BHO

William and Mary: August 1692

Pages 393-429

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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August 1692

Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Sir William Russell, bart., to be captain of the troop in the regiment of horse commanded by Col. John Coy, of which Capt. Hambden Coy was late captain; for Hambden Coy, esq., to be lieutenant to Capt. George Fletcher, in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse; and for Francis Mainge, gent., to be cornet to the said Sir William Russell's troop. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 284.]
Aug. 1.
Kensington.
Declaration by the Queen as to the precedency to be enjoyed by the foregoing officers. [Ibid., p. 285.]
Aug. 1. Passes for Mr. Roger Griffith to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. John Browne and Richard Smith, his servant, ditto; for James Andre, ditto; for Mr. Martin Michna, Mr. Anthony Coller, and Mr. George Kens, ditto; for Kasten Buckholt and one servant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 316]; for Henry Thynne, esq. Peter Repingon, a Swiss, his governor, James Claves, and John Roye and Anthony Perier, his two footmen, to embark at any port in the kingdom and go to Holland and thence to Germany and Italy, and to return hence. [Ibid., p. 317.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Surrey, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon John Towers until the 12th instant. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 381.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of William Churchill, stationer, for stationery ware, furnished to the Earl of Nottingham's office from the 26th of March, to the 24th of June 1692, amounting to 90l. 5s. 6d. [Ibid., p. 382.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland granting to Sir Charles Hara, Sir Thomas Millington, and others, the proprietors of the convex lamplights in England licence for the sole use of their invention in Ireland for 14 years. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 491.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson. The Duke of Leinster with the transport ships joined Admiral Russell on the 28th July off Portland, and the next day a council of war was held, the result of which was sent up here; and in the meantime the fleet has come to St. Helens to expect the Queen's further orders which were sent by an express this evening. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 70.]
Aug. 1.
Dover.
Capt. Jacob Rogiers of Dunkirk to the Earl of Nottingham. I desire you will give me a pass to go home, seeing it is now almost two months since I was taken by an "Amsterdamer," and I do not know the reason why I am detained here, where we have no prison (sic) amongst us, and our privateers, which cruise in the North Sea, let the prisoners go to their dwelling places with free ships, so that they detain nobody. Wherefore I pray. you give me a pass to go to Zealand or Flanders. I served King William in 1665. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 186.]
Aug. 2. Passes for Ensign Desprez and Ensign Colombiere to go to Harwich and Holland marked "never signed" [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book36, p. 316]; for Sara Van Dyck and Elssenville (sic), ditto; for Jacobus Vanden Houten, ditto; for Philip Kettle, ditto [Ibid., p. 317]; for Noé Maressall, ditto; for David Des Hayes, ditto; for Isaac Roselis; and for John Peterson, ditto. [Ibid., p. 318.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. I told you last night that Admiral Russell and the Duke of Leinster, upon the difficulties which appeared to a council of war in the execution of the design they were ordered upon, were coming back with the transport ships to St. Helen's to expect further orders. Early this morning the Lord President, Lord Howard, the Lord Chamberlain, Lord Nottingham, Lord Rochester, and Lord Sydney, went to Portsmouth where they will be to-night, and to-morrow they will go on board the fleet to consult with the general officers of the fleet, and army, and take a final resolution what is to be done. Yesterday at the General Council, three bills sent from Ireland in order to pass the parliament, which will be held there upon the arrival of the Lord-Lieutenant (who talks of setting out next week), were read and approved, viz.: an Act of Recognition, an Act to reverse the Act of Attainder made in King James's parliament in 1689, and an Act for confirming the Acts of Settlement and Explanation. Sir Robert Sayer is dead. The letters from Flanders have just come in, and say that ours and the French army on Friday last were still in the same camps without attempting anything further; they confirm that the enemy's loss in the late action is rather greater than ours, they compute we have about 4,000 killed and wounded, and several officers who were thought to be killed are prisoners, among whom are Col. Calthrop, Col. Lowther, and others; Sir John Lanier was still alive. Of the French, the Prince De Turenne, Marquis Belleford, the Duke De Villeroy, and Col. Stoupe, are said to be killed and the Duke De Chartres and the Duke De Maine wounded. They have about 400 officers killed and wounded. The Duke of Savoy is certainly marching into Provence or Dauphiny, which puts the French in great fears on that side. Col. Withers arrived here this morning from the King's camp and after having been to wait upon the Queen, went on to Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 71.]
Aug. 2. A relation of what is necessary to be done for the execution of the enterprise against the enemy's right wing. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 116.]
Aug. 4. Pass for Anne Guients and two children, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 318.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Fotherby, esq., to be commissary-general of the provisions, ammunition, and stores, which are to be sent to the West Indies. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 286.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Major John Langston. Shows that his brother, having an arrear due to him from King Charles II., for service done at Tangier, assigned over to Col. Francis Boynton, since deceased, 500l. of the said arrear, for which the petitioner became bound, with him, in a bond of 1,000l.; that Col. Boynton is since dead, having made Mrs. Tobin his executrix who lately arrested the petitioner and cast him into Newgate, where, after charges and a long imprisonment he was forced to engage some friends to give fresh bond, which he will be obliged to pay or be sent again to prison. Forasmuch as the late Col. Thomas Langston, coming early to his present Majesty, lost his equipage at Salisbury (for which the King promised him 500l., which is as yet unpaid), and as his brother is since dead, leaving him not only several debts but a young daughter to maintain, he prays for the payment of the said 500l. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 359.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mathew Hore, of the county of Waterford. Shows that, "in the distracted [times] in Ireland," he was very serviceable to his protestant neighbours, "whereof they gave him ample certificates," and that he never bore arms against their Majesties, but submitted himself early to their delarations, and took the oath of allegiance, and continued in his house where the judge of the assizes, and other great officers of the army have lodged; and this occasioned the rapparees to carry away the greatest part of his stock. Though he was always a great opposer to the late Act of Repeal, nevertheless he is outlawed and his estate seized, although he is but a tenant for life. Prays a pardon with an order to reverse his outlawry, and to be restored to his estate. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 361.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to give order for the payment of 20l. to Col. Blaire in consideration of his services. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 516.]
Aug. 5. Passes and post warrants for Nicholas Van Egmont and Johanna, his wife, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Catharine Janse, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 318]; for Thomas Bouillon, Renier Vander Steen, and Peter Denis, ditto; and for Nicholas Hill the messenger to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 319.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill for incorporating the company for smelting lead with pit and sea coal. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 390.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to John Overing for the sole use of his invention "of an engine to convey air into pipes, by new contrived bellows, with plates, covered with leather, for securing the head, and retaining the air about the upper part of the body, giving liberty for a man to see, walk, and work a considerable time in many fathoms under water." [Ibid., p. 394.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, containing a pardon to Robert Longfield of all treasons and other crimes committed during the late rebellion, he having represented that he was employed under the late pretended Commissioners of the Revenue in Ireland, as clerk of the quit-rents, without any suit or application for it, and being a member of the late pretended parliament at Dublin, he did not give any vote for the repeal of the Acts of Settlement. Immediately after the victory at the Boyne he delivered up the papers in his custody to the order of the Committee of Protestants at Dublin. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 494.]
Aug. 5.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre, secretary to the Earl of Nottingham. I send you the copy of a letter from Capt. Wylde, commander of the yacht Isabella, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 335.] Enclosing:—
Copy of a letter dated at Southampton 4th August, 1692, from Capt. Baron Wylde, commander of the Isabella yacht. When we were in Guernsey Roads we had this account from Capt. Dilkes, captain of the Adventure (he, with the Sandadoes, having brought in two prizes) that in St. Malo there were 22 sail of men-of-war, all in a sailing posture except two, eight being ordered for Brest the first fair wind, with six fireships; and that all the merchants in the town had removed their goods upon the news they have from England of bombarding the town. They are every day fortifying the town and walls, and have planted 60 guns on the walls to seaward, and in one of the castles, lying next St. Ambrose Island, they have planted a mortar piece with some guns. And that there are five privateers with King James's commissions, and 30 from St. Malo, all at sea. There is in building there one ship of 56 guns, and in two more months there will be 30 more at sea, from Havre and other places. The master of a lime-vessel has been seized and threatened with hanging for speaking against the Prince of Wales. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 339.]
Aug, 6.
Kensington.
Commission for Thomas Smith, gent., to be quarter-master to Sir John Morgan's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 291.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Eleanor Finch, daughter and heir of Hewet Finch, and Frances his wife, deceased, and also administratrix of the said Frances Finch. Shows that by divers petitions presented by her mother to King Charles II., and to the late King James, and by references and report from the Earl of Clarendon, lord-lieutenant of Ireland, it appears that her father had disbursed for the service of the Crown, and the good of the [protestant] religion, in 1641 and 1642, the full sum of 3,133l.: that in consideration of that matter, King James granted to her mother a royal letter by which she was to have a custodium upon forfeited and concealed lands, the quit-rent whereof was not to exceed 100l. per annum, and that her mother entrusted her son-in-law to get a custodium, and take out letters patent, but he could not obtain it from Lord Tyrconnel, then Governor of Ireland. The petitioner having been a great sufferer by reason of the late distractions in Ireland, prays for such letter as was granted to her mother by King Charles and King James whereby she may receive relief for the said debt. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 360.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Governors and Company of Copper Miners in England. Shows that, upon application made to their Majesties, a great quantity of copper ore was found in England which was totally "unimproved," and the petitioners having found out several furnaces for smelting and refining the same, their Majesties were pleased to grant them letters patent, bearing date the 3rd of August, 1691 for incorporating them; since which time they have been, and are still, at a great expense in discovery and digging of "the chiefest mines of copper ore in several counties of England," which they have successfully improved to the great advantage of the kingdom, by employing many thousands of poor people, and by erecting furnaces, workhouses, &c., for smelting and refining the said ores, and in reducing them to good and serviceable copper; they have thus laid the foundation for a profitable commodity to the nation.
It is declared by the letters patent that their several privileges and immunities shall be construed to their best advantage; and in regard the copper ore, so purified and refined, is by the great care and expense of their company, sought for and dug out of the several mines; and to prevent all obstructions and distinctions between working copper mines, and purifying and refining the ore, they pray to have full power and authority granted to them for working, digging, and searching for copper mines within the limits of the charter they already have, since the digging of the mines is the essential part of their charter; the ore they dig being what they purify and refine. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 361.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Major General Thomas Maxwell, to appear the first day of the next term at the King's Bench, being bound in 2,000l., with four sureties, each in 1,000l. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 516.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to carry MajorGeneral Thomas Maxwell, a prisoner in your custody, before Lord Chief-Justice Holt, or in his absence to any of the Justices of the Court of King's Bench, in order to his being bailed. [Ibid.]
Aug. 6. Passes for Mary Browne to go to Harwich and Holland; [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 318]; for Benjamin Pesoa, ditto; for Steyntje Willems, with a little child, and Catharina Willems, her sister, ditto; for Jacob Ruschag and Hartman Heisler, ditto; for Mr. John Wolters and John Caspar Borchman, his servant, ditto; [Ibid., p. 319]; for Mr. Anthony Exeel and 12 troopers, ditto; for Adam Hofman and Anna Christina, his wife, ditto; for Daniel Janside Roy and Adrian Vermey, ditto; for Magdalena Jacobse, ditto; for John Reus and Frederick Muller, ditto; for Johanna Dircks, ditto; [Ibid., p. 320]; for John van Briensche, ditto; for David Carvalho, Abraham Frois, Moses Frois, Abraham Rapas, Ben Rapes, and 2 children, Abigail Nunes, Rebecca Henriques, Branca Rodrigues, and Jeuda Carmy Esteves, being all poor jews, ditto; for James Henriques, Francis Pereyra and his wife, Joseph Labo and his wife, John Van Well and his servant, Abraham de Caseres, Myer Coen, Rachel Mines and Samuel Vaes, jews, ditto; for Mrs. Inchelin and Anne Mary Massomnean, ditto; for Jane Petit Maitre and Jane Gendarme, ditto; for Dorothee La Garenne, ditto; for Peter de L'Epine to go to Holland; [Ibid., p. 321]; for Gireetje Stuarts to go to Harwich and Holland; for Anthonie Paul, ditto; for Nicholas Quina, ditto; for Mr. Hans Hambledon and Dr. Arthur Forbus, his governor, ditto; for Isaac Chatelain and Abraham Bonnel, recommended by Mons. le Mothe, French minister, ditto; for Lysbet Colaese Van Hattevelt, with five children, ditto; for Meydert Seldert, ditto [Ibid., p. 322]; and for John Claris ditto. [Ibid., p. 323.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I have received your letter wherein you make an objection against issuing the writs for the meeting of Parliament to be held by the Lord Lieutenant, and I think it reasonable what you say, that this may endanger, at least, the dissolution of it upon his arrival; but since he is coming hence, and intends to be soon in Ireland, in order to prevent any loss of time in preparing the writs, I think it will be necessary for you to order them to be written, leaving a blank for the date, and ready to be sealed as soon as he arrives. The bills you sent over are engrossed and will be sealed the beginning of next week, together with the commission to Lord Sydney to summon a parliament. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 342.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Sharp, or any other messenger-in-ordinary, to search for five men, pretending to be soldiers, who have lately come from beyond the seas, upon some treasonable designs; and having found them, to seize and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Bock 6, p. 389.]
Aug. 6. Allowance of the expenses of William Duncombe, esq., their Majesties' Envoy Extraordinary to the King of Sweden, from April 10th, to July 10th, 1692. [Ibid., p. 390.]
Aug. 6.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, empowering Thomas, Lord Coningsby and Charles Fox to appoint Elnathan Lumm their deputy in their office of Receiver General of all the Revenues of Ireland for the payment of the forces, with the salary of 600l. per annam. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 492.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. The Lords of the Cabinet who went from here last Tuesday morning, arrived about midnight at Portsmouth, and the next morning went on board to Admiral Russell, where they stayed till towards evening and then came back to Portsmouth, and on Thursday night they returned here. The forces would sail to-day, at farthest, except the regiments of Foulke, and Hales, and the 200 dragoons, who are put ashore again at Portsmouth. Lord Sydney has fixed Thursday next for going towards Ireland. The French privateers have done a great deal of mischief on the coast of Ireland, and some of them came into St. George's Channel to intercept the Lord Lieutenant in his passage from Chester to Dublin, but the biggest of these privateers was taken by the Centurion frigate, and we hope the other frigates which are sent thither to cruise will meet with the rest. The convoys for the Straits, West Indies, and other parts, will now be quickly settled, and a good squadron is designed for the first. The Bishop of London has called Dr. Lancaster, one of his chaplains, to St. Martin's, which the Queen had designed for Dr. Gough; but the right of presentation to this as well as St. James'—that is whether it be pro hoc vice in the Queen or the Bishop of London—must be determined by the law. We are told by letters of the 30th from Edinburgh that Sir William Patterson, Sir John Ramsay, the Lord [Laird ?] of Dalmanoy (?), his brother, and several others, had been committed to prison for refusing to take the oath called the Assurance. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 72.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. I send enclosed an Order of Council for renewing the old charter to the town of Nottingham, with a clause of restitution and confirmation of all the powers, prescriptions, franchises, lands, profits and advantages, which they enjoyed at any time before the late surrender thereof, and desire you will prepare such heads as may be agreeable to the directions of the said order, and transmit the same to me to be laid before the Queen for her further pleasure. [Ibid., No. 73, and H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 517.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dame Frideswide and Arabella Stephens, showing that Sir John Stephens, Frideswide's husband, and father to Arabella Stephens, served Kings Charles I. and II. in the wars in England and Ireland, and attended King Charles II. during the time of his exile abroad; that upon his restoration he gave several grants to Sir John Stephens which proved of little effect and of great expense; that in consideration of the many disappointments he met with in those grants, he had a grant, dated the 2nd of December, 1674, of a pension of 336l. per annum during his and the petitioners' lives, and the life of the longer liver, which pension was placed upon the establishment, but has not been paid since their Majesties' accession to the Crown; and that they have a lease of some lands in Ireland, wherein there is but few years to come, out of which there is a quit rent payable to the Crown of 120l. per annum; and the said lands, lying for the most part in the county of Cork, are waste, and not worth the said quit rent. As they have no other means of subsistence, by reason of the late rebellion in Ireland which has reduced them to a low condition, they pray for an order to respite the levying the said quit rent upon their said lands until their pension is placed upon the establishment, and paid out of the revenue of that kingdom. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 363.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Abraham Collin to go to Harwich and Holland; for Maertje Gerrits, and one child, ditto; for Anna Cleef, ditto; for John Le Platrier, ditto; for Philip Boequet, and Bertrand Goffo, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 323]; for Daniel Godin, ditto; for Catherine Van Rossum and Catherine her daughter, ditto; for John Sucofsky, with two grooms, and thirteen horses, ditto; for Passokins Minne, ditto; for Shaffras Hannedes, an Armenian, ditto; and for William Browne, ditto. [Ibid., p. 324.]
April 8.
Loo.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed the great seal of Ireland, granting to Henry Guy, esq., Robert Rochfort, esq., and Matthew Hutton, esq., their heirs and assigns all castles, messuages, lands, etc., in Ireland, whereof the late King James II. had any estate on the 5th of February 1684. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 506.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Bishop, Dean, and the rest of the clergy of the diocese of Limerick. Shows that, in the two last sieges at Limerick, the cathedral church and the rest of the churches of the said city were so ruined by the bombs, etc., that the inhabitants cannot meet together in any of them; that the clergy and other inhabitants are so impoverished by the late war, that they are not able to rebuild and repair them; that there was, in the said city, one Mr. John Leonard, a merchant, who has withdrawn himself to France, and there continues beyond the limited time, and the said Leonard has some mortgages, as they are informed, on some lands in the county of Clare to the value of 1,000l. or 1,500l.; they pray for a grant of the forfeitures aforesaid to be applied to the repair of the aforesaid churches. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 363.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Neal, esq. Shows that he obtained, in 1691, two patents, one for making good steel, never yet made in England, the other for making brass for wire and plates malleable for kettles, etc., being commodities of general use, never yet made in England, which may be made of the materials arising in Ireland. Forasmuch as the setting up of such manufactures there without his privity, would prejudice his inventions, granted to him here for 14 years, he prays for letters patent for the sole use and making of steel and brass in the kingdom of Ireland during the term of 14 years. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant. [Ibid., p. 364.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Cloudesley Shovell. I have yours of the 8th instant, and the Queen commands me to tell you to continue always in readiness to execute the King's orders. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 517.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Michel, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 324]; for Peter Hayer, ditto; for Peter Vanden Berge, ditto; for Martin Brouwer and Meyndert Uilenbroeck, ditto [Ibid., p. 325]; for Henry Braamt, Dick, his brother, Jacobus Borr, and Samuel Snouwer, ditto; for Jacob Israels, Solomon Levi, — Moses, his wife, and two small children, ditto; for Maria and Catharina de Lions, two sisters, and Maria Carlin, ditto; and for Marcus Carl, ditto. [Ibid., p. 326.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the commander of any of their Majesties' packet boats at Falmouth, to receive Count de Grachall going to the King of Spain from the Elector of Bavaria, with his retinue, servants, goods, and necessaries, and carry him to Corunna. [Ibid., p. 325.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Viscount Sydney and the Lords-Justices of Ireland to give order to the Attorney-General to admit Lady Ellen Aylmer, Sir Justin Aylmer, bart., and Luke Aylmer, esq., her children, to bring a writ of error for the reversing their outlawries, the said Lady Aylmer having represented that upon the death of her late husband, Sir Fitz-Gerald Aylmer, bart., in 1685, she became guardian to her said two sons, and took them to France for their education where they have remained ever since; notwithstanding which, she and her two sons, the eldest being only ten years old, are outlawed for high treason. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 496.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson. Yesterday the Dutch mail came in with letters of the 1st instant from the King's camp at Lambeque, [Limburg] which tell us that the King, having advice that morning, that the French army had decamped from Enghien, immediately ordered an army to march after them, and advanced himself with the right wing as far as Enghien to obscure (sic) the enemy's march; but they had made too much haste to be overtaken, and the King returned to his camp at Lambeque. Lieut.-Col. Calthrop of the Guards, who had been taken prisoner, had returned to our camp, and said that the French own to have had 8,000 men killed and wounded, and above 400 officers, among whom are divers persons of quality, and the French themselves write very modestly of this action from Paris. Our loss as it is given in by the several regiments is 3,000 killed and about 2,900 wounded; but of the former, who were supposed to have been killed, about 700 are prisoners with the French, amongst them several officers. Sir John Lanier died at Brussels last Friday sennight of his wounds.
The court-martial had finished the trial of Granville, and would pronounce sentence the next day. Letters from France give an account that the Duke of Savoy had gone to the country of Ambrun, and had taken Guillestre, and a castle belonging to the Archbishop of Ambrun which occasioned a great consternation amongst the French.
We have a melancholy account from a vessel which has come from Jamaica, of an earthquake which had happened at Port Royal, which had sunk the greatest part of the town, standing on a point of land into the sea, and drowned 2,000 of the inhabitants. The Swan frigate which was careening was broken to pieces, and much mischief was done on that side of the island. On Sunday last the forces sailed from St. Helen's to the eastward, and it is said, have arrived at the Downs.
Eleven o'clock at night. Just now the letters came in of last Thursday from the King's camp; they only say that our army continued at Lambeque, and the French at Guislenghen, and that the Chevalier Granville was hanged the day before. Letters from France say that the Duke of Savoy had besieged Ambrun, in which were four battalions besides the ordinary garrison. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 74.]
Aug. 9.
London.
T. Fotherby's proposals with regard to his position and establishment on some expedition about to be undertaken; the proposals are under nine heads, and answers to them appear in the margin. [Ibid., No. 75.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to "a Dutch Captain." There being information upon oath, that some contraband goods are put on board the ship under your command, which perhaps you may not be aware of, and the officers of the Customs being required to search for the same, I am to tell you, that since none of their Majesties' men-of-war are exempted from such search, you are to make no difficulty in admitting the search in your ship, but rather to be assistant in it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 517, and H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 190.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Grill, to go to Harwich, and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 326]; for Mr. Mierander, Mr. Palmroot, and Mr. Gran, ditto; and for Samuel le Grand and Henry le Nain, ditto. [Ibid., p. 327.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Surrey, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon John Towers until the 12th of September. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 395.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Duke of Leinster. I have spoken to the Commissioners for the Sick and Wounded to direct to their agent, one Harris, at Deal, to take care of such sick men as you shall order to be put on shore. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 518.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the principal Officers of the Ordnance. The Tripolins having lately declared war with France, have desired the Queen to furnish them with some powder and ball of 4, 6, 8, and 12 pounds. The Queen would therefore have you report what quantities might be spared to them upon this occasion, if she should think fit to gratify them in their request. [Ibid.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Holmes. I enclose an information, which I received from the Lords of the Admiralty, relating to some of your officers. I desire you will cause this matter to be fully examined and send me an answer as soon as possible. [Ibid., p. 519.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. The Queen desires you to send Dominick over to France in the first transport which shall go there with prisoners of war. He will be delivered into your hands by Charles Maris, one of the messengers, and you must keep him safely until he is landed in France. [Ibid. p. 529.]
Aug. 11. The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. We require you to make punctual payment of 11s. sterling per diem, to Lieutenant-Colonel James Murray. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 139.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Frederick Klingenburg, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Rousset, ditto; for Paul Caillon, ditto; for Mr. Anthonio Bacciocco, ditto; for Mr. Peter Lombard and Charles Lombard his son, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 327]; and for Mr. Abraham Meur, Mr. Nicholas Vander Dum, Mr. James Hayes, and Mr. James Bourdon, their governor, ditto. [Ibid., p. 328.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. On Tuesday Sir John Ashby with the squadron which had been to the westward rejoined Admiral Russell at St. Helen's; he had sent his long boats ashore on the French coast where the men who landed drove all before them and took some cattle. The forces under the Duke of Leinster were yesterday still in the Downs expecting further orders from the King. Lord Sydney goes to Ireland to-morrow. Seal. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 76.]
Aug. 11.
The Hague.
The States General to the Queen on behalf of Robert Boitet and others, owners of the City of Copenhagen. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 419.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of Lord Sydney, dated the previous day, concerning the clergy of Limerick's petition. The report is as follows: I have considered this petition of Nathaniel, Lord Bishop of Limerick, Ezekiel Webb, Dean of the same, and the rest of the clergy of the diocese of Limerick, and as it is reasonable to believe, that in the two last sieges of Limerick, the cathedral, and the rest of the churches in the said city, have suffered much, as suggested, and as the clergy and other inhabitants of that city and diocese are so impoverished by the late rebellion, that they are not in a condition to rebuild and repair the said cathedral and other churches there, as is set forth in the petition, I concur in opinion with the Lords Justices, that it is a work of absolute necessity that the said churches should, some way or other, be put into good and sufficient repair, fit for divine service; so I cannot but recommend it to your Majesty as an act worthy your consideration, and I see no reason why you may not fitly grant them the forfeited incumbrances and mortgages of the said John Leonard to be applied to the repairs of those churches. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 365.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sarah Mayo, widow, showing that her husband was a captain of horse in Col. Wolseley's regiment and that he was killed at the Battle of Cavan, and that all that she had in Ireland was seized, as forfeited, to the value of 1,500l., and that she has been forced to live since upon charity. Prays for the arrears due to her hushand. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 421.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I enclose a presentment made by the Commissioners of the Customs against Capt. Davison. The Queen would have you examine the matter of this complaint and report the case with your opinion to her. She would have you consider of what the Turkey Company desires in relation to their convoy, as you will find it expressed in the enclosed Minute of Council, and report your opinion upon it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 519.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen is pleased to allow 100l. a year to Mons. Van Poole, postmaster at the Brill, for his care in despatching their Majesties' letters and other services; the same to be paid out of the profits of the Post Office. She desires you to give the necessary orders herein. [Ibid.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The fleet being designed to sail from Portsmouth, her Majesty would have you direct the Victuallers of the Navy to send a further quantity of victuals to Torbay, and to supply the fleet there with as much fresh provisions as is possible, which may be cheaper and will be better for the men. Their Majesties' ships the Defiance, Warspite, Monmouth, Cambridge, and Lion, being ordered to the Downs, the Queen would have you direct the Victuallers of the Navy to complete, with all speed, the victuals for those ships, for three months. [Ibid., p. 520.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen, having ordered 40s. a man for raising ten additional men to each company in Col, Foulkes's regiment, would have you give orders for paying Col. Foulkes as much money as that allowance amounts to. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 520.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for Abraham Clary to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Mr. John Payne, Anthony Eles, John Britton, William Webb, James Shaw, Andrew Barnes, Christopher Reve, Robert Piper, John Fergusson, Robert Payne, and John Cook, who had an order from the Admiralty to prevent their being pressed, ditto; for Margaretha Vilett, with her little child, ditto; and for John Van Cam, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 328.]
Aug. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland granting to Thomas Neale the sole use and benefit in Ireland of his new invention for making fine steel, in goodness equal to Venetian steel, for 14 years. [S.P.D. Signet Office 12, p. 501.]
Aug. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland granting to Thomas Neale the sole use of his invention for making brass wherewith to make wire and plates malleable for kettles, skillets, and other utensils in Ireland, for 14 years. [Ibid. 2.]
Aug. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland granting to John Tyzacke and Thomas Neale the sole use of their invention for tanning all sorts of leather, and converting it into imitation of Russia leather, and with the same tincture, grain, and smell as Russia leather, in Ireland, for 14 years. [Ibid., p. 503.]
Aug. 12.
London.
[Lord Godolphin] to the King. According to your commands from Limburg, I enclose a warrant for your hand, for the granting all the lands of your private estate in Ireland to the persons therein named. Mr. Guy had at first some scruples at having his name in the trust because he said, in case the Parliament should come to look into it, he being a member of the House would be obliged to give a present answer to all their questions, whereas there might otherwise be time gained, before any answer could be made upon it. But having better considered in how pressing terms you were pleased to order the despatch of this business, he was contented to pass over that difficulty and his name stands in the grant.
I received from Mr. Blathwayt your commands for returning immediately some more money to the Duke of Savoy. We have spoken this day at the Treasury with the same merchants as did it last time and I believe we shall be able to finish it with them so that some of the bills may be remitted by the next post.
I need not trouble you with repeating that the public funds falling so far short as they do for providing the public charge and at the same time many great expenses extraordinary falling upon us, will so deeply engage your revenue in anticipation, that I am sure you will be very sorry to see it in that condition at your return, but I know no remedy under heaven for it. Either the things which you command and which seem to be so absolutely necessary, must be omitted, or else this consequence, as ill as it is, must be unavoidable. I shrink at the thought of the reckoning we must shortly make for all the expense of this summer and the difficulties of providing for another year, and yet in order to do this, I believe you will soon find it necessary to fix the day for the meeting of Parliament here and also for your own return upon which will depend all preparations which are requisite to that matter. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 118.]
Aug. 12.
On board ship, 5 miles from Dunkirk.
[Admiral] Van Zyll to [Lord Nottingham]. Touching the sending of Dutch ships to the Downs. Understands that her Majesty's ship the Kingfisher has already arrived there. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 192.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Lacy. Shows that, having obtained their Majesties' pardon, through some neglect, his small fortune is seized by the high sheriff, the same having been left out of the said pardon, and that he is like to be deprived thereof to his utter ruin. Prays for an order to all persons that have anything belonging to him in their possession to restore it to him. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 366.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Frances, Countess-Dowager of Tyrconnel. Shows that, by indentures of lease and release bearing date the 1st and 2nd days of November, 1681, in consideration of a marriage then had between her and Richard, Earl of Tyrconnel, her late deceased husband, and of 10,000 crowns, her marriage portion, he, the said Richard, Earl of Tyrconnel (by the name of Richard Talbot, esq.) conveyed and assured the manors of Cabragh and Taragh, and other manors and lands in Ireland, to Sir John Temple, knt., their Majesties' Attorney-General of the said kingdom, Anthony Guidot and William Andrews, gent., and their heirs, to the use of him the said Earl for his life, and after his death to the use of the petitioner for her life, as and for her jointure, and after to other uses in the said indenture mentioned. The said Earl afterwards, in the year 1689, was outlawed and attainted of high treason, and all his manors and lands in Ireland, as well the above named as others, seized into their Majesties' hands as forfeited. The said Earl died after the said outlawry, and thereby the petitioner became entitled to, and in right ought to have, and enjoy the said manors and lands, so settled upon her as aforesaid; but the same, by reason of the said seizure, are detained and kept from her, and she must greatly suffer unless relieved by her Majesty's grace and justice. Prays her Majesty to give order that she may be let into the possession of her jointure-lands and quietly enjoy the same. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 448.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Earl of Argyll. The Queen, being informed that Thomas Taylour, a soldier in your regiment, has killed Cuthbert Kendall, would have you cause the said Taylour to be put on shore, and delivered into the hands of some civil magistrate; and you are desired to give me an account, as soon as it is done, that further order may be given for his prosecution. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 521.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for John le Maire to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 328]; for Johanna Jansen, and three small children, ditto; for Wyfje Simense, and her little child, ditto; for Salomon Gilbert, recommended by Mons. D'Egalentiere, French minister, ditto; for Mr. Martin Bremer, and Levien Velthuysen, ditto; and for Christofer Laman, ditto. [Ibid., p. 329.]
Aug. 13.
Limbeck.
Review of the troops of Hanover. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 119.]
Aug. 13.
Middleburg.
The Admiralty of Zealand to the Queen, touching the arrest of the ship Jacoba. Seal of Arms. See enclosure to Sir Charles Hedges' letter to the Earl of Nottingham of6th September. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 423.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of Transport. Understanding that your agent, Mr. Buckle, has not been obstructed in the execution of his office, but that on the contrary he has absented himself from it and "played the knave," I am commanded by the Queen to tell you that she would have one of you go down this afternoon to the Downs, and take care of what is necessary to be done; and I desire that the person who goes down will strictly enquire into Mr. Buckle's behaviour and give me an account of it. [H. O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 522.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Marshal of the King's Bench. The Queen having ordered Mr. William Fuller, a prisoner in your custody, to attend her at Kensington, at 4 o'clock to-morrow afternoon, with some of his friends, would have you carry him thither at that time. [Ibid.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Charles Throckmorton, esq., with Joseph Charmont and Andrew Williams, his two servants, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Thomas Falaise, ditto; for Daniel De Underlooke, ditto; for Giles Brugmane, Thomas Tulot, John Baldi, and Hubert Docrem, a servant, ditto; for Robert Browne and John Bryan, a boy, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 330]; for Mrs. Anne Selby, Mr. James Prechard, and Elizabeth Bostock, ditto; for Peter Giles, ditto; for John Labadie, ditto; for Mr. Moreau, ditto [Ibid., p. 331]; and for Simon Chapman, a messenger, ditto. [Ibid., p. 332.]
Aug. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting to Robert Thornton the office of stationer for serving all offices in Ireland with all sorts of stationery ware. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 497.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Tunbridge Wells. This is only to enclose the Gazette, and to say the forces still continue in the Downs, and the fleet at St. Helen's, but the latter has orders to make another turn to the westward, though I suppose they will not start until the weather is better. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 77.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Warrant Officers belonging to the fireship Wolf, Captain Greenway, commander. Shows that, by order of Sir Ralph Delaval, they burnt their said ship at "Sherbrook" [Cherbourg], in the engagement against the French and have received but 10l. each as gratuities, although there was formerly given 20l. for the like service. They pray that the like encouragement may be given to them, for their said service, as was formerly allowed to others upon the like occasion. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 366.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Pitt, esq. Shows that he was lately tried and found guilty of the manslaughter of William Hoyle, esq., for which he had their Majesties' pardon, but he cannot be restored to his goods and chattels without a Privy Seal. Prays to have a Privy Seal for the same. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 367.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen, not thinking fit to proceed yet to the trial of the Earls of Huntingdon, Middleton, and Dunmore, and of the other persons who were remanded last term, is willing they should be enlarged from their present confinement, and be bailed by you in such manner as you judge most proper; and that each of those lords should give a recognizance of 5,000l. with four sureties each for 2,000l. You are also to take ample bail of the others, viz.: Sir Andrew Forrester, Sir Solomon Swale, Col. Norton, Major Cullivert, Austin Matthews, George Newton, and Jeremy Collier. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 523.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Major-General Maxwell. I am sorry the method that the Lord Chief-Justice proposes for your enlargement is not to your satisfaction, since I do not know that there can be any other expedient. [Ibid.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Greenhill. The Queen, being informed that three French protestants, who made their escape out of France, have lately come, in an open boat, to Stonehouse, and are inhabitants at Dartmouth, and Bideford, and well known there, would have you send for them, and examine them, what number of ships there are in any ports of France, that they know of, of what strength, and number of guns, and in what condition they are to go to sea; and you are particularly to examine them as to when Mons. Nesmond sailed from Brest, and what number of ships he had with him; which examination you are to transmit to me. [Ibid., p. 524.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose a memorial of Col. Foulkes, and two memorials of Col. Goodwin by the Queen's command; she would have you give some speedy order therein as soon as possible. [Ibid.] Enclosing:—
(1) Memorial of Col. Foulkes. Whereas the regiment of foot under his command is appointed for the service of the West Indies, he offers as a necessary preparation for the said service, that the arrears due to the same be stated and discharged. The regiment being considerably in arrears in Ireland, the officers contracted several debts on account of themselves and companies, and must be paid now they are leaving the kingdom. That when the aforesaid debts are discharged and provision made for the families, which many officers and soldiers have depending on them, they will have little left to provide the requisite necessaries for the voyage and service, and therefore will deserve to be no less considered than the Duke of Bolton's regiment was on the like service, the officers of which, besides their arrears, had three months' pay advanced to them. That as the time of their embarkation is so near, it is high time the money on account aforesaid was issued, so that the regiment may set about making provision for the voyage; payment will be an encouragement to the soldiers, who are at present troubled to find themselves excluded from their Majesties' bounty of 20s. per man, which most regiments which have returned from the Irish service have received. The Duke of Leinster promised this regiment it should be likewise paid to them in a little time. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 525.]
(2) Memorial of Lieut.-Col. Goodwin, offered on the occasion of the designed expedition to the West Indies. The regiment of Col. Hales having served in Ireland, where very little was received either for clearings or subsistence, have consequently arrears to settle. It is the request of the Lieut.-Colonel and the officers, that, in consideration of the necessity the whole regiment may be under of paying their debts before they leave this kingdom, and of providing for their voyage and families, her Majesty will order the accounts to be stated and the arrears paid. [Ibid.]
(3) An abstract of the last muster of Col. John Hales's regiment for the months of July and August, 1692. [Ibid., p. 526.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the President of the College of Physicians. The Queen intending soon to send some soldiers to the West Indies, and thinking it necessary to appoint an able physician who may take care of directing what shall be necessary for their health, would have you consider of some person whom you shall think most proper and willing to undertake the service. [Ibid., p. 524.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. John Dyve, Mr. Anthony Meure, and Mr. Peter Villesauver, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 331]; for Lieutenant Richard Keyes and John Cole, his servant, ditto; for John Butler, esq., with one servant, ditto; for Peter Muller, to go to Harwich and Denmark; for Barent Ferdinandus, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Lawrence Bogenaar, ditto [Ibid., p. 332]; for Jacob Michielse. Sarah his wife, and Abraham, Isaac, and Aaron, their children, ditto; for Frederick Lucksen, ditto; and for Michiel De Roy, ditto. [Ibid., p. 333.]
Aug. 16.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench to take bail for Theophilus, Earl of Huntingdon, Charles, Earl of Dunmore, Charles, Earl of Middleton in Scotland, Sir Solomon Swale, bart., Sir Andrew Forrester, knt., William Culliford, alias Cullivert, Ambrose Norton, esq., Austin Matthews, gent., and Jeremy Collier and George Newton, clerks, prisoners for high treason; and also for Thomas Maxwell who was sometime since committed for high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 400.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Memorandum by Lord Rochester for the King, with marginal notes by an anonymous writer.
If his Majesty should not return into England earlier this year than he did last, there may happen the like inconveniences which did then, by not having taken sufficient measures for the carrying on his business in Parliament, which as it did very much delay all the preparations for the last year, so it might perhaps to a great degree disappoint those that would be necessary for the next, if it be true, what is generally apprehended, that the gentlemen are not likely to meet in too good a humour. Marginal note.—"So far all I have spoken to agree with him."
For the remedying of which it might be expedient, that though there be yet more than two months before the King would have the Parliament sit, there should be no time lost in taking all the consideration possible, and making all suitable preparations for such measures as are likely to succeed when it does meet; for if it should prove necessary to make any alterations it would take a great deal of time, both at home and abroad, to adjust everything upon new schemes. It is perhaps too confident a thing for anyone to say that Parliament will, or will not, do anything, whatsoever that may be, proposed to them; but without doubt the being distrustful that they will not meet with too great satisfaction in the transactions of this summer, is an undertaking that they would not be displeased with anyone that should presume to make it for them. Marginal note.—" Sir J. Lowther says nobody can know, one day, what the House of Commons would do the next; in which all agree with him; and that makes him think it unnecessary to deliver any opinion now."
The having given so very considerable sums of money without receiving more eminent advantages by it, will probably pass for such a sort of miscarriage as will abate, at least, their zeal in giving on, as they have done, especially since it may be feared very little can be said that has not been already urged, to give them hopes of better increase for the future. Besides, if everybody were in the best disposition imaginable, it must be allowed there would be almost insupportable difficulties to struggle with. Marginal note. — " Lord Cornwallis says, had the Parliament met when summoned this summer, upon the victory at sea, they would have given anything. English people being puffed up by success which, when forgot (as it soon is) their zeal will cool; so that consequently, by this time, it will be forgot quite, which will prove of ill consequence, he thinks, to your affairs."
If three millions and a half were so hard to be compassed last year (which was even too narrow a provision for the services then designed) it must needs be harder then next year to find that sum, and the 700,000l. that are fallen short of the poll bill, which possibly the Parliament may think fit to make their first care, because they have obliged themselves to make that sum good, and which, though it be for the expense of the expiring year, must be had out of the product of that which is beginning, and will be a dead weight upon any new tax that might be thought on, after the additional excise upon beer and ale; and the land shall have their (sic) new load for the service of the next year. Marginal note.—"Lord Privy Seal, Lord Nottingham, Lord Commissioner Trevor, Lord Cornwallis, and Sir J. Lowther, think it can be given if they are willing. Sir Edward Seymour speaks doubtfully, so does the Lord Steward."
It is plain, by experience, that by no methods hitherto practised such sums can be raised in one year for the service of that year, and the methods of new excises, if the people were as willing to fall into them as they are generally averse from them, could not possibly, in the first year at least, turn to an account proportionable to so great an expense. Marginal note.—"Commissioner Trevor thinks even a general excise would turn to account the first year."
This, then, seems to be the prospect of that matter relating to money from the opinion of those that think the calmest upon this subject, that so great sums are not to be had again this year if everybody were disposed to do what they could, which it is doubted is not the case. If this be the true state of this point, it must be submitted to his Majesty's great judgment whether it be not more advisable for him to fall upon some new measures that may be less expensive to the nation than to set his whole stress, and to employ all his credit, to pursue those that were taken last year, when there is so little appearance of success; for then may they who possibly wish ill to the government find great advantages if they can defeat what is his Majesty's chief design to bring to pass. If less preparation be made, than last year, the Confederates may be disheartened, and would, perhaps, provide separately for themselves; but if it were found impossible to make the same, it were better for the King to prepare the Allies by degrees and dispose his own affairs in good time, to fall upon things it were more probable for him to succeed in. Marginal note.—"Lord Privy Seal says if the Allies did suspect we were setting up only for our own defence, they would shift for themselves and then we were all undone; that he thinks if the Allies could make a defensive war only, and you make a great descent into France, the Parliament would give anything, or if that could not be done, then that you should let them know that you would take care the money should circulate as much as may be here for buying clothes, bread, and all that was possible to be bought here at home."
It would be for the King's service at home and a great disappointment to the designs of his enemies, that it might be understood in Parliament, that he is not so much concerned for this or that particular way of carrying on the war, provided it be done in such a manner as may encourage and support his Allies, and particularly if an army of so many thousand men (the pay of which being so great a proportion, carried over and spent in a foreign country, is one of the greatest and most sensible grievances) be not suitable to the interest of England, nor to be supported but by too great a wasting of their substance, Parliament would, in that case, provide for increasing the Fleet and let the expense the States were at, on that head, be turned to pay a proportion of the King's land forces. Marginal note.—"This proposal of the increasing the Fleet in this manner, the Lords Privy Seal, Nottingham, and Cornwallis say is the most pernicious thing in the world, endeavoured by your enemies to ruin our trade and then laying blame on you, as though you did it to favour the Dutch; besides the impossibility of it, as having not ships enough, nor men, unless we stop even the coast trade; but I hear the first has a little changed his mind, which he is apt to do, and Lord Commissioner Trevor laughed at it."
It would be well to let it be understood, that the King's chief care and design is to bring the country out of this very expensive war into an honourable and safe peace by all the means he or the nation can think of and so disappoint a great many ill-contrivances to discompose his affairs, and to carry on the service for one year more, which is enough to be aimed at for the present. Marginal note.— "I cannot help saying it seems to me like sitting still, and letting the French King take what he will; but I hope it will not be in the power of the Parliament to make Lord Rochester in the right in this as he proved by Mr. Russell doing nothing; for he would, at first, have had those designs laid aside which have been frustrated by those who should have executed them."
Some men have published that the King does not take the people of England to feel what they pay, and that he thinks they could pay a great deal more, if they were well pressed to it; to which may be answered, that they never did yet, in any time, pay so much in so few years, and therefore it may be apprehended, that a further pressing upon them might end in a general ill-will to the Government and an inclination to change it for any other they could meet with; which God forbid. Marginal note.—"As Lord Rochester means very well, I daresay, in what he writes, so I hope to be excused for thus scribbling on it; but I could not help it, having in my mind, as I read it over, what others have said to me and I took this to be the shortest way of telling it." [S.P. Dom. King William Chest 12, No. 120.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Minshall and the rest of the owners of the English "private man-of-war" called the William and Mary, Capt. Holman, commander. Shows that on the 21st or 22nd of June last, the said ship, coming from St. Malo, where she had been with a squadron of ships of war, commanded by Capt. Mees, took two light Danish vessels called the House of Gravenstien, Erasmus Olsen, master, and the White Dove, John Greave, master, which had been employed at Havre as transport ships to the French King; that the said Capt. Holman, having lately noticed that a French privateer was cruising off Portland and Weymouth, thereupon set sail and took the said privateer and brought her into Portsmouth; that upon the proceedings in the Court of Admiralty against the said prizes, their Majesties' proctor desired the same might be condemned as perquisites of the Admiralty, in regard Capt. Holman's commission was revoked the same day, or the day before he took the two prizes, and was not renewed when he took the privateer. Considering the charge in fitting the said ship, and that Capt. Holman could not possibly have had notice of his commission being revoked at the time of his taking the two prizes, and the privateer, the petitioners pray to have the same benefit of the three prizes, as if his commission had been in force. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 367.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Alice Short, wife of William Short, one of the grandchildren of Thomas Bonham, esq., and Anne his wife, of Dagenham, in Essex, deceased. Shows that her mother was one of the daughters of the said Thomas and Anne Bonham, but never had any portion from her father, and died before him leaving the petitioner very young; that the said Thomas Bonham died on the 3rd of May, 1676, and left a considerable personal estate, besides a real estate of above 400l. a year; that his widow afterwards exhibited before the judge of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury a certain writing purporting to be a will of the deceased, and obtained a probate thereof in common form, and continued in possession thereof till October, 1678, and then died intestate; that, after her death, Thomas Bonham the son and heir, together with Margaret Bonham and Diana Dagger, alias Bonham, two of the deceased's daughters, and one Edward Manning and others, agreed together that administration should be granted 'to the said Manning for their use, which was done accordingly; that in August, 1682, the petitioner intermarried with her now husband and being told the will was not a good will, called Manning to prove it by witnesses; Manning and Thomas Bonham, the son, appeared and propounded the said will, but failing in proof the judge pronounced against it, and declared that Thomas Bonham, senior, died intestate, from which sentence they appealed in Chancery and the Judges-Delegate confirmed the said sentence. After this the petitioner prayed that she might have administration and her share out of the estate, to prevent which the said Thomas Bonham set up another pretended will which the Judge declared against, and from that he appealed again to Chancery, and obtained a Commission of Appeal, and the delegates confirmed that decree also. The petitioner again prayed a distribution and Thomas Bonham and Thomas Manning, executor of the said Edward Manning, appeared before the Judge and consented to a distribution, and accordingly the Judge made a distribution ordering that whereas Edward Manning had, by consent, furnished the petitioner's husband with 225l., upon his bond and notes, the same should go towards her share, and Thomas Manning should pay her 300l. more, and that as Thomas Bonham had, by order, brought 200l. into Court, the said money should be paid to her, and that the said Thomas Bonham should pay her 950l. more. The said Bonham and Manning appealed, and it was not ordered that Manning should pay the petitioner anything, and Bonham was only ordered to pay 800l. By this the petitioner thinks herself much aggrieved, conceiving her share to be much more, they having had the estate in their hands above thirteen years, and prays a commission of review. Referred to the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal of England. [Ibid., p. 368.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to provide hammocks and bedding for 2,000 men going to the West Indies. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 527.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Henry Bellasis. I enclose an extract from the petition of Lady Frances Shaen; the Queen would have you return an answer to her complaint, and let me have it. [Ibid.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Tripolins, having lately declared war with France, and having desired her Majesty to furnish them with some powder and ball of 4, 6, 8, and 12 pounds, the principal officers of the Ordnance have reported that they can spare, out of the stores in the Office of the Ordnance, 200 barrels of powder or thereabouts with a proportionable quantity of the several sizes of shot desired, provided they are paid for the same. The Queen would have you consider what money can be spared for this service. I enclose, by the Queen's command, a memorial of the Dutch Secretary; you are to report what is best to be done therein. [Ibid.] Enclosing:—
Mons. Bade's memorial. The Admiralty of the Meuse having caused to be founded at Rye, and in its neighbourhood, certain cannon, Mons. De Zitters requests permission to export the same into Holland, duty free; these guns are to be employed against the common enemy.—Westminster, 12th August 1692. [Ibid., p. 528.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Anna Ears and Anna Evens, with their two children, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Otto Hulstkorst, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 333.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Commission for Vigot Grongnet, esq., to be reformed captain in Col. Francis De Cambon's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 286.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Anne Edmonds, Mrs. Elizabeth Edmonds, and one servant, to go to Harwich and Flanders; for the Earl of Suffolk, the Honourable Edward Howard, and Mr. Gerrard Russell, with John Salmon, Thomas House, and—Ham, three servants, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Duplat, with his wife, and one child, ditto; for Anthony Vander Linde, ditto; for Mr. Thomas Davey, and Mr. William Morgan, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 334]; for Thomas Taylor, and Stephen Linsey, ditto; for Francis Lettar, and Maria Magdalena, his wife, ditto; for Philip Margurt, ditto; and for Mr. Jacob Radhe, and Thomas Preston, ditto. [Ibid., p. 335.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Sarah Carter, who was convicted of murdering her bastard child at the last assizes held at Cambridge, until the 9th of September next. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 395.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Great Seal, to prorogue parliament until Monday the 26th of September. [Ibid., p. 396.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General, to discharge Elias Brag, a prisoner in Bristol Gaol, of the fine of 100l. set upon him for certain words spoken by him; he being utterly unable to pay and having lain in prison about four years. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 397.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. The Queen has given leave that the Earl of Middleton, the Earl of Huntingdon, the Earl of Dunmore, Sir Andrew Forrester, Sir Solomon Swale, Major Norton, Major Cullivert, and the other prisoners who were remanded the last term, be admitted to bail, and they were accordingly bailed yesterday by the Lord Chief-Justice. The late Archbishop of Glasgow is made Bishop of Kilmore in Ireland. The Prince and Princess of Denmark have to-day gone to Bath and after their return will come to Berkeley House. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 78.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles Horde, of London, merchant. Shows that the ship Friends' Adventure, Capt. Ingle, commander, was taken, about a year since, by the French, coming from Jamaica, and carried into St. Malo, on board which the petitioner had about 5 tons of indigo, which being of considerable value, he gave order for baying the same for his account, which has been done accordingly. Prays for a license to import the same in the ship employed for the exchange of prisoners. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 370.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Soren Sorensen, master of the ship the St. John, of Copenhagen. Shows that he is an inhabitant of Copenhagen, and sailed from thence with his said ship, and loading of deal for Topsham, where he left the said loading and proceeded in ballast, to Bordeaux, where he took, on his owner's account, several tuns of wine, vinegar, etc., and upon his own account 19 hogsheads of "town wine," 4 hogsheads of vinegar, etc., bound to Copenhagen, as by Mr. Molesworth's pass, and other attestations under the city seal, may appear. Being taken on his way home by an English privateer, Capt. Stocker, commander, he was brought, in March last, into Dartmouth, and upon a full hearing the Judge of the Admiralty cleared the said ship and goods; but she has been since condemned by the Lords of Appeal in July last, upon an article of the late treaty, for going directly from Denmark to France. He prays that in consideration of his wife and five small children, and as he has nothing to depend upon but his eighth part of this ship, and part of the goods on board, that their Majesties will bestow their tenths of the said ship and loading upon him. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 371.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report by the Lords of the Treasury, dated 17th August, 1692, concerning Sir Basil Firebrace's petition. The report is as follows:—In obedience to your Majesty's commands signified to us by the Earl of Nottingham upon the petition of Sir Basil Firebrace, knt., freighter of the ship Friends' Adventure, Charles Cowper, master—praying license to redeem the said ship with her cargo, being Portugal wines, which were taken by a French privateer going into Falmouth, and carried into St. Malo, the petitioner giving security that no goods of the product of France shall be imported in the said ship—we have considered the same, and for our better information therein, referred it to the Commissioners of the Customs who have made report thereupon, which is hereunto annexed. Referred back to the Treasury to give order accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 373.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen having appointed Thomas Fotherby to be commissarygeneral of the ammunition, provisions, and stores designed for the West Indies, is pleased to allow him 25l. per month, to continue during this expedition until his return, with an advance of 200l. for his necessary preparations. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 528.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Passes for Matthew Wassenburg to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 335]; for Mrs. Deborah Bourne, Deborah Bourne, her daughter, Jacob Bunnell and Anne Rogerson, her servants, ditto [Ibid., p. 336]; for Mr. Soroder, ditto; for Mr. John Coeg, ditto; for Isaac Dutry, ditto; and for Margretha, Kercher, ditto. [Ibid., p. 337.]
Aug. 19.
Kensington.
Pass for the ship, Friends' Adventure, Charles Cowper, master, to pass with her lading of Portugal wines from St. Malo, to any port in England, leave having been given to Sir Basil Firebrace of London, knt., her freighter, to buy the said ship, and her lading, she having been taken on her voyage to Falmouth, and carried to St. Malo. [Ibid., p. 336.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Kenge and Peter Mariscoe, or any other messenger-in-ordinary, to search for Elie Guiban, an alien enemy and suspected to be a spy. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 397.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. Col. Withers arrived here to-day from Flanders having passed through the Downs where he left orders for the forces to sail towards Ostend, which they would do to-day or to-morrow at the latest. The Dutch letters have not come in yet and we begin to think the packet boat is either taken or forced back. Col. Withers left his Majesty last Monday between Ghent and Bruges marching towards Ypres, having sent his baggage and heavy cannon to Ghent. We believe here that his design is upon Dunkirk. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 79.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Christopher Taaffe. Shows that he commanded as captain in the Irish Army, and quitted that service sometime before the surrender of Limerick, and was kindly received by General Ginckle. Having a desire to serve in Hungary, he obtained the General's letter to Lord Carlingford; but not being able to support so great a journey without money he prays to be supplied with some to proceed on his journey. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 370.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. James Nugent. Shows that on the reduction of Limerick, he came with a regiment of foot which he commanded in the Irish Army, and was assured by General Ginckle he should be employed; that he continued from the 3rd of October with his regiment, till the 17th of January and was then disbanded, as may appear by the Lords-Justices' letter to Lord Sydney; that he lent 76l. of his money to his officers in great distress, upon assurance he had to be continued in his employment; and that he and his officers are much indebted, having received but 14 days' subsistence when disbanded. Prays that the arrears of pay due, till he and his officers were disbanded, may be paid him, and for some forfeited lands in Ireland to be settled on him at an easy rent. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 372.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Porter, vice-chamberlain to the Queen-Dowager. Shows that the Commissioners of Sewers in Lincolnshire have made laws for the perpetual use and running of water and setting down the sluices, between the towns of North and South Somercotes, and the towns of Cockerington and Sherbrook, and also between the towns of Granthorp and North Somercotes aforesaid; and they, conceiving the same to be of advantage to the said towns, pray to have the royal assent to the said laws to be made perpetual, according to the Law of Sewers made in the 23rd year of Henry VIII. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 374.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Royal African Company. Shows that, in September last, they obtained leave to import from France, 80 tons of redwood taken at sea from them, and that they were to import the same in three months; but the ship could not then bring above 28 tons, and the time for importation having expired, they pray for a like passport to bring over the remainder. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 374.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lords of the Treasury concerning Mr. St. Leger's petition. The report is as follows:—We have considered the petition of John St. Leger, esq., and the report of the Lord Lieutenant thereupon, both which are hereunto annexed, whereby it appears that the said John St. Leger has suffered in his estate in Ireland, by the rebels there, to the value of above 6,000l., that he and his family are reduced to great necessities by reason thereof and that he can discover some concealment of mortgages, bonds, etc., which are utterly unknown to your Majesties' Commissioners in Ireland. He prays in consideration of his faithful services, and of the great charges he has, and must be at, in the discovery and recovery thereof, that you will grant him what he shall so discover and recover towards the repair of his said losses upon his answering one-fourth part thereof to the Crown. We are of opinion, if you shall grant the petitioner authority with the aid of the Exchequer to sue for the said money, etc., that what money shall be discovered and recovered by him should be paid into your Exchequer in Ireland and a third part be reserved to your use, and that the residue may be thence issued to the said Mr. St. Leger as your free gift and bounty for his services, sufferings, and charges aforesaid. Referred back to the Treasury to consider the value of the concealments. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 381.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Captain Isaac Evertson, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Abraham Fromanteel, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 337]; for Simon Claasen, and John Jansen, ditto; for Thomas Thomassen, ditto; for Peter Eylander, to go to Harwich and Denmark; for Mr. Isaac Taylor and Isaac Taylor, his son, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Nicholas Van Loon, ditto. [Ibid., p. 338.]
Aug. 20.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill, authorising Sir William Trumbull, one of the Clerks of the Signet, to discharge his duties by deputy, and nominating George Woodeson, gentleman, as deputy. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 398.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Tunbridge Wells. (fn. 1) This morning a Dutch mail came in with letters of the 15th from the King's camp at St. Livens Hautein. They tell us that our army decamped that morning from Ninove marching three leagues to Hautein, being about the same distance from Ghent. In their march the Spanish troops which were in the van of the army having notice of a French party of foot who were lying in a wood between the two lines, immediately beset the wood and took above 100 of them prisoners from two brigades of Luxemburg's army, among which were two captains and two lieutenants. Our heavy baggage was sent away the day before. The army was to march again the next day to pass the Scheldt. The Duke of Luxemburg was still at Lessines. The letters from the Hague say it was generally believed the Brandenburg forces would besiege Namur, whilst the King gave the French a considerable diversion on the other side. The Duke of Savoy has besieged Ambrun, and some letters say it is taken, but this needs confirmation [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 80.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for Andrew Jamin, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Benjamin Janson, to go to Harwich and Denmark; for John De la Place, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Henry Gautier, ditto; for Mrs. Desloire, and Francis Pressé, ditto; for Henry Schieking, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 339]; and for Salomon Persineau, ditto. [Ibid., p. 340.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Pass for the ship Patrick, of Galway, Henry Murphy, master, to go with her lading of Spanish wine, fruit, and salt (she having been taken on her homeward voyage and carried to Brest) to any port in Ireland; and for James Kenney, of Galway, merchant, owner of the said ship, to import her goods there, upon security given that nothing but the said cargo is imported, and not any of the goods of France, except necessary provision for the voyage. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 340.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord Chancellor. I have received a letter from Lord-Justice Coningsby, and yours of the 6th instant, wherein you mention Lord Meath's being removed from his regiment which I believe must be a mistake, at least I know nothing of it. I have spoken to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners about those you mention, whom they will take care of; but in the meantime they must be kept till the French shall comply with the articles in discharging some of ours, whose detention is the cause that the exchange of prisoners of war is, for the present, suspended. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 343.]
Aug. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant to Sir Charles Hedges, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty, to allow to Francis Minshall, and the rest of the owners of the English man-of-war, called the William and Mary, William Holman, commander, all the advantage from the capture of ships House of Gravestien, White Dove, a French privateer of eight guns, and other ships which the Admiralty have prayed might be condemned as a perquisite, in regard they were all taken after the commission to the said William Holman had been revoked; the said owners had prayed for the grant, in regard the two ships were taken so soon after the revocation of the said commission, and that in regard the said captain went out and fought the privateer, while she was cruising off Portland and Weymouth, where she had much disturbed and annoyed the coast. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 398.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, containing a release for three years to the Provost, Fellows, and Scholars of Trinity College, Dublin, of the sum of 247l. per annum, part of the quit and Crown rents, payable by them, because of the miserable state of the said college occasioned by the late wars in Ireland, which have ruined their buildings and wasted their lands. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 497.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Viscount Sydney and the Lords-Justices of Ireland, to give necessary orders to the Barons of the Exchequer in Ireland and others to allow to the Receiver-General of the revenues in Ireland 862l. 10d. upon his account by reason of the want of a fund for contingencies. [Ibid., p. 499.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting to William Robinson, esq., a yearly payment of 600l. in consideration of his services in payment of the army in Ireland under the paymaster-general there, until he be provided with some employment. [Ibid., p. 504.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. Their Majesties' forces sailed out of the Downs last Sunday early in the morning towards Ostend, where it is supposed they arrived yesterday, having had a very fair wind, and we are expecting to hear what enterprise will be employed from that side. The fleet by our last letters was still at St. Helen's because of the westerly winds which still continued. The Dutch post has just come in; letters by it confirm the surrender of Ambrun upon articles and say the Duke of Savoy was marching towards Gap. The King had passed the Scheldt and the Lys and was encamped last Thursday at Gramont, and the Duke of Luxemburg about Courtray. These letters speak as if Namur would be besieged, and some other places towards the sea coast. Seal. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 81.]
Aug. 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. William Warren, and William Powell, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Lysbet Claese, with her little son, ditto; for Margretha vanden Silver, with five children, ditto; for Mr. John Christoph Martini, and Mr. Frans Berent Worman, ditto; and for Abraham Conseille, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 341.]
Aug. 24.
On board the St. George in Lisbon River.
Sir John Jennings to The Right Hon. Henry Boyle. Lord Galway has sent me your letter, with an abstract of the orders Major General Wills has received, for proceeding, with the troops under his command to Barcelona, and concluding from thence that an attempt upon Cadiz is entirely given over for this year, as the Lord-High Admiral has sent me orders to return to Great Britain with three or four ships of my squadron, I presume I may now put them in execution, and have accordingly determined to sail hence the first of next month. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 427.]
Aug. 24.
Guernsey.
Capt. John Stephens, commander of an English privateer Guernsey, to —. I was chased by a St. Malo privateer, who forced me to weigh my anchor, and I outsailed him, and the next day, being Sunday, I spied four ships going along shore, and I made after them, and found two were French privateers. They tacked after me so I was forced to run from them and stood towards Capt. John Major, a privateer of Jersey, but he seeing they gave me chase made all the sail he could from me, but sometime after I spied a sail at sea whom I made to be Capt. Tupper of Guernsey, I made the signal to him and he answered me, and then being certain it was him, and knowing he would stay by me, I brought to, to stay for the French privateers, but they seeing there were two of us, made the best of their way to St. Malo. Capt. Major would not bear down till he saw the Frenchmen had gone. Describes the capture of a ship from New England that the French had taken off Ireland. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 347.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
Passes for Magdalen Longeuil, with her child, and Jane and Judith Valet, her two sisters, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Hermanus Hendricksen Quiter, with seven children, and one servant, ditto; for Sibrandt Actorff, ditto; for Jonathan Dupon, ditto; for Dennis Helder, to go to Holland and Sweden [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 342]; for Magdalena Widerick, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Catherina Van Isselveer, ditto; for Mr. James Kennedie, and Mr. John Cuthbert, ditto [Ibid., p. 343]; for Jane Maires, Jane McFarlin, Isabel Oliphant, Helen Irvin, Barbara McClartie, and five children, ditto [Ibid., p. 345.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord-Lieutenant. I have lately received, from the Lords-Justices of Ireland, seven bills under the Great Seal of that kingdom, which, having been considered by the Lords of the Committee, the Queen is pleased to approve of the five following, viz:—An Act for punishing officers and soldiers, who shall mutiny or desert the service. An Act for encouraging protestant strangers to settle in Ireland. An Act for better settling intestates' estates. An Act for exempting protestant subjects dissenting from the Church of Ireland, from the penalties of certain laws; and An Act for preventing frauds and perjuries. In the first bill for punishing mutineers or deserters, her Majesty would have that part of the preface left out, which relates to the necessity of a standing army, and I enclose that preface altered as she would have it passed, that you may cause this bill, thus amended, and the other four above mentioned, to be again transcribed and sealed in the usual form after the writs are issued for calling a Parliament. The Lords of the Committee, concurring with the Lords-Justices in their opinion that only one transmission of bills can be regularly made before the date of the writs, I also send two other bills which were sent on paper by the Lords-Justices, the first about the militia, in which you will perceive some amendments, and some queries and observations in the margin which you will consider. The second about an Act of Indemnity to which her Majesty would have such clauses added as shall be necessary for pardoning all such persons who are comprehended in any of the articles granted to the places which surrendered. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 343.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord-Lieutenant. I shall get the letter for the Commission of Enquiry signed to-morrow, and shall call for the report of the Treasury about transporting sheep to Ireland, and will give you an account on Saturday. The troops arrived at Ostend last Monday. [Ibid., p. 429.]
Aug. 25. Allowance of the bill of George Stepney, esq., their Majesties' Secretary, residing with the Elector of Brandenburg from the 30th of January, 1691–2, to the 30th of July, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 418.]
Aug. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland for the donation of the Bishopric of Kilmore to Alexander Carncrosse, late Archbishop of Glasgow, and for his investiture, confirmation, and restitution of temporalities. The said see being void by the deprivation of William Sheridan, the late Bishop, for not taking certain oaths. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 505.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. We expect the next letters from Flanders will bring the news that Namur is besieged, for the Brandenburg and other confederate forces were come within two leagues of the place, and they were sending cannon with great quantities of ammunition from Maestricht which could be designed for nothing but a siege. At the same time his Majesty will undertake something in Flanders towards the sea coast, but what it will be we do not yet know. The progress of the Duke of Savoy certainly occasions a great consternation in France, it is believed he will next attack Gap or Briancon; the latter is pretty strong. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 82.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Raimond Chapon, Isaac Gautier, and Peter L'Archer, three French protestant soldiers, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; for Michael Eyerer, ditto; for Maurits Clevestein, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 343]; for Abraham Williams, and Lion Vante, ditto; for Tobias Rezer, and Paul Henry Spiegel, ditto; for Johanna Dircks, ditto; for Jacob Polack, ditto; for Mary Blondel, ditto; for Henrietta Jansz, ditto [Ibid, p. 344]; for Mrs. Soares, and her daughter Esther Vein, and Moses Findanque, ditto; for Captain David Sutton, and Mr. Kearney, ditto; for Catherine Capion, ditto [Ibid., p. 345]; and for Joseph Crosse, an Italian, ditto. [Ibid., p. 346.]
Aug. 26.
Kensington.
Warrant by the Queen to the Lord-Lieutenant. Whereas several frauds and embezzlements have been committed in Ireland, chiefly by those entrusted with the stores of war and provisions, and with the forfeited goods, which have been seized or ought to have been seized, so that several of the said stores have not been answered, neither has there been any just account given of them; and it being thought necessary that this matter should be speedily and strictly examined into that we may recover what is thus detained, and that every guilty person may be prosecuted, you are to cause a commission to be issued, directed to three such persons as you shall judge best qualified for the execution of the same, authorising them to demand an account of the stores of war and provisions, and of all forfeited goods, and of those who have been concerned in receiving, issuing, keeping, or seizing the same, and to summon the said persons to bring or send in their papers and vouchers. Each commissioner is to be allowed 400l. a year for salary, and 300l. a year for a secretary, clerks, books, etc. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 345.]
Aug. 26.
Guernsey.
Capt. John Tupper, commander of the English privateer, Swallow, to —. We met eight great ships near St. Malo coming from thence. Three of them bore upon us, but seeing they could have no advantage, immediately joined their squadron. We saw thirteen great ships, and many small ones in St. Malo Roads. On the 19th instant I took a small fishing boat in the roads of Granville, which, after examination of the men, I set at liberty. They informed me that the Irish soldiers who were upon the coast were gone towards Rochelle. On the Sunday following I met three French capers giving chace to Capt. Major of Jersey and Capt. Stephens of this island. We have taken a ship from New England that had been taken by the French and brought her here. Copy. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 343.]
Aug. 27.
Kensington.
Commission for Dr. William Grimbalston to be physician-general to the forces going to the West Indies. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 287.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the proposals of Sir William Moor, and Capt. William Townshend for the better securing merchant ships homeward bound. The proposals show that a great number of merchant-men have been taken between Cape Clear and the Blasketts, which is the station where the French privateers cruise, to the great prejudice of most of the English homeward bound ships from the West Indies, etc., they usually "falling" between these two places. It is therefore proposed, if their Majesties' think fit, that two fifth-rate frigates, with about 420 men, should "guard and station" as above, and to be commanded by the undertakers, who will undertake to secure all merchant ships homeward-bound that fall in between the said places. And if any should be taken there, they will be obliged to make satisfaction for them, provided they are not taken while the undertakers' frigates are refitting, victualling, or careening. The undertakers will be obliged to pay one fourth part of the seamen so employed, at their own charge, and at any time to spare 50 or 100 seamen for the fleet. They will set out, at their own cost, a tender that may be of considerable service to their Majesties by cruising between Cape Clear and Kinsale. They offer likewise to pay their Majesties one tenth of their prizes, besides the tenth already reserved to the Admiralty, which tenth, with the Customs that will be saved and paid by this undertaking, they hope will be sufficient to answer the charge; and the rest of the prizes will be a proportionable recompense for their charge and hazard. Referred to the Admiralty, [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 375.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
Pass and post warrant for Stephen Gythens, a messenger, to go to Sheerness, and Flanders. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 345.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. This morning the Dutch mail of Friday came in, and brought the news of a sudden accident which had befallen the packet boat, which had on board the letters of Friday sennight; she was blown up at sea, and of 150 passengers only 40 were saved; these were taken up by an Ostend privateer. The letters from the King's camp are dated Monday last; it was still at Gramont, his Majesty having detached 10,000 foot, mostly English and Scots, under the command of Lieut.-Gen. Talmash, towards Bruges to join the forces who were expected at Ostend from England. The troops of Brandenburg still lie about Huy, and as yet had made no steps towards the siege of Namur. 500 men of the forces of Liege had defeated 1,000 French who were sent from Namur to cut wood for palisades, and had killed 300, and had taken 400 prisoners, among whom was the Prince D'Enrichemont, two other colonels, and about 25 other officers; of the "Liegers," who lay in ambush and surprised the French, there were but one killed. The letters from France say that the Duke of Savoy, since the taking of Ambrun, was marching to besiege Briançon. In Germany the armies continue in their former posts, but the Germans still talk of repassing the Rhine. The letters from Vienna bring an account of the death of "the Lord Ambassador Harbord," who died at Belgrade on the 11th instant after a sickness of six days. Our forces arrived at Ostend last Monday. There are letters from France which say there had been a fight between the Duke of Savoy's troops and the French, but they conceal the success which shows it was not favourable to them, especially since they own that the Duke of Savoy had afterwards besieged Briancon. Seal. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 83.]
Aug. 27.
Huy.
General Fleming to the King. He has received the King's orders as to the movement of troops under his command and has therefore marched to Huy, where they are now encamped with that town on their right, Neufville on their left, and the Meuse behind them. He hopes to receive the King's further orders and only begs that they may be given in time so that he can communicate them to his master the Elector, and that he can form his measures on them. Endorsed by the King "Lettre de Fleming." [S. P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 121.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dame Frances Dereham, widow of Sir Richard Dereham, knt., deceased. Shows that King Charles. II., in the 31st year of his reign, granted her husband the place of Comptroller of Kings Lynn in Norfolk for his life, Her husband going with the Duke of Albemarle to Jamaica assigned the said place to Sir Thomas Dereham for her and her children's use, and her said husband having lately died at Jamaica, the said place is now void. Prays to have it granted to some persons in trust for herself and three fatherless children, it being worth but 80l. per annum in time of peace, and of which 20l. a year is allowed to a Deputy. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 378.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Vice-President, etc., of the College of Physicians. The Queen would have you consider of a person proper to be apothecary to the forces which are going to the West Indies, and another to be his assistant, both to attend the service thither. She would also have you consider of the kinds and quantities of medicines which may be useful and necessary to be sent with them; in selection of these Dr. William Grimbalston, physician to the forces, is to be consulted. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 529.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I have received a letter from President De La Tour, wherein he tells me, that the assignment of 18,000l. which he understands by Sir Joseph Herne is already made, and the assignment of 18,000l. more to be made, are not sufficient for the entire payment of the ordinary subsidy and the augmentation given by the King for this year ending the 10th of October next. He desires me to represent this to you that the remaining part may not be left in arrear. [Ibid., p. 530.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Bartman to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; for Daniel Lieura, ditto; for Conrad Reichel, ditto; for John Hanneton, ditto; for John Vermeer, ditto; for Mary Van Somerer, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 346]; for Marc Le Royer, and Daniel Vauquet, recommended by Mons. Piozet, French minister, ditto; for Sir John Morgan, bart., Capt. James Jones, Capt. Roger Whitley, and their seven servants, ditto; for Mr. Trophime Roux, ditto [Ibid., p. 347]; and for Mons. de la Fouleresse, and John Fuch, Peter Bucholdt, and Nicholas Holst, his servants, to embark at any port, and pass over to Holland or Denmark. [Ibid., p. 353.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses incurred by Sir William Dutton Colt, Envoy Extraordinary from their Majesties to the Dukes of Brunswick and Luneburg, and to the Landgrave of Hesse Cassel from the 27th of February to the 28th May, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 401.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Order in Council for the preparation of a charter for the town of Nottingham. Seal of Privy Council. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 84.]
Aug. 29.
Ship Amsterdam in the Downs.
[Captain] C. Vander Zaan to Lord Nottingham. On going on board the ship of Rear-Admiral Shovel, found he was ashore. The captains say that the five ships of war under "us," destined for St. Helen's Bay, are to be victualled for three months, and go to the south. Awaits orders for her Majesty. Seals. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 196.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Futrell. Shows that he served Kings Charles I. and II. as a soldier for many years; being now very aged and not able to get his livelihood, he prays for the first place that falls vacant in Christ Church Hospital at Oxford. Granted upon the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 376.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles Dering, esq., AuditorGeneral. Shows that when the King was in Ireland he represented the necessity of having a house annexed to his office for the preservation of records, and his Majesty was pleased to grant him a forfeited house which happened to be let to one of the Commissioners of the Great Seal. There now being two houses on Ormond Quay, forfeited to their Majesties, he prays to have one of them at a moderate quit-rent. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Isaac Fernandez Dias, Isaac Motes Baruch, Isaac Nunes, and other Jews, late of Jamaica, merchants. Shows that they were inhabitants, for several years, of Jamaica, and by the earthquake which happened there on the 7th of June last, they have lost all they had. They pray to be made free denizens of England. Referred to the Lords of the Committee of Council for Trade and Foreign Plantation. [Ibid., p. 388.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Officers of the Ordnance. The Queen desires you to exchange the match-locks and pikes of Col. Foulkes' and Col. Hales' regiment for firelocks. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 530.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir William Stephens. I have acquainted the Queen with your letter of the 27th instant, who desires you will take great care to prevent the deserting of the soldiers and their escaping from the Isle of Wight in any boat which may go from thence. [Ibid.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen would have you send some fireships to Sir Cloudesley Shovell, in place of the Hawk and Cygnet, which two ships you are to recall as soon as possible. [Ibid., p. 531.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Having laid before the Queen, the enclosed [not entered] letter from the Lords-Justices of Ireland, addressed to me on behalf of the clergy of that kingdom, she desires you to consider it and report your opinion what is best to be done for their relief. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 538.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. William Spencer, John Chambers, and William Savage, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 347]; for Hendrina, and Johanna Van Kerper, sisters, with Lysbet Rechorst, a young girl, ditto; and for Lieut.-Col. Redmond Morris and Richard Butler, his servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 348.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord-Lieutenant. I send you the Queen's letter for passing a Commission of Enquiry, and likewise an extract from some papers laid before the Queen by the Commissioners of the Admiralty about difficulties which the officers of the Navy met with at Cork in weighing the Swallow, recovering the Breda's anchors and cables, and transporting timber; and having represented the necessity of expedition in these services, her Majesty would, have you to be assisting the officers herein. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 348.] Enclosure.—The officers of their Majesty's Navy at Kinsale, having made preparation, and got all things in readiness for weighing the Swallow in that port, they went to Cork to hire vessels for that purpose, wherein they had the friendship of the collector and merchants, but could not, however, procure any vessel, but on such extravagant terms as they could not comply with. They therefore desire to have the assistance of the government in impressing (pursuant to their warrant from the Navy Board) and taking up vessels as are wanting for the said service, they paying a reasonable rate for the same, as they are empowered to do by the Navy Board; otherwise winter will come, and they will not be able to effect the said work this season. The Breda's anchors and cables in Cork Haven are in danger of being lost for want of a vessel to assist the Clerk of the Cheque to recover them. The Purveyors likewise in that part of Ireland meet with several difficulties in providing transportation for the timber provided by them in those parts for the Navy, which is no small inconvenience to the service at this time, when that commodity is so exceedingly wanted at several yards to carry on the works. [Ibid.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill for a new charter to the Mayor and Burgesses of Nottingham. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 402.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill containing a grant to John, Viscount Fitzharding, of the office of the keeper of the Pall Mall in St. James's Park, and of the house there called the Mall House, and of the little garden belonging. [Ibid., p. 405.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. By an officer who came hither yesterday from Ostend we had letters dated at that place on the 26th instant, which tell us, that the forces arrived there on Monday the 22nd, and were all landed the next day, and went to encamp at Marieburg, about 4 English miles from Ostend towards Niewport, where they were joined by the detachment which was sent from the King's army under the command of Lieut.-Gen. Talmash. On the 24th, at night, the Earl of Portland came to Ostend where he had a conference with the Duke of Leinster, Lieut.-Gen. Talmash, and the other general officers, who after this returned to their forces, which marched on towards Niewport and four of our regiments had possessed themselves of Furnes, a town between Niewport and Dunkirk, which looks as if his Majesty's design was upon this last place. The fleet still continues at St. Helen's; 26 French men-of-war were seen last week not far from Ushant. They stood to the southward and are supposed to be designed to the Straits. By a vessel which came to Plymouth from Kinsale, we hear that 12 English merchantmen were arrived there under convoy of two men-of-war. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 85.]
Aug. 30.
Huy.
General Flemming to the King. He has received the King's letter with commands which he will carry out. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest, 13, No. 122.]
Aug. 30.
London.
[Lord Godolphin] to the King. We shall make a shift to carry on the payment of the subsistence for one week more, without making use of the clause of credit in the Poll Act, which Act will not raise above 600,000l., so there will remain a credit upon it for 740,000l. more, which we must endeavour to borrow as we can, for it is the only fund that remains for all the services of the public till the Parliament comes to grant new ones. In order to have a loan from the City on this fund, the Queen has appointed the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to attend her this afternoon at the Cabinet Council and I hope it will have the effect we desire. I am sure without it, we cannot go on above a week longer.
I believe Mr. Harbord's death will occasion you a good deal of trouble about his three places as they are called here, though in reality they are but two, and those not of very considerable advantage, for I reckon the place of Vice-Treasurer of Ireland was but as a pension to him, the executive part of it being in Lord Coningsby and Mr. Fox. So that I hope your Majesty will make use of the opportunity now in your hands of saving the 1,000l. a year payable to Mr. Harbord for his life; you will find, but too soon, that saving is no more than necessary both in Ireland and England.
The other two places he had were Surveyor-General of the Crown Lands and Auditor of the Duchy of Cornwall, the latter of these is 200l. a year salary and of very little other advantage besides that; I think the Queen has a design upon it for one of her own servants, and I must own I think it is as proper as any thing she is like to find for him. If it be left to the Treasury, we are bound up by a minute entered in our books upon a former occasion of this nature to dispose of it in favour of Mr. Shaw who was formerly a servant of Lord Rochester. The office of Surveyor of the Lands is a place of great trust, and not now of any great advantage other than what may be made by the abuse of that trust to the prejudice of the Crown. It will concern you to give it to a man of probity, and it will concern the Treasury that he also be a man of capacity. The Surveyor-General being a kind of Privy Councillor to that Board, has admittance there upon all occasions, just as the Auditor of the Exchequer has, and those two officers with the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the Treasury is not in Commission, ought always to be present and assist the Lord Treasurer with their opinion on all matters relating to their several employments. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 123.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lady Frances O'Neile, and her four daughters. Shows that by her marriage with Sir Neile O'Neile it was agreed with her father to settle on her 400l. per annum, 200l. for her jointure to commence from her husband's death, and 200l. per annum more upon some other lands after the death of his mother and grandmother who were then both alive, but who soon after died. The said Sir Neile O'Neile is now outlawed, all his estate in Ireland is seized to their Majesties' hands, and Lady O'Neile therefore prays to have the examination of the right to her jointure, and of the portions of her said daughters, referred to some counsel learned in the law in Ireland. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 377.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Officers of the Ordnance. The Queen having thought fit to employ Capt. Thomas Phillips upon a particular service, which requires dispatch, would have you forthwith state his accounts, he being ordered to go away immediately. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 531.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. You will herewith receive a commission appointing Lord Paget to be Ambassador to the Grand Seignior, with the Queen's warrant for affixing the Great Seal to it. [Ibid.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to insert the following in the establishment for the forces designed for the West Indies:—the Commissary 300l.; his two clerks, both together, 100l.; the physician 500l.; the apothecary 100l.; and his assistant 60l, all per annum. [Ibid., p. 537.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The names of the officers of Col. Hales' regiment, who refuse to go to the West Indies, as the lieutenantcolonel and major inform me, are captains James Wood, Robert Fisher, and Edmund Hales; lieutenants Thomas Ogle, and John Chichester; and ensigns John Ogle, John Wood, and — Jackson. [Ibid.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
Passes for Casparus Gottfriedt Ochmichen, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for David Creisseil, ditto; for Gaspard Cardozo, ditto; for Jacob Dupri, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 347]; for Nicholas Le Sauvage, ditto; for John Kylewers, and his wife, ditto; for Peter Hardy, ditto [Ibid., p. 348]; for Mr. Jacob Thelluson, ditto; for Nathan and Salomon Michielsz, two brothers, and David Alvringe, with their wives, and four children, ditto; for William Rosierus, ditto; for Dirck Van Ameren, ditto; for Giles Robeson, ditto; for Gerit Aderyansen Reyders, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 349]; and for Marc Anthony Pigout and James De Havilland, ditto. [Ibid., p. 351.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of William, Lord Paget, EnvoyExtraordinary to the Emperor of Germany from the 6th of December, 1691, to the 2nd of September, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 404.]
Aug. 31. Warrant to allow to James Hamilton, of Tallmore, esq., 400l. 4s. 1d. collected from the receivers, collectors or others answerable for the King's revenue and from private persons for the use of the Association in Ulster in 1688. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 508.]
Aug. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland, granting to Col. William Wolseley the office of Master of the Ordnance in Ireland, void by the death of William, Viscount Mountjoy. [Ibid., p. 513.]
Aug.—
Whitehall.
Passes for Lewis Gouzil, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 326, p. 334]; and for Mrs. De Grosmenil, and Mrs. De Neuville, ditto. [Ibid., p. 335.]
[Aug.] A list of the officers killed and wounded at the battle of Steinkirk:—
Killed:—Lord Mountjoy and the Earl of Angus.
Taken prisoners:—Lieut.-Gen. MacKay, Sir Robert Douglas, Col. Hodges, Col. Lowder (sic), Col. Bloom, adjutant-general to the Danes, Col. Hawley and Capt. Jackson, of Fitzharding's regiment, Col. Foxton, of the Prince of Hesse's regiment, Colonels Warcup, Bristow, Calthorpe, and Hamilton of the 1st battalion of Guards, Capt. Waray, Ensign Poyke, Ensign Gunter, Ensign Ironside, Lieut. Roney, Lieut. Herluington (?) and Capt. Stroud, Brigadier Wells, of the Horse Guards, Colonels Goes, Moore, Audrey, and Alva, all Dutch, Capt. Delayer of Galway's regiment, Major Kerke and Capt. Kygo, of O'Farrell's regiment, Capt. Mackenzy, Capt. Sharpe, Lieut. Kay and Lieut. Griffith also of O'Farrell's regiment; Captains Davers, Hamilton, Horbane, and Lowther; Lieut. Graves, Lieut. Weyers, Lieutenants Earle, McDaniel (?) and Lock in Fitzpatrick's regiment, Ensign Beaufew, Ensign Lushren, Lieut.-Col. Wictenbr' (sic), Capt. Poole and Capt. Hobush in Eppinger's regiment; and Lieut.-Col. Savile in Trelawny's regiment.
Wounded:—Lieut.-Gen. Tetteau, Sir John Lanier (since dead), Major-Gen. Stracke of the Danes, Lord Cutts, the Prince of Hainault, Col. Cholmondly of the Horse Guards, Major Fox of Fitzpatrick's regiment, Capt. Bedford of Fitzharding's regiment, Capt. Elliot of the Earl of Bath's regiment, Capt. Sterling, Lieut.-Col. Macay, Col. Sir Charles Graham, Capt. Stanley. Capt. Musgrave, Capt. Wildebeare, Ensign Harris, Ensign Deaton, Lieut. John Greenvill, and Lieut. Thomas Greenvill of the Earl of Bath's regiment, Lieut. Morton, of O'Farrell's regiment, Capt. Peachy and Captain Bringfield of the Horse Guards, Capt. Jordan, Capt. Hosier, of Epinger's Dragoons, and Col. Eaden of the Guards. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 86.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Across the address is written "gone to Cobham Hall."