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William and Mary: January 1692

Pages 80-120

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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January 1692

1691–2. Jan. 1.
Kensington.
Commissions for Thomas Dove, gent., to be cornet of Captain Edward Lloyd's troop in Colonel Francis Langston's regiment of horse; for John Richardson, gent., to be adjutant of the same regiment [H.O. Military Book 2, p. 231]; for George Carpenter to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of horse commanded by Colonel Edward Villiers, and likewise to be captain of a troop in the same regiment [Ibid., 3, p. 100]; for Charles Fox, to be lieutenantcolonel and captain of a company in Colonel Robert Hodge's regiment of foot; for Archibald Row to be major and captain of a company in the same regiment; for Charles Cockburne to be captain of the company of Grenadiers of which Major Archibald Row was captain in the same regiment; for Thomas Parsons to be captainlieutenant in the same regiment; for Walter Johnstoun, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of Grenadiers, of which Captain Charles Cockburne is captain in the same regiment; for Sir Bradwardine Jackson, bart., to be ensign to Captain Davidson in the same regiment; a brevet for Captain Davidson to command and take rank as lieutenant-colonel; for Walter Sharpe to be captain of the company of which Captain Francis Scott was captain in Col. Francis Fergus D'Offarrell's regiment of foot; for Henry Trelawny to be colonel of the regiment of foot lately commanded by Major-General Charles Trelawny, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 101]; for Francis Alexander, to be lieutenant in Capt. William Tompson's company in the Duke of Bolton's regiment, commanded by Lieut.-Col. William Norton; for William Robinson to be ensign to Capt. Ralph Gore in the same regiment; for Robert Radford, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Gilbert Abraham is captain in Col. John Hales' regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 103]; for Hannibal Hall to be surgeon of Col. Samuel Venner's regiment of foot; for Paul Wentworth, esq., to be lieutenant to Lieut.-Col. Francis Edwards' company in the second regiment of foot guards called "the Coldstreamers," commanded by Major-Gen. Thomas Talmash; for William Windresse, gent., to be ensign to Lieut.-Col. Charles Cotton in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 104]; for Hammond Rooke, esq., to be major of Col. Henry Trelawny's ragiment of foot, and to be captain of a company in the same [Ibid., p. 106]; for Stephen Piper, esq., to be captain of the company in Col. Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot of which he himself is captain; for Sir Bradwardine Jackson, bart., to be ensign to Capt. Davidson in the regiment of foot commanded by Robert Hodges [Ibid., p. 107]; for Capt. Anthony Morgan to be "exempt" of the first troop of horse guards of which Richard, Earl of Scarborough is captain and colonel, and to rank as eldest captain of horse; for Capt. Philip Chevenix to be "exempt"; for Samuel Wells, esq., William Barnes, esq., and James Chamberlayn, to be brigadiers and eldest lieutenants of horse in the said troop; for Ambrose Lock, gent, and Andrew Corbet to be sub-brigadiers and eldest cornets of horse; for Hugh Beheathland and George Short to be sub-brigadiers in the said troop [H.O. Military Book 2, p. 108]; for Robert Thorold, gent., to be ensign of the company in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Ferdinando Hastings, of which he himself is captain; for Thomas Cooke, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain John Norris, was captain in Col. Robert Hodges' regiment of foot; for Richard St. George, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Richard Wyborow was captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Sir George St. George, knight [Ibid., p. 109]; for Stephen Tempest, esq., to be captain lieutenant in the same regiment; for Loftus Duckenfield, esq., to be captain of the company, of which Capt. Henry Edgeworth was captain in the regiment of foot lately commanded by late Adam, Viscount Lisburne, deceased [Ibid., p. 111]; for Major William Palmer to command and take rank as lieutenant-colonel of horse [Ibid., p. 113]; for Benjamin Conway, clerk, to be chaplain to Col. Edward Fitzpatrick's regiment of foot; for James Bridgeman, esq. to be lieutenant-colonel of the second regiment of foot guards, called " the Coldstreamers, " commanded by Major-Gen. Thomas Talmash, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment; for William Seymour, esq., to be major of the same regiment and captain of a company in the same and to rank as youngest lieutenant-colonel of foot [Ibid., p. 114]; for George Kilham, esq., to be major of the regiment of horse commanded by Col. John Coy; for Roger Pope, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Major George Kilham was captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 117]; for Oliver Brook, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Capt Richard St. George is captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Sir George St. George, knight; for Henry Eyre, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. James Barry is captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 118]; for Henry Villiers to be captain of the company, of which Capt. Cole was captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. William Stewart [Ibid., p. 120]; for Henry Anderson, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Alexander Stewart in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Ferdinando Hastings; for —Hennage to be captainlieutenant in Col. Robert Echlyn's regiment of dragoons; and for —Johnston to be lieutenant in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 122.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mons. Estienne Ernauld to come from Flanders or Holland, and to land in any English port with his goods and necessaries; for Mrs. Marie Anne Darras, and her two children Catharine Dunouchel and Frances Dumouchel, and a servant maid, to come from France and to land in any port in England; and for the Sieur Betard, to go to Holland, recommended by Mons. Hoffman, the Emperor's Secretary. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 210.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Pass for Richard Vincent, lately a trooper in Col. Langston's regiment, to embark at Chester for Ireland. [Ibid., p. 223.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for a gift of the escheat and life rent of Arthur Udny in favour of Mr. James Elphinston of Logie. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 49.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for a gift to George Bailly of Jerviswood, of the wardship and marriage of—Hamilton, of Balincreife. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 51.]
Jan. 1.
Kensington.
Leave granted to George Ford, esq., high sheriff of Essex, to reside out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 2, p 44.]
Jan. 1. "The present state and list of the children of his late Majesty King Charles II., his new royal foundation in Christ's Hospital, presented to their Magesties King William and Queen Mary, by the Lord Mayor of London, with the President and Governors of the said hospital. " Gives the names and ages of children put as apprentices to the practice of navigation, with the names of the ships on which they were placed and the names of the masters of those ships. Printed. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 1.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Commission for Edward Savill to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of foot, commanded by Colonel Henry Trelawny, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 101.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lodowick Jackson, gent., aged and afflicted with the gout, for license to execute the office of escheator of Waterford, by John Langton, as his deputy. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 288.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney-General. I send enclosed [enclosure not entered] the paper signed by the two archbishops and several bishops, by the King's command, who would have you prepare a proclamation pursuant to what is proposed in it, and present it at the next Council. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 370.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. His Majesty having appointed the Earl of Essex to be Custos Rotulorum of Hertfordshire, and of the town and liberty of St. Albans, desires you to give order for the necessary bill to be prepared to pass the Great Seal. [Ibid. 3, p. 95 and S.P. Dom. Will., & Mary 4, No. 2.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Catherine Vandevelde, and her daughter, to go to Holland; and for Mr. Charles St. Prix, to go to Holland or Flanders, recommended by Lord Dover, whose servant he is. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 211.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Gellibrand, or Charles Maris, messengers in ordinary, to make diligent search for Mr. Roberts, and having found him to apprehend him and bring him before Lord Sydney, on the charge of maintaining a correspondence with their Majesties' enemies. [Ibid.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant for a ratification to Lady Katherine Stuart and Sir Joseph Williams, her husband, of the " few mills, few farms, and duties of Islay." [S.P. Dom. Scotland, Warrant Book 15, p. 52.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Johanna Heuleur, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; and for Isaac de la Jaille, to go to Gravesend, and embark for New England. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 156.]
Jan. 2.
Dublin Castle.
The Lords-Justices of Ireland to Viscount Sydney. In answer to a reference to them of the petition [recited] of John Lovett and others, praying for incorporation as a company to develop the fisheries of Ireland, they state that they have considered the petition of Mr. Lovett and are of opinion that such a grant would be of great use to the Crown, and would employ many people who are poor and in want of work. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 153.]
Jan. 2.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Wishes him health during the coming year; having written the enclosed memoir, he is unable to write more than a few lines. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 1.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Commission for William Taylor, gent., to be ensign of the company, of which Major Archibald Row is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Robert Hodges. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 102.]
Jan. 3. The King to the Lords of the Treasury ordering the payment of the yearly salary of 20l. sterling, to Mr. Andrew Anderson as clerk deputy in the Exchequer. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 15, p. 55.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor of London, as to making a collection in churches for the poor of London, in the same words as that calendared under date 29th December 1689. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 40.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The same to the Bishop of London, on the foregoing subject and in the same words as that already calendared under date 29th December 1689. [Ibid.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. I have received your letter of the 30th of December, and have directed the persons mentioned in it to be brought up in custody to me by the messengers who will deliver this to you, and have ordered them to take your directions in executing their warrants. I have the more reason to suspect this " Lord Moldora because, upon enquiry, I cannot find there is any person of that name in the king's service, neither can I meet with any person who has heard of him." [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 370.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, lieutenant-general of the Ordnance, directing him issue 60 "granadoes," 300 "hand-granadoes," 20 barrels of powder, 200 shovels, 100 pickaxes," 2 "fixt pettards," 3 mortar pieces, 7 inches in diameter, with travelling carriages and other materials, for service of the English forces in Scotland. These stores are to be delivered to Lord Stair, and to be accompanied by one experienced bombardier, and one " practitioner bombardier." [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 229.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Thomas Bitham, and a servant, to go to Holland or Flanders. [H.O. Warrant Book 38, p. 211]; for Mrs. Catherine Palmer, and her servant, Mary Wynne, recommended by Sir John Lowther, to go to Flanders and to return; and for the Sieur Gustave Richard, to go to Holland, recommended by the Marquis de Ruvigny, and by the Minister and Elders of the French Church, Soho. [Ibid., p. 212.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Steur to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for Mr. John How and Mr. Edward Honywood, and a servant, to go to Falmouth and embark for Spain. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 156.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Thompson, one of the Messengers in Ordinary; to go to Sandwich in Kent, and take into custody three persons, one going by the name of " Blackford, Lord Moldora," and two others pretending to be his servants—who were lately taken at Deal, and thence carried before the Mayor of Sandwich—and to bring them to the Earl of Nottingham to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 235.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to Peter Newlyn, messenger in Ordinary, to go to Hythe, in Kent, and receive into custody two Frenchmen seized in that town upon suspicion of being alien spies, and also John Inskipp, constable of West Hythe, apprehended for concealing and harbouring the said Frenchmen in his house, and to bring them in safe custody to the Earl of Nottingham. [Ibid., p. 236.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Captain Christopher Billop. Shows that he seized, on board a smack, Lord Preston, Mr. Elliot, and Mr. Assheton with a packet of letters going to France, and was afterwards commanded by Lord Sydney to stay in town with some persons who were to discover the late Bishop of Ely, Mr. Graham, Mr. Penn, and others, in order to secure them, which took up nearly two months' time. Though missing the three last named, he seized Father Franks, and others with many treasonable papers. In doing these services he lost "the good sight of one of his eyes through extreme cold," and having been ever since in the fleet, had not an opportunity of laying this matter before the King. There is the sum of 900l. 9s. 6d. or thereabouts due to his Majesty from the estate of Richard Parry deceased, who was collector of the fee farm rents of Driffin Cloyd in the county of Denbigh, for arrears due before the year 1676, when the growing rent was sold to William Chiffinch, Esq., for which arrears divers prosecutions have been had, but the same is still standing out and unpaid. Prays for a grant of the said arrears to be sued for at his own charge. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 225.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Pass for Lady Anne Hay, and a maid servant, to come from France and to land in any port in England. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 212.]
Jan. 5. Warrant for a gift to John, Earl of Tweeddale, of the place and office of Lord High Chancellor of Scotland. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 56.]
Jan. 5. Warrant for a yearly pension of 1,500l. to John, Earl of Tweeddale. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 57.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I need not say anything concerning the money you wrote for, as I hope you have received it; it lay sometime at Chester waiting only for a wind. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 281.]
Jan. 5/15.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Not being able to write well I enclose copies of letters received. General Fleming thinks it would be well for the armies on the side of the Upper Rhine to assemble as soon as possible. Baron Goerts desires to learn your views as to his going to Vienna. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 2.]
Jan. 5.
Dover.
Extract from a letter written by Mr. Abraham Stock. Yesterday morning I went to Hythe, where I found the Constable, mentioned in my last from Deal, in a tavern, drinking with some of his consorts, though in custody. I said but very little to him, for I found he was perfectly instructed; besides he is a very cunning fellow, and keeps an ale house at Butters (?) Bridge, two long miles from the sea side, but just in the roadway from Canterbury and other places, from whence great quantities of goods, and other things to be shipped off, are brought, and is likewise, in way upwards for what is brought ashore (sic).
I only asked him why he entertained such men; others spoke for him before he could open his mouth, and said he was not home, neither did he know they were in the house, but that his wife took them in, they pretending to be Dutch, and the like, and besides, being a public house they were not to examine who or what their guests were. He seems to make very light of it. I went from thence to prison to see the two Frenchmen; I asked them why they came ashore, they told me they wanted provisions, and so came to get some sheep, and that it blew hard after they were ashore. Four of the six who landed, could swim off to their boat, these two could not, so were left behind. A very fine excuse to cover their roguery !
First, as I am informed, the place where they landed is all beach, and no sheep near it for a good way, and besides that it was very fair weather, and if they were not as well acquainted with all peoples' ways and houses in all these parts, as I am in the way from the Exchange to Westminster, these Frenchmen could never have found that house; but they are old traders, as I found by their discourse and names. I asked who was their captain and what was their vessel, because many of those fellows have by-names. I did not know their captain by his true name, which is Gilles; they told me he went by the name of Mattis, which is as well known in all these parts, and in Dover, amongst the seamen, as any man here. The father and son have never, for these forty years, to my remembrance, followed any other trade than the wool and silk and the like. I asked what boat they had, they told me an open shallop only a little deck forward, and the like astern, upon each stood a gun, mounted upon carriages, and two small guns upon swivels on the side, and 17 men, and to justify their landing, one of them pulled out of his bosom a paper which is copy of their captain's commission, the last clause in which, they think, will help them from being taken as spies, and bring them off as prisoners-of-war. As soon as I saw the paper, I suspected, by its being so much worn, that it is a paper left ashore to serve upon all occasions, if any of their men are left ashore here as these are. Capt. John Knight who took them, and not Mr. Bassett, as I wrote in mistake, told me he searched as narrowly as possibly could be done, but found no paper, neither did they own they had any. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 191.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Guygnard, a French protestant, to go to Holland, recommended by the Ministers and Elders of the French Church, London; for John Ennis, with his wife and three children, to go to Ireland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 212]; and for the Sieur Phillipe Pomier, to go to Holland, recommended by Mons. L'Abastide St. Sebastian, lieutenant-colonel to the Marquis de Ruvigny, and by Mons. Du Bourdieu. [Ibid., p. 213.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General, to grant the office of Procurator of Jersey to Daniel Messervy, gent., formerly held by Francis de Carteret, Esq., with reversion to Jeremiah Le Pin. [Ibid., p. 214.]
Jan. 6.
Kensington.
Warrant to Viscount Sydney and the Lords-Justices of Ireland to grant restitution of the temporalities of the see of Elphin to Simon, Bishop of Limerick from 4 December 1690, and a remission of the payment of first fruits. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 422.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I desire you will order protections to Robert Sanderson, Christopher Sanderson, and George Morris, that they may not be impressed for sea, being in their Majesties' special service. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 68.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the Petition of Percival Brunskill, gent. He had formerly addressed himself, to his Majesty for the office of Custos Brevium or for restoration to the surveyorship of fines of the Green Wax or a commissioner's place in the Alienation Office; and he now prays for compensation for his services and sufferings. Referred to Baron Atkins. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 289.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Pass to come to England for certain persons unnamed, able to make discoveries of various designs against the Government. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 213.]
Jan. 7. The King to the Earl of Tweeddale and the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland directing them to issue proclamation "to roup" the Customs. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 58.]
Jan. 7.
Kensington.
The same to the Ministers and Elders of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. By our letter from the Hague, in February last, and in another in June from our court at Anderleck, directed to the last General Assembly, we signified our care for the settlement of the Church in our ancient Kingdom of Scotland, and for bringing these ministers who formerly conformed to episcopacy, to an union with you in the church government by presbytry, as it is now established by law. And though we had fair assurances from the commission, of their willingness to take their brethren into ministerial communion, yet there hath not hitherto been such progress made in that matter as we expected.
It is represented to us that you are not a full Assembly, there being as great a number of the ministers in the Church of Scotland as you are, who are not allowed to be represented, though they were neither purged out upon the heads mentioned in the Act of Parliament by the general meeting or their delegates, nor by the last general assembly, during which time there was no stop put to your procedure or trials; yet our pleasure was to these "conform ministers," not to insist upon that point, but to apply to you "in the terms of a formula and declaration," which we have delivered to our Commissioner, being rather inclined that this union may be the more effectual and cordial, [and] that it should be an act of your own to receive and assume into church government and communion with you, such as shall address to you in these terms and subscribe to the Confession of Faith, which "clears" the soundness of their principles, as to the fundamental articles of the protestant religion.
It is not our meaning, or intention, to impose or protect scandalous ministers, and though more caution is necessary in the admission of persons to sacred orders, than allowing them that share of the government in the Church which is consequent to their ministry, and that scandals are neither to be presumed, nor lightly sustained against presbiters; and these ministers having some months ago, applied to the Commission, you might have had opportunity to understand their circumstances, and if anything scandalous should hereafter appear, they ought then to be turned out, notwithstanding you now receive them.
By all which a trial, in order to this union does not appear very necessary; yet for your satisfaction on that point, we will not desire you to admit any that may apply, against whom there shall be any accusation, supported by proof; but where no sufficient probations are adduced, we judge it just and necessary that you should admit these who apply and are not found scandalous, and that the trials be in open assembly. Such as are not guilty are to be received before the General Assembly rises. If so many accusations be brought in, that time will not allow of examination during the ordinary time of the sitting of the General Assembly, or thatyou cannot be absent from your parishes, you are to appoint two Commissioners, one to sit at Edinburgh, after the rising of the General Assembly, for discussing such accusations as the General Assembly cannot overtake, that may be brought against these conform ministers who shall apply, and reside upon the south side of the river Tay, and the other Commission to sit at Aberdeen within ten days after the rising of the General Assembly, to discuss such accusations as remain undetermined by the General Assembly against these ministers residing upon the north side of the river Tay, who shall apply to you; and that the trials may be the more impartial, speedy, and unsuspected, one half of the Commissioners shall be of you, the old presbyterian ministers, and the other half of those ministers who formerly conformed to episcopacy and are now to be received by you, against whom there is no accusation; which Commissions are to consist of 24 ministers at least, being 12 on each side, who are to sit without interruption till they determine these accusations, which may easily be finished before Whitsunday next.
You are to discourage malice and calumny, and proceed with diligent impartially, that those who are worthy may be admitted, and such as are scandalous ministers, whom we abhor, may be rejected, so as there may be a full representation of the whole Church in the next General Assembly.
We renew to you the assurance of our intention to protect you and to maintain the presbyterian government in the Church as established by law, and that you will not suffer incroachments or novelties to be intruded upon it, nor allow yourselves to be imposed upon by some hot, violent, spirits, who would carry you from moderation and charity, whose design is to confine the whole government of the Church in the hands of part of the ministers, which is inconsistant with the presbyterian grounds and the plan of church government established by Parliament in 1592 and lately ratified. We have sent to you the Earl of Lothian as Commissioner. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 58.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Colonel Van Erffa, Colonel Vintinghoff, Major Duffelen, 9 captains, 16 lieutenants, 50 sergeants, and 30 servants, going over for recruits to complete the Danish forces in His Majesty's service to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for Colonel George Scheppe and 2 servants, going on their Majesty's service, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 157.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to discharge from his fine Nicholas Gloster, convicted at the Old Baily for uttering certain seditious words, and sentenced to stand in the pillory, and to pay a fine of 20l. [H.O. Warrant Books 6, p. 236.]
Jan. 7. The Pensionary Heinsuis to the Prince of Waldeck. Asks for information about the artillery which the King will bring and of which he will take charge, as the subject has already been raised by Mons. Vander Myle. Copy extract. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest, 12, No. 3.]
Jan. 7.
Berkeley House.
Princess Anne of Denmark to the King I have already informed the Duke of Portland that I am too ill to leave the house, and regret that I must, therefore, defer waiting on you. I trust soon to be well enough to have an interview. Holograph. [Ibid., No. 4.]
Jan. 7.
Cork Harbour.
Copy of a letter from Captain Wivell, commander of their Majesties' ship Centurion. The transport ships were not ready to sail with the Danes until last night at 8. Great neglect (sic) has been occasioned by not having enough ships, and several of them not manned or ready. I was forced to lend them about forty men as they could not sail. I am to let you know that the best ships of force, went to Bristol, the worst and of no force go to Flanders with me. By some underhand dealings they have put nearly 300 Danes on board seven great Dutch flyboats, laden with salt, which may be of great prejudice to the convoy.
[Memoranda in the margin.—The whole care of transporting the Danes was left to Mr. Van Homrigh by the Generals in Ireland.]
I am just sailing out of the harbour with about 30 sail, the Chester with me, and I sent an express last night to Kinsale, for the men of war and transport ships to sail this morning by day break, so I hope to join them to-night, when we will make the best of our way to the Downs for pilots to carry us to Flanders, but the Brigadier who is on board, who commands the Danes, cannot tell me where they are to land, nor have I any orders therein. This seems very strange for it has been for long understood by everyone concerned that the Danes were to go to Ostend, and this the captain might have known from Mr. Scravenmoer, or the Lords-Justices who received the King's orders therein. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 195.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Eleanor, and Mrs. Christiana Arthur, and their servant maids, Anne Gerrard, and Mary Hackett, to embark on any vessel coming from France, with exchanged prisoners and to land in any port of England, and go from thence to Dublin [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 214]; for the Sieur Henning Christian, Koch, an officer in Major-General Macklier's regiment to go to Holland, recommended by the Sieur Macklier Major-General of Swedes; for William Anderton, and John Farnworth, to go to Holland or Flanders; for Mrs. Frances Baillon, and Cecile Favane, with their goods, to embark on the first ship which leaves England for France, with prisoners for exchange; and for Mrs. Margaret Chilton, with her two daughters, Margaret and Catherine, to go to Holland or Flanders. [Ibid., p. 215.]
Jan. 8.
The Hague.
Count de Windisgratz to the King. I thank you for your letter, communicating what should be done with regard to his Imperial Majesty. I think it my duty to write and inform you what the Prince of Lichtenstein, Ambassador to his Imperial Majesty, told me about the Pope's sentiments. His Holiness no longer regards with indifference the war that is wrecking the peace of Europe, but is most anxious to bring about a universal peace, and to that end intends to send Nuncios-Extraordinary to the courts of the Emperor, Spain, and France. If this universal peace cannot be brought about, he would endeavour to obtain peace in Italy. The writer then gives details of the interview with the Pope on the affairs of Turkey and the proceedings of France. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 5.]
Jan. 8.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the same. Acknowledges instructions as to the concert proposed in the presence of Count Windisgratz and the Pensionary. Hopes for good from the change in the Government of the Low Countries. Refers to the despatch of troops to Piedmont. Postscript.—Count de Solms informs me of the enemy's movements between Namur and Charleroy and asks for instructions as to his conduct towards the Elector of Bavaria. Difficulties arise with the English, Scotch and other troops here as to the payments they should make to the hospitals. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 6.]
Jan. 8.
Culenburg.
The same to Baron Schoning. Regrets that it is not in the Baron's power to command the troops of Saxony to march. Contemplates making a diversion in march and fears that time may be lost if the troops are not moved. Copy. [Ibid., No. 7.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Dr. Wallis. The King has commanded me to present you with 100l. which is ready to be paid you as soon as you appoint any person to receive it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 370.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Having laid before the King this afternoon, at the Cabinet Council, a letter I have received from Consul Baker, I enclose you the extract of it, so that you may lay the same before this Majesty, and issue out such orders as shall be necessary on this behalf. [Ibid., p. 371.] Enclosing:—
Extract of a letter from Mr. Thomas Baker his Majesty's Consul at Algiers. I have received a letter from the Commissioners of Prizes enclosing a bill of exchange for ten thousand and eighty-seven reals the proceeds of the Genoese prize which I am obliged to pay unto the Dey in weighty Spanish dollars, at the rate of eight reals each, without any deduction; for according to the tenor of the bill drawn by Mr. Robertson there will be 40 per cent. loss to his Majesty, gold being 5 per cent. less value than plate, and the exchange between Cadiz, and this place 35 per cent. I have been forced to pay for the carpenter, so often mentioned, and have taken up a few at 35 per cent. interest, half of his ransom, being 400 dollars. I pray that both these sums be speedily sent hither by a man-of-war taking in the said money at Cadiz, or remitted to Leghorn to Mr. Ball or the Consul. I have dispensed almost all his Majesty's cloth and shall stand in great want of five pieces more to be done up in half pieces. A great part of that which I brought proving so ordinary that I have been several times out of countenance when I made presents of it, and the violets and crimson were false dyes. Algiers, Oct. 11, 1691. [Ibid, p. 371.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Dorothy Williams, Benjamin Williams, John Bonnington, Adam Foxwell, and William Turner, to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 215]; and for John de Lamonnerie, a captain-lieutenant in Major-General's Chauvet's regiment, and Martin Rogewangen, his servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 216.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mary Chayer to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for John Vonch, and his wife, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 157.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices. Charles Allen, a servant of mine, and one of your pursuivants, having formerly had your licence for dispensing with his personal attendance upon you in that employment for twelve months, which is nearly expired, I desire you to renew the licence for 12 months longer. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 144.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the same. I am commanded by the King to acquaint you, that you should not have made it a secret that his Majesty designed the regiment of 1,400 men (which he commanded you to form) for the service of the Emperor; for if they have any hopes of being employed in his own service, they will look upon themselves in a deceived manner, and will most probably, when they get on the other side of the sea, desert and go into the French service as the last did, which his Majesty sent from the Isle of Wight to Hamburg. You must, therefore, plainly tell them the King's intentions in this matter, that they may know the engagement into which they enter. His Majesty would not have you detain the transport ships in pay, which you designed for carrying these Irish, because there cannot presently be a convoy for them; and before the convoy can arrive in Ireland there will be other ways of transporting them. The unnecessary expenses of the demurrage of these transport ships will thus be saved. This is all the King has ordered upon your letter of the 2nd instant. [Ibid., p. 281.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Thompson, messenger in ordinary, to make strict and diligent search for the Sieur Du Quesne, Comte Du Morant, and having found him, to apprehend and seize him, as an alien enemy, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 237.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Thomas Southwell, bart, showing that soon after the King landed in England he raised 100 horse in the county of Limerick, and maintained them at his own charge during two months at a cost of 500l. That when his measures were disappointed he attempted with his party to break through the enemy, and to reach Londonderry or Enniskillen. That on his attempts being overpowered, he and his party were tried and condemned as traitors, and were kept for 15 months in a gaol at Galway, and were reprieved by warrants purchased with great charge. That for supporting the poorest sort of 190 prisoners, and in procuring four or five reprieves he was forced to borrow 500l. which is now demanded from him. That during their imprisonment the Earl of Clanricard who was their Governor, sent them word to prepare for death, but the Earl of Seaford being then accidentally there, taking compassion on the petitioner had leave to carry him into Scotland which was done accordingly on the 1st of May 1690, and during his stay there he prevailed with the said Earl who brought him to his Majesty's party.
And whereas the 500l. borrowed for the support of those who were then suffering for his Majesty and the protestant cause, which said sum is now to be repaid, which cannot be performed by the petitioner, because it would be too heavy a burden for him, considering that his estate near Limerick is so much ruined, he prays that some public means may be found for the payment of the 500l. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book, 1, p. 226.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Neale, esq., showing that there have been, for want of heirs, escheats of estates in the plantations in America, which of right belong to the Crown, yet no advantage of such escheats has happened for want of due looking after. The petitioner having now settled a postage in those countries, and having thereby a better opportunity than others, prays for a grant of such escheats not yet granted to others, to be by him or his assigns recovered, for the term of 21 years, rendering one moiety of what he and they shall thereby get clear, or upon other terms and conditions as the Treasury shall order. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 227.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill to pass the Privy Seal, containing a warrant to the Treasury, to pay the Baron de Frise, or his assigns, the sum of 5l. per diem, he having been sent Envoy to the Elector of Saxony. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 216.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Richard Holcomb, to embark on the next vessel which shall sail from England to France with prisoners for exchange. Memorandum:—"This pass, being for a servant of the Duchess of Portsmouth, was directed by the King upon Lord Sydney's moving for it;" it was renewed on 3rd February following, with permission to return, added. [Ibid., p. 217.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have nominated the Earl of Lothian as Commissioner for holding the general assembly at Edinburgh upon the 15th instant, and have sent him down instructed to that end. In case, by ill weather or other accident, he shall not be able to keep that diet, you are to adjourn the general assembly, either by proclamation or by sending one of your number to meet with the assembly, and as our Commissioner for that diet, to adjourn it to such time as you understand the Earl of Lothian can be present. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 60.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
The same to the Episcopal Ministers in Scotland, "who have now addressed his Majesty." We have received your addresses by the bearers; you shall experience the good effects of our protection. We doubt not of your duty in uniting with your brethren, the Presbyterian ministers in the terms we have "been at pains to adjust for you;" the formula will be communicated to you by the Commissioner. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Instructions for the Earl of Lothian, Commissioner to the general assembly of the Church of Scotland:—
(1.) The union amongst ministers, that the Church may be planted and settled, is our principal design in this general assembly, and you are to endeavour that the general assembly follow what we have proposed in our letter to them before they fall upon other business to divert them.
(2.) You are to endeavour that the general assembly shall "assume" 150 of these ministers, who formerly served under episcopacy, in the northern shires, upon their application in the formula of an address, and upon their offering to sign the test or declaration hereto subjoined, without further enquiry or trial; because these ministers in the north are generally acceptable to their people; and you are to endeavour that the general assembly shall receive 30 ministers in the south upon their application in manner aforesaid, especially of the presbytries of Dunbar, Haddington, Stirling, and Dunfermline.
(3.) Where appeals are brought in, or complaints from ministers or paroches in relation to the choosing or imposing of elders, you are to see justice done impartially, according to law, and to prevent heats and animosities; and that the general assembly be not diverted from the union and receiving of their brethren, you are to endeavour to get a committee named, consisting of equal numbers of the most prudent and judicious of both parties, to whom the general assembly may remit, to make enquiry into these complaints with you, to be reported to the next general assembly.
(4.) Whatever ministers have been put out since our letter in February last from the Hague was known—which stopped any further turning out of ministers—you are to require the general assembly to repone in the same condition they were then in.
(5.) The general assembly cannot conveniently sit above 20 days, or a month at furthest, at which time (or sooner if they please) you are to dissolve this general assembly and appoint a new one upon the—day of—1693, unless we see cause to call it sooner pro re nata, and you are to take care that the Act runs in these terms: that you, as our Commissioner, do dissolve this general assembly and call the new one. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 60.] Appended:
The formula of the address and test or declaration to be signed by those ministers who formerly served under episcopacy:
To his grace, their Majesties' Commissioner, and the general assembly met at Edinburgh.
The undersubscribers for ourselves and our constituents, ministers of the gospel in Scotland
Humbly shew
That since episcopacy is abolished and presbyterian government established by Act of Parliament, as it was established in the year 1592, and we being desirous to exercise the holy function wherewith we are invested in our several stations for the glory of God, advancement of religion, their Majesties' service and the peace of the nation, do therefore humbly desire that all stops and impediments may be taken off, so that we may be permitted to act as presbyters in presbytries, synods, and general assemblies, in concurrence with the presbyterian ministers in the government of the Church as now by law established.
The test or declaration to be signed by all those who shall be assumed:—
I, —do sincerely declare and promise that I will submit to the presbyterian government of the Church as it is now by law established in this kingdom, under their Majesties King William and Queen Mary by presbytries, provincial synods, and a general assembly, and that I will, as becomes a minister of the gospel, heartily concur with the said government for the suppressing of sin and wickedness, the promoting of piety and the purging of the church of all erroneous and scandalous ministers. And I do further promise that I will subscribe the confession of faith and the larger and shorter catechisms now confirmed by Act of Parliament as containing the doctrine of the protestant religion professed in this kingdom. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 61.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. "We have signified the utmost of mercy, gentleness, and compassion to those Highlanders who have continued so long in open rebellion, whereof many of their leaders stand convicted by our Parliament and condemned as traitors. Now that all of them have refused the favourable and advantageous offers we made them and several of their chieftains and many of their clans have not taken the benefit of our gracious indemnity, we consider it indispensable for the weal of that our kingdom, to apply the necessary severities of law. To that end we have given orders to Sir Thomas Levingston to employ our troops (which we have already conveniently posted) to cut off these obstinate rebels by all manner of hostility. And we do require you to give him your assistance and concurrence in all things that may conduce to that service. And because these rebels, to avoid our forces, may withdraw themselves, their families, goods or cattle, to lurk or be concealed amongst their neighbours, we require and authorise you to emit a proclamation to be published at all the market crosses of these or the adjacent shires, where the rebels reside, discharging, upon the highest penalty the law allows, any reset [receipt] of, or correspondence or intercommuning with, these rebels. You will know, before this comes to your hands, who have taken the benefit of the indemnity and are thereby safe, and who have not, that the names of the leaders, in particular, and their clans and tenants in general, who have been all engaged and involved with them, may be expressed, that nobody, through ignorance, may be insnared." [Ibid., p. 62.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Earl of Leven, captain of Edinburgh Castle, to deliver "granades, shovels, and powder" out of stores there to Sir Thomas Levingston for service in the Highlands, and to receive a similar quantity of the same at Leith out of the ship of which Andrew Simpson is skipper. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
Instructions, signed by the King, to Sir Thomas Levingston. You are to march our troops, which are now posted at Inverlochy and Inverness, to act against these Highland rebels, who have not taken the benefit of our indemnity, "by fire and sword and all manner of hostility, to burn their houses, seize or destroy their goods or cattle, plenishing, or clothes, and to cut off the men."
To that end you are to join the troops or divide them in parties, as you see cause or opposition. The troops at Inverness lie most conveniently to be employed against Glen Moriston and Glengarry; the detachment of the Earl of Argyll's regiment at Inverlochy, with what you see proper to send out of that garrison, and of the independent companies there, may be employed to reduce the Isle of Skye and the castle of Island Donald; but these troops would require to be conveyed by water.
You will understand these matters better upon the place, and we leave it to your discretion.
The Earl of Argyll having legal right to Sir John Maclean's estate, and most part of that clan having already taken the oaths of allegiance, you are to act in relation to the Macleans by the Earl of Argyll's advice.
You are to endeavour to seize the house of Invergarry and to put a garrison there.
That the rebels may not think themselves absolutely desperate, we allow you to own powers to give terms and quarters, but we are so convinced of the necessity of severity, and that they cannot be reclaimed, that we will not allow you to give any other terms to chieftains, heritors, or leaders, but to be prisoners of war, whereby their lives are safe. But for all other things they must "render" on mercy and take the oath of allegiance.
If the yeomen and the commonalty be content to take the oath of allegiance, render their arms on oath, and be content to take new tacks, from the governor of Inverlochy, or whom else we shall appoint, of their possessions at the rental they presently pay; in that case, we will allow you to give them "quarters" and indemnities, for their lives and fortunes, and it is our interest to protect them from the soldiers or from being plundered.
We have written to our Privy Council to assist you and to emit a proclamation "discharging to reset" the rebels' persons or goods, if any shall transgress this proclamation, you are to use the "resetters" as parties engaged with the rebels.
We have ordered Colonel Hill at Inverlochy and Bailly Dieff at Inverness, to make provisions for the subsistence and transport of necessaries to our troops and what else you find needful for carriage or otherwise. We empower you to call for assistance of sheriffs, justices of peace, or other magistrates, and in case you cannot find that assistance that is necessary in an expedition, we authorize you to command or make use of anything you find necessary for the troops, but with the greatest ease and tenderness to the country you can.
By our command our Secretary has written to several chieftains to send some of their men with a fortnight's provisions to assist our troops and engage them in the destruction of the rebels; you may call for them or entertain them, as you see fit. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 63.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of one of their Majesties' chaplainsin-ordinary to Mr. Thomas Hoge, minister at Cultearn (sic). [Ibid.]
Jan. 11.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Castleton's regiment has arrived and gone to Bergen op Zoom. Count de Solms has found quarters for two regiments, one of cavalry and the other of dragoons in Brabant. Movements of the French army. I expect Count de Solms will write as to the affairs of Groningen. Strength and condition of the regiments. The Count's project to send LieutenantGeneral Mackay is impracticable, owing to the difficulties which would arise with the Prince of Brabazon [Brabenzon] and the King of Spain. I hear that the marriage between the Elector of Saxony and the Princess of Denmark has been broken off. There is trouble with the troops in Zell; had the present Prince of Hanover as much firmness as the late Prince, his brother, this trouble need not have caused any disquietude. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 8.]
Jan. 12.
Kensington.
Commission for Charles King, esq.; to be captain of the troop lately commanded by Sir Albert Cunningham, deceased, in Colonel Robert Echlin's regiment of dragoons. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 102.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Colonel William Stewart praying for the payment of 2,280l. which he laid out for the King's service in Ireland. Referred to the Treasury; the Earl of Ranelagh and Sir Charles Fox having reported favourably upon the petitioner's allegations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Books 2, p. 289.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrant for Mr. William Carstairs, gent., with three post horses and a guide, to go from London to Edinburgh [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 217]; and for the ship the Arms of Copenhagen, to sail from London, to France, and from thence to Copenhagen with her lading of salmon and other goods. [Ibid., p. 218.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, to take into custody Claudius Willet, who stands accused of having published certain dangerous and seditious libels against the Government. [Ibid., p. 217.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Pass for Etienne Le Fevure to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 157.]
Jan. 12/22.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Has received the orders from the King and has informed the Count de Solms of them, who will attend to the two battalions at Namur at the request of the Prince of Vaudmont. The Bishop of Munster desires to exchange prisoners which will be done. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 9.]
Jan. 13.
Kensington.
Commissions for Edward Gleast, clerk, to be chaplain of the regiment of foot commanded by Col. William Beveridge. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 102]; and for Richard Smith, esq., to be major of the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Richard Brewer and captain of a company in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 105.]
Jan. 13.
Kensington.
Warrant appointing Algernon, Earl of Essex to be lord-lieutenant of Hertfordshire. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John, Earl of Bath. Shows that the lands of Pallas, &c., were, by letters patent from Charles II., granted to the late George, Duke of Albemarle, and his heirs and that the same, after his decease, descended to Christopher his son, who settled the same on the petitioner and his heirs; that by virtue of the same title the petitioner is in possession of other lands of the said Duke in Ireland, excepting the lands above mentioned, which are seized on by the Commissioners of the Revenue in Ireland, and disposed of as the property of one Esmond, whose ancestors were the proprietors thereof, in time of the rebellion before the said Acts of Settlement; to all which the petitioner is entitled by the laws and statutes of Ireland. Prays for an order to put him in possession of the said lands. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 290.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Roger Sizer, commissary to the Pay Office, for an order to the Paymaster-General of Ireland to pay him certain sums which are due to him from different persons. Referred to the Paymaster of the Forces in Ireland. [Ibid., p. 291.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Postmaster-General. I desire you to order the master of the packet boat at Falmouth to receive on board the Count of Valsasain, Don Gonzalo Chacon, and others, with all their servants, goods and necessaries, and to carry them to Spain. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 372.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mons. Estienne Ernauld to come from Holland, Flanders, or France; for Jean Couper, one of the King's footmen, to go to Holland; and for Mrs. Margaret, and Mrs. Mary Brent, and Anne Waters; their maid servant, to go to Flanders. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 218.]
Jan. 13.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General, to prepare a bill, containing a pardon to John Auchmouty, William Deanes, John Livingston, Alexander Gawne, Robert Johnston, Patrick Cunningham, and James Innis, of high treason for levying war against their Majesties in England in 1689, whereof they stand convicted. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 238.]
Jan. 13.
Kensington.
The King to—. Whereas by Act of Parliament, made in 14 Charles II. (entitled an Act for ordering the forces in several counties of this Kingdom) it is provided that, in regard of the extraordinary duties which the London forces may be put to for our safety, and for suppressing and preventing insurrection, it shall be lawful for the lieutenants of London, by our warrant, to impose and levy as much money as they need for defraying the arrears and necessary charges of the Militia of London, with ammunition, &c., in such manner as the assessment then was levied, and not exceeding in any one year the proportion of one month's tax which the said city then paid towards the tax of 70,000l. per mensem; We are now given to understand by our lieutenancy of London that the Militia are much indebted and in arrear for past services, and consequently less able to serve us in the future. We therefore direct you to impose and levy for one year, to be accounted and commence from the feast of St. Michael last past, as much money as is needful for defraying the necessary charges of such duties of those forces, according to the rules prescribed by the said Act. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 40.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords of the Admiralty. Mons. Tharmoylen, a merchant and subject of Denmark, has represented to the King that the ship the House of Gravestein, whereof he is owner, and freighted on his proper account, was taken in her voyage by their Majesties' ship the Tiger, Capt. Thomas Cole, commander, and afterwards, with her lading, discharged by the Court of Admiralty; but between the time of her capture and her being so discharged, the said Capt. Cole had embezzled a considerable quantity of brandy, part of her said lading which has not hitherto been restored. You are to examine the matter, and give necessary directions in it, that the party concerned may receive satisfaction for the damage he has sustained. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 68.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Hugh Smith, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Captain Edward Woodcock is captain in Charles Earl of Monmouth's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 230]; for Paul Piere Le Bas, esq., to be ensign to Capt. Charles Holburne in Sir David Collier's regiment of foot [Ibid. 3, p. 103]; and for William Scot, gent., to be lieutenant to the said Capt. Holburne. [Ibid., p. 106.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Neale, esq. Shows that the late King James granted, in the third year of his reign, to the Duke of Albemarle and his assignes all mines of gold, silver, lead, tin, copper, and all mines, minerals, etc., of salt petre, and salts whatsoever in all the American plantations, except New England, Virginia, and the northward parts of Carolina, for the term of 57 years paying to the Crown the sixth part of the value or proceeds. And forasmuch as the said mines have not yet been discovered nor opened, and no profit thereby to the Crown, he prays for a lease of the same on the conditions aforesaid for the like, or some other term of years. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 227.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney-General concerning Mr. Patrickson's petition. The report runs: I have considered this petition and if the rivers of Irt and End (sic) and other waters in Cumberland be plentifully stocked with horse mussels or mother-of-pearl as is suggested in this petition, it seems probable to me that this establishing of the fishing trade within the limits aforesaid may be of considerable advantage to the undertakers and of public benefit by employing a great number of poor people. And for the encouragement of the petitioner and those persons that are willing to be concerned with him in the carrying on the said fishery by a joint stock I conceive your Majesty may grant them a charter of incorporation. Granted accordingly. [Ibid., p. 228.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Marshall for an order to the Treasury for payment of money due to him for bringing over Colonel Earle from Ireland. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid 2, p. 291.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Dr. Wallis. Will you decipher the enclosed letter if you can and send it to me. There is not much of it in cypher which may make it more difficult to find out the meaning; but if it is discovered I believe it may contain something of importance to their Majesties. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 372.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. The King commands me to acquaint you that he would have you remove Mr. John Robins from being one of the justices of the peace in the Tower Hamlets, and would have you cause Mr. Robert Bullock, of Edmonton, to be inserted in the commission of the peace for the county of Middlesex and to be one of the quorum. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 373.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to Lord—. A battalion of the first regiment of the foot guards going to embark at Deptford, in order to their transportation to Flanders with the first fair wind, his Majesty has commanded me to desire you to give directions that some of the City or Company's barges may be in readiness and appointed to carry them from London to Deptford. [Ibid. 3, p. 95.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The same to [the Postmaster-General]. Mr. Robert Watte being recommended to me as a very fit person to be postmaster of the city of Hereford, I desire you will appoint him as such. [Ibid., p. 96.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause certain arms to be issued for Col. Sir James Leslie's regiment of foot in Scotland. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 230.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, to keep in custody Claudius Willet, indicted for high treason in compassing and imagining the death and destruction of the King and Queen. Memorandum. — Mr. Aaron Smith said that when this commitment was directed and drawn no heabeas corpus had been brought upon the former commitment; and this was sent to the Keeper of Newgate the night it was signed and dated. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 219.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Like warrant to John Bale, messenger in ordinary, to make diligent search for Martin Powell, and having found him to apprehend him for high treason. [Ibid., p. 220.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mary Aspall, Joan Blanchfeild, and two children, to embark on the next ship which goes from England to France with prisoners for exchange [Ibid., p. 219]; for Mr. Anthony Vane, to come from France to England on board the first ship which comes from thence with prisoners for exchange; recommended by the Earl of Feversham. [Ibid., p. 220.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John, Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant his dispensation to William Wotton, B.A., for holding, together with the vicarage of Laycock in Wiltshire, the rectory of Llandrillo in the county of Denbigh, and diocese of St. Asaph. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 119.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Count of Valsasain, Don Gonzalo Chacon, Delvaus, and Captain Don Manuel Ossorio, with all their servants, etc., to go to Falmouth and embark for Spain. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 157.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Leave granted to Thomas Rowney, junior, esq., high sheriff of Oxfordshire to reside out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 42.]
Jan. 14.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. I learn from your letters that you hold a contrary opinion to mine as expressed in my letter of the 27th of December; this knowledge increases my illness. I propose to go to Brussels, if well enough. Does your Majesty desire to raise a second army for the Elector ? Mentions the proposal of Mons. Doppt (Dopft ?) to go to Flanders. [S.P. Dom King William's Chest 12, No. 10.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to John Crump. You are required to cause a stop or embargo to be laid on all ships in any port or harbour within my Vice-Admiralty, only excepting such ships as trade coast-wise, or to Ireland, or the islands of Jersey, and Guernsey, and such as shall be employed in their Majesties' service, or are permitted to sail to the East Indies, Africa, Italy, or any other parts by order of his Majesty in Council, or such as having been first cleared to other trades, have brought, or shall bring, any of their Majesties' forces from Ireland, and such othrs for whom sufficient bond shall be given for their going to Flanders or the more northern parts of Europe. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 69.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Commission for Lewis Duplessis, to be lieutenant of the company of which Captain William Harmer is captain, in Lord Monmouth's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 232.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Bale, messenger in ordinary, to search diligently for — Gilstrop, and to apprehend him for uttering treasonable words against their Majesties. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 221.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Anna Lindemans, a soldier's wife, and her three children, to go to Holland [Ibid., p. 220]; for Mr. Richard Margot, and a boy, to go from London to Plymouth [Ibid., p. 221]; and for Mrs. Maido (sic) Macdonnell, to go to France on board the first ship with prisoners for exchange. [Ibid., p. 222.]
Jan. 15/25.
Culenburg.
Memorandum by the Prince of Waldeck. He has received the King's letter of the 8/18th instant, with his orders. Owing to the uncertainty of the movements of the Electors of Saxony and Brandenburg, matters on the Upper Rhine are difficult to regulate. Nothing is heard of the arrival of the Elector of Bavaria. Affairs are in a bad condition in Flanders. Refers to the demands of Count de Solms and the Prince de Vaudemont. The artillery and ammunition for Namur from Maestricht are delayed. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 11.]
Jan. 15.
Munich.
Maximillian Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to the King. Thanks his Majesty for the letter he has just received, informing him that he has been made Governor of the Low Countries, which appointment he owes to the good offices of the King. He is starting immediately for Vienna, and most anxious to remedy, as soon as possible, the state of affairs existing in the Low Countries. Holograph. [Ibid., No. 12.]
Jan. 15/25.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Thanks him for the letter he has written to him; hopes he will be pleased with the accounts he is sending. He is still very ill. [Ibid., No. 13.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords of the Admiralty. Being informed that two French men-of-war, of a very considerable strength, are ready to sail from Rochefort, in order to join five other great ships from Brest, and to cruise, this winter, on this side of Cape Finisterre, I have thought fit to advise you thereof, that you may give such orders thereupon as you shall judge fit for preventing any of our merchant ships, or others, from being "snapped" by them. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 70.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Thomas Burk, and Helen, Countess-Dowager of Clanricarde, his wife. Shows that the said Col. Burk commanded a troop of guards in person, in the Irish army at Limerick at the time of the surrender thereof, and was fully comprised within the benefit of the Articles, and pursuant thereunto, by express order of Baron de Ginckle, was put into actual possession of Portumna, and all other lands belonging to the petitioners in the province of Connaught, as by certificate may appear. That upon division of the Irish forces the petitioner embraced his Majesty's service before any other, and has since subsisted the said troop at his expence, ready to march where his Majesty should command. That his wife went into France in August last for recovery of her health, and upon the surrender of Limerick, the General's pass was obtained for her to return. Notwithstanding this, by unjust contrivance of some private persons, pretending an interest in part of his estate, the petitioner and his wife were, the last Michaelmas term, indicted of high treason in the court of King's Bench in Ireland. The Lords-Justices of Ireland, upon his complaint, declared the said proceedings were fraudulent and contrary to justice, but could not relieve the petitioners without order from the King.
The petitioners pray his Majesty to order the said indictment to be quashed, and all further proceedings thereupon against them to be discharged, the colonel being ready to give sufficient security for his wife's speedy return and constant obedience. Referred to the Lord's-Justices of Ireland for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 229.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you by the King's command the enclosed copy of a letter from the Lords-Justices and Council of Ireland to me concerning the transportation of horses, &c. from England and Scotland into Ireland, duty free, so that you may give such directions in the matters proposed by them as shall be requisite. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 373.]
Jan. 16. Intructions, signed by the King, for Sir Thomas Levingston:—
The copy of that paper given in by McDonald of Auchteraw, has been shewn to us. We formerly granted passes to Buchan and Canon, and we authorise and empower you to grant to them, and ten servants to each of them, leave to come freely and safely to Leith, and from that place to be transported to the Netherlands before the— (fn. 1) day of March next; to go from thence where they please, without any stop or trouble.
We allow you to receive the submissions of Glengarry, or those with him, upon their taking the oath of allegiance and delivering up the house of Invergarry; to be safe, as to their lives, but as to their estates they must depend upon our mercy.
In case you find that the house of Invergarry cannot probably be taken in this season of the year, with the artillery and other provisions that you can bring there, we leave it to your discretion to give Glengarry the assurance of an entire indemnity for life and fortune, upon the delivery of his house and arms, and taking the oath of allegiance. In this you are allowed to act as you find the circumstance of the affair requires. But it were much better that these who have not taken the benefit of our indemnity, in the terms and within the "dyet," prefixed by our proclamation, should be obliged to "render" upon mercy; and the taking of the oath of allegiance is indispensable, others having already taken it. "If McKean of Glencoe and that tribe can be well separated from the rest, it will be a proper vindication of the public justice to extirpate that set of thieves." The "double of these instructions are only communicated to Col. Hill." [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 64.]
Jan. 16. Instructions, signed by the King, for Colonel Hill. A copy of the foregoing. "The double of these instructions are only communicated to Sir Thomas Levingston." [Ibid., p. 65.]
Jan. 16. Warrant for a Commission to John Aitkin for being their Majesties' Secretary at War to all the Forces in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 66.]
Jan. 16. Commission to Captain John Erskine to have the precedency of a lieutenant-colonel. [Ibid., p. 67.]
Jan. 16. Commissions for William Baillie to be captain of Captain Cunningham's company in Colonel John Buchan's regiment of foot; for Colin Campbell to be captain of a company in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot; for David Kennedy to be captain-lieutenant of his own troop in the regiment of foot of which he is colonel; for David Creighton to be lieutenant of Sir William Douglas of Caver's troop in the royal regiment of dragoons commanded by Sir Thomas Levingston [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 69]; for James Urquhart to be lieutenant of Major Archibald Paton's troop in Col. Richard Cunningham's regiment of dragoons; for Robert Hamilton to be captain-lieutenant of Col. John Buchan's company in his own regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 70]; for George Shaw, of Sachie, to be eldest lieutenant of the company in Stirling Castle commanded by Captain John Erskine; for James Auchinleck to be cornet of Major Balfour's troop in Sir Thomas Levingstone's dragoons [Ibid., p. 71]; for Francis Scott to be cornet of Capt. Robert Bullock's troop in Col. Richard Cunningham's regiment of dragoons; for William Cunningham to be ensign to Col. John Buchan's company in his own regiment [Ibid., p. 72]; and for Robert Creighton to be ensign of Captain William Baillie's company in Col. John Buchan's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 73.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for George Liphen to go from hence to Harwich and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 157], and for Jan Hüysman to go to Holland. [Ibid., p. 158.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The letter from you, and the Lords of the Council, for bringing cattle into Ireland, duty free, I have sent, by his Majesty's command, to the Treasury and until I have their report upon it, I cannot answer it. I have also sent your letter of the 9th inst. to the Treasury from whom you will have an answer touching the 24,000l., you wrote for. I have read your letter of the 8th inst. at the Cabinet Council, and his Majesty having ordered the Articles of Galway as well as those of Limerick to be ratified, thinks it just that you should take the same method of determining who are entitled to the benefit of those articles of Galway, as I wrote to you in mine of December the 29th that you should do for those of Limerick. And because by the capitulations the outlawries are to be reversed, you are to let me know the proper way of fulfilling this part of the capitulation, that I may lay the same before his Majesty that he may give his orders therein; if any be necessary after the capitulations are ratified under the Great Seal. The King would have you consider of the heads and materials of such acts of settlement, and other acts as you think proper for the good of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 282.]
Jan. 16. Estimate of the charge of freight for 12,000 men for six months, and provisions at short allowance for the same time. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 14.]
Jan. 16.
Leipsic.
Baron de Heckeren to the Prince of Waldeck. Acknowledges a letter from the Prince enclosing the copy of a letter to General Schoning commanding him to assemble the troops of Saxony. It is bad policy on the part of the Imperial Court to delay sending some one to this Court, as many persons are trying to influence the Elector. Copy. [Ibid., No. 15.]
Jan. 17. Pass for Jean Bouffet to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 221.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Elizabeth and Margaret Boné to go to Holland or Flanders [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 221]; for Mr. Christopher Trummer to embark in any port in England and go to Holland, and pass to Maestricht, and so to Aix in Germany. [Ibid., p. 222.]
Jan. 18.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a grant of the temporalties of the bishopric of Lincoln to Thomas, bishop of that see; to commence from the time of the death of Dr. Thomas Barlow, late bishop thereof. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 119.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Pass for Anne Watson to go to Harwich for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Allowance, by the King's command, of Consul Baker's "bill of extraordinaries," and of duties paid "at the feast of the Turks' Bairam," and at that of the "feast of the Turks' Corban." [H.O. Warrant Book 6, pp. 239 & 240.]
Jan. 18. List of payments made out of the secret service but now to be paid at the Exchequer: To the Duchess of Buckingham, 1,200l. per annum; Mrs. Jane Berkeley, 200l.; Dame Anne Bunce, 200l.; the Pages of the Bedchamber, paid to the 13th of February 1690, 36l.; Mons. Brassaly's children, paid by quarterly payments 40l.; Mrs. Carlisle, widow, 80l.; Mr. Philip Darcey, 400l.; Mrs. Jane Davis, 200l.; Dame Katherine Dallison, 100l.; Mr. Lewis De Vielle, 50l.; Mr. Fanshaw, 104l.; Mrs. Fitzharris, by 40s. a week for herself and daughter, from 1st January 1690, 104l.; Mr. Fox, for two other children of Mrs. Fitzharris, at 30s. a week from 1st January 1690, and 40s. a week from Michaelmas 1690 to 1st January 1690—91, 78l.; Col. Charles Godfrey. 1,000l. (transferred to secret service); Mr. Bernard Granville, rent of Mote Park, 300l.; Sir Eliab Harvey for keepers of Waltham Forest, 233l. 10s.; Mr. Godfrey, for Lady Mountjoy's children, by 3l. a week, 156l.; Mr. Edward Howard, 200l.; Col. Philip Howard, 120l.; Mrs. Mary Kirke, widow, 250l.; Mr. Johnston, and others, prisoners in Newgate, at 58s. a week, 150l. 16s.; Alice King, widow, 300l.; Col. Kingwell, 200l.; Mrs. Katherine Leslie, 200l.; Mrs. Frances Langford, 200l.; Lord Morley and Mounteagle, 200l.; Lord Lucas for prisoners in the Tower, uncertain; Lady Arabella Macarty, 300l.; Mrs. Needham's children, 300l.; Lady Newcomen, 100l.; Lady Newburgh, rent of Bagshott, 100l.; Mr. O'Haugherne, prisoner, by 20s. a week, 52l.; Col. Philips, — Doctor Oates, 10l. a week, 520l.; Mrs. Barbara Roach, daughter of Elizabeth Simpson, —; James Roach "that servant to Londonderry" (sic), 40l.; Anthony Seagar, quarterly bills, uncertain; Sir John Trevor, Speaker of the House of Commons, 5l. per diem, 1,825l.; Col, Trussell, dead; Lord Willoughby of Parham, 200l.; Mr. Parry Walton, for repairing pictures, 200l.; Mrs. Sympson, —.
Payments continued to be made out of secret service: to Mr. John Dwyre, 2s. per diem, 37l. 10s. per annum; the Countess of Dorchester for my Lady Katherine Darnly, commencing from Christmas 1690, 1,600l.; Sir Henry Fane, —; Mr. William Lover, 1,000l.; Mr. Papillon, 600l.; Mr. Wolseley, 400l.; and Charles Godfrey, esq., 1,000l. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 16.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Passes for Richard Edwards to go to Holland, and to return again [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 221]; for Mrs. Catherine Luttrell, and her maid servant, to embark on the first ship which goes to France with prisoners for exchange [Ibid., p. 222]; for Mr. Thomas Plumerden to go to Flanders; and for Capt. John Raddishe, a captain in Col. Hodges' regiment, and one servant, to go to Holland. [Ibid. p. 223.]
Jan. 19.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have seen your letter to our Secretaries complaining that your seamen are pressed contrary to the freedom of the kingdom of Scotland, and to the injury of trade. We are resolved to give orders to prevent this in future. But we expect from you that, being engaged in a war which concerns not only England and Scotland but almost all christendom, you will provide for our navy 1,000 men or more, and we will pay to each seamen on entry 40s. sterling and full pay thereafter as English seamen receive.
We recommend you to use your utmost endeavours to provide 1,000 seamen as quickly as you can by the same methods as formerly used, or what other way you shall find most speedy; and to inform our Secretary when you have such competent numbers together at Leith, that we may send ships to transport them; and the entry money shall be in readiness there. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 73.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Pass for Erasme Konig and John Carpentrie to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to receive John Inskipp, committed for high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 238.]
Jan. 19.
Heidelberg.
— to Monsieur Lambey. My affairs are going on well. The "Herr" has sent me, with Piccard and Carl, to Brussels for the chalk. We have undoubtedly been deceived by that rogue. We can serve the King better at Maintz and Frankfort than here, and he, the King, is anxious that all shall be in readiness before the end of March. Copy. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 17.]
Jan. 19. The Prince of Nassau to the Prince of Waldeck. Your Excellency will see by the enclosed that the French are trying to assert themselves both at Maintz and Heidelburg, and that it will be as well to keep watch over their movements. Copy, extract. [Ibid., No. 18.]
Jan. 20.
Kensington.
Commission for Robert Napier, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Capt. Edward Griffith was captain in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 107.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Thomas Marshall, praying to be paid his arrears, as commander of a fireship, and, in consideration of his services, to be preferred to the command of a man-of-war. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 294.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Pass for Peter Evard to go to Harwich for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Commissions for George Fletcher, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Capt. Thomas Griffith was late captain, in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 231]; for Thomas Pulteney, esq., to be exempt and eldest captain in the second troop of horse guards [Ibid. 3, p. 104]; for Robert Illingworth to be captain of the company of which Major Fletcher was captain in Henry, Earl of Drogheda's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 106]; and for Rowland Gwynne, gent, to be ensign to Capt. Jean Corbett in Col. Toby Purcell's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 115.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney, to the Commissioners of the Great Seal, directing them to pass a bill appointing the Earl of Bedford custos rotulorum of Middlesex during the minority of his grandson. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 105.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Brune Clench. Shows that he has served, in the quality of a volunteer, on board several of his Majesty's ships, and at last on board the Constant Warwick, which was taken, after some hours fight, by a French man-of-war, and that, in that fight, he lost both his eyes. Prays for a competent allowance, quarterly, to supply him with food and raiment. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 294.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dr. Robert Georges, secretary to the late Duke Schomberg, setting forth that he served his grace some time in that station, and that there was an allowance payable out of the train and army due to him for the same, but that he never received anything of it. Prays that the allegations of his petition may be examined and adjusted by the Lord-Justices, and payment made of what shall appear to be due to him. Referred to the Lord-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 295.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
A proclamation against vicious, debauched, and profane persons. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 70.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Peter Daulbone, one of the second troop of guards, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 223.]
Jan. 21. Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, to receive Martin Powell into custody. [Ibid., p. 223.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of Sir Thomas St. George, knt., Garter King of Arms, employed by his Majesty to invest the Duke of Zell with "the habit and ensignes" of the Order of the Garter. [Ibid., p. 231.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Nicholas Hendrickson to go to Harwich and embark for Denmark. [Ibid. 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Cane, showing that a judgment was obtained against him, in King James II.'s time, in the Court of King's Bench, and was also confirmed in the Exchequer Chamber, in which he is informed there is manifest error. Prays for leave to bring a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 231.]
Jan 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of Charles Fox concerning Mr. Sizer's petition. The report is as follows:—I have considered the petition of Roger Sizer, and find that there is due to him from several officers, lately deceased in Ireland, according to the annexed account, the sum of 575l. 6s. 2d., as appears by their several receipts, which the petitioner prays may be stopped out of the pay of their respective regiments, there being sufficient due to each of them to satisfy the same. Granted. [Ibid. 2, p. 293.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Pass for Thomas Ward, soldier, his wife, and two other soldiers, to go to Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 223.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Bale, messenger in ordinary, to make diligent search for a certain person, whose name is unknown, having lately come to England from France, and who is now returning thither; and to apprehend and take him into custody, together with his papers and writings. [Ibid., p. 224.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Pass for Hüybertje Van Suermondt to go to Harwich for Holland. [Ibid. 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 22.
Dresden.
Baron de Schoning to the Prince of Waldeck. Thanks him for his letter, the contents of which he has considered. The army of his Imperial Highness, which is in quarters in Franconia and Swabia, has had orders to march when necessary to cover the countries there, but his master has been desirous of letting the army rest, as it is enfeebled by illness, and in order to obtain recruits. Says that the Baron de Heckeren has informed him of the trouble the Prince is taking to secure him an interview with the King, which be greatly desires, but fears his many enemies, or rather false friends, in Brandenburg, wish to prevent him from seeing his Majesty, for fear he should speak of anything prejudicial to their interests. Copy. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 19.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Derick Storke. Sets forth that his Majesty, having granted him three markets every week, in the Haymarket, with a toll of 6d. for every load of hay, and 2d. for every load of straw, to the intent that the said place be kept in repair, etc., by him; and he having caused the said market to be proclaimed, the farmers, etc. refuse to pay the said toll except it be settled by Act of Parliament. Prays his Majesty to give some further order for enforcing his said grant. Referred to the AttorneyGeneral, who, in company with the members for Middlesex, is to enquire into the petitioner's allegations, and to report thereon. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 292.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King has resolved this day at the Cabinet Council, that the sum of 1,000l. shall be paid forthwith to Col. O'Donnell here in England, and 500l. out of the Revenue of Ireland, pursuant to the capitulation concluded between Lieut.-Gen. Ginckle and him, and that the yearly sum of 500l. shall be paid to him out of the same revenue to commence from Christmas last past, and that he shall be placed upon the establishment of that kingdom for the said yearly sum of 500l.; his Majesty has likewise resolved, at the same time, that 400l. be forthwith paid here in England to Col. Lutterell and that the yearly sum of 500l. be paid him out of the Revenue of Ireland to commence from Christmas last past, and that he be likewise placed upon the establishment of the same. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 373.]
Jan. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant for a bill appointing William, Earl of Bedford, lord-lieutenant of the county of Middlesex, during the minority of his grandson, Wriothesley, Lord Russell. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 103.]
Jan. 23.
Kensington.
Commission for John, Lord Berkeley, to be colonel of the regiment of horse lately commanded by Richard, Lord Colchester, and to be captain of a troop in the same regiment; for the same Lord Colchester to be captain and colonel of the third troop of horse guards of which John, Earl of Marlborough was late captain and colonel [Ibid., p. 104]; for Sir John Lanier to be lieutenantgeneral of the forces [Ibid., p. 105]; for Thomas Talmash, esq., to hold a similar officer; and for Lord George Hamilton to be colonel of the Royal regiment of fusileers, lately commanded by John, Earl of Marlborough, and to be captain of a company in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 106.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Count Sandelier, and one servant, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 158.]
Jan. 23.
Kensington.
Order by the King to the Lords-Justices for the restoration to James Hamilton of possession of six lighthouses in Ireland, and the yearly allowance of 500l. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 149.] Annexing:—
Petition of James Hamilton; Esq. Whereas King Charles II. granted by letters patent, bearing date the 13th of November 1665, certain powers to Sir Robert Reading, bart., in pursuance of his having erected six lighthouses in Ireland, and maintained the same, for the preservation of ships passing that way. That the said King also on the 16th of July 1667 granted to Richard, Earl of Arran, deceased, in trust for Sir Robert Reading, and Jane, Countess-Dowager of Montrath, the said lighthouses, and power to maintain them and their lights, and towards their support to receive from all ships and vessels belonging to Ireland, trading by any of the harbours, 1d. per ton inwards and from all strange ships 2d. per ton inwards, and 2d. per ton outwards, and from all fishing boats, fishing near any of the harbours, 10s. yearly; To hold the said Earl of Arran for 61 years, from the 1st of May then last past. That Charles II. afterwards freed Irish vessels from light dues, and granted to Sir Robert Reading 500l. a year out of the concordatum money to be paid for the support of the said lighthouses. That the said lighthouses, the 500l. per annum, and other duties, were sometime since, vested in the said James Hamilton. The said 500l. per annum and other dues were paid till 1688 when the Earl of Tyrconnel stopped the same, and that by reason of the late rebellion the 500l. has not been paid, and the petitioner could not maintain lights the same as formerly, because he was in England soliciting the payment of the 500l. That a person having been placed in the lighthouse of Dublin, the petitioner is dispossessed of the same, which was built at the charge of Sir Robert Reading, and the other lighthouses are neglected to the great peril of ships. The petitioner is ready to keep and maintain the same, if he is allowed the 500l. a year as before, and prays to be restored to the said lighthouses.
The petition was referred to the Lords-Justices, who on 26th June 1691, referred it to Richard Levinge, esq., the SolicitorGeneral of Ireland, who reported as follows:—
Upon order from the King, concerning the petition of James Hamilton about light houses in Ireland, I have considered the grant mentioned in the petition, and find that the 500l. per annum was granted to Sir Robert Reading; that upon the intermarriage of the said James Hamilton with his now wife, Elizabeth, the only daughter and heir-apparent of Sir Robert Reading, there was a settlement made, and that by indenture of release of five parts, bearing date the 22nd day of January 1683–4, made between Sir Robert Reading and the Countess of Montrath, his wife, both since deceased, of the first part, Edward Corker, and Daniel Reading, Esq., of the second part; the said James Hamilton of the third part; James, Duke of Ormond, deceased, Chidley Coote, and John FitzPatrick, esqrs., and Sir Joshua Allen of the fourth part; and the said Elizabeth, by the name of Elizabeth Reading, of the fifth part; did thereby and by lease for a year, dated on the previous day, amongst other things, together with the said Edward Corker and Daniel Reading, assign to the said Duke of Ormond, Chidley Coote, John Fitzpatrick, and Sir Joshua Allen, the said 500l., per annum, in trust after the termination of several trusts and uses expressed, since determined, that the same should, be sold towards the payment of 11,000l., which James Hamilton was to receive, with the said Elizabeth, 10,000l. whereof was to be settled upon them, and their issue. I find that the right in law to the said 500l. per annum by the said settlement remained in the said Chidley Coote, John Fitzpatrick, and Sir Joshua Allen, surviving trustees thereof, and that they, by letters of attorney, bearing date the 20th of February, 1690–1, have empowered the said James Hamilton to receive from the Treasurer, or other his Majesty's ministers of the Court of Exchequer in Ireland, the said 500l. and the arrears thereof. I do not find that this 500l. has been sold or disposed of, so as the purchase money thereof might have been laid out according to the said settlement; but the same being for a term of years, and the power granted by the trustees to the said Mr. Hamilton as aforesaid, that his Majesty may restore him to the said lighthouses, and order the 500l. per annum to be paid him, or allowed upon account, and deducted out of the rents of the lands which he holds from the Commissioners of the Revenue. Dated 8th July 1691.
The Lords-Justices, thereupon, reported to the King as follows:—
We have received the petition presented to his Majesty by James Hamilton, Esq., to be restored to the lighthouses in this kingdom, and to be paid 500l. per annum formerly granted for keeping the same. We referred it to the Solicitor-General, whose report we transmit to you, and agree as to the petitioner's right to the said lighthouses, and also to the 500l. per annum. Dated at Dublin Castle 14th August 1691.
The King referred this report to the Lords of the Treasury of England, who reported as follows:—
In obedience to his Majesty's commands, signified to us by the Earl of Nottingham, upon the annexed petition of James Hamilton, Esq., we have considered the same as also a report made by Richard Levinge, esq., Solicitor-General of Ireland. We have nothing to object to in the report made by the Lords-Justices. Dated: Treasury Chambers, Whitehall, 24th November 1691.
Jan. 24.
Kensington.
Commission for Thomas Ferrers, gent., to be ensign to Lieut.-Col. Edward Rouse in the first regiment of foot guards commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 103]; and for Hatton Compton, esq., to be lieutenant and lieutenant-colonel of the third troop of guards commanded by Richard, Lord Colchester. [Ibid., p. 111.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Commissions for William Guyon, gent., to be cornet of the troop of which Lord O'Brien is captain in the regiment of horse commanded by Col. Robert Byerley [Ibid., p. 106]; for Gervais Thurby, gent., to be lieutenant of Capt. William Stewart's troop in Col. Robert Byerley's regiment of horse [Ibid., p. 107]; for— Ogilby, esq., to be lieutenant and lieutenant-colonel of the third troop of guards; for Thomas Butler, esq., to be cornet and major of the same troop; and for—Villiers, esq., to be guidon and major of the same troop. [Ibid., p. 111.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Recorder of London, to cause the names of Jonathan Compton, and Anthony St. Leger, who stand accused of burglary and felony in the house of Henry de Nassau, Seigneur D'Averquerque, Master of the Horse, and divers other felonies, to be inserted in the next general pardon which shall come out for the convicts at Newgate, they having been very instrumental in discovering their accomplices. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 224.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Pass for Walter Cantwell, a gentleman in their Majesties' second troop of guards, commanded by the Duke of Ormond, to go to Holland. [Ibid., p. 225.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Baron de Frise, who was sent as Envoy-Extraordinary to the Elector of Saxony, took leave of his Majesty on the 7th of June, 1691, and returned again on the 31st of December last. [Ibid.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing a grant to John Williams, D.D. of the canonry or prebend in the Church of Canterbury, void by the resignation of Dr. John Younger. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 120.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
The like to the same, to prepare a bill containing a presentation of Robert Farrow to the vicarage of Netherbury and Beaminster with chapel of Mangarton, in Dorsetshire, and the diocese of Bristol, the same being void by the deprivation of Arthur Squibb, the late incumbent, by reason of his not having taken the oaths prescribed by the Act of Parliament, of 1689. See post under date 29 March. [Ibid.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
The like to the same to prepare a bill containing the presentation of William Stanley, D.D. to the Archdeaconry of London, void by the promotion of Thomas Tennison, to the bishopric of Lincoln. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 121.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Edward Fortune to go to Harwich and thence to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 159.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a ratification of the Articles of Limerick, bearing date the 3rd of October last past. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 283.] Annexing
A copy of the said articles under thirteen heads. [Ibid., pp. 284– 289.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
A similar warrant for ratifying the articles granted to the town and garrison of Galway, by Lieut.-Gen. Ginckle, commander-inchief of the forces on the 21st of July last past. [Ibid., p. 289.] Annexing
A copy of the said articles under sixteen heads. [Ibid., p. 290– 293.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill making Peter Chauvin, clerk, rector of Threxton in Norfolk, an alien born, a free denizen of England. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 241.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant of the dignity of a Baron and Earl of Ireland, to Godert, Baron de Ginckle by the title of Baron of Aughrim in Galway, and Earl of Athlone in the said county, with the usual fee of 20l. per annum. [Ibid., p. 242.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant of the office of Clerk of the Crown in Chancery to Thomas Chute, of the Middle Temple, esq. [Ibid.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to Viscount Sydney, and to the Lords-Justices of Ireland for the reversal of the outlawry of Charles, Lord Baltimore, convicted of high treason in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 411.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords-Justices of Ireland to cause letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal of Ireland to John, Viscount Fitzharding, of the office of commander and governor the fort near Kinsale, at a salary of 20s. per diem. [Ibid., p. 419.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Alexander Sanderson. Sets forth that he was a captain in Londonderry during the whole siege, and a great sufferer by the war in Ireland; prays for three months' pay. Referred to the Paymaster in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 273.]
Jan. 26. Commission for John Fairbrother, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Kayworth in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 109.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief Justice Reynell. The King would have you consider with the Attornies and Solicitors General of England and Ireland, about the heads of such acts as may be proper to be prepared for the settlement of Ireland, and of all other matters fit to be done at this time for the establishment of the peace and quiet of that kingdom; I desire you will give the other gentlemen notice hereof as soon as possible. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 375.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. Understanding by a letter from Capt. Wivell to you, whereof I received a copy by your order, that neither he nor the commander of the Danes, know where those Danes, who are going to Flanders, are to be landed, I desire you will send a letter for the said captain to the Downs, to be delivered to him upon his arrival there, acquainting him that he is to land the Danes at Ostend, in case the order should not reach Cork before he sails from that port. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Mayor of Rye. I have your letter of the 21st, giving me an account of Mr. Hill's landing in that port; the gentleman is very well known to me, and I approve of what you did upon that occasion. I shall be glad at any time of information as to suspected persons arriving from France. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 96.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Thomas Ogilvy, and John Ogilvy to go to Holland; for Captain Robert Mushart, a captain in Col. Graham's regiment, to go to Holland or Flanders; and for John Bayly, formerly gunmaker, and furbisher to their Majesties, to go to Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 225.]
Jan. 26.
Kensington.
Additional instructions signed by the King to the Earl of Lothian, Commissioner to the General Assembly. We have seen your letter to our Secretary and what you had delivered to the General Assembly, and we are well pleased with your procedure and management. If you cannot induce the General Assembly to comply with what is contained in our letter to them, and your instructions, but that they will proceed to other matters contrary thereto, we authorize you to dissolve this General Assembly, without calling on a new one, as you were formerly instructed. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 74.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Pass for Michael Yates to go to Harwich and thence to Holland. [S.P. Dom Warrant Book 36, p. 159.]
Jan. 26.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent incorporating the Earl of Nottingham, Viscount Sydney, James, Duke of Ormond, the Earl of Burlington, Henry, Earl of Drogheda, Richard, Earl of Ranelagh, Edward, Earl of Meath, Sir Richard Reynolds, Richard Pine, esq., John Hely, esq., Sir John Temple, Richard Levinge, Thomas Coote, Sir Charles Meredith, Sir Joseph Herne, Sir Thomas Cook, Sir Stephen Evans, Sir Henry Furness, Edward Jennings, esq., Gauwen Corbett, Sir Henry Bellasis, Daniel Osborne, William Robinson, Frederick Porter, Richard George, William Culliford, Bartholomew Van Humery, George Clarke, William Jackson, William Bridgeman, Richard Warre, John Pulteney, John Davies, Francis Cutt [Cuff ?], Roger Moore, Charles Caldwell, Robert Curtis, William Founds, Edward Pearce, Richard Cox, Michael Mitchell, Mayor of Dublin, Robert Johnson, John Rogerson, Anthony Pearcy, Alderman of Dublin, John Nicholls, Benjamin Burton, Michael Cole, Daniel Hayes, Andrew Price, David Cossart. Thomas Putland, Samuel Watson, Edward Lloyd, Henry Glegg, Henry Spranger, John Lovett of Dublin, Christopher Lovett, William Seven, Thomas Morgan and Robert Hamper, by the name of the Governor and Freemen of the Company of the Royal Fishery of Ireland; the office of governor is to be on the foundation of the company, exercised jointly or severally by the Earl of Nottingham and Viscount Sydney. Richard Cox is to be the first Deputy Governor. The annual meeting of the Company is to be held in Dublin on the first Thursday in each December. Full power is given to the company to carry on the fishery in the most advantageous manner and to build such "deggers, russes, fishing vessels, and other ships for merchandise" as may be needful; and free liberty is given to transport fish and oil made from the same fish, to any place in England or Ireland or beyond the seas. The Company also has power to build store houses, wharfs and docks upon any of the waste lands belonging to the Crown adjoining any sea or river. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 153.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. As I understand by a letter from Capt. Wivell, commander of the Centurion, at Cork, appointed to convey the Danes into Flanders, that neither he, nor the Brigadier who commanded those Danes, know where they are to be landed, I desire you will acquaint the said captain, that he is to Land the Danes at Ostend. [Ibid., p. 282.]
Jan. 26.
Kensington.
Leave granted to Henry Nourse, esq., high sheriff of Wiltshire to reside out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 2, p. 44.]
Jan. 26.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre By command of the Admiralty, I enclose a copy of a letter dated the 19th instant, from the commanders of the ketches the Hind, Scarborough and Harp off Dover, so that you may lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham, for orders for the disposal of the persons therein mentioned as seized. Seal. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 199. Enclosing
A copy of a letter from Capt. Thomas Kercher, Capt. Roger Belwood, and Capt. James Studley. Last Saturday night a Folkestone shallop was found, Edward Brown, master, lying at anchor at Dungeness. The master pretended she was bound for Pevensey for goods. but did not know for whom, we have secured him and his men, and sent his shallop to the Custom House at Rye. We have been in our station 11 days, having prevented seven French shallops landing at the Ness. An Ostender informs us that 12 sail of French men-of-war are in Dunkirk Roads ready to sail. Capt. Watton in the Lark, was with us when the shallop was sent to Rye. Dated 19th January, on board the Hind, of Dover. [Ibid., p. 203.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anthony Hammond, esq. Shows that Anthony Hammond, his father, purchased the residue of a term of 99 years, granted by King James I., of the manor of Somersham in Huntingdonshire, and also the inheritance of the said manor from Lord Grandison, for a valuable consideration unknown to whom an intermediate term of 43 years (to commence from the determination of the said 99 years) after the warrant but before the date of the grant of the said inheritance, was granted by King Charles II., to Lord Holles and others in trust for the QueenDowager, and afterwards in trust for the King, his heirs and successors. That the petitioner has reason to believe such grant for 43 years was a "surprize" upon his said late Majesty and would not, had all the circumstances been known, have been made. Prays his Majesty that the residue of the term of 43 years after the expiration of such leases as shall be granted by the Queen-Dowager may be transferred to him, his executors and assigns, the value thereof being small to their Majesties by reason of the QueenDowager's said power of renewing leases of the premises. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 231.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Matthew Bellew, showing that, notwithstanding he left Ireland in 1688, and has not been there since that time, he stands indicted and oulawed for high treason in acting against their Majesties. Prays the said outlawry may be set aside. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 295.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. There being some accounts depending between several of the late Lieut.-Gen. Douglass' relations, and the officers of the regiment of Scots Guards, whereof he was colonel at the time of his death, the King has appointed a Council of War here in England, in order to examine and state the said accounts relating to the said regiment, which cannot be done unless Mr. Gawen, agent of the said regiment (now a prisoner in Newgate, but likely to be discharged upon his Majesty's pardon) appears at the said Council and states his accounts there. The King would have you oblige Mr. Gawen, before he is admitted to have the benefit of the said pardon, to give good security to come as aforesaid in case the same can be legally done. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 97.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Pass for Hans Jocum Fahreneron, corporal, and Hans Sorensen, trooper in Col. Sechested's Danish regiment, to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 225.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a charter for incorporating the several trades of grocers, mercers, and drapers of Tiverton, in Devonshire. The following are amongst the clauses to be inserted in the said charter:—Heads of a charter for the grocers, mercers, woollen and linen drapers of Tiverton, in Devonshire, that they may be incorporated by the name of Master, Wardens, Assistants, and Commonalty of Grocers, Mercers, and Woollen and Linen Drapers, in Tiverton. Thomas Rice to be constituted the present master, and to serve until Michaelmas next, or till a new master is chosen. Peter Morse, and William Lewis to be constituted the present Wardens. William Heathfield, Edward Bury, Philip Combe, Richard Hall, Thomas Wood, Richard Batson, Robert Combe, John Iron, and John Courtis to be the present Assistants for life or till removal. They may from time to time, admit such persons of the said respective trades, who have duly served their apprenticeships in the said trades at Tiverton, to be freemen of the said corporation. No person who has not served his apprenticeship in one of the said trades, shall exercise that trade in the said town or parish by way of retail or open shop-keeping, unless in open fairs, or until he is free of the same Company, or has served his apprenticeship according to the laws and statutes of the Realm. Power to purchase lands to the value of 1,000 per annum. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 227.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices. I wrote you, a year ago, by the Queen's command, the King being then at the Hague, on behalf of Captain Richard Swan to be master gunner of Dublin Castle, and I find that soon after, he had a grant of that office from you. But he has acquainted me that since obtaining that post, another person has stepped in, and endeavours to make him lose the benefit of it by pretending to the said office. I heartily recommend him to your favour, hoping you will give him the benefit of that office. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 151.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Commissions for—La Sale Deme, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Captain Gualy is captain in Colonel Francis Du Cambon's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 231]; for Richard Carter, junior, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain Richard Carter was late captain in Colonel Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot; for John Gollop, gent., to be ensign of the same company; for Thomas Stevens, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Captain Stephen Piper is captain in the same. [Ibid]; for Thomas Marwood, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of miners, of which Captain John Pitt is captain; and for David Crawford, gent., to be lieutenant of a company, in Colonel Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 232.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Patrick Gordon, gent. Shows that he has, with great charge and expense, found out an extraordinary way of making blue, purple, and all sorts of paper and pasteboards, and of embellishing and beautifying the same by such methods as were never yet known by anyone in Ireland. That he intends, if encouraged thereto, not only to set up and establish the said manufacture in that kingdom, but also to make such sorts of paper there as were never yet made. Prays for a patent in Ireland. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book, 1, p. 232.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. Capt. Henry Macdonogh, and Lieut. Connor Macdermot two of the Irish prisoners now remaining under your custody in the Savoy, having represented by their petition to his Majesty that they are ready to take the oath of fidelity, and to enter security for their future good behaviour, and praying for their discharge, the King is disposed to grant their request, and has commanded me to signify his pleasure to you, that these two persons should not be sent into France with the other prisoners, who are to be exchanged, but be detained in your custody till they have taken the oath of fidelity and given such security for their good behaviour as his Majesty shall think fit to require. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 375.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
A proclamation for all mariners belonging to the ships of war, to go on board the vessels to which they belong. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 71.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The same, requiring all seamen and mariners to render themselves to their Majesties' service. Printed. [Ibid., p. 72.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Capt. George Pfeiffer to embark at Harwich for Holland; and for Baron de Baumgarten to go to Spain. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 229.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Permission to print a sixth edition of the book entitled, the "Great Historical, Geographical, and Poetical Dictionary," edited by Mons. Le Clerke; it having been examined by Mr. Fraser. [Ibid., p. 230.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing Edward, Viscount Villiers, keeper of Hyde Park. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 243.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill containing the grant of a patent to Thomas Porter, Matthew Elliston, Richard Frith, junior, and Thomas Winter, for a dye, newly discovered by them in America, and produced from certain roots. [Ibid., p. 244.]
Jan. 28. The case of the Distressed Orphans of London. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Will & Mary 4, No. 3.]
Jan. 28–Feb. 10. Memoranda touching the Bill of Accounts. [Ibid., No. 4.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Pass for Col. de Vimeney and Capt. Monregnon, with two servants, to embark at Harwich for Holland or Flanders; recommended by the Marquis de Ruvigny. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 229.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Clarke, esq., Comptroller of the Ordnance in Ireland. Sets forth that in King Charles II.'s time he was made Comptroller of the Ordnance in Ireland, and that he was removed from that place, without any pretence of neglect, by King James II. Prays, in consideration of his right to the aforesaid place, that be may have his Majesty's order for the value of his place (out of the Ordnance in England) from the time Mr. Meesters, who now enjoys the place, has had the same, and that he may have, for the future, a pension assigned him out of the said office, until his Majesty shall please to prefer him, in that office or elsewhere. Referred to the Board of Ordnance. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 296.]
Jan. 30. Viscount Sydney to Lord Commissioner Trevor. I am informed you have a presentation before you, for the living of Chard, in Somersetshire; the town has presented a petition to the King upon that occasion, which not having yet been laid before him, I desire you will suspend passing the presentation for some days. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 97.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners for Prizes. The King being informed that Sir Edmund Jennings, lately one of the Commissioners of Prizes, died in September last, some days before Michaelmas day, whereby he could not receive his salary for that quarter, desires you to give order for paying the same to Jonathan Jennings, esq., son of the said Sir Edmund, which would have been paid him, had he lived. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p., 98.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Earl of Castlemain, and two servants, Mr. George Watkins and William Crosse, to embark at any English port and go to Holland or Flanders. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 231.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Lords-Justices. Brigadier De la Mclonniere, has represented to the King that he, sometime since, obtained leave to come to England and left part of his equipage in the house of one Edmund Britt in the county of Carlow, and the rest in another house, so as not to be too chargeable to the country. Sometime after, by the General's order, all the Brigadiers' equipage was put into Britt's house, and had been there but a very little time, when it is supposed out of revenge, because all was quartered upon him, Britt and his servants betrayed the equipage to a company of rapparees, who in the night plundered the same. The Brigadiers' chief servant has made oath of the truth of all this, so the petitioner desires the King to give order that he may have the benefit of the proclamation, which was put forth, about a year since in Ireland, for preventing such robberies. His Majesty has commanded me to signify his pleasure to you, that you may enquire into this matter, so that the Brigadier may receive a proportionable compensation for the damage he has sustained. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 151.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I sent you, by the last post, the King's letter for passing a grant of the fishery to Lord Nottingham, and myself with several other persons, and am now to acquaint you that the names of Sir John Edgeworth, and Thomas Neale, esq., are added to the grant, and also Richard Barry, if not already in. Most of the names in the letter having been transmitted by you the King leaves it to you to put out three persons, so that the three above named may be inserted [Ibid., p. 152.]
Jan. 30.
Berlin.
Field-Marshal Fleming to the Prince of Waldeck. Refers to the defence of the Rhine. Only three regiments of foot and about two battalions remain of the Cologne army, because two battalions are shut up in that place. It is to be feared that if the enemy arrive with 3,000 or 4,000 men they will do much mischief in the neighbourhood of Cologne. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 20.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Colonel Hugh Wyndham to be colonel of the regiment of which Colonel Robert Byerly was late colonel, and to be captain of a troop in the same regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 232]; for Capt. Thomas Philips to be captain of the company of which Capt. Gervais Lillingston is captain, in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Gustavus Hamilton; for Gervais Lillingston, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Thomas Philips was captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Thomas Earl. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 107]; for Sir Samuel Grimston, Sir William Lemor, Sir John Gerrard, Sir John Aylin, Sir Richard Franklyn, Sir William Cowper, Sir Edmund Anderton, Sir Thomas Pope Blunt, and Sir John Bucknall, barts., Sir William Lytton, Sir Humphrey Gore, Sir Thomas Byde, Sir John Gore, Sir Charles Cæsar Sir Ralph Ratcliffe, knts., Ralph Freeman, senior, William Gore, John Plummer, Thomas Halsey, George Hadley and Robert Cecil, esqrs., to be deputy-lieutenants of the county of Hertford; and for the Earl of Essex is to issue out their deputations accordingly [Ibid., p. 109]; for Thomas Dawkins, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Bedloe's company in Col. William Stewart's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 113]; and for Major Cornelius Wood to be lieutenant-colonel to Col. Hugh Wyndham's regiment of horse. [Ibid., p. 121.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Noah Cadroy, one of the gentlemen of the second troop of Guards, with one servant, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 232.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a grant making John Hinoyssa, an alien born, a free denizen of England. [Ibid., p. 233.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen of London, concerning certain immunities and privileges, claimed by the Agent of the Hanse Towns, (vide calendar under date 23rd May, 1689). The agent had presented another memorial representing that notwithstanding the King's former letters, some persons in the ward of Dowgate have made another attempt on the house called the "Stillyard," and have taken away the agent's goods to the value of about 20l. sterling, and therefore, praying the conservation of the said ancient privilege belonging to the said house and agent. We order, therefore, that the said agent and house be not only freed from all duties and taxes whatsoever, but also that you give effectual orders for restoring to him his goods lately distrained, and that for the future no molestation be given nor distress made upon him under pretence of refusing to pay any duties or taxes whatsoever. [H.O. King's Letter Book 2, p. 45.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Order upon the petition of Capt. James Waller touching the office of prothonotary of the Common Pleas in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 425.]
Jan. 31.
Malines.
Count de Solms to the Prince of Waldeck. Concerning the payment of seven sous a day to the Hospital for each sick English or Scotch soldier, which is three sous more than the States pay. Copy extract. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 21.]
[Jan.] Report by Earl of Nottingham, made in pursuance of an order in council of the 7th instant, upon the petition of Edward Carleton, Richard Haynes, and other merchants of London on behalf of themselves, and John Leonard and Thomas Macnamarra, praying passes for the two latter, merchants of Limerick, to return with their own ships, goods, &c., from France to Limerick.
I have considered the said petition, and find that by the third article of the Treaty of Limerick concluded October the 3 last, it is agreed in these words, that, all merchants or reputed merchants of the City of Limerick, or of any other garrison now possessed by the Irish, or of any town or place in the counties of Clare, or Kerry, who are absent beyond the seas, who have not borne arms since their Majesties' declaration in February, 1688–9, shall have the benefit of the second article in the same manner, as if they were present; provided such merchants and reputed merchants repair into this kingdom within the space of eight months from the date hereof.
By the second article of the said treaty, it is provided on behalf of the persons therein comprised, that they shall enjoy all estates of freehold and inheritance, and all other rights, etc., which they enjoyed or were entitled to in King Charles II.'s reign, or at any time since, by any law then in force; and that their estates be restored to them, and be discharged of all arrears of quit rents incurred since Michaelmas, 1688; and likewise enjoy all their goods and chattels, real and personal, in their own hands or in the hands of any other in trust for them, and that they may use, exercise, and practice their professions, trades, and callings as freely as they did in the reign of King Charles.
Mr. Edward Carleton, of London, merchant, has made oath on the behalf of John Leonard, above mentioned, and Mr. Richard Haynes, of London, merchant, being a quaker, has declared on behalf of the said Thomas Macnamarra as appears more fully by the papers annexed, that the said John Leonard and Thomas Macnamarra have neither of them, to their knowledge, borne arms against your Majesty, in which case they are entitled to the benefits of those articles and are to be permitted to return within eight months. And their desiring a pass, seems to be a just respect to your Majesty, and may be fit to be granted, now the articles are ordered to be ratified.
As to a liberty to bring their effects with them, if they mean in French commodities, as such leave would be against the Act of Parliament prohibiting the same, it is not so much as promised to them by the said articles; but as to their household goods which they carried out of Ireland into France, or if they can bring away their effects in such commodities as are not prohibited by the said Act, I believe it may be for the public interest that they be permitted to transport them.
I further lay before your Majesty the petition hereunto annexed in the name of the same John Leonard, praying a pass for him pursuant to the articles of Limerick, to come out of France into Ireland with his two ships, the John of Limerick, and the Happy Return of Limerick, all manned with English and Irish seamen, and to bring away in them, with his household goods, his wife and family, and their apparel. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 234.]
Jan. Pass for Jane Price, a poor old woman, to embark at Chester for Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 221.]
Jan. Rough memoranda touching bribery, &c., at an election at Chippenham at which Firebrace and Talmash stood. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 5.]
Jan List of the Regiments, in Bruges, Ghent, Oudenarde, Niewport, Ath, Maestricht, Brussels, &c. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 22.]
Jan.—Mar.
Kensington.
Commission for William Jordan, esq., to be lieutenant and youngest Captain of the troop of grenadiers belonging to the second troop of horse guards, commanded by the Duke of Ormond. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 120.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Blank in orginal.