represented to the King that, by reason of his close confinement there, he is very much impaired in his health, and having therefore prayed the liberty of the Tower, as other prisoners have, and that his relations and friends may have freedom of access to him, his Majesty is pleased to command me to tell you that the said Mr. Dorrington is to have what he requests. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 90.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Henry Pierson—who by discovering divers treasonable practices against the government is in debt— for a grant of the fine of 200l. imposed upon Thomas Thurlow, clerk, for misdemeanour. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 276b.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Henry Wray, bart., who being a prisoner of war, prays for a grant for his liberty on giving good security. Granted; the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners, being directed to take bond for his good behaviour. [Ibid., p. 277b.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, to deliver to a messenger, Martin Bertillier, a French papist, arrested as a spy. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 232.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Jones, one of the messengers in ordinary, to receive the body of the said prisoner and retain him in custody. [Ibid. p 234.]
Dec. 10–12. "Project des Espagnols" submitted to the King. The Marquis de Castanaga wishes to second the King's plans as to the safety of various countries under the protection of the Allies and submits arrangements as to the troops, &c. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 105.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
The King's Warrant suspending the Bishop of Meath from the Privy Council. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 277.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
A like warrant appointing the Bishop of Kildare to the place vacated as above. [Ibid., p. 278.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. It is the King's pleasure that you grant to Col. Henry Luttrell a custodium of the estate whereof his brother Col. Simon Luttrell was lately seized, as desired in his petition. [Ibid., p. 137.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Danish secretary here having lately delivered a memorial to the King, touching the ship the Prophet Daniel, now under an arrest in the Isle of Wight, and some other ships belonging to the subjects of the King his master, lately made prizes, his Majesty commands me to send you a copy of the said memorial, that you give such directions upon a discharge for the ships as the justice of that cause may require. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 91.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Treasury. The King being pleased to allow the recruits which shall be sent over into Flanders a free passage on board the packet boats between Harwich and the Brill, has commanded me to acquaint you therewith, that you may give orders to the Postmaster-General to take care that the said recruits be allowed a free passage. [Ibid.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the wives and widows of the seamen lately belonging to the Woolwich. Shows that their husbands some being dead, some turned over to other ships, and some in arrears for 24 months' pay, they, having a charge of children, are reduced to great necessity. They pray for payment of wages to be made to them. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 277b.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Roffey and John Hodges, praying a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [Ibid., p. 279.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Edgworth. Shows that without levy-money he formed for the King's service one of the best regiments then in England, and that he completed the companies to sixty, three serjeants, three corporals, and two drummers, according to the English establishment; but not having the order for completing the companies to sixty men each, ready to produce at the muster, he was respited ten men, a serjeant and drummer in each company. Prays that the said respite may be taken off. Referred to the Paymaster in Ireland and Major-Gen. Talmash. [Ibid., p. 280.]
Dec. 10. Pass for Massilian Calmell, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 154.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to prepare a bill containing a grant to Charles Morton and Samuel Weale, of the sole use of their invention of an engine for beating, pounding, or stamping all sorts of mineral ores, hemp and flax, and that may also be applied to many other things that require pounding, beating, or stamping. If "disjoined," a part may be usefully applied for raising or drawing up of ore work and other things out of mines, and coal pits. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 233.]
Dec. 11/21.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. The enemy is continually on the move; discusses, in the event of an encounter, what result may be expected. I have demanded of Castanaga the 6,000 men agreed on at Maestricht. Speaks of the further movements of the army, and details of the campaign. The Elector of Brandenburg wishes to conduct the operations on the Meuse and Moselle. Count de Solms is again at variance with the Spanish. Everyone wonders why you act as you do with regard to various companies of soldiers in your service; I have assured them that I know nothing, but that it is necessary to keep the troops at Zell. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 106.]
Dec. 11/21.
Brussels.
Memorandum for Mons. Dopft together with the opinion of the Prince of Waldeck on the points it contains, These points concern the movements and the arrangements of the allied troops; one is as to the rank of Lieut.-Gen. Mackay. In England his rank is that of lieutenant-general, but in Holland only that of major-general. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mainhart, Duke of Leinster. Shows that he designes to search for wreck upon the coast of America. Prays for letters patent granting to him all wrecks that may happen within the latitude of 12 degrees south and 40 north, for a period of 20 years. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 277a.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jurrie Beniengh, Gisbert van Doenk, Jaspar Stevens, Henrick Messes, Rolof Roelofsen, Arien Lambertsen, Jan Beskes, Dores Mom, and Andries Frederickse, nine Dutch soldiers, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; for Christopher Root, ditto; and for Hermanus Kryger, Henrick Steegelits, Johannes Quartier, —Feyell, Anthony Servaes, and —De Clou, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 154.]
Dec. 12/22.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Refers to the difficulty of his position. Count de Solms demands a high position in the government. Sentiments the Prince of Vaudemont; the writer thinks he should go to Brussels before the arrival of the Elector of Bavaria. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 108.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Col. Ferdinando Hastings having desired leave to come over to England for the recovery of his health, it is the King's pleasure that you forthwith give him leave. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 135.]
Dec. 12. The same to the same. I have represented to the King that there is some reason to think that several of the late proprietors of the greatest part of those forfeited lands in Ireland, which the King has made a grant of to me, claiming the benefit of the capitulation of Limerick, within which they are comprised, will expect to be restored to their estates, and by that, by such means, I shall be defeated of the estates of the late Lord Bellew, Walter Bellew, and Dudley Bagnall, which have been granted to me by letters patent, as likewise of those lately belonging to Sir John Fleming, the late Lord Netterfield, and Eustace, for which I have a firm promise.
His Majesty was thereupon pleased to tell me that he thinks fit to ratify and confirm the several articles of capitulation as far as it is in his power, yet further than that, it could not be intended; nor does he think himself obliged to do it. Therefore as to those parts of the above-mentioned estates, being actually passed away to me under the Great Seal, and the others by promise, he thinks it a thing out of his power to maintain the said articles, and intends that I should still keep possession of them according to his grant and promise.
With this I thought it necessary to acquaint you, so that when any of the late proprietors shall lay claim to the above-mentioned estates, pretending to be restored thereto by virtue of the said capitulation, you may be able to secure my tenants in quiet and peaceable possession. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 136.]
Dec. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant to appoint Augustin Frazer, clerk, chief chaplain of Chelsea hospital. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 98.]
Dec. 13/23.
Brussels.
Count (?) Henry de Lorraine to the King. I have just returned from Namur, where I have improved matters a little. The Prince of Waldeck imforms me that the States-General have agreed to [send] the ammunition I have asked for; but so long as Castanaga is at the head of affairs in the Low Countries nothing important can be done there. Directly the Elector of Bavaria is made Governor, fresh efforts will be made. We think the design of the enemy is to attract the attention of their troops towards the Meuse and Sambre, and then to attack Flanders. I have formed a project with the other commanders to frustrate their designs. We are anxiously waiting the arrival of the infantry from England. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 109.]
Dec. 14/24.
Hague.
—to the Landgrave of Hesse Cassel. Progress of events on the Continent. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 110.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Captain William Watten. As I am desirous to show some act of favour to Major John Powndall, late muster-master of the militia within the county of Kent, I have thought fit to direct and authorise you, that—upon his performing the duty of mustermaster, within the two lathes of St. Augustine's and Shepway within the said county in duly mustering the men and examining the arms of the two regiments of foot, and two troops of horse, within the said lathes according to the Act of Parliament in that case made and provided—you permit and suffer him to receive the profits of the said two regiments to his own proper use. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 92.]
Dec. 15/25.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. I enclose a memorandum showing the present state of affairs. His Imperial Majesty has sent to ask the views of the States as to Savoy; not knowing your opinion on this subject, I have found it difficult to advise. Details of the campaign. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 111.]
Dec. 15/25.
The Hague.
Memorandum for the King, drawn up by the Prince of Waldeck. The Prince of Vaudemont and Count de Solms have gone to Brussels to discuss various measures and I have sent Colonel Lindeboom to represent my views. I do not think they have a sufficient force to carry out the plans of the Prince of Vaudemont. Discusses propositions that have been made. It is impossible to supply the English troops with provisions from those apportioned for the army of the States. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 112.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Mons. De la Fouteresse. The King having read your memorial of the 19 past, in which you propose a free navigation of the north sea on behalf of the Crown of Denmark, being desirous to testify his sincere desire for a good correspondence between the two Crowns, has charged Lord Dursley, his minister to the States General, on his arrival at the Hague, to communicate your memorial to the Pensionary of Holland. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 92.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Simon, Bishop of Limerick. Shows that his Majesty after his happy return from Ireland was pleased to signify his pleasure to translate him to the bishopric of Elphin in Connaught, when that province should be reduced, and accordingly gave a letter under the Sign Manual for that purpose bearing date the 4th of December, 1690, which said bishopric the petitioner thankfully accepts. But his circumstances (by the loss sustained in houses, stock, &c., to the value of above 3,000l. besides loss of private rents) are so low that he cannot defray the expence of his translation. And whereas some rent is due from the tenants of the diocese Elphin, of which he fears little will be got; prays for the arrears due out of the said bishopric since the date of his Majesty's letters, and for the first fruits which amount but to 80l. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 219.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Jones, merchant of Plymouth, owner of the ship Hawk, which was taken by a French man-of-war and retaken by the Dreadnought, Captain Beaumont, commander, and brought into Spithead; prays for the restitution of his ship and goods, he gratifying the captain that retook her. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. 2, p. 278.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Commission for Daniel Harvey to be guidon and major of the second troop of guards. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 100.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, allowing 2,100l. sterling to George Hamilton of Barnton, out of the surplus of the Supply and Excise, over the 48,000l. sterling he is obliged to advance to the Forces, and 130l. sterling to William Duff "out of the first and readiest of his intromission with the revenue." [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 35.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland for paying half a crown per day to the master-gunner of Fort William, and 1s. 3d. to each of his two mates, with 4s. per day to the keeper of the magazine there, and 100l. to be paid for coal and candle furnished by Col. Hill and 25l. sterling yearly to be allowed for candle to that garrison. [Ibid., p. 36.]
Dec. 15. Warrant to George Hamilton of Barnton for payment of 700l. sterling to the Earl of Argyll to an account of the arrears of the retention money due to his regiment. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 100l. to Col. Hill to an account of the arrears of the retention money for buying and furnishing provisions for the use of the forces. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 36.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 500l. to Col. Cunningham for like arrears to his regiment. [Ibid., p. 37.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 500l. to Col. Buchan for the same. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 50l. to Lieut.-Col. Robert Lumisden for the same. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 100l. to Major George Wishart for the same to his independent company. [Ibid., p. 38.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 50l. to Captain George Monro for the same. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 50l. to Captain Archibald Murray for the same. [Ibid., p. 39.]
Dec. 15. The like for payment of 50l. to Captain Hugh McKay for the same. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15. The King to the Earl of Argyll. You are to send orders to your major to march a detachment of 400 men, out of your regiment to Dunstaffnage, with all diligence, to be transported from thence to Inverlochy by sea. And we have given orders to Col. Hill to pay the boats that shall transport them. And we desire you will send 300 good and well-armed men, with 14 days provision, to be transported with the detachment aforesaid to Inverlochy, there to receive their orders from Col. Hill or the person in command there. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Sir James Lesley. You are to repair to your regiment with all speed, and to give orders to your major to march the seven companies of your regiment, in or about Perth or Dundee, to Inverness, there to remain till further orders. [Ibid., p. 40.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Col. John Buchan. You are, with all diligence, to march these six companies of your regiment, now at Aberdeen, to join the rest of your regiment at Inverness, there to remain till further orders. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Captain Robert Lumisden. You are with all diligence to march, with a detachment of 50 good well-armed men, out of your independent company in garrison in the "Blair of Atholl," to Fort William in Inverlochy, there to remain, till they receive further orders from Col. Hill, or other person in command there. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Captain George Wishart. You are with all diligence to march with a detachment of 50 good, well-armed men out of your independent company in garrison at Abergeldie, to Inverness, there to remain till further order from Col. John Buchan, or other person in command there. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The King to Captain George Monro. You are with all diligence to march with a detachment of 50 good, well-armed men, out of your indepenpent company in garrison at Finlarig, to Fort William in Inverlochy, there to receive orders from Col. Hill, or other person in command there. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 41.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Captain Archibald Murray. You are with all diligence to march with a detachment of 50 good well-armed men, out of your independent company in garrison in Bellandallock, to Inverness, there to remain till they receive further orders from Col. John Buchan, or other person in command there. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
The same to Captain Hugh McKay. You are with all diligence to march with a detachment of 50 good, well-armed men, out of your independent company in garrison in Ruthven of Badenoch (sic), to Inverness, there to remain till they receive further orders from Col. John Buchanan (sic), or other person in command there. [Ibid.]
Dec. 16.
Rochester.
William Lavender to Sir Joseph Williamson. I have this day summoned my brethren and several of the principal citizens of this city, to inquire what prejudices accrue to them by hawkers, pedlars, and itinerant chapmen, and they all agree, nemine contradicente, that they are the greatest nuisance they meet with and without a suppression of that sort of people they cannot pay scot and lot, rents, &c. I pray your utmost endeavour with Capt. Banks our other citizen (sic) to suppress these persons. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 3, No. 86.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Mayor of Harwich. Having received a particular information of the circumstances of Mr. Bagnall's case, who is under custody at Harwich, I think it fit he should have his liberty, and you are to discharge him and permit him to embark on the first packet boat that shall sail for Holland. [H. O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 93.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anne Fitzharris widow of Edward Fitzharris, esq., on behalf of herself and children. Shows that the attainder of the said Edward is an impediment to her and her children in several things fit to be done in their behalf; therefore, prays that her children may be restored in blood. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 278.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Gilbert Edwards, "exempt in the second troop of guards." Shows that Sir Patrick Trant(?) is indebted to him by bond in 320l., Sir Patrick's estate being confiscated and 17,000l., part thereof, paid into the Exchequer, the petitioner petitioned his Majesty, about Easter last, and was assured of a just and fair dealing herein; but being on the King's service in Flanders, he had no opportunity of making any further application. Prays for satisfaction of the said debt. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 280.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Corry. Shows that in 1689 his house of Castle Coole near Inniskillin, together with several other houses, were burnt to the ground, and the men, to the number of 60, appointed by the petitioner for the defence of the said houses, ordered into Inniskillin, by the King's Governor for the better defence of that Castle; and that, moreover, vast quantities of wheat, malt, and other provisions and goods to the value of 3,000l. were made use of for the service of the Castle. By all this the petitioner is reduced to poverty. Prays for some consideration of his services. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 281.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. James de Carbonnel, and Mr. Humphrey Walcot, to go to Portsmouth and embark for Spain, recommended by Mr. Thomas Carbonnel merchant in Mark Lane. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 154.]
Dec. 17—Jan. 21. Notes of proceedings in Parliament touching the Bill of Treasons. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 3, No. 87.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Privy Seal. The King commands me to tell you, that you forbear to pass the bill now lying before you, for incorporating the several persons therein named, in a company to be called the Company of the Royal Fishery of Ireland, till his Majesty shall have declared his further pleasure to you. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 93.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the crew of the ship Ruby. Shows that they served almost four years and received only a month's pay; pray that they may be paid. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 281.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. James Chetwood, John Cookshank, Thomas Mercer, and William Drake, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 155.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Nash praying to be restored to his place of Receiver-General of the Revenues of South Wales, Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 281.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance, to cause five barrels of cannon powder to be issued to the Mayor of Hastings for the defence of the town and harbour. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 227.]
Dec. 18.
Kensington.
Commission for William Selwyn to be colonel of the regiment of foot lately commanded by Lieutenant-General Percy Kirke. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 99.]
Dec. 18. Pass for Captain John Peirie of Aberdeen to go with the ship Lion to the Mediterranean. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 41.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords-Justices of Ireland to grant to George Tollet, gent., the office of Controller-General and Accountant-General of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 401.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Licence for William Lacey, esq., high sheriff of the county of Somerset to reside out of the county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 39.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Edgeworth. Praying —in consideration of the services and sufferings of himself and his sons—for some employment, military or civil, in Ireland or elsewhere. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 282.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Colonel William Stuart, praying to be paid the sum of 2,280l. 10s. 9d., spent by him upon his regiment. Referred to the Earl of Ranelagh, and Charles Fox. [Ibid., p. 284.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Richard Bulkeley, bart., praying letters patent for holding a market for live beasts at the town of Dunlaoar (Dunleer ?), in Ireland, every Friday, and another weekly market on Saturday for the convenience of the said town and neighbourhood, at the like rents as are contained by his present letters patent. Referred to Sir John Temple, Attorney-General of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 309.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices. The petition of Mr. Matthew Barry, praying to be restored to his office of Clerk of the Council in Ireland, having been read on Thursday last before the King and Council here, I gave the King a short but full account of the state of Mr. Barry's case, which to the best of my remembrance was that he had been Clerk of the Council there for about 30 years past, during which time I never heard but that he behaved himself very well in that office, that he continuing Clerk of the Council in the late Earl of Tyrconnell's time did behave himself very ill in it having been eminently active and instrumental in the persecution which was then begun against the protestants there, that after the abdication, he acted under King James for several months and amongst other things drew up the proclamation which styled the King a usurper, or went about to procure the hands of several privy councillors to it, and that thereupon Mr. Coningsby and I being satisfied of the truth of all this, thought him a person not fit to be employed in a post of so great trust as that of Clerk of the Council, having for our further satisfaction advised with the Commissioners of the Great Seal, the Judges who were then there and with Mr. Serjeant Osborn about it. They all gave their opinion that Mr. Barry had been guilty of high treason which confirmed us in our resolution of not letting him act in that employment, and so gave the office to Mr. Pulteney.
Having given the King this account of the whole matter he seemed well satisfied with it; yet, that the petition might have its due course it was ordered in council that the same should be referred to you to consider and report your opinion upon it, and that in the meantime Mr. Barry should continue suspended. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 137.]
Dec. 19. The same to the same. Recommending Mr. John Francis, a relation of Mr. Solicitor Levinge, and at present dwelling with him in Dublin, for the first good ecclesiastical preferment that should become void. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 139.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices. The Earl of Scarborough having a judgment upon Col. Patrick Sarsfield's estate for 700l. and upwards, which has some time since been entered up, whereby the same has become a legal incumbrance upon the said estate, the King thinks it reasonable that Lord Scarborough should have the benefit the reof and directs that you grant a custodium of the said estate to his lordship if the same be seized into the King's hands. [Ibid., p. 150.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant for the royal assent to the election of Thomas Tennison, D.D., one of our chaplains in ordinary, as Bishop of Lincoln, the bishopric being void by the death of Dr. Thomas Barlow, late bishop thereof. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 117.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Pass for Gregory Bludner, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 155.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the shipwrights, ropemakers, and other workmen belonging to the dock yards and rope yards, praying for an order for the payment of their wages which are in arrear. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 277a.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for encouraging seamen and mariners to enter themselves on their Majesties' ships of war. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 6, No. 69.]
Dec. 21.
Kensington.
License for Henry Neale, esq., high sheriff of Buckinghamshire to dwell out of the county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 39.]
Dec. 21.
Kensington.
License for John Neale, esq., high sheriff of Bedfordshire to dwell out of the county. [Ibid.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Hatton, gentleman. Shows that he has invented a new way of making paper in great quantities and with less charge, and more advantages, than any that has been as yet practised in England, by means of a mill driven either by wind or water. Prays for letters patent for the sole use of his invention, for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 283.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Evan Jones and Benjamin Wood. Shows that they have found out a method to carry and entertain all such as shall have occasion to travel on horseback on all the high roads in this kingdom, to and from the city of London, upon such easy, cheap and safe terms, as will be acceptable and beneficial to the public. Pray for a license to go on with the same undertaking, and that the same may be called the "Traveller's Guide, licensed by their Majesties." Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mathias Fowler and Richard Benger, and other tradesmen of Marlborough, co. Wilts, praying for the payment of 155l. 7s. 6d., being by them advanced to two troops of horse, commanded by Captain Nevill, and Captain Coole, in the Duke of Lienster's regiment, after their return from Ireland and whilst quartered in the said city (sic). Referred to Charles Fox, paymaster of the forces in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 284.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Sends them the order made upon the petition of Mr. Matthew Barry, that they may be better enabled to make their report. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 140.]
Dec. 21.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant his dispensation to Thomas, Bishop elect of Lincoln, to hold in commendam until the 1st of July next, the vicarage of St. Martin in the Fields, and the rectory of St. James, Westminster, both in the diocese of London. [H.O. Church Book 1, p 118.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Captain Robert Read to go to Edinburgh. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 155.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Sir Robert Cotton, bart., and Thomas Franckland, esq. The King commands me to let you know, that you should stop the dispatch of the foreign mail, till to-morrow at noon. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 93.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Governor and Company of Copper Miners. Shows that after great expence and charges they are now carrying on the melting and refining of copper out of English ore, whereby great advantages will accrue to the nation. Pray that, for their encouragement in the making of English copper, and in consideration of 2,000l. which they are willing to pay yearly, they may have full power to make and vend farthings, halfpence, and pence of English copper for 3 years. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 219.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Lovet of Dublin, merchant, on behalf of himself and several of the nobility, gentry, and merchants of Ireland.
Shows that the sea coast of Ireland is stored with plenty of fish, which, if well cured and saved, would greatly increase the revenue of Ireland, and be very beneficial to the King's subjects there by employing the poor inhabitants of both sexes.
That by reason of the poverty to which Ireland is reduced, the said trade cannot be supported and carried on without a joint-stock which cannot be otherwise raised than by creating a corporation into which many persons of quality and fortune in that kingdom are desirous to come.
The petitioners therefore pray for a grant of incorporation "into a Royal Fishery." Referred to Sir Charles Porter and Thomas Conningsby, Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 140.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Enclosing the above petition, and requesting a speedy report thereon. [Ibid., p. 142.]
Dec. 23. Petition of John Lord Delawarr to the House of Commons, praying that they will not permit Sir John Cutler to resume his privilege as member of their House, which he had formerly waived, in a chancery suit, as to a debt contracted by Charles, late Lord Delawarr. [S.P. Dom. Will, and Mary 3, No. 88.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert, Lord Lucas, to have the estate lately belonging to Thomas Eustace, late of Confey in the county of Kildare, passed by letters patent of Charles II. to Sir Edward Sutton and his heirs, and by him conveyed to the petitioner and his heirs; shows that the late Lord Tyrconnel, since King William's accession, has obtained a grant thereof from King James in Ireland. Desires, therefore, to have the same estate passed by letters patent to him and his heirs. Referred to the Lord-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 287.]
Dec. 23. Sir C. Hedges to [the Earl of Nottingham]. Having examined the cases of two of the Portuguese ships, mentioned in the enclosed, which are all that have been proceeded against in the Court of Admiralty, I find that the Nostra Dame de Penla de Franca, pretended to be bound for Hamburg, was taken about Scilly in a direct course for Ireland by the Bonadventure, frigate, Capt. Mees, commander, and brought into Plymouth on the 5th of May, 1690, and almost all the lading pillaged by the captors. The master of this ship being examined, and the ships' papers tranmitted to the Court of Admiralty, a claim was made in the name of Pedro d'Acosta Silva, of Lisbon, for the ship and 18 tuns of wine and another claim for 30 tuns of wine, and the rest of the lading for Thomas, of Hamburg.
Thomas of Hamburg. Among the ship's papers was the King of Portugal's pass for the ship, as belonging to the said Pedro d'Acosta, and a French pass for the said ship to Hamburg, and the master having sworn that he was put in by the said Pedro it seemed at first sufficient to prove that the property of the ship belonged to him; but it afterwards appearing that the said Pedro had given in a false claim for the goods and that the claim of Thomas was only colourable, they being fully proved to belong to Frenchmen. And in regard that the claimer declined making any other proofs, the ship and lading were condemned as good prize, not mentioning anything of the treaty with Holland. If the parties concerned thought themselves aggrieved they had a proper remedy by appeal, and it is not a business of state, since there is room for redress in the ordinary way.
The other ship called the St. Francis taken by the Garland frigate, and pillaged by the commander, his officers and crew, appears to have been a Dutch prize, set out at Brest by one Le Duque, a Frenchman, designed first for Dunkirk or Calais with salt and wine, and so to the East Country to fetch pitch and tar. She has two masters, one a Portuguese and the other a Frenchman, and four of the seamen are French. The care of the first voyage to Dunkirk or Calais seems to be committed to the French master, the Portuguese to be only for colour. This ship and lading were condemed as belonging to the French, from which condemnation the Portugese claimers appealed, but not proceeding therein, the cause was remitted to me whereby the former sentence was confirmed, and is now passed in rem judicatam which is the same by the laws of nations as a record is in Westminster Hall or by the Common Law. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 265.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Post warrants for Mr. William Leach to go to Portsmouth, and for Peter Newlyn, messenger, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 155.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
License for Peter Leigh of Booth, esq., high sheriff of the county of Chester to live out of that county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 39.]
Dec. 24.
Kensington.
License for Sir William Craven, knt., high sheriff of Northamptonshire to live out of that county. [Ibid. 2, p. 44.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Patrickson, gent. Shows that he, having a lawful right and interest of fishing in the rivers of Irt and End and other waters in Cumberland, is desirous to erect a fishery in the said rivers and waters in the said county, by which a great number of poor will be set at work; but as the said undertaking will be costly, it cannot be carried on without a joint stock. Prays for letters patent incorporating him with such other persons as he shall nominate. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 221.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter Gaultier, praying to be heard as to his new invention of making fine paper. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid. 2, p. 285.]
Dec. 24.
Kensington.
Commission for Lewis Renè Royrand, gent., to be lieutenant of the company, whereof Capt. Edward Woodcock is captain in Charles, Earl of Monmouth's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 227.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Pass for Francis Couppett, to go to Harwich and Holland, recommended by Pierre Degaléniere, French minister. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 155.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to prepare a bill containing a grant to John Palmer, esq., of the place or office of Secretary of the Islands of St. Christopher, Nevis Montserrat, Antigua, and other the Leward Carribbee Islands in America, in the room of Thomas Fernley, esq., deceased. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 234.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Calendarers of London, praying to be incorporated by charter. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 285.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Mayor of Dover. I have your letter, concerning Marke Guile, the master of a fishing smack of Barking, whom you have secured with his vessel, upon suspicion of transporting wool to France; he stands accused upon oath of other crimes, and therefore you must oblige him to find sufficient sureties for his appearance, at the next assizes to be held for Kent. Care will be taken to prosecute him, and if any further evidence against him comes to your hands, you must transmit the same to me. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 94.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon a report of the Solicitor-General in favour of Mr. Offley's petition for a patent for making pitch, tar, rosin, and saltpetre in North America. Referred to the Committee for Trade and Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 220.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Lord Chancellor Porter. Lady Dorchester desires me to recommend her affairs in Ireland to you, to which purpose I presume I need only acquaint you that she now stands very well at Court.
I take this opportunity to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 23rd past concerning Mr. Pulteney, and in answer to it, I am to desire you will deliver out his patent to the person who will be directed to wait upon you. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 143.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. The King upon considering your letters of the 11th, 12th, and 18th inst., directs as follows:—
He still thinks it necessary that you should prevail with as many of the Irish as you can to return home and live quietly, which he did not intend should be suspended till Col. Lutterell's arrival, who was only to be assisting you in the more speedy performance of that service; but he approves your reason of forbearing to do so till after the sailing of Col. Sarsfield with the men accompanying him into France. These being gone, he would have you proceed on the despatch of this matter with all speed.
As there may be several "who have no home to receive them, or none, at least, which can yield them a subsistance," he is content that out of these and any others, who upon such like reasons shall insist upon being employed, you form a regiment of two battalions, each of seven companies, and both not exceeding 1,400 men, besides officers, for the Emperor's service. This is the most that the King will allow to be employed, after you have endeavoured to persuade as many as you can to stay; he would, therefore, have you enquire into the number, and quality of those Irish who expect to be entertained in his service, an account of which you are to send here.
As to the artillery intended to be sent from Limerick, the King would have it remain there till the spring; then a convoy will be sent to bring it away. In the meantime, you are to take care to secure it.
As to appointing a Physician of State, to be physician to the army, the King thinks it unnecessary now.
I have delivered your letter about the coats, &c., and as to the heralds and some other crown officers, to the Lord Chamberlain, who is the proper officer to take the King's directions thereon. The King ordered, on the last council day, the ratification to be despatched of the articles of Limerick. [Ibid., p. 278. See also S.P. Ireland 353, No. 102.]
Dec. 26.
Kensington.
Commission for Francis Chantrell to be captain of the company whereof Colonel William Selwyn was captain in the second regiment of guards called the Coldstreamers, commanded by MajorGeneral Thomas Talmash. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 99.]
Dec. 26.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a warrant to the Treasury and to the Postmaster-General of England, to pay to William Aglionby, esq., appointed agent to the King of Spain, the sum of 40s. by the day, commencing from the day of his departure, and to continue until his return. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 235.]
Dec. 26. Allowance of the expenses of Mr. Edmund Poley, Envoy Extraordinary to the Duke of Savoy, from the 1st July, old style, to the 1st of December last, new style. [Ibid., p. 237.]
Dec. 28.
Kensington.
License to Sir Nathaniel Curzon, bart., high sheriff of Derbyshire, to dwell out of that county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 40.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Friend. Shows that he has served in the late expedition in Ireland under Capt. Nedbury in Col. Babington's regiment, at the surrender of Charlemont, and falling then very sick was discharged, as may appear by a note of the said Capt. Nedbuy, dated the 13th of May 1691; he has also had two sons killed in the said war, who might have been his support now. Prays for a beadman's place in the Cathedral Church of Worcester. Granted, if vacant. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 223.]
Dec. 28.
Kensington.
Commission for James Francis, gent., to be ensign of that company whereof Captain Edward Crofts is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Charles Trelawney. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 100.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles, Earl of Manchester. Shows that King Charles II. by letters patent dated the 22nd day of March in the 13th year of his reign, granted to the petitioner's grandfather the two hundreds of Toseland and Leightonstone in the county of Huntingdon with all privileges and advantages thereunto belonging, and also the office of bailiff of the said hundreds for the terme of 31 years, under the yearly rent of 50s. 9d. The term having nearly expired, he prays to have his grant renewed upon the same conditions. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 222.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Farrar, of Chester. Shows that he is a very poor old man, and through age is become "dim of sight, and passed labour," and incapable of supporting his family. Prays for an almsman's place, now void, in the Cathedral Church of Chester. Granted. [Ibid.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Molesworth, bart., praying for redress under the following circumstances:—Sir Hender Molesworth, his brother, being required by the late Duke of Albemarle, then Governor of Jamaica, to enter into a bond or recognizance with 17 other persons, in the sum of 100,000l. on condition that the said Sir Hender Molesworth should on his repairing into England answer his Majesty's demands, concerning the treasure taken out of a wreck near Hispaniola, and imported into Jamaica.
In October 1688 the said Sir Hender arriving in London accordingly addressed himself to the late King, who declared by Order of Council, dated the 12th of October 1688, that Sir Hender had surrendered himself according to the condition in the said recognizance mentioned, and that he did not think fit to require any further security from him, and thereby ordered that the recognizance should be vacated and that the Duke should deliver up to him or his agents the same when required; and in pursuance of that order a letter was signed under the sign manual dated the 17th of October 1688 requiring the delivery of the said recognizance, and the vacation of same.
But the Duke of Albemarle having died long before he received those letters, the Duchess refuses to perform the same without his Majesty's command under the privy seal. Referred to the Committee for Trade and Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 224.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth Felton, by Thomas Felton, esq., her father. Shows that Thomas Howard, the petitioner's ancestor, was by the late Queen Elizabeth in the 39th year of her reign, summoned to Parliament by the title of Lord Howard of Walden; that the said Thomas Howard, did thereupon sit in that parliament and vote as a peer; that by the said sitting and voting, the petitioner's ancestor's blood was ennobled, and he, by the laws and customs of the kingdom, had an inheritance to him, and his lineal heirs in the said dignity, which dignity after the death of the said Thomas, who in 1 James I. was created Earl of Suffolk, descended to Theophilus his son and heir, and after Theophilus to James his son and heir; that James late Earl of Suffolk, being seized of the said dignity of Lord Walden of such estate as aforesaid, died, leaving Lady Essex Griffin, his eldest daughter, and the petitioner his grandchild, only daughter and heir of Elizabeth Felton, his other daughter, his co-heirs; that the said Lady Essex Griffin and the petitioner are also lineal heirs of the said Thomas, first Lord Walden; and that the said dignity and honour is indivisable and by the law of custom of this kingdom, your Majesty may confer the same on either of the co-heirs. The petitioner therefore prays to have the said dignity conferred on her, as one of the co-heirs of James, Earl of Suffolk, and one of the lineal heirs of the said Thomas, first Lord Walden. Referred to the House of Peers. [Ibid. 2, p. 286, and S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 3, No. 89.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Having signed a reference to your Lordships upon the petition of Lord Lucas, praying letters patents under the Great Seal of Ireland to him and his heirs of a certain estate, heretofore conveyed to him by Sir Edward Sutton, I now, at his request, desire that you will expedite a report thereupon. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 143.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. As to the question whether certain persons named by you are comprehended within the Articles of Limerick, the King thinks you are the best judges, and would have you determine it, as there shall be occasion. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 280.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance are to cause 407 "snaphance musquets," whereof 31 are to be strapped, for grenadiers, 407 cartouch boxes, 31 hatchets, 7 halberts, and 6 drums, to be issued for the use of the regiment of foot, whereof Charles, Duke of Bolton, is colonel, commanded by Lieut.Col. Norton. These arms being for arming those men that supply the vacancy of a detachment drawn out of the said regiment for service in the West Indies. [H. O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 230.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Commission for Daniel Hartford to be cornet of that troop, whereof Captain John Achmouty is captain in Colonel Wolseley's regiment of horse. [Ibid. 3, p. 100.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Ordering them to emit a proclamation, adjourning Parliament to the 15th of April 1692. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 42.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for appointing George, Earl Melville to the office of Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland. [Ibid.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift to George, Earl Melville, of a yearly pension of 900l. sterling as Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland. [Ibid., p. 43.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for appointing John Wishart and James Scougall, advocates, jointly and severally during their lives, and the longer liver of them to be one of the four Commissaries of Edinburgh, on the vacation of John Wishart and Sir James Ogilvie. The said office being in the Crown by the abolition of episcopacy. [Ibid., p. 44.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Blank commission as Commissary of the Commissariat of Dunblane. [Ibid., p. 45.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for appointing Mr. William Spence, principal warden of the Mint, to the office of General Receiver of the bullion money in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 45.]
Dec. 30.
Lisburn.
An anonymous letter addressed "to Mr. John Rayley, merchant in New Queen Street near Cheapside." I am glad to find that what I wrote from Dundalk arrived safely, I wish this may have the same success; and though I now appear in another dress, do not think it is out of the least suspicion I have of you, but to defend me from the vigilancy of those enemies which would destroy that interest which all good men endeavour to support; and, had not sickness prevented me, you should have known that, when we left above 10,000 men, not slain but meanly interred in the fields about Dundalk, then with a poor sickly army we retreated back into the North to fight with hunger and cold, which has already reduced some regiments to 100, others to 50, so that unless God's providence defends us—as it lately did a small number of poor sickly men at Newry—we shall all certainly perish by the Irish coming down upon us, before any relief can be sent from England.
The Irish are now forming a considerable body at Dundalk resolving quickly to attack us; of this and several other of their designs, the General has been acquainted but Major-Gen. Kirke, having the ascendant over him, makes him give credit to nothing that may be for our preservation or the public good. By drinking with the general's son he got into the father's esteem, and there, by all the arts and diligence imaginable, preserves himself, and rules there with absolute power, so that none but his creatures are preferred, who are all of as debauched principles as himself. All measures are taken that will ruin and destroy that part of this poor country, which is already under the English government, and might have been a great support to the army had it been prudently managed. Since he came to us at Dundalk our affairs have had no good success, and that war, which then might have been ended with small charge to the Crown of England, will now cost more men and treasure than the Parliament can yet imagine, which makes me beg you to use your interest with the worthy gentlemen of your city, who are members of Parliament, to beseech them to take our sad and miserable case into their consideration, and strictly to examine our affairs, that a speedy remedy may be applied to our misfortunes, which are Kirke and the French. The first, in all probability, is a pensioner of France, for no man living can be more for King James's interest than he, as appears by all his actions, and the insolence of the other is insupportable, and their daily going to the Irish, makes it plain that they did not come here for our assistance, but ruin.
My circumstances will not allow me to be an author [sic, actor ?] therefore I desire not to be brought on the stage, neither need I, for, on strict inquiry, this, and much more, will be made appear. To that end let me beg for the sake of the poor protestants here, that Sir Henry Ingleby, Lord Blayney, Mr. Richard Boyle, son of Lord Shannon, and several others, who have lately gone from hence, be examined before the Parliament, and for a more exact account of all the miscarriages here, and the cursed contrivances of MajorGen. Kirke, let them send to Lieut.-Gen. Douglas, a person of great honour and worth, who will show plainly the reason of all the misfortune in the army.
In the civil affairs, none can relate more, or better advise, than Dr. Robert Georges, and James Hamilton, esq., of Tallymore (brother-in-law to the Earl of Monmouth) now here; and that the worthy members may have a true account how barbarously the poor English have been treated in their sickness by the French physicians and surgeons, let them examine Dr. Dunn and Mr. Charles Tomson, men of experience, honesty and worth, to whom the army are infinitely obliged. By following these measures they will quickly come to know the original of all our evils, and then can, with greater certainty apply remedies, for from them we expect our cure. The gentlemen of this country have lately proffered the General to raise 6,000 men, which would be a great support to us till succour comes from England, but Kirke makes the General slight the offer and refuse arms to any of the protestants of this kingdom. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 113.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ann Bolton, wife of Nicholas Bolton, mariner. Shows that her husband served on board the fleet for some time, and was in the engagement against the French at Bantry Bay, where he lost his hearing because of the noise of the guns; whereupon he was discharged from the said ship. He has likewise lost two fingers, whereby he is unfit for further service; she therefore prays for an order for her husband to be allowed a protection to preserve him from being again "imprested." Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 288.]
Dec. 30.
Kensington.
Commission for Robert Echlin to be colonel of the regiment of dragoons, lately commanded by Sir Albert Cunningham, deceased, and likewise to be captain of a troop in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 100.]
Dec. 30. Passes for Maria Canock, and Elizabeth Hadlo, her servant, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for Colonel Sparefelt, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 156.]
Dec. 30.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent appointing Robert, Earl of Lothian, High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 47.]
Dec. 30.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. Ordering the payment of 700l. sterling to the Earl of Lothian, as High Commissioner to the Church of Scotland. [Ibid., p. 49.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords-Justices of Ireland to allow Capt. John Gyles, one of the Commissioners of Ordnance for Ireland, a salary of 300l. per annum. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 403.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same to grant to Dixie Codington, esquire, and Richard Tyghe, gentleman, the office of Saymaster, for over-seeing, searching, and trying of leather in Ireland, upon the surrender of Cornelius Bolton, who with Joseph Scardevile, received a grant thereof in 34 Charles II., and who, after the death of the said Joseph, held the same as trustee for Henry Scardevile, bachelor of divinity. [Ibid., p. 404.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
License for Edward Lyttleton, esq., high sheriff of Herefordshire, to live out of the county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 2, p. 44.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. The King commands me to put the bearer hereof, Captain Du Rivage, master of the French shallop, lately taken into your hands, in order to his being exchanged in such manner as other prisoners of war are. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 94.]
Dec. 31.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Mr. Warr. Enclosed I send you copy of a letter from Mr. Abraham Stock of Deal which you are to lay before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 183.] Enclosing:—
Abraham Stock to [J. Sotherne]. This is to acquaint you that the brigantine sloop has brought in a Dane which he took close by Calais cliffs with short sail, as if he designed for Calais or Dunkirk. Some few days since the magistrates of Hythe, suspecting a country constable, searched his house and found under his bed two Frenchmen, belonging to some of the privateers that use that trade; they put the Frenchmen in prison and secured the constable who may discover a great deal of roguery carried on that way. A certain person in rich apparel, with two servants in blue liveries, pretend they came to Rye last Saturday night and lay there till Monday morning and then came to Hythe where they were suspected by Mr. Bassett who had not time enough to examine them; but this morning Mr. Bassett came hither where he found them. Upon examination the person said he was come this way to see if he could find any loose men to press to recruit his regiment of which he pretends to be colonel in Flanders, a very rediculous pretence, for he had no press warrant, but said he would see what men he could get and then send or go to London for a press warrant. I told him there was no such warrant granted to press landsmen, then he knew not what to say. They have carried him to Sandwich there to be examined bfore the Mayor. His servant calls him Blackford. Lord Meldore, (sic) Deal 30 December, 1691. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 187.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Daniel Ballow, M.A. to the vicarage of Chard in the county of Somerset, and the diocese of Bath and Wells void by the deprivation of Samuel Thomas, the last incumbent for not having taken the oaths prescribed by Act of Parliament. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 118.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Commission for Henry Cunningham, to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of dragoons, lately commanded by Albert Cunningham, deceased, and to be captain of a troop in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 100.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Passes for Andrew Glado, and John Kalf. Lord Cavendish's servants, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 156.]
Dec. Memoranda and copies of letters relating to the negotiations of a treaty between the Elector of Brandenburg and the Marquis de Castanaga. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 114.]
Dec. Draft Bill, "For the better relief of creditors by preventing the escape of prisoners for debt." [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 3, No. 90.]
Dec. Memoranda touching "the Bill for the recovery of small debts in Westminster." [Ibid., No. 91.]
The establishment of the Irish regiments in France. [Ibid., No. 92.]
Notes and memoranda touching proceedings in Parliament under the headings: "Whether the Lords have right to name Committees to be joined with ours, to take the accounts;" "The King going out of the realm," and "the land forces." [S.P. Dom Will. & Mary 3 No. 93.]
Gross produce of the old duty of Inland Excise on beer. In 1689 before any additional duty it was 702,026l. In 1690, the additional duty of 9d. coming on July 24, 1689, it was 640,021l. In 1691, the double duty coming on November 27, 1690, it was 559,692l. [Ibid., No. 94.]
Memoranda concerning the Excise of beer and malt. [Ibid., No. 95.]
Reasons offered to the consideration of Parliament by the drapers, haberdashers, grocers, hosiers, glass-sellers, cutlers, and others of the great decay of their trades by the increasing number of pedlars, hawkers, and "petty chapfolks." Printed. [Ibid., No. 96.]
The case of the Duchess of Albemarle and of the creditors and executors of the late Duke of Albemarle. Printed. [Ibid., No. 97.]
A table of fees of John, Archbishop of Canterbury, his chancellor or vicar general, registrar, principal apparitor, and other ministers together with examples of extortionate fines, and fees taken by Joseph Martin, Archdeacon of Exeter, John Baldwine, seal-keeper to the chancellor of Exeter, Dr. Richard Michell, registrar to the Bishop of Exeter, and Christopher Babb. [Ibid., No. 98.]
Specimen page of an edition of "Flavius Josephus" addressed to Sir Joseph Williamson by E. Bernard. [Ibid., No. 99.]
Information by Charles Le Hardy, an inhabitant of Jersey. He is well assured that some of the inhabitants of Jersey, Guernsey, and the adjacent islands do "underhand trade with the French" to the prejudice of their Majesties. Le Hardy prays that he may have order to seize all goods he can find going to France or coming from thence. He also believes there is a great deal of corn sent from the said islands to France. Begs that his order to seize may be sent secretly, by which means he hopes to show that there are some persons in the islands "more ready to serve the enemy than their sacred Majesties." Endorsed:—"Memorial by Philip (sic) Le Hardy. [H.O. Channel Islands 9.]
Memorandum of what "my Lord Bishop of Salisbury desired me to put your Majestie in mind [of]." That five or six bishoprics, being now void in Ireland, there will be an opportunity, after Mr. Walker is in the first place considered, to remove Dr. Marsh now Bishop of Ferns, to a better Irish bishopric there, he being one of the worthiest, and most learned in that nation. That in supplying the vacant preferments in the province of Ulster, regard be had to the Scotch Episcopal clergy, and particularly that Dr. Carncross, late Archbishop of Glasgow, and Dr. Ramsay, late Bishop of Ross, put out by King James, be put into two bishoprics in Ulster; which will be an encouragement to others of the episcopal clergy of Scotland to transplant themselves thither. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 115.]
Proposed rules for the "better and more equal distribution of church preferments," which will free the King from a great deal of importunity.
(1.) No dignity or living should be given to any who already have either, unless they quit the old before taking the new.
(2.) The prebends of Westminster to be limited to the ministers of London and Westminster; the minister of St. Margaret's, Westminster, shall be always, as at present, one of the prebends, "because the House of Commons go to that church, and therefore it is fit there should be encouragement for a good preacher."
(3.) One prebend, at least, in every cathedral church, should be bestowed on some minister in the city of that cathedral.
(4.) The minister of Windsor, because his living is small, should always be one of the prebends of that church.
(5.) For the future, never more than one foreigner at the same time shall have preferment in the same church, "lest the English be discouraged."
The compiler then reminds the King of certain persons fit for preferment:—
Mons. Alix, by your Majesty's command, for a prebend of Westminster, or canon of Christ Church, Dr. Stanley for the deanery of Lincoln, Mr. Talbot, the Earl of Shrewsbury's kinsman, and, as I am informed, a worthy man, to whom you have promised the next prebend of Windsor; the Bishop of Bristol to whom you have promised a good commendam; Mr. Wilson, Lord Halifax's chaplain, for some good living; Mr. Booth, Lord Warrington's brother; Dr. Haccliffe, whom you have nominated provost of King's College; Mr. Patrick, brother of the Bishop of Chichester who has written 'many excellent books against popery," for a prebend of Westminster; Dr. James, recommended by the Earl of Marlborough, for a living in your gift; Mr. Wigans, your chaplain and minister of Kensington, as a canon of Christ Church; and Dr. Williams, Dr. Grove, and Dr. Scott, "very worthy ministers of London" whom I have formerly mentioned to you.
The following ecclesiastical offices are now vacant in Ireland:— The archbishopric of Cashel, and the bishoprics of Clogher and Elphine. The bishoprics of Killaloe and Ferns will be void "if they be advanced." For these vacancies the following have been recommended:—The Archbishop of Glasgow, the Bishops of Killaloe and Ferns, "two of the worthiest and most learned of that nation," fit for advance in their preferment; the Dean of Armagh, nephew to the Primate of Ireland; Dr. Wilson, dean of Rapho particularly recommended by the Duke of Ormond and very deserving of a bishopric.
The deaneries of Armagh and Rapho will then be void, to which may be advanced the present Dean of Cork, recommended by the Duke of Ormond, and Dean Fitzgerald, nephew of the Primate; of both I have received good characters.
Three bishoprics in England will shortly be void, Hereford—for this, Dr. Hall of Oxford is proposed—Lincoln—for this, Dr. Beverege —and Lichfield—for this, the Bishop of St. Asaph or the Bishop of Londonderry. For the English sees—besides the archbishoprics— vacant by the deprivation of these holders, the following are recommended:—For Norwich—the Dean of Canterbury; for Ely, Dr. Beaumont, professor of divinity at Cambridge "who did very early and eminently appear for your Majesty"; for Bath and Wells, Dr. Wake, "if he will take it"; if not, I do not know of any fit person for it, unless the Bishop of Chichester can be prevailed with to remove hither, who is beyond comparison the fittest person for the place; for Gloucester, Dr. Nicholas is much commended by the Bishop of Salisbury; he is a prudent and good man, and warden of Winchester and may hold that in commendam with the bishopric which is very small, but he is rich; for Peterborough, Dr. Ridder the present dean, if he will take it "which much I doubt because the bishopric is very poor and so is he"; failing him, Dr. Cumberland—"the most learned and worthy minister in that diocese and always a moderate man"—is recommended.
The writer concludes with suggestions for filling vacant deaneries. Bristol is very small and "fittest to be given to the best minister in that city"; for Winchester, Dr. Grove or Dr. Scott, and for Durham—which is "undoubtedly the best in England"—he names "no-one. Here, besides the deanery, there will he, at the King's disposal, two good livings, the archdeaconry and a hospital of 800l. a year." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 116.]
Petition of Solomon de Medina to the King. Machado and Pereyra have employed him to solicit the payment of 5,000l., due to them for carriages, furnished last summer in Flanders, for the King's service, which sum, the Earl of Marlborough assured them should be paid to them on his, the Earl's, return to England. Begs for a speedy payment. [Ibid., No. 117.]
Prayers suggested to be used by the King, and by his people on his behalf. [Ibid., No. 118.]
Papers marked "Mr. Henry Smith's alphabet of places, things and persons, by which he will write, if he finds occasion requires; he will direct his letters for Mr. Richard Brayne, enclosed to the person you shall direct him in Holland." [Ibid., No. 119.]
Form of oath of allegiance and proposed penalties for those that refuse it. [Ibid., No. 120.]
Draft instructions to the High Commissioner (?) in Scotland with suggested alterations. [Ibid., No. 121.]
Proposals for receiving the episcopal ministers into the Presbyterian Church government in Scotland, and remarks on the unfitness of pressing the oaths on particular persons as is ordered by the late Act of Parliament.
The differences between the presbyterians and the episcopalians have been the occasion of the troubles and rebellions that have fallen out in that kingdom these many years past; each party, as they were uppermost, carrying violently towards the other, with whom have always joined those of the state that had no other way to recommend themselves than by espousing a party who instead of making use of their interest to unite the presbyterians and episcopalians kept the wound open to make themselves either necessary to the Prince or to have the applause of a party. Those unhappy divisions amongst protestants have seemed rather to be fomented than healed by the proceedings of the last two reigns, so that there are few that did not become concerned either in persecuting or being persecuted. It is too true that the episcopal ministers and those that favour that way are, for the most part, dissatisfied, which is generally the north half of the kingdom, as well the noblemen as gentlemen and commons, and many noblemen and gentlemen of the south parts also.
Some noblemen and gentlemen who were cited before the Council to take the oaths or pay a year's rent were imprisoned and fined, and the rest lay under the same hazard by a late Act of Parliament. But the methods used have been so ineffectual to make them comply that all those who have been called before the Council have suffered imprisonment several months or given bond to pay their fines (except one gentleman who complied). So that all the effect these methods have had is to make these persons and their friends more and more exasperated against the Government.
These are the causes that there is so great a party in that kingdom disaffected to the present government, who are therefore esteemed Jacobites, and would probably prove so in case of an invasion; for both the clergy and others finding themselves pressed or insecure in their livings naturally desire and struggle for any alteration, for which reason they desire to return under that government which they too gladly shook off a few years ago; yet the generality of protestants as well ministers as others would be loath to desire the change of a protestant king for a popish one.
This therefore requires a very speedy remedy which can only be done by Parliament taking away or altering some Acts which have been the occasion of these disorders. The great difficulty is that the same Parliament must be made use of that made these Acts, for by calling another Parliament the same persons or more bigoted ones will be chosen because they have excluded others from being capable to elect Commissioners to Parliament, by the Act ordaining them all to take the assurance which is generally "stuck at," for the reasons mentioned in another paper; and yet this Parliament might have been and may still be made tractable, if the officers of state show them good example.
For which ends it is proposed that in the first session of Parliament the act for receiving the episcopal ministers may be made shorter and clearer, for their coming in will in a great measure break the disaffected party. And to effectuate this it is thought necessary that the King give instructions to his Commissioner to the next session of Parliament that those ministers that have not yet taken the benefit of the late Act within the time prefixed for taking the oaths, be allowed a longer time to take them. And that the terms on which they are to be received be as follows, or as near as can be to them:—
1. That they take the oath of allegiance and assurance, or an "explication" of the allegiance and assurance in other words.
2. That they sign the Confession of Faith, commonly called the Westminster Confession of Faith, as the confession of their faith.
3. That they own the present church government in Scotland to be lawful and that they shall not endeavour the subversion of the same, but concur in it for purging the church of erreoneous and scandalous ministers and for the promoting of piety and godliness and suppressing of vice and wickedness.
And that this may take effect, that it be declared by the Act that the General Assemby or a certain number of the most moderate of them, for the more convenient receiving in of the ministers that live far off (and which may be named by the advice of the Commissioner to the next General Assembly) be obliged to receive all the episcopal ministers who shall offer to sign and come in on the above mentioned terms, unless it can be proved within 30 days after they shall apply that they are either erroneous, scandalous, or negligent of their duties.
That this or some similar course be taken is, it is thought, already apparent to be to the King's interest. But there is another argument which ought to have no small weight with all good protestants, which is, that in many places in the country there are several parishes lying together desolate of ministers which were put out by the Council; so that there will be for 30 or 40 miles together no sermon or public worship, by which means the people are become most vicious and desolate [dissolute ?], and almost turned heathens, not knowing Sunday from Saturday or having the convenience of christening their children. Many places have been in this condition three or four years, for there are not Presbyterian ministers enough to supply the parishes that are wanting, neither are the people very forward to have them. Thus it is like to continue until the episcopal ministers be received and then they will be considered as all one church and will as willingly accept of Presbyterian ministers as others.
The remedy proposed for the other inconvenience of pressing the oaths in manner above mentioned is, that the Act be taken away and in its place that the Council be empowered to require any they shall suspect as not well affected to the Government to oblige themselves:—
1. On their honour, in writing, never to act against or disturb the peace of the present government. And since this cannot be pretended to be against conscience, that those who refuse it may be imprisoned till they comply or be banished as the Council shall think fit.
2. To take bail of others, in the same terms, for what sums they think reasonable, and that this bail do not expire but last as long as they live.
3. That the Council have power, in case of intestine troubles, or appearance of invasions from abroad to imprison any that they shall have reason to have more than ordinary suspicions of, during the time of such troubles or apprehension of such invasions.
4. That the laws may be put in full execution against those who shall either act, speak, or write against the King and government; but at the same time care must be taken that no stretches of the law, or advantages, be taken which will increase twenty enemies in the place of one that shall be taken off in that manner. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 122.]
Notes of the sums owing by Protestants to "forfeiting persons" in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 123.]
Abstract of the establishment of the forces in England: Horse, 1,538; foot, 8,680; and dragoons, 654. Total, 10,872. [Ibid. No. 124.]
A similar abstract of the English forces in Holland. [Ibid., No. 125.]
Abstract of the three military establishments: The Dutch forces in England, the English forces in Holland, and the English forces in England—delivered to the House of Commons. [Ibid., No. 126.]
Memoranda and queries as to forces and garrisons. [Ibid., No. 127.]
Abstract of the establishment of the Dutch forces in England. [Ibid., No. 128.]
A similar paper, in Dutch. [Ibid., No. 129.]
Estimated cost of maintaining regiments of horse, dragoons, or foot. [Ibid., No. 130.]
Statement of the ordnance and stores in the following forts and castles in England and the Channel Islands:—Arcliffe Fort, Berwick, Bridlington, Calshott Castle, Carlisle, Chatham, Chepstow Castle Chester Castle, Clifford's Fort, Clifford's Tower, Deal Castle, Dover Castle, Gravesend, Greenwich, Guernsey, Holy Island, Hull, Hurst Castle, St. James' Park, Jersey, Landguard Fort, St. Mawes Castle, Moat's Bulwork, Pendennis Castle, Plymouth, Sandfoot Castle, Sandgate Castle, Sandown Castle, Scarborough Castle, the Scilly Islands, Sheerness, Southsea Castle, Tilbury Fort, The Tower, Upnor Castle, Walmer Castle, Whitehall, the Isle of Wight, Windsor Castle, Woolwich, and North Yarmouth. [Ibid., No. 131.]
Estimate for the year's expenses of Chelsea Hospital:—
£ s. d.
Diet for the officers, soldiers, and servants lodged in the hospital 4,380 10 0
Clothing 1,019 12 6
Money allowances to those lodged in the hospital 1,270 2 0
Salaries 1,988 6 8
Washing 400 0 0
Lamps and candles 230 0 0
Firing 650 0 0
Keeping the court gardens and walks 380 0 0
Money allowances to those out of the hospital 1,710 11 6
£12,029 2 8
[Ibid., No. 132.]
Note of ships with the Earl of Torrington, at Plymouth, Falmouth, and in the Irish sea. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 133.]
List of ships on the Irish station. The vessels are: the Monk, commanded by Sir Cloudesley Shovell; the Ruby, by Capt. Froud; the St. Albans, by Capt. Fitzpatrick; the Dover, by Capt. Whittaker; the James, galley by Capt. Dover; the Experiment, by Capt. Jennings; the Pearl, by Capt. Deane; the Smyrna Merchant by Capt. Harloe; the Swift, by Capt. Townson; the Sapphire, by Capt. Price; the Europa, by Capt. Whetstone, and the Nathaniel, fireship, by Capt. Kiggings. [Ibid., 10, No. 134.]
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Postscript to a letter, stating that the writer encloses a letter from Major-General T. . ., and that he will withdraw the troops from Tirlemont and St. Tron, and will assemble them in the neighbourhood of Louvain. [Ibid., No. 135.]
The same to the King. Two of the generals are of the opinion that the troops should be assembled. News from Liege, the Bishop has been able to put affairs in a good condition there, the cavalry and dragoons will be able to be maintained. Refers to the store of ammunition; future plans. The opinion of Count de Cenlos is that the troops are too scattered, and that it would be easy for the enemy to fight them. [Ibid., No. 136.]
Memorandum concerning the movements of the allied troops. Those at Namur are to hold themselves in readiness to march, and when they do they must not take the straight road from Namur to Louvain, but keep well to the right. [Ibid., No. 137.]
"Memoire pour la marche." Directions for the marching of the troops to Mons (?). [Ibid., No. 138.]
Details of a conversation touching the siege of Mons; the means of sending relief to it, &c. [Ibid., No. 139.]
Memorandum suggesting that the Landgrave should bring some forces to the Rhine. That the troops of the Elector of Bavaria, which are on the Upper Rhine, should make incursions into the enemy's country, until some other enterprise is decided on. That the Elector of Saxony is willing to send some thousand men, in addition to those he has already given, into the Empire; that the need for troops is very great. [Ibid., No. 140.]
Memorandum of the troops of the Prince of Brandenburg, shewing the companies of cavalry and the battalions of infantry. There are two battalions of Holstein and Schomberg in Liege [Ibid., No. 141.]
Memorandum of the things that it is necessary to do, promptly for the defence of the town of Namur. [Ibid., No. 142.]
The Prince of Vaudemont, Mons. D'Overkirk, and [Count de Solms ?] to the Prince of Waldeck. They hear the enemy are making great preparations and suggest various plans; the Prince of Waldeck criticises the subjects touched upon. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 10, No. 143.]
Instructions for Count de Solms, commander-in-chief of the troops which will remain during the coming winter in the Low Countries. [Ibid., No. 144.]
Project of a treaty of alliance between the King of Denmark, the King of Great Britain, and the States General. The treaty is "for the re-establishment of peace in Christendom." [Ibid., No. 145.]
Remarks on the projected treaty. [Ibid., No. 146.]
Further remarks on the same. It is extremely important that it should be kept secret till finally ratified. [Ibid., No. 147.]
Cover of the letters written by the Marquis of Castanaga to the King. [Ibid No. 148.]
Table showing the forces of the Duke of Savoy, the Elector of Bavaria, and others. [Ibid., No. 149.]
Table showing position and number of troops. [Ibid., No. 150.]
Order of battle of the army of Brabant. [Ibid., No 151.]
List of infantry soldiers. [Ibid., No. 152.]
Order of battle to be observed in some engagement. Showing the positions of various squadrons, of the numbers of those squadrons, and by whom they are commanded. [Ibid., No. 153.]
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Recommending Mr. John French to the deanery of Rapho, when the same shall become void by the promotion of Dr. Wilson, the present dean, or otherwise. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 131.]
Instructions for the Lords-Justices of Ireland. To prepare a bill and transmit it to England, for vesting all forfeited estates in the Crown, and for conforming all attainders and outlawries, as they shall see most serviceable and easy to pass. To prepare a bill for conforming so much of the articles of Limerick as "we have promised to ratify;" and also bills for encouraging the linen manufacture in Ireland, and for encouraging the education of children of the Irish in the protestant religion. To ask in "our name," at the beginning of the session of Parliament, for money necessary to pay the debt "now lying on us in that Kingdom," and for the fortifications there. If Parliament insists upon an imposition, you are not to oppose it. [S.P. Ireland 353, No. 103.]
Remarks on Connaught, Munster, and Leinster endorsed "Bishop M.'s memorandum." Connaught has more Irish Catholics in it than any of the rest, and they are richer, and generally well affected to the English interests. Mr. Dennis Dayly is a prudent and moderate man. Lord Dillon of Costello bears a great sway amongst them by reason of his relations and the greatness of his estate. Lord Boffin is a man of good interest. Munster should be more narrowly watched on account of its "contignity," to France and of the many fishermen who maintain correspondence with France. Description of the chief inhabitants. Leinster need not be much feared, there being English enough in it and Dublin to prevent commotions, and the Irish weakened in their estates. Remarks on the chief inhabitants.
If there were any of the Romish bishops now in Ireland, one of them salaried in each province with a pension 100l. per annum, [it] would be a good means to gain intelligence, and keep the rest of the clergy in order; but I know of none now in the Kingdom. But instead of them, the secular clergy and head (?) superiors from among themselves to inspect over the rest. I presume that Father Murphy and Father Burne, both of Dublin, are fit men to be trusted, being men of parts and education, and that 50l. per annum would be a liberal allowance for any of them."
The regular clergy of the kingdom are not now very numerous, and most of them flock to Dublin for bread, not being able to subsist in the country. Suggests sending them out of the country, for doing which there is precedent in Ireland. They are a burden to the Kingdom, and under no government but that of their superiors. They depend more immediately on the Pope's authority, and are supported by it against their bishops. They bear a greater sway amongst the people than the secular priests and are more irreconcilable to their Majesties' government and they seem to wish for nothing more than to be sent away that they may be supported abroad; whenever there is any commotion, they are not only privy to it, but foment it.
Whenever the State thinks it expedient to secure the persons of Roman Catholics, the Chief Governor should have a list by him of the names of all persons that are most powerful and most dangerous to the Government; these should be secured and none else. The promiscuous seizing of persons and releasing them after their confinement has drawn reflection on the Government "and bred no small aversion to it." The Protestants employed in the execution of the Government's orders have unhappily contributed to the increase of the reflections by committing many, sine defectu, either out of revenge for past injuries, or from a design of gain, sparing some and releasing others, as they conceived most for their profit. [S.P. Ireland 353, No. 104.]
Remarks upon the city of Limerick and the adjacent country by Dr. G[orges]. Copy. [Ibid., No. 105.]
Memorial of Sir John Hanmer. Setting out that if any certain intelligence of a fleet or squadron of French men-of-war shall be commanded hither to insult our coasts or land forces, especially southward and south-westward, then for the better security of these parts Brigadier Hanmer's regiment of foot, and Brigadier Wolseley's regiment of horse, should immediately march towards the enemy and upon their march be joined by the regiments of dragoons of Col. Echlin and Col. Cunningham, and when in Munster by the regiment of Col. St. John. That 4 three-pounders should be sent immediately down to Cork, 2 for Col. St. John's regiment and the other 2 as he shall think necessary. And because this force is intended to keep the field, it should be supplied with all things necessary for the same. It will also be necessary to have a quartermaster-general, which employment, having been executed by myself ever since I had the honour to be the officer-in-chief commanding under your Excellency, and having done that duty to your satisfaction without any consideration hitherto, I humbly pray you to move his Majesty for a commission for me for the same and that I may have leave to appoint a deputy under me, who shall require no salary from his Majesty, but such as he shall receive from me out of the twenty shillings a day entered upon the establishment for the payment of the quarter-master-general. Whereas several colonels have imputed to me a neglect for not soliciting his Majesty to be made a major-general, thereby hindering promotion, I beg you, for their consideration and my own, to acquaint his Majesty with the date of my commission as brigadier, which is 25 September 1689, and that now, it being necessary to have an officer to command as a general officer, that I may have a commission for a majorgeneral, or a brevet for the same, but to serve with the pay of a brigadier only. [S.P. Ireland 353, No. 106.]
Disposal of the private soldiers and non-commissioned officers of the regiments to be broken in Ireland. Horse:—three troops of the royal regiments, and Mr. Harbord's troop, into the royal regiment. Six troops of Wolseley's regiment and Col. Russell's regiment into his own regiment. Foot:—Col. Beaumont's, and Col. Hale's regiments, into Churchill's, Trelawny's, and Collier's. Col. Gustavus Hamilton's and the Earl of Drogheda's, as many as are English into Hanmer's; the rest of those two regiments, and of the three regiments of foot of Enniskillin and Derry, now to be broken, and to be disposed into the regiments of Lieut.-Gen. Douglas, Lord Lisburn, the Earl of Meath, and the standing regiments of Enniskillen, and Derry; all which regiments are to make their recruits in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 107.]
Recruits wanting for the Danish foot in Ireland: the battalion of guards 74 men, the Queen's battalion 129, Prince Frederick's battalion 59, Prince Christian's battalion 114, Prince George's 65, the Zeland battalion 115, the Jutland battalion 114, the Funnish battalion 140. In all 810 men. [Ibid., No. 108.]
List of recruits to be raised in England and Ireland, for the regiments of foot in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 109.]
List of recruits to be raised in England for the army in Ireland; total 3,958 men. [Ibid., No. 110.]
Memorial from the colonels of horse, and dragoons in Ireland. We propose to clothe our respective regiments, provided they may have the off reckonings or usual deductions for clothing, due from the 1st of September 1689, to the 1st of January 1690 paid them, and also 300l. a troop towards the subsistence of their recruits of men and horses, and enabling them to provide tents and equipage for their officers, and saddles, bridles, furniture, and other necessaries for our regiments. Signed —Edward Mathews, R. Byerley, Richard Leveson, F. Langston, John Coy. [S.P. Ireland 353, No. 111.]
Memorandum that the King's pleasure be signified to the LordsJustices for the giving public notice to the inhabitants of Ireland to send into the Treasury office there, the receipts and certificates of the officers for the provisions delivered, or diet furnished to the army of Ireland during the winter quarters, so that an account may be taken and stated thereof, in order to the satisfying the inhabitants for the same, by debentures upon the forfeited lands, and placing the same to the deductions of the army. [Ibid., No. 112.]
A proposal "for an establishment for store-keepers, gunners, and montrosses, to remain in the several garrisons in Ireland." [Ibid., No. 113.]
Extracts from the journals of the House of Commons relating to Ireland between 1689 and 1691. [Ibid., No. 114.]
Articles 35 and 36 of the general instructions to the commanders of the King's ships about salutes upon meeting with any ship within the King's seas (which for your better guidance herein you are to take notice that they extend to Cape Finisterre) belonging to any foreign prince or state. You are to expect them in their passage by you, to strike their topsail and take in their flag in acknowledgment of the King's sovereignty in those seas, and if any shall refuse, or offer to resist, you are to use your utmost endeavour to compel them thereto and in no wise to suffer any dishonour to be done to his Majesty; and in case any of his Majesty's subjects shall be so far forgetful of their duty as to omit striking their topsail, as they pass by you, when it may be done without the loss of the voyage, you are to bring him to the flag, to answer his contempt, or otherwise to return the name of the ship and of the master to the Secretary of the Admiralty or the Lord High Admiral of England or the Commissioners for executing the said office, as also of the place whence and the port to which he shall be bound. And you are to make the master of such ship pay the charge of what shot you shall make at her. And you are further to take notice that in his Majesty's seas, the King's ships are in nowise to strike to any, and that in other parts no ship of his Majesty's is to strike her flag or topsail to any foreigner unless such foreign ship shall have first struck, or at the same time strike, her flag or topsail to his Majesty's ship, except in the harbour of some foreign prince or in the road within shot of cannon of some fort or castle, where you are to send on shore to inform yourself what return they will make to your salute. And in case you have good assurance you shall be answered gun for gun, you are then to salute the port as is usual; but if you shall not be well assured that you shall have an equal number of guns returned you, you are in no wise to salute that place. And in case the ship wherein you now command shall at the same time carry his Majesty's flag, you are, before you salute the place carefully to inform yourself how flags of the same quality with that you carry, of other princes, have been saluted there, and you are to insist on it being saluted with as great respect and advantage as any flag of the same quality with yours.
You are hereby directed (pursuant to an Order of Council of the 30th of June, 1691) to observe for the future the same rule for salutes in the Port of Genoa, as you do at Leghorn and all other ports without any distinction, notwithstanding any former practice. [H.O. Admiralty 1, No. 14.]
Memorandum as to the payment of the King's forces in England, Holland, and Ireland this year. It is suggested with regard to Chelsea College, that the King should allow a certain sum yearly for its support, rather than so much in the pound. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 1.]
Memorial from a captain of the first troop of horse guards to the King, to prove the writer's claim to be considered the eldest colonel of the horse guards. King Charles II. on forming the troop of horse guards, gave to those who were, or should be their captains the post of eldest colonel, he that had, or should have their first troop was always to be first, and consequently the eldest colonel of horse. Sir Philip Howard was imprisoned for refusing to obey the Duke of Monmouth's commands, but he afterwards acknowledged the Duke's claim to be considered eldest colonel, and the Duke of Albermarle, who succeeded Monmouth, enjoyed to the full the privileges of eldest colonel, though on the complaints of the Earl of Feversham and Sir Philip Howard, he had some restrictions put upon him. Thus the writer thinks, by quoting the above precedents, that his claim, as captain of the first troop of horse guards, to be considered the eldest colonel is established. [Ibid., No. 2.]
Portion of a prayer imploring blessings on the King and Queen. [Ibid., No. 3.]
—to the King. By letters which I received by the last post, I am informed that your Majesty's Commissioner has shown to the Council several letters to and from disaffected persons, making a large discovery of a horrid plot against your Majesty's Government, upon consideration whereof, his Grace did desire that such prisoners as he had presumptions against as to their privacy and accession to the mentioned plot might be examined by torture, which after some debate and struggle, was granted as to Mr. Pain, one Morgan, and three of the name of Bell. I had also information from England concerning the Earl of Annandale's confession which I shall not presume to trouble you with while more particular accounts are given by other hands. Lords Ross and Skelmerlie have not fulfilled the conditions they agreed to. How things stand as to them and what were the terms granted to them shall be made known to your Majesty when affairs will allow you to grant me the honour of access. The Lord Commissioner sent me hither, to inform you of what past in parliament and of the reasons of his management. Seeing that Lord Annandale has made a full discovery of persons and things, you may be pleased to consider what orders to give the Lord Commissioner and whether it may be fit to secure as many of the persons that have been named as can be got, for so long as there is any shadow of hope as to the late King's affairs, no trust is to be put in them. These things I thought it my duty to acquaint you with. Endorsed by the King (?) "Scotland.' [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 4.]
[Viscount Tarbat] to the King. By former letters you were informed why I went not North, which did necessitate me to use the help of Col. Hill, and some others, in dealing with the Highlanders, and no one could have more discretion than Col. Hill.
At first the Lairds of Largies and Loup, and 160 of the McDonals were brought in by Achinbreck, at which some here showed dislike. The Earl of Seaforth on Col. Hill's first letter to him, did enter on terms of agreement, and has proceeded so far as to engage him to be by, and not to engage with the enemy until the result of the treaty; that in the interim his house should be voided of a most useless garrison which was in it, and protection given him to live in it. Of this, Col. Hill did acquaint me, and writes that he had sent full information of what past, to the Lord Commissioner, but they came not to the Commissioner's hand, I cannot tell by whose fault; so the Earl of Seaforth stays still in the Hills, but has not joined the enemy. Nor do I wish he should, for he would add too much strength to them. And I presume, if tolerable conditions were granted to him (as not to be pressed to oaths because he is a Papist, to have indemnity and protection to his person and estate as other good subjects, and 1,000l. paid to repair the injuries done to his house and estate by Bellingown's garrison) he would come over and be a peaceable subject to you, and if he should join the enemy, ten times so much will not reduce him.
As to the other Highlanders, Col. Hill got on in treaty with them so discretely that no offer was made to them in any considerable thing, until they should move further in desires.
They proposed to treat altogether to send on to King James to inform him of their resolution to treat, to have a general indemnity, and that every one of them may be secured in their possessions, and that a few of them may have small sums to put them at ease, particularly that McLean be either secured in the late donation made to him by King Charles, of 500l. of his old estate, or at least, that the "condiscendance" past before the Exchequer on the King's order between the late Earl of Argyll and him, may be made good, whereby Argyll was to quit 300l. rent of MacLean's old estate to him, and the King was to buy in other 200l. rent, and this 500l. to be secured on McLean. Col. Hill frequently informed the Commissioner and myself of these proceedings, but the MajorGeneral was then near to be in readiness for a Highland expedition, and he was not for capitulation, since he doubted not to reduce them by force, and the Earl of Argyll was against such concessions as would prejudge or lessen his estate and expectations, and several of your Councillors thought it dishonourable to treat with them, and all these thought it better to root them out by war than to give them any favour; at the same time, the Earl of Breadalbane proposed a cessation with them till the last of November, during which time all hostility should stop, and in the meantime, capitulation with the particular clans, in order to a total submission, wherein he offered his service, the Commissioner allowed him to offer this to you, on which he went to Chester, but came short by a day. Meanwhile the advice given you for going against the Highlanders and Islanders by sea was prosecuted under command of Major Fergusson, but with too small a force. Thus the MajorGeneral and others being against capitulation the enemy, hovering with an eye unto Ireland and foreign descent, and the army designing to ruin the Highlanders by force, obliged me to inform you, and to desire new orders, though oft urged by Col. Hill, but I could not proceed unless you or the Commissioner were satisfied with the advantage, and the Commissioner found such obstructions in that by the Major-General's methods that he would not move in it until you were informed.
The army then marched, and what by Col. Hill's treaties, the Earl of Seaforth's withdrawing, and Major Fergusson's attacks on the coasts, the Highlanders did not draw to a body, but each clan stayed on their own lands, and kept themselves out of the MajorGeneral's route, and he judged it not fit to seek them out, so the garrison was settled at Lochaber. As soon as the Major-General removed Col. Hill set the treaty on foot again, and has sent this letter with another to the Lord Commissioner, which I pray you will consider and give your commands about this affair, for by several variations since the first order, I do not know if I should proceed in the method then allowed, especially being under the discouragement of the Major-General, and several Councillors are averse to give any tolerable conditions to them.
The Commissioner inclines for treaty, seeing the vast expense of such campaigns, and how little they effect in reducing any clan, whilst your peaceable subjects are ruined, what by the necessary harassing of the army, and what by the enemies' ravaging and robbing, and twenty such campaigns will not reduce them, for though a garrison of Inverlochy be of great use to annoy them, yet it will never reduce them, nor protect any part of the low country (sic) from these injuries; and they will prejudge the nation, expend the public money, and fatigue your armies long enough, and all their estates will not recompence a tenth of one year's losses, and giving them what they desire is less loss than to keep up this army "three months, besides three years," and perhaps be as near a point then as now.
One thing all the clans desire, which is as much for your advantage as theirs, which is that all these superiorities, be bought from the Highland lords, so that they may hold their estates "immediately" of you, and having them "immediate vassals," keeping a little garrison in Lochaber, and a man of ability, being no Highlander, to be your lieutenant governor there, you will be indeed master of the highlands, much as ever King of Scotland was.
Your Commissioner is so bound up by deferring to the MajorGeneral that albeit he be convinced of the fitness of other measures than are taken, yet he will not contradict nor meddle much in the matter of the army, whilst the nation did regret and indeed exclaim more. Nor is it fit for me to write of their many sufferings.
At present the enemy is ravaging over the "low country" in the North, more boldly than ever hitherto.
The Major-General is towards them with a body so considerable as in all probablity they will not force, but retire to the hills and fall on some other place, so by the motion of both, the countrymen will be ruined, and this may be a reason why disaffection to the Government does increase to astonishment. I adventured to tell you that persuading the Highlanders was a good way to fatigue your enemy and waste money, but in my opinion was not so fit a way to reduce the highlands as by posting the army so as to block them up within the hills, and meanwhile to infest them by sea. But neither of these ways is so easy nor secure as to do it by treaty, which the tenth part of what is already expended would have done.
What you command shall be readily obeyed, and if you think it fit I will go North, or if you give no return, I shall understand that as a command to forbear further meddling in this matter.
Lochiell and Glengary are the "activest" men. McLean and McDonell the most powerful. Ten thousand paid were enough to bestow on all, McLean getting so much of his old estate. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 5.]
Memorial concerning affairs in Scotland. By the agreement or verbal contract made between my Lord Breadalbane and the Highlanders, it is evident that it was owing to necessity and not to any good will towards the Government or for the public welfare which forced them to ask for and to accept the treaty of last summer, for they owned and declared in stated terms to the said Lord Breadalbane, as they made it on good authority, that if there should be any invasions from abroad or any rising of his Majesty's, videlicet King James', subjects in Britain, then, and in that case, the above mentioned agreement is to be null, and if his Majesty does not approve of the same it is to be null, and if the forces be sent abroad then this is to be null, &c. One knows for certain that Bucchan was not in a condition to assemble the last summer, any more than he is at present, to the number of 500 armed men. It is very true that the greater part of the regiments which are in Scotland were, and are still, in a very good condition and more than sufficient to reduce these savages ("barbares") to the state one would wish, and one might perhaps say that they are inferior to none in the King's service.
The Highlanders being people without any principle of religion or honour, will be always ready to strike a blow without caring what they have promised, if one does not prevent them by disarming them; the only way of feeling sure of these people is by restraining them by means of small garrisons. In the present state of affairs it would be much more to the service of the King that these garrisons were detachments from the regiments, which would be changed from time to time, because then one would be sure of having disciplined men and officers more devoted to their duty than to their purse, as they would have to render account to their superiors; besides a garrison composed of Highlanders or of men of the same views or inclinations, could never be a safe thing. The greater part of the clans or chiefs of the Highlanders speak quite openly to my Lord Breadalbane as to the breaking of their word and deny nothing, adding that they only recognise King James, and that they only wish to receive mercy ("grace") from him. There are those who dare to boast of having friends in the Council, and that nothing happens of which they are not warned. There are prisoners in the castle of Edinburgh and others who even have a regular correspondence with Bucchan and other chiefs of the rebels. In truth one can say that there are disaffected persons dispersed throughout the kingdom, but it is easy to know them, to frustrate their designs, and secure them by taking away their horses or in not allowing them to have the necessaries for service. The ecclesiastical affairs have so much influence and weight with the political government in this country that it is impossible to touch one without moving the other, the inhabitants being superstitously attached to their sentiments; however, one must not be mistaken, religion serves here sometimes as a pretext, or else they are generally poor and having to fish in troubled waters, gold and silver, or the hope of obtaining some, is always the principal motive which moves them. One may say that the middle course which his Majesty has chosen, in leaving the Government to the presbyterians on one side, and favouring the episcopalians with his royal protections on the other, is the surest and only way of preserving the peace in Scotland. Finally two regiments of infantry, each of two companies, of which one would be quartered in Inverness and Aberdeen, and the other in the south, two regiments of dragoons dispersed in places between Glasgow and Elgin in Moray would be sufficient with the garrison of Iverlochy reduced to 300 men, and that in Edinburgh Castle and Stirling. I say these four regiments joined to these three garrisons would be all that would be necessary to maintain peace in this country in spite of all those who desire to disturb it, and for the payment Scotland could provide it without troubling England, or making extraordinary demands on her own subjects, as appears more clearly in the account here enclosed. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 6.]
The names of Scotch nonconformist ministers that are at present in Holland (?), whose constrained absence from their own country, cannot but have reduced them to straits, and whose modesty has made them choose rather to live in the obscurest and meanest way than to give any trouble to those amongst whom they have sojourned, though indeed some few have been helpful sometimes to some of them:—
Mr. Alexander Pitcairn, who has several children.
Mr. James Veatch, who has a wife but no children.
Mr. James Kirtoun, who has a wife and children.
Mr. George Campbell, who has a wife and a numerous family, but of such modesty that I do not know whether he will take any supply or not, but he is a worthy man.
Mr. Alexander Hastie, who has a wife and two children.
Mr. John Harroway, who has a wife and child.
Mr. George Barckley, who has a wife but no children.
Mr. Patrick Verner, who has a wife and two children.
Mr. William Moncriefe, a young preacher.
Mr. Patrick Cooper, a young preacher.
These are the names of the ministers sojourning in "these provinces" and in asking help for them, unknown to most of them, the writer is actuated by Christian compassion. Then follow he names of 11 young Scotch gentlemen, most of whom applied themselves to arms, and who may be in their respective places not a little useful upon occasions, whose circumstances, which are afterwards given, call for charitable and compassionate consideration:—
Mr. Fullerton, a man of great courage and generosity, of which he gave proof in allowing himself to be taken that Lord Argyll might escape.
Mr. Dickson "a well accomplished person."
Mr. Wishart, (fn. 1) son of a minister.
Mr. Cleeland, (fn. 1) a man of courage and interest amongst the Commons of Scotland.
Mr. Bruce, (fn. 1) "who loves arms."
Mr. Campbell, (fn. 1) a relation of the family of Argyll and "forfoulted " for joining with the late Earl.
Another Mr. Campbell, "a man of courage and sense."
Mr. Guthrie.
Mr. Seaton, a relation of the family of Winton forced to stay abroad from being with the late Earl of Argyll in his expedition.
Mr. Bagell, also in Scotland with the late Earl of Argyll; he has a numerous family, but I mention him here because he is not a minister.
Mr. James, "a young man in great straits." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest, 11 No. 7.]
Lord Brandon to the King. Considering the zeal I have shown in supporting your Government, I am unhappy that I have not received the least mark of favour from you. This neglect effects me particularly as by it I have lost rank in the army. I do not know how I was misrepresented to you at your first coming into England, but am sure you could not think any the worse of me for being faithful to a king to whom I owed my life, and whose commission I therefore believed I ought not to refuse when it was offered me. But true to my trust, my principals and inclinations were always on your side, and when King James was gone away I am sure no man came to you with more sincere intentions to serve you than myself, but have since only met with discouragements, though my endeavour has been to promote your interest and carry on your service. My great ambition is to serve you in the army, because I think I can there do you most service, and I hope you will place me in the post you consider the most suitable. I suppose you know I have served abroad under the Prince of Condé, and that after that I was first lieutenant-colonel, then a colonel 13 years ago. No man except Lord Oxford and Sir John Lanier were colonels before me. I do but just mention my pretensions and then submit wholly to you, and as I cannot but expect all kind of rights from your justice, and so I assure you that when I have once a position in the army in such a rank as you think fit, I will never ask to be raised higher, till you shall yourself judge it for your service so to do. Printed by Dalrymple. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 8.]
Considerations concerning Ireland. The [lord]-lieutenancy not to be given to any single person for these reasons.
It may be necessary to alter the powers which former lieutenants have had, particularly the late Duke of Ormond, who by peculiar favour extremely enlarged that jurisdiction, as may be seen by his several commissions, together with some proposals made by him which were approved here, and were calculated for giving him more power, and taking it away from the Crown.
Any Lieutenant who succeeds will pretend it a diminution to him if he has not the same privileges. Besides in the proportion and in the nature of the allowance given to the Government there, many things may be changed, to which Justices will more easily submit, and there will be less difficulty for the Council to give their opinion freely in all things relating to Ireland, which I have known to be otherwise when a Lord-Lieutenant has been concerned. The King will be sure to have proper information when some of the commission will always be ready to tell the truth, and whether out of duty, emulation, or interest, it will still be for your service and advantage. It is granted that Justices are most convenient; the question remains how should they be qualified. I should suggest, one to be a soldier, the other a clergyman, and a lawyer. This method will give such a distribution of their several talents and callings, that it will be very advantageous for carrying on the service, and especially for making the first settlement, to which no one man can be equal.
The present General, if he will admit partners, can hardly be waived.
For the clergyman, I should think Dr. Walker's present reputation, that is now fresh and without objection, may supply the want of experience or any other defects, besides that you have so gained and obliged him that he is your "creature, " and will act accordingly; he may be made an archbishop, the better to qualify him for the dignity of such a commission.
The lawyer must be whoever you shall think fit to make your Chancellor; he must be a man well chosen since a great part of the burden of the Commission will lie upon him as to the civil administration.
There is, besides many others, this advantage in a Commission, that upon any emergency one of the Justices may go in person and act with authority for your service in the provinces, whilst two are left at Dublin to carry on the government.
In such a time as this, a kingdom is "safelyer" trusted in the hands of several persons, who cannot so easily agree to do anything against the interest of the crowned here. A single person may receive wrong influences from some in England who may correspond with him, thus the consequences may be more mischievous than when the power is divided into several hands.
2. To dispose no places at present but provisionally, excepting to such who have been put out, and have since behaved themselves well, who seem to have a right to be distinguished from the general case, so as to be admitted or, more properly, restored.
3. To begin early to re-establish the revenue, and immediately declare a resolution of making no grants of any kind out of it, till it be settled and understood; to grant no reversions especially, but let things fall into the Crown before they are disposed, and above all not to part with any of the quit rents which were reserved in the settlement by Charles II.; and to take care that one of the first things to be done by the Parliament of Ireland shall be to resume what was granted away by either of the late Kings.
4. Not to let the office of ordnance there depend upon the office in England.
5. To begin early to think of an Irish Privy Council, but to be slow in declaring it; when settled, to exceed rather than lessen the number; not to be too particular in the qualifications of the persons, but to dispense with some defects, if men of credit and estates; since men, who may be angry if left out, will do more harm than they can by their mistakes, when they are in, considering that there will not be much business to be trusted to their judgement.
6. To give order, from time to time, that a distinction may be made between the secular and the regular priests, which will have a great effect by dividing them, so that they will be less able to make opposition, and the consequence will be that they will have to submit.
7. To require of some of the principal Irish here to give to you in writing their considerations relating to the better settlement of Ireland, and that they would communicate them only to you, thus by placing confidence in them, they will be pleased, and will discover their inclinations and interests.
8. To declare you will refer many things to be settled there in Parliament when one can be called, which is no more in effect than referring it to yourself, since by the constitution of the Government the Acts must be first approved here, before they can be admitted or debated there.
9. To make some Declaration either in Council or otherwise; that some relief and subsistance must be found for the widows of such as have been or shall be killed, whilst in defence of their country.
10. To send order to the General there, to declare that all who shall burn or destroy houses, goods, or corn, &c.: shall render themselves incapable of mercy; this may in some measure prevent the ruin of the protestants' estates now in the hands of the Irish, or else when the kingdom shall be reduced, they will still remain in a condition of want, as it would be in a new plantation, when it is first inhabited.
11. To make an early enquiry into the merits of men fit to be preferred or rewarded, to have their characters from several hands, and not rely upon any single recommendation.
12. To establish something like the late Court of Claims to judge forfeitures incurred by the Irish Papists or Protestants, that took up arms with them, and to take care that the enquiry into estates above such a value may be reserved to be determined here, if it can be done legally, which I suppose it may.
13. A consideration may be had at this time, which gives an opportunity that should not be lost of establishing colonies of French Protestants in several parts of that kingdom, as well as others out of Germany, who by the violence of the French will be reduced to seek shelter and protection in some other country. Besides many others there will be two considerable advantages by this project:— First, the weakening of France by withdrawing more of their subjects; and then by repeopling Ireland, which will one way or other be a good deal exhausted by this late revolution. The forfeitures which will come and the voluntary desertion of the kingdom by such Irish Papists as may be desperate will make room for an establishment of this kind, which besides promoting an increased trade may contribute very much to a raising security of the peace of that kingdom.
14. You will do a great thing in declaring that you will recommend it to the Irish Parliament, when called, to establish some particular immunities and privileges for Londonderry and Enniskillen. Also, though it may seem a light thing, to add to the arms of those towns. Upon the Mayor of London killing a rebel with a dagger, that has been made part of their escutcheon; such rewards of honour are more visible and permanent than things of more substance, and by making these people proud of having done well in this generation you will encourage the next to follow their example.
15. If there is anything in this paper that you think fit to consider and pursue, I hope it may be declared by you as your intention at Council. All things of grace to your subjects should flow from yourself, so that it may be understood that you are the author of them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 8a.]
Memorandum of the grievances of Ireland which the King of his own gracious inclinations may remove without the concurrence of Parliament.
1. The hearth money which has been so great an oppression to the poor that the Court party who contrived it, being sensible of the great opposition so unjust a tax would meet with in Parliament, took care to "fee" every lawyer (but myself) in the House of Commons, as counsel in that cause, by which stratagem they effected their design. The collecting of which has ever since been one of the crying sins of Ireland.
Suggested that the King should issue a proclamation, promising the release of this heavy duty on his poor subjects, thereby excusing them from paying it, till it be repealed from Parliament.
2. The unjust exactions of the officers of the customs, who compel all private persons to pay duty for the importation of all wearing apparel, books, and household goods, thus greatly discouraging both English and strangers from coming there; whereas, by Act of Parliament the customs are only laid on merchandise, which are goods, wares, and commodities to sell again and make profit by trading.
Suggested that, proclamation be issued forbidding officers at sea ports to exact custom for any goods, except those to be traded withall and sold again. This is pursuant to the very words of the Act, and agreeable to the practice till the Revenue came into the hands of farmers, at whose unjust exactions the Court connived, till they were brought into use, and then the King's officers practised the same.
3. If the quit rent be collected now for some years to come inevitable ruin of Ireland must follow, "by nipping the fruit in the blossom," taking the farmer's stock for the King, before he has thoroughly stocked his lands.
Suggested that, a proclamation be published that no quit rent shall be collected, till the kingdom be inhabited and stocked, so as to be able to bear it, the time of which it will be the Governor's and Privy Council's duty to acquaint the King.
4. The quit rent itself as now payable will always be a burden, for being equally laid on all sorts of land it is therefore very unequal, because some land pays 5d. per acre, that is not worth above 6d. or 8d. per acre and land worth 7s. or 8s. per acre pays but the same rent.
Suggested that when the kingdom shall become prosperous there may be commissions appointed in every county to take reasonable value of all such lands as pay quit rent to the King, and accordingly rate the quit rent in proportion.
5. The High Court of Chancery not being in commission, we have had in that court a continual course of injustice for 18 year, together, whilst the present Lord Primate of Ireland was Lord Chancellor.
The removal of the injustice in the Court of Chancery is most probably to be affected by putting the Great Seal into the hands of Commissions.
6. Papist lawyers, attorneys, and officers in the courts of Justice are opposed to English interest in civil matters.
This may be effectually removed by the Lord Chancellor or Lords Commissioners admitting none to plead at the Bar, nor to act in any office in the courts, without taking the oath of fidelity; it being from the Primate's neglect to tender the late oath of supremacy to the papist lawyers that we are now overrun with them, whereas before his time, no Protestant Lord Chancellor ever admitted them to come to the Bar.
7. The Papist hierarchy in all spiritual matters impoverishes the natives, viz., making them pay their dues to them, though they pay the same to our clergy; and they hinder the spread of the Protestant religion and civil manners amongst them.
Proposed that all secular clergy may under severe penalties be banished the Realm, pursuant to laws in that case made. The regulars may stay, because the secular clergy are turbulant and ambitious, "every parish priest aspiring to be an Archdeacon, then a Dean, then a Bishop," so that they make fractions and parties for themselves "in persons of qualities families." Besides it is those who (as was demonstrated about 12 years since) levy in the kingdom for the see of Rome, a yearly revenue of about 240,000l. sterling. They also inspire the ignorant laity with rancour and hatred against the protestants and make their conversion so difficult if not impossible, and keep them in opposition to English manners and from being any way civilized; on the other hand the regulars are for the most part "harmless, ignorant poor men," who only preach morality and gather no riches for themselves nor ever did for the Pope, and live only "on what few pence they find on the altar and other charities."
8. We were become almost inferior to the Irish by reason of the daily oppressions and injustices of these after-named judges, and their favouring the Irish interest against us, who though lately turned out, yet were made judges by the interest of the late King, who had entire management of the affairs of Ireland, when Duke of York. The English in Ireland now live under constant fear and apprehensions of these judges being replaced, which will discourage their return. They are Sir Richard Reynolds (sic), Sir Standish Hartstonge, Mr. Justice Lindon, and Baron Worth, against every one of whom we can call to mind many notorious acts of injustice.
Suggested that the King should fill the Bench with lawyers from England in place of the oppressors, firstly because the lawyers in Ireland are not fit or of sufficient number to fill the Bench, and secondly, because every stranger is an addition and help to the "planting of the kingdom" as they take with them their families and relations. But to prevail on men of merit to go there, the judges' salaries must be raised, as at present they are too small to keep men from the temptation of taking money indiscretly; the chief judges have each but 500l. sterling per annum and the six others but 400l. sterling apiece, and 100l. for a circuit to every judge that goes; whereas, if their salaries were made 800l. apiece to all, without any difference or allowance for circuit, and 200l. to the first serjeant to go his circuit, it would soon pay itself, and the King be no loser by it.
9. The illegal and unreasonable exacting of the excise on beer and ale by the wine "measure," which was by order of the Council, against the declared judgment of judges and lawyers, at the trial of it before the Privy Council between the farmers of the King's Revenue and the brewers.
Suggested that the collectors of the excise may, by Proclamation, be ordered not to exact the excise of beer and ale according to the "wine measure," but according to the old measure. Of beer and ale, until the Privy Council shall again hear and determine that matter.
10. The great number of Privy Councillors and the fact that a large proportion are officers in the Army; by this means both the oppressions of the kingdom abroad (by them committed) are smothered, and they are able to carry on and countenance any ill design or oppression of the Governor (who is General of the Army) in the Council. Their power being great in the country through their soldiers, they bear down all who stand in their way. A number of persons of quality and gentry used formerly to be on the Privy Council without any regard to their merit, only for the end that by being of the Privy Council they might have place and precedence before all other persons of their own rank and quality; so that the number of the Privy Council was above four score, the half of whom, if assembled together, must rather hinder, than further business.
All this might be remedied if the Privy Council consisted of but 28 or 30 persons, whose estates or employments would keep them at or near Dublin.
It is most necessary to have an honest Privy Council, because by the laws of Ireland, the Privy Council prepare and draw up in form, all the bills which pass into Acts; the Parliament being only a negative voice, a power of rejecting or refusing.
11. The discontinuance of a Parliament now 24 years in the kingdom, whereby we have been disabled from representing our grievances and from passing amongst us the many good laws made in England and other good laws agreeable to our circumstances.
Suggested that the Privy Council of Ireland should prepare bills for a Parliament, which bills must afterwards pass the Privy Council in England, before they can come before the Parliament of Ireland. So that as soon as the King nominates his Ministers of State and Privy Council of Ireland, they may with his permission sit here in England, and be preparing matter for a following Parliament.
These few following grievances will need the King's conjunction with the Parliament for their redress:—
1. All ships which trade from Ireland to the West Indies, on their return with merchandise, must now pass Ireland, and not touch there under pain of forfeiture of the ship and goods, but must go to an English port, and there pay custom, and then return to Ireland; in which latter voyages they are frequently lost, the seas between England and Ireland being more dangerous than the whole voyage from the Indies.
2. The Royalties of the principality of Tipperary belonging to the Duke of Ormond, the liberties of the Archbishop of Dublin and the Earl of Meath, are great and permanent oppositions, and hindrances of justice and of the public wealth and tranquility of the kingdom.
3. No justice can be expected in trials with the Irish, unless they be made incapable of being on juries. We have many instances of their readiness to foreswear themselves to serve the Irish. There is hardly an Englishman in Ireland that cannot testify to this.
4. The want of a militia is required to be regulated by Parliament, as that, hitherto has been only voluntary, but yet amounted to 5,000 horse and 15,000 foot, one county making 22 troops of horse.
5. Through the want of martial law the army which the English paid for their defence has become their greatest opposition, the soldiers by their officers' authority becoming exempt from all law, and whatever violence they committed; as they are in the army no one dares touch them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 9.]
"Relation of his Majesty's expedition in Ireland, and particularly of the battle of the Boyne drawn out of letters written by persons of quality and credit." The account commences with a preface wherein the writer explains the reasons which have led him to give such an account, one being, that as it was such an important subject a better idea would be obtained when the account was given in one whole, instead of in instalments as in the Gazette. 18 pp. closely written. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 10.]
Lord Talbot's report on the forts and fortresses in Ireland. According to Lord Dartmouth's instructions to survey the garrisons in Ireland, and to report on their condition, I have taken a survey of the principal places, and find that there are not more than five capable of being fortified to resist a considerable army; the reason for this is, that the inland towns were considered sufficiently fortified by their natural position, surrounded as they were by bogs, rivers, and great passes. But now the country has been improved by the bogs being drained, and the most considerable passes made of no use; neither would it be worth while to fortify them as passes because there are several new bridges made, and new ways across the bogs are being daily made for the benefit of the counties bordering on one another. All which considered I advise as to:—
Leinster.
Dublin is the metropolis of the kingdom, well populated, and the next or nearest port to England. It ought, therefore, to be strongly fortified against any attempt, for the loss of it might endanger the whole kingdom. No other place is so well populated, though there are many ill-minded people there. At present the castle or chief seat of the Government is " all in rubbish by the late fire, " and even when in perfection was not capable of securing the King's stores of war, without great danger of their being destroyed by fire, it being " so pestered up" with houses and other offices within and without; so that even were it capable of being made strong it would not be convenient to have the residence of the Chief Governor near the general stores, as the people like to be as near the court as possible, and the place is becoming very much blocked up.
The powder and stores of artillery lately sent over are stored in the hospital at present, it being the most secure place and there being no danger of fire. It is unsuitable as a magazine or garrison, as it is so far from the sea-side and it could not therefore be relieved, nor can it be made a place of strength because of the hills which command it. As the castle and hospital are incapable of being made magazines or places of strength fit to receive the King's stores and to secure the records of the kingdom, new ones must be built, but not on the same site, as that would in time become buried amongst houses and hills, as is the Tower of London; for when buildings increase the ground rises, from the rubbish and foundations which are thrown out of the vaults, cellars, &c.
Things to be considered before building a fort upon the hills: the purchase of the lands and houses which are near Stephen's Green, all which must be done by Act of Parliament.
Munster.
The fort of Duncanon is a small block house situated upon a rock under a hill, it cannot be made strong or enlarged, and is very irregular. Yet this is all the security there is at present, for one of the finest rivers in the three kingdoms; there is also a spacious road and three rivers, five or six miles up, which spread into the heart of the south of Ireland, and pass many large towns.
Waterford has been a garrison, but it cannot be fortified, and even if it were, no relief could be brought to it, as it is so far up the country. Suggests the erection of fortifications at Passage, which is at the narrowest part of the river where ships can only pass with great difficulty. No hills overtop it; a battery could be placed there, and the same garrison that is at Waterford keep it.
Cork harbour is at the middle of the south of the kingdom, and is convenient for an enemy to land, as there is a large island in the middle of the harbour which would contain 100,000 men. It is suggested that various booms and blockhouses be erected across the harbour, so that if the enemy should land there, they would be hindered from making much progress until an army could be brought against them. The cost of these works is given. The city of Cork is the second in the kingdom as regards population and trade. The city is fully described. It is suggested that a fort be built on the hill called the Cat, where the stores and arms for the forces can be kept. At present they are in an old decayed tower.
The harbour of Kinsale is not to be compared with that of Cork, but as the town is near the entrance it can more easily victual the merchant ships that call there. The King must not be put to great expense in fortifying this place. The present security of the ships in the harbour is indifferent, the boom is rotton, the new blockhouse is well built but badly situated, it can never be made a place of great strength. Suggestions are offered for securing it.
The three ports of Waterford, Cork, and Kinsale being secure, the south of Ireland will be protected against the attacks of the enemy.
Limerick.
This town was once the strongest in the kingdom, but now through the neglect of the corporation to repair the walls, has fallen into decay, and the bogs that surround it have been drained. The town consists of two parts, the Irish and English towns; if one was taken both would be lost, it would be too expensive to fortify both, it is therefore suggested that a citadel be built which would command them both. The place from its position is extremely important, being the greatest inlet, and in the heart of the country, and key of all the western trade. At present the stores are in an old castle. The cost of building a citadel would be 70,000l. The Corporation should be questioned for not keeping the walls in better repair.
Connaught.
Athlone has been represented as the most proper place for a store or chief magazine and the fittest to lodge a train of artillery for the relief of all other places, but there are now several bridges above and below it, it cannot be made a place of strength because of the hills, and it is not by any means the centre of the kingdom. For all these and other reasons it is suggested that it be merely made a horse quarter, and be made fit to receive a considerable number of horse and dragoons. The castle is yet in good repair, but no one dwelling in it, it will run to decay. If the King wishes to have a stronghold in the centre of the kingdom he must have it at some distance from Athlone.
Galway is a place of indifferent trade, having gone much to decay, by reason of the bad road, but it is the chief port of the province; the best way to strengthen it would be to enlarge the upper citadel, build a small redoubt on the green hill, and another upon Mutton Island, this will amount to at least 20,000l. The country all this way is " wild and barbarous, " there are many creeks, for pirates and smugglers; these must be hindered by the revenue officers.
A considerable allowance has been made to the walled towns, which allowance has been diverted to private uses.
Ulster.
Charlemont having in the last war made a considerable resistance against an inconsiderable force, has come to be regarded as a place of great strength, but it is not, nor from its natural position could it ever become a great stronghold, therefore it would not be right to lodge the stores there, but it had better be continued as a pass and be kept by a single company. Should occasion arise there is a place five or six miles below it at the foot of the River Blackwater, called Derry Worath, from which arms could be easily transported to other places.
Londonderry.
This has the appearance of a place of great strength, and looks as if it could easily be made into an island, but that would be at the risk of destroying a noble river " which is the nourishment of that city. " It is guarded now by the London Companies. The place can only be relieved by the river which is commanded by the fort called Culmore. It must be fortified, as there is no place of strength in this part of the country. Carrickfergus has no command of the channel or river of Belfast, which is the third place of trade in the kingdom, but it has an old strong castle, and is fit to receive the King's stores. It has been mentioned as a fit place to be fortified and made into a garrison, but no vessels of any considerable size can come up close to it, and by reason of the tide they lie dry six or eight hours. But Belfast lying close to this place, which has always 40 or 50 sail or ships before it, is " rich and numerous, but not well affected, " having nothing that can give a check to anything happening either foreign or domestic; I leave this part of my report to the judgment of those who can more discern the necessity of the affair. I think the Castle of Carrickfergus should be put in a posture to receive the garrison now ordered for it, and when money can be spared, that Belfast should be properly defended. The repairs at Carrickfergus will cost 12,000l., those to the citadel at Belfast 20,000l.
There are many more places that might be fortified, but the more fortifications there are the more the army is dispersed. I therefore consider it best to fortify only the principal places, to lodge two trains of artillery, one for the North and the other for the South, and to erect booms and redoubts to secure the entrances into the harbours. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 11.]
Project in the handwriting of Count de Solms for increasing the English companies of infantry and for forming three regiments into one. Gives the payments per diem of a colonel and major and the other officers in a regiment, then the payment of the various companies. Suggests various alterations in these payments which will be for the good of the service. Suggests the reforming of several regiments. [Ibid., No. 12.]
Memorandum in the handwriting of Count de Solms, concerning the supply of bread for the army in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 13.]
Memorial by Count de Solms as to suitable provisions for the army in Ireland; advocates the consumption of cheese, and mentions that it would be well to supply brandy, salt, tobacco, and beer at a fixed price. [Ibid., No. 14.]
Memorandum in the handwriting of the Count de Solms, concerning clothing of the infantry. Methods are suggested by which the expenses of the tents and arms will be lessened and the colonels and majors obliged to take greater care of what is placed under their charge. The soldiers will require new coats, hats, and stockings towards the end of the campaign. Discusses other matters concerning the soldiers' outfit. [Ibid., No. 15.]
Memorandum in the handwriting of Count de Solms, concerning the hospitals in Ireland. Both officers and men complain of the manner in which the hospitals are conducted, particularly of the way in which the authorities raise money for the hospitals, namely by deducting sums of money from the soldiers' pay, when they are wounded. The authorities also complain of the officers, and there is a general state of dissatisfaction between them. Recommendations follow for the remedy of existing evils. [Ibid., No. 16.]
Answers to questions concerning the campaign in Ireland, which had been raised by the King, as to the following points:—Recruits, clothing, artillery, provisions, transportation, and hospitals.
As to recruits orders had doubtless been sent to the Duke of Schomberg. Reference to supplying defects in the horse. The regiments in Scotland are much weakened in numbers.
As to clothing the Treasury has promised to pay 3,000l. a week towards it.
Colonels Talmash and Godfrey being content will proceed much more expeditiously. They promise that it shall be better, and that it shall be in readiness by the beginning of March.
As for the artillery, the waggons in stock here and at Chester and in Ireland should be used.
As for provisions, these should not be provided by contract. Biscuits should be largely employed, for nothing is more certain than this, that in the late wars, both Scotland and Ireland were conquered by timely provisions of Cheshire cheese and biscuit, and how unusual so ever it may be in foreign armies to eat biscuit, yet considering that everybody agrees that rye bread produces disease in Ireland, and as the army there cannot be supplied with wheat bread, there is no choice but to depend upon biscuit.
As to transportation, ships must be pressed by Act of Parliament.
As to hospitals, the medicines have been bought, and 500l. in 1,500l. has been saved by ready money being employed; by this means much more might be saved in Ireland. The officers of the hospital and the surgeons ought to be sent over now, as they will make their journey slowly, and the sooner they arrive the sooner their lack of experience will be remedied. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 17.]
Proposal concerning the next year's prosecution of the war in Ireland. When the numbers of the army are settled, then estimates must be taken for providing ammunition, provisions, clothes, shipping, transportation of soldiers and necessaries of war, the money to expedite these particulars must be set apart and paid out as required by those persons responsible for providing the above necessaries.
Biscuit and Cheshire cheese were found in the last civil wars in Scotland to be the most useful and nourishing for keeping the soldier in better health when marching, and enough biscuit for 10 days can be carried by each soldier, and it will keep 6 months, or longer, which no other bread will do. For these and other reasons it is cheaper in the long run than bread. It is suggested that in order to facilitate the conquest of Ireland, it would be well if the English army could take the field 8 or 10 weeks sooner than the Irish army, then the latter will be discouraged, and they can have little or no service from their horse (by reason of the forage) which was the best of their strength the last year, and the sole reason that our army could not proceed in their March beyond Dundalk.
But as the English army had better take the field at the beginning of April, and the forage will not be ready till the end of May or middle of June, hay must be provided for the horse. The amount of hay which would be required is calculated, and it is thought that 50 ships of 100 tons each ship, could bring over enough for the 5,000 horse and dragoons, the entire cost of which hay would be 1,400l., half of this to be paid by the troops, the extra expense to be borne by the King, who it is urged will greatly gain in the end, by bringing the army in the field so soon, as by this means the campaign will be much shorter. [Ibid., No. 18.]
Memorandum as to the infantry now in Ireland—
The troops suffered much towards the end of the campaign, and consequently the number of them will be found considerably less than that number sent in originally, this may be accounted for by three reasons: firstly the mortality amongst them has been very great, secondly some have deserted, and thirdly the commissioners gave in a larger number than that which really existed—suggestions follow for improving this state of affairs. Smaller regiments should be amalgamated and fresh regiments should be raised to replace them. Each colonel should be able to do this. A few men could be taken from each company in England and sent to Ireland and their places filled. Many Scotch soldiers could be drawn from Scotland, they would be strong and could withstand the inroads of fatigue and illness.
Many of the soldiers in Ireland desire to leave the service. Referenee to the service of the officers. The regiments of Ingoldsby, Roscommon, Drogheda, Lovelace, and Sanche (?) are in a bad condition and ought to be formed into others who can find their own recruits; Kirke's, Meath's, Hamilton's, Melonniere's, Du Cambon's, and La Cabinottes'. Herbert's is feeble and he does not care to trouble to form his into a complete regiment, the regiments of Stuart, Hanmer, Beaumont, Wharton, and Kingston, ought to be incorporated and have new recruits. The regiments of Bellasis, Dering, Gower, Earle and Lisburn, will require a considerable number. The best plan will be to make a few complete companies of each regiment, and to reform the worst companies into one body. Negligence and deceit on the part of the officers are very general. Suggests remedies. The accounts should be made up regularly every month. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 19.]
Memorandum of the articles which it is necessary to shortly order for the army in Ireland, and also of the abuses and faults observed there:—
1. The chief thing is to think in time of the recruits or fresh levies for the army in Ireland.
2. Overcoats can be obtained best and cheapest from Galloway in Scotland.
3. The supply of shoes and stockings, though these are not wanted now, should be entrusted to faithful and zealous persons, as the last provided were made of horse leather and were ruined in two days; these may be all very well for the slaves in the plantations where it is dry, but they shrink directly they get wet, and besides they were charged at 3s. 6d. a pair to the poor soldiers and the real cost should have been 2s. Plans were often hindered thereby. It would be well to provide the shoemakers with the army with repairing materials.
4. The condition of the artillery is bad; several pieces burst at the siege of Carrickfergus. An enclosed memorandum from Capt. Glaum shows, in part various defects, and there is a great deal of trickery. Brandy and cheese, intended for the artillery are sold. The superfluous expenses have amounted to a large sum; first the masters of the vessels have reported their ships to be of a greater tonnage than they really are, because they have been paid by the ton.
Many officers and men have perished for want of doctors and proper care being taken of them in the hospitals; the men in charge of the hospitals pass for doctors, but they are not so. The hospitals must be governed differently. Suggestions for improvement.
Remarks as to supplying the men with provisions, and as to furnishing equipage for the officers.
Remarks on the officers' lack of experience.
Mentions various things required for the next campaign. The cavalry needs plenty of forage. Too many protections are granted, and there are spies in the army. The protections should be given only on condition that those having them remain at home.
There is great complaint in the army as to the lack of money, and 1,000l. sterling must be sent over. Nobody will change theguineas and white money ("les guinés et l'argent blanc"). The Enniskillens are not disciplined, and better service would be done if they were kept to themselves. Suggestions as to the course of the next campaign. Connaught should be entered from the side of Sligo.
Connaught being conquered, the provinces of Leinster and Munster would fall of themselves.
The Enniskillens do not care for the English but they like the Scots, most of their parents being Scotch. It is well therefore not to have too many English in their regiments. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 20.]
Some considerations relating to Ireland:—
1. That some of the Scots' regiments may by degrees be "rolled" from thence and English sent in their room.
2. If any more regiments are to be raised, it would be well if they were raised in the North, and in Scotland, where they may be raised more easily than anywhere else, and also will make Ireland more secure as well as serve the King abroad.
3. That Lord Dillon may be gained into His Majesty's interest; being now the chief person the Irish depend upon he would have it much in his power to prevent their designs if it may be so arranged, that his change of opinion, be kept a secret.
4. That the King may come to a resolution touching a parliament in Ireland, and when he will have it meet. [Ibid., No. 21.]
List of the officers and servants of his Majesty's artillery to be employed in the field for the year 1691. No names are given; only the titles of the officers. [Ibid., No. 22.]
Memorandum concerning artillery and ammunition for the expedition of the year 1691 in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 23.]
List for the year 1691 of ordnance, carriages, ammunition, wagons, necessaries, &c., to be employed in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 24.]
Plans of batteries which defend the entrance of the bay of Kinsale and Fort Charles. [Ibid., No. 25.]
Plan of the town and forts of Kinsale. Showing also where the English and Danish troops will attack from. [Ibid. No. 26.]
List of Danish infantry for Limerick. [Ibid., No. 26a.]
[The King of Spain] to the Elector of Bavaria, Captain General of Flanders. Instructs him to endeavour to separate the Duke of Hanover from "the third party" which is being formed in the Empire, by treating with him for the hire of troops. Dated at Madrid. Copy. Spanish. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 27.]
Justification of the right which the Emperor has (in default of male heirs of his Catholic Majesty), to the kingdoms of the crown of Aragon, &c. Spanish, 6 pp. [Ibid., No. 28.]
Letter by some person whose signature is illegible, referring to movements of troops on the Danube. [Ibid., No. 29.]
Unsigned report on the Bay of Biscay with a view to operations of the Allies against France. [Ibid., No. 30.]
Memorandum as to the movements of Mons. Bose. [Ibid., No. 31.]
Memorandum concerning the Count of Ausberg's visit to "Bergeyck." [Ibid., No. 32.]
List of the troops of Brandenburg on the Maas and Rhine. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Memorandum of what is expedient for the protection of Namur [Ibid., No. 34.]
Memoranda as to the movements of the allied troops towards Tongerell. [Ibid., No. 35.]
Memorandum for the King. Mons. de Nordwyck needs money for the secret correspondence. Three regiments have been put in Liege to restrain the populace, &c. [Ibid., No. 36.]
Memorial to the King from James Gondran, a minister at Orange, praying for relief. [Ibid., No. 37.]
A memorandum of money due under the treaty made between the Elector of Brandenburg, through Mons. de Diest and the Marquis of Castanaga. [Ibid., No. 38.]
Memorial about the movements of troops in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 39.]
Map of the neigbourhood accompanying the foregoing memorial. [Ibid., No. 40.]
Memorandum of a demand for provisions. [Ibid., No. 41.]
Memorandum of supplies at Ghent, Oudenarde, &c. [Ibid., No. 42.]
Statement of things necessary to be done for the re-establishment of the cavalry. [Ibid., No. 43.]
Proposition in the Earl of Portland's writing, by the Deputies of Amsterdam to the Pensionary Heinsius. [Ibid., No. 44.]
A calculation of the armies which can be formed upon the Rhine. [Ibid., No 45.]
Minute of magazines of rations, &c., for garrisons and field troops at Brussels, Louvain, Mechlin, Namur, &c. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 46.]
List of artillery officers who are to remain in the army. Dutch names. [Ibid., No. 47.]
List of artillery ordered from Maestricht to Namur. Ibid., No. 48.]
Disposition of field-pieces. [Ibid., No. 49.]
Memorandum of the force. Movements, &c. of army, with notes, [Ibid., No. 50.]
Plan of Bavarian and Luneburg batteries. The name of the town is not stated. [Ibid., No. 51.]
Plan, stated to belong to Lieut.-Gen. Boulengier, of the artillery, and showing the fortifications of Vienna. [Ibid., No. 52.]
Plan of Valenciennes. [Ibid., No. 53.]
Five military plans. [Ibid., No. 54 to 58.]
—Delavel to the King. Sends to him a plan of the rivers Meuse and Sambre. As the King has expressed approval of his behaviour at Beaumont, hopes he will give him the commission of captain [of engineer ?]. [Ibid., No. 59.]
Plan of the course of the river Meuse from the ancient limits of France to the junction of the Sambre, and of the Sambre from the ancient limits of France to its mouth, made in the years 1661–1663 (in order to ascertain the proper places to be fortified), by order of the Governor of the Low Countries. Correctly copied from the original for the service of the King of Great Britain in the year 1691. [Ibid., No. 60.]
Plan of Maubeuge. Showing particularly the site of the religious houses. [Ibid., No. 61.]
Plan of fortifications. [Ibid., No. 62.]
Plan of fortifications. [Ibid., No. 63.]
A plan apparently of the position of ships in an engagement off Cape de Bevesier. [Ibid., No. 64.]
Plan of fortifications by "Bombelles." [Ibid., No. 65.]
Plan by "Bombelles," showing where it is proposed to dig a dike and construct other fortifications. [Ibid., No. 66.]
Cover for enclosing memorials from Goer and Meister. [Ibid., No. 67.]
Cover for enclosing list of troops. [Ibid., No. 68.]
Cover for five lists of papers relating to the artillery. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 11, No. 69.]
Cover marked as enclosing plans of cities and orders of battle. [Ibid., No. 70.]

Footnotes

  • 1. These are volunteers at Wessel.