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William and Mary: July 1692

Pages 344-393

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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July 1692

July 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Josue Adam Desloire, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Capt. Francis Despierre Darenne was late captain, in Henry, Viscount Galway's regiment of horse [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 281]; for George Moncroft, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Dudley Van Brook in Col. William Beveridge's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 282]; for John Bressac, gent., to be a reformed cornet in Viscount Galway's regiment of horse [Ibid., p. 283]; and for Richard Hodgkin, gent., to be ensign to Lieut–Col. Robert Goodwyn's company in Col. John Hales' regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 284.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Blackford. Shows that he was a lieutenant in Sir Thomas Newcombe's regiment in Ireland, and upon the Revolution was turned out of commission, and could never get any since; being found at a woman's lodgings where clippings were also found, he is since found guilty of high treason for the same. Prays for a pardon. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 333.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney General concerning the "Corporation of Pitch and Tar." The Report is as follows:— In obedience to your Majesty's commands, I have considered the matter of the petition annexed whereby the petitioners pray that they may be incorporated in order to the carrying on an undertaking for the making of pitch and tar out of ordinary pitch coal and sea coal, which, as they allege, is a thing that has not been practised in England unless by themselves.
That which they insist upon as the ground of their desiring to be incorporated is, that the stock requisite for the effectual carrying on an undertaking in England of this nature, so as to supply the kingdom with sufficient quantities of these commodities, must be so great, that the same is not to be raised unless upon the establishment of a corporation. Because if such an undertaking should be carried on only by articles of partnership, the stock will be liable to the particular and private debts of the several partners, and subject to be torn in pieces upon the bankruptcy of any of them. The petitioners offer as a further motive to you to grant them a charter of incorporation, to be obliged annually to make and deliver into your stores for your use 100 last of pitch, and 100 last of tar at such rates as your officers of the Ordnance shall, from time to time, think reasonable.
An undertaking to supply the kingdom with sufficient quantities of pitch and tar within itself seems to deserve your encouragement, and in case you shall incorporate the petitioners, you may prevent any abuse which may be made of your favour, by directing such clauses to be inserted in the charter as may determine the same, in case the undertaking be not effectually carried on, or should be prejudicial to the public in any practise of it.
Referred to the Admiralty, with direction to make trial of the pitch and tar mentioned therein. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 334.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Nailor, Thomas Roughley, and David Potter, on behalf of themselves and others, dissenting protestants of Lancashire. Shows that for divers years past they met together peaceably at a place called St. Helens, in the said county, and upon publication of the Act for exempting some protestants from the penalties of certain laws, they certified to the Justices in the Quarter Sessions the place of their meeting as the said Act requires; but the clerk, having omitted to record the same, undue advantage has been taken against them as offenders against the said Act of Parliament, which tends to their ruin. They pray for some relief for what they have already suffered, and an order to prevent the like for time to come. Referred to Lord Willoughby, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. [Ibid., p. 359.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to give order to Capt. Bembo (sic) to go to Portsmouth, and embark with the Duke of Leinster, upon the present expedition. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 495.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Wilshaw. I am told by the Admiralty that the Merlin yacht is now ready at Portsmouth, by which you may send the enclosed packet to Mr. Russell, with orders to fling it overboard in case of necessity. If the Merlin is not there, I desire you will send it by the first safe conveyance with the like instructions. [Ibid.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Passes and post–warrants for Mary Tovart to go to Harwich and Holland; for Francis Le Fevre, ditto; for Isaac Voyer, ditto; for Hermanns Verboom, ditto; for Simon John Swartz and John Haacks, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 277]; for Louis Cole to go to Harwich and Denmark; for John Pauli Cirusano to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Keyser, ditto; for John Henry Garman and Henning Sax, his servant, John Mollenfort and Henry Kos, ditto; for Capt. Samuel Atkinson and his attendants with posthorses, etc., to go to Portsmouth, and ports and piaces there adjacent [Ibid., p. 278]; for Hendrino Lucretia Dullers to go to Harwich and Holland; for Marguaritta Tilleman, ditto; for Ester Hemskerke and Petronella De Vos to go to Harwich and Flanders; for Isaac Van Nimwegen to go to Harwich and Holland; for Adrian Riedtveldt and Adrian Pietersen, ditto [Ibid., p. 279]; for Charles Pinon and Margarita, his wife, and one child, ditto; for Abraham Petit–Maitre, ditto; for Ciprien L'Abbadie, ditto; for Catherine Chenebier, ditto; for Joseph Sauvage, Mary, his wife, and Girard, Peter, and Margaret their three children, ditto, recommended by Mons. Piozet, French minister; for Sir James Hayes, bart., to go to Harwich and Flanders [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 280]; for Anthony Menanteau and Magdalen, his wife, to go to Holland; for Sir Henry Bellasis and three servants, to go to Portsmouth; for Richard Hopkins, the messenger, to go to Rochester [Ibid., p. 281]; for Henry Allen, the messenger, sent on their Majesties' special service, to go to Portsmouth and to and from any other place, whither he shall be sent by Sir Henry Bellasis; and a similar pass for Stephen Githins and Thomas Newlin. [Ibid., p. 283.]
July 1.
Camp at Ham.
Memorandum giving information about the citadel of Namur, and the movements of the Duke Luxemburg and of Marshal Boufflers. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 103.]
July 1. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. There being a difficulty in passing a grant of the late King's private estate in Ireland as your Majesty designed at your going away, I am desired to represent to you, that great part of those lands being settled as a security for the payment of 1,000l. a year to Mrs. Godfrey, and of 2,000l. a year to the Lady Bellasis for their respective lives, the shortest and most effectual way of doing what you seemed to intend will be, to make a grant under the great seal of Ireland of the reversion of those lands settled for the payments above–named to Mrs. Godfrey and the Lady Bellasis, and the immediate possession of the remainder of the late King's said private estate to such persons as you shall there think fit to appoint in trust for those who you design shall have the benefit of the said grant, and if it should be your pleasure to have this done in the manner here mentioned, you will please to command that a letter be dispatched from the Treasury for you to sign to the Lords Justices or Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland accordingly. I shall not trouble you with adding anything here to the subject of my letter by the last post, but humbly expect your favourable answer. [Ibid., No. 104].
July 1. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Warre. I have examined the case of the ship Hope, Hans Bergesen, master, and she is really a Sweedish ship. Touching the four ships mentioned in Mons. Scheel's memorial here enclosed, one called the St. John, Claus Johnson, master, claimed by Mons. Ravenclaw, appeared to belong to Gluckstadt and began her voyage to France from Altena, and so was condemned on the 7th of June last. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 385]. Enclosing the memorial referred to. [Ibid., p. 389.]
July 18.
On board the Albemarle at sea.
Sir Francis Wheeler to the Earl of Nottingham. Admiral Russell having told me that his Majesty had done me the honour to desire me to command the West India Squadron, and having had some discourse with the Admiral on the whole affair, he commanded me to put my proposals in writing, and to transmit them to you, among which I particularly recommend to your consideration the 1st, 2nd, 9th, and 17th articles. The 1st is on a point of honour which I hope you will intercede on my behalf to his Majesty, to grant in consideration of the number of ships I am to command and the difficulties I am to undergo in that country. The 2nd is a thing so hard that if I must go I would rather be in a fifth–rate in the same squadron than to command on those terms. And to the 9th and 17th, without care be taken as I propose, no service can be done, and hundreds of men will be lost, and the ships, for ought I know, will be so weak that they will not be able to stand any shock. I insist so much on the 9th to you, because, when I was going out in the winter, I could by no means get the Navy Board to consent to anything of the kind, and it is of that consequence, as all the seamen can assure you, that if we have victory over the enemy, and no supply of masts to refit us, the sea will be theirs, because they never want such things in a plentiful manner. I humbly beg this favour of you that if these four articles cannot be granted that you will move his Majesty, that I desire to be excused and make room for a better man because I am sure I shall not be able to serve him as I would. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 393.] Enclosing:—
(1.) Proposals offered by Sir Francis Wheeler, upon his going to command the West India Squadron.
First. That his Majesty will give me a commission as RearAdmiral and Commander–in–chief of the West India Squadron, and to wear the Union Flag at the mizzen–top–mast–head from the date of my commission, and to strike it in the presence of all the Channel flags, without which this command will rather prove a prejudice than advantage; for if one serves, in effect, but as a private captain, it is much better to serve in the Channel, than in a place so remote to our climate, and northern constitutions, attended with infinite difficulty of diseases and wants.
Second. That I may be made wholly independent of the Governors of any of the Plantations, and their Councils of War; that my instructions may positively tell me my charge, and let my life answer my behaviour; such instructions being much more binding to oblige me to study union with the Governors and consult their interest; whereas, otherwise, let them and their Councils of War direct me to do anything in my business be it never so improper. I have nothing to do but obey. Besides it looks as if his Majesty had very little opinion of me, not to let me command in my own business, rather than Planters who will only consult their own interest and pride, without consideration of the ships and seamen of England. Marked "Agreed."
Third. That the substance of my instructions should be, in general, to defend and protect to the greatest extremity, all the Plantations, merchant ships, and all manner of commerce, and when these will permit in concert with the Governors and General of the soldiers with our joint strength to make what attacks and depredations on the enemy's Plantations we are able. Marked "To be in the end of instructions generally, so as not to hinder the particular services which he shall be ordered."
Fourth. That since the public affair must be carried on in Council, I may, as Capt. Wright did, continue the post of Councillor in all the Plantations where I go, taking place next the Governor, to be there when I shall think fit, not only to consult our warlike affairs, but to enable me to give his Majesty a state of those countries when I come home. Marked "Agreed."
Fifth. That in any expedition, when the army is landed on the enemy's coast, and I shall think fit to go ashore, I may have place and command next the General. Marked "Agreed."
Sixth. That Barbadoes, and by no means the Leeward Islands, may be my head quarters, place of residence, and the placing of stores for the following reasons:—(1) That it having six times the strength of all the Leeward Islands, and lying to windward, we can, in three days, sail down to succour them whenever there shall be occasion; on the contrary, if the Barbadoes should be attacked from Europe, to save our souls, we cannot ply up in three weeks or a month. (2) Barbadoes being the place from whence most of our sugar comes, and where all our fleets of merchantmen from England first arrive, we ought to be there to ply to windward in the latitude of the island to prevent the enemy waylaying our convoy, as they had like to have done five months ago. (3) It being to windward of the enemy's islands, lies most fit for us to set out upon any expedition. Lastly, that the Mole at Barbadoes is now in that condition that fourth–rate ships are carried in it, and the Leeward Isles afford nothing of that kind, nor upon any extremity have they any provisions or naval stores to be bought or any fresh victuals to be had for love or money, and, except at St. Christopher's and Montsserat, no water to be had but what is saved in cisterns in time of rain, which will never agree with Englishmen, but above all, the country is so sickly to new comers that it kills all the poor seamen. Marked "Agreed."
Seventh. That since I shall be obliged in July and August, the usual time of hurricanes, to put to sea with the ships, to change the latitude at least ten degrees, I desire that leave may be given me to go to New England, it being commonly not above 24 days' sail, by which means, in going into such a northern climate, it will put our ships companies in good health, supply ourselves if there be occasion, with all manner of provisions, cheaper than in England, furnish our ships with masts, yards, plank, pitch, tar, deals, etc., at half the price they cost in England, and, if there be a necessity, dock any of the ships; and besides all this bring away 200 men to supply the squadron, and this voyage will be performed, so as to be at our station in two months, and withal give some sort of protection to the commerce between that country and the Islands, a thing of no small conveniency to the planters.
Eighth. That a set of careening gear may be sent with us, a plentiful stock of pitch, tar, oakum, tallow, etc., to enable me to careen the ships as often as I shall think fit; it being certain that nothing will contribute more to disturb the enemy's commerce, and secure the bottoms of the ships which lie so subject to worms; and to enable me to do this work, that there may be sent with me a mastercaulker, and eight or ten other able ones, as was done in the Straits in all the Barbary wars, and that I may have liberty to procure an old ship for a hulk.
Ninth. That the Navy Board should immediately contract, and send away a proper ship to New England, to load with masts, yards, etc., to come from thence to Barbadoes, nothing of that kind being to be had there for money, let the extremity of weather and battle be never so much. Letters from the Governors of Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands will tell what great want has been in Capt. Wright's squadron and since; and that this work may be done with the greater safety, that the ship may go out with me, and that I may see her safely out of the Channel.
Tenth. That I may have power to hold Courts–martial, with the placing and displacing of officers, and appointing a judge–advocate, and a marshal, as usual. Marked "Agreed." And that all victuals and stores, naval as well as ordnance, may be consigned to me as usual. Marked "Muster–master to be appointed and Fotherby at the musters."
Eleventh. That a vessel, with two mortars to throw bombs at a great distance, may be sent out with me, the French being provided with the same.
Twelfth. That two sloops may be framed in England, and sent with me "to be employed, a turtling for the sick men or otherwise."
Thirteenth. That I may have liberty, from time to time, to appoint the ships which go to Jamaica, or elsewhere, that shall be ordered out of my squadron; and that I may have liberty, as there shall be occasion, to send home such ships, as convoys, as I shall think fit, with the respective fleets of merchantmen.
Fourteenth. That an able master may be appointed with instructions, who I may employ as storekeeper, and to keep various things. Marked " Supra on the 10th."
Fifteenth. Upon the ships going out, that all the money or bills that are paid by the victuallers to supply the drink which is not carried out in specie, for their eight months indent may be put into my hands, to be paid, from time to time, to the pursers, least they should die, and the men be cheated, as is very often done.
Sixteenth. That a large quantity of bedding and slops be sent out by every ship, and a double proportion of necessaries to each ship, and that the sugar be only for six weeks, and that the remaining part of the sugar money may be laid out in other proportions, and I will supply them with sugar in the country; and that the victuallers send necessary money to buy wood and candles at such time as they send us supplies of victuals. That the Commissioners of Victualling confer with me how the men are to be supplied with drink at such time as we revictual in the West Indies. Marked "Victuallers to attend."
Seventeenth. In consideration that, for the time past such sickness and mortality has attended the King's ships, as has rendered them almost unable to sail, to the great disheartening of all the seamen of England, I propose that the greatest care imaginable may be taken of hospitals, so that all the sick men may, from time to time, be put ashore, that they may get their health, and to prevent the rest from falling into the same distempers, for want of which, in those hot countries, common fevers turn almost to the plague, to that degree, that half the seamen who went out in Capt. Wright's fleet, never returned, 40 or 50men in a ship, lying constantly sick, and sometimes 10 or 12 from each ship thrown overboard in a day. My opinion is, that such a large sum of contingent money may be sent by me, that I may hire a convenient house, and convert it into a hospital, to hold at least 250 men, with surgeons, nurses, cooks, etc., and that I may have 500 bundles of bedding with two pairs of sheets to each. And that a physician may be sent out with an apothecary and a large quantity of the best drugs, and store of necessaries of rice, fruit, etc., as is usual for that purpose. To compute the sum of money necessary for this service I reckon upon the fourth and fifth man in each ship being always sick.
The King pays 12d. a day for each man in the Channel [fleet] to the house that receives him, and it is impossible, in those countries where fresh victuals are above three times the price, that it can be done under 18d., so deducting 6d. for his sea victuals, which may be sold or trucked, and casting for the whole time, that his Majesty intends the ships shall stay abroad, one may come to know the sum. And besides the above–mentioned sum there will be absolutely wanting another stock for other uses, which often will be requisite for stores and victuals when the King's is expended. As for credit, it must be depended on to meet with none; and if any, by chance, it must be at 30 per cent. profit, for such exaction is common in those countries. Compute the numbers of poor men who have been lost in those countries, for want of this necessary care, together with the danger of losing the ships, for want of strength, and the bills that have come home from the Governors and Commanders, and it will, I presume, be thought I am in the right.
Eighteenth. That since it is absolutely necessary that we should be masters of the sea, both to defend our own, and annoy the enemy, I conceive, according to our way, that it is hardly possible, because our preparations are always so public that the enemy form their strength accordingly so that we must fight with great odds. To prevent which, I propose, that some of our fourth–rate ships may be always kept sheathed, which makes them more fit for all southern convoys. And then it is easy to steal away with three or four ships without any manner of notice till they arrive at Barbadoes, taking care that the commanders go with orders sealed up to be opened in such a latitude, in the presence of all his officers, and such a project I could wish was done this winter after the squadron has gone; for their West India Plantations being so dear to them, there is no manner of question but they, the enemy, will strain a point to send out a stronger squadron than we, though it be to come home in the Spring.
Lastly. That the "Rupert," an old and rotten ship, very unfit for a foreign voyage, be in the Channel near the yards; to be mended and patched, is much more fit for her; and I think the "Resolution," a much better ship for that voyage, and, I believe, wants very little repairs, and if she is cleaned her sheathing will only take up three days more. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 397.]
(2.) Proposals offered by Sir Francis Wheeler, touching the land forces which are to go to the West Indies.
First. That, in my opinion, the officer who goes out of England to command the soldiers may have his Majesty's commission to be Major–general and Commander–in–chief of the land forces in pay and if any regiments or forces of the country militia are raised to join the army upon any expedition, that then the Major–general, as soon as they are embarked, shall positively command in chief with martial law.
Second. That the office of Commander–in–chief of the soldiers, in succession on occasion of death, may be appointed by his Majesty before they go out of England, and not left to the Governors.
Third. That the gentleman who commands the country militia may be a general officer; the militia from all the islands is to make one brigade.
Fourth. That though in all the islands of his Majesty's, where his forces in pay are landed, the respective Governors must command, that the particular command of the soldiers may be in the MajorGeneral, and the disposing of all offices.
Fifth. That the King's revenue in all the Plantations may be applied to go in part to pay the soldiers.
Sixth. That the soldiers may go over in merchantmen and not in the men–of–war, pestering the ships in that hot voyage, having been the occasion of the death of so many good men, and that every soldier may have his bed, and care taken of him in his voyage in point of medicines.
Seventh. That when upon any expedition it shall please God to give us success, the whole booty of negroes, cattle, horses, copper, sugar, indigo, ginger, cotton, etc., may be divided, in kind, in open field amongst the army before they embark, whether soldiers, seamen aboard and ashore, or planters; it being to be understood that the latter go upon no purchase no pay, and the seamen serve out of their business; and such a small reward cannot but be necessary to the officers and soldiers, that go so far to seek their graves, and taking notice how little ready money they will receive in that dear country. The same thing was done by the victorious Sir Christopher Mings, and Sir John Harman, as Sir Cloudesley Shovell can inform, to the great encouragement of both seamen, soldiers, and planters. And besides taking notice that his Majesty can never be the better for those things; the chief officers embezzle them, and cheat both King, army, and fleet; as witness the other day at St. Christopher's, where that great booty fell into the General's hands, and both soldiers, seamen, and planters were cozened of it all, to the greatest dissatisfaction imaginable. And for the better regulating these dividends, that his Majesty will please, under his hand, to say what proportion the General, Admiral, other general officers, field officers, captains, both by sea and land, and other officers shall have. And that the General Council of War cause the distribution to be made accordingly, and let the men do what they please with it; for it is usual in such cases for merchants to follow the fleet and buy the booty. The publication of this order, and the just distribution, will cause multitudes of the planters to go on these expeditions. Marked: "Sir Cloudesley Shovell to give answer how formerly distributed.
Eighth. That especial care may be taken about hospitals for the soldiers, after some such manner as I have proposed for the seamen. And considering the great charge his Majesty is at to carry over recruits, besides the charity to save so many men's lives, the expense of doctors, surgeons, etc., will be more than four times over–paid, by looking after the men at their "seasonings." And indeed unless the country grows healthier, or more care be taken than has been already, it is but carrying over so many poor seamen and soldiers to be buried. At such time as there is no expedition on foot, I believe Barbadoes, in respect of health, is the best place for the body of soldiers to quarter at. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 407.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Earl of Macclesfield. Shows that he is informed that in Wales there are some symptoms of lead and other ore, not royal, in the several parishes of Llanelltyd, Dolgelly, Llanvachreth, Llanaber, and Llanediveyney [Llanedwen ?] and that there are several "meeres or ponds," upon the mountainous part of the said parishes, all upon their Majesties' wastes there. Prays for a lease or grant of the said meres or ponds and soil thereof, and of all mines and quarries, other than royal mines, within all the wastes and commons of the said several parishes, at such rent and reservation as it shall be thought fit, reserving their Majesties' tenants' rights. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 358.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief–Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of John Law, esq., with two sureties, that he appears the first day of the next term, at the King's Bench. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 496.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen would have you permit the prisoners at the Tower, to dine together, when they shall desire it. [Ibid.]
July 2. Passes for Captain de Milerie, and his wife, to go to Harwich; [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 280]; for Mr. John Daniels to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Bessen, ditto; for Simon Jenter Bitterman ditto, [Ibid., p. 281]; for Christina Jansz, with her six children, the eldest 16 years old, to go to some port not specified; for Govert Van Vleit, and Cornelis Van Vleit, with Catherina his wife, and a little child, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Hadgick Martin, and his son, two Armenians, ditto; for Don Antonio Nicolaeta and Louis Le Vean, his servant, to go to Harwich and Flanders; for Mr. Emanuel Felbier to go to Harwich and Flanders [Ibid., p. 282.]; for Leonardo Fellinger to go to Harwich and Holland; for Willemina Plunckett, and Sara, her daughter, ditto; and for Margriete Eyffland, and her little daughter, and Johanna Wynants, ditto. [Ibid., p. 283.]
July 2.
Namur.
Memorandum stating that Namur has been taken and that the enemy are now leaving the town; gives information about the French troops. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 105.]
July 2.
Namur.
Information as to the movements for the French troops. [Ibid., No. 106].
July 2. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I beg leave to trouble your Majesty with a proposal Dr. Davenant has made me to bring himself into your service. If you have no engagement or promise which stands in the way of what he desires, I think it may be a very easy way of gratifying a man that has both inclination and ability of being very useful to your service.
Mr. Ashmole is Comptroller of the Excise by patent for his life; he is old and infirm, and yet has been unwilling always hitherto to resign his place to several who would have treated with him for it, but being wholly strangers to the business of that office, he was not inclined to treat with them. He seems very desirous now to agree with Dr. Davenant for it, because he thinks the service would not suffer in his hands, so that unless you are under some former engagement for it, as in the case of Col. Birch, I see no reason why you should not like of this expedient of putting in a good officer to control the Accounts of the Revenue of the Excise, who has a great many notions in his head for the improving of it. I confess I would willingly have him encouraged to prepare a digest into a method of being made practicable against the meeting of the Parliament. He has likewise a very good scheme of a general excise, which I would have him review and alter in some particulars, especially that relating to the Malt.
Hoping you will give me leave to go to Tunbridge Waters about eight or ten days hence, I intend leaving directions with him and Mr. Parry to prepare a paper of what may be fit to be proposed to the Parliament to be laid upon the Malt, when the present duty of double Excise expires, and to let me have it on my return. It will not be sufficient that the Parliament provide for the charge of next year by remote funds as they did for the last year, but it will be absolutely necessary that the funds be such as will bring in a constant supply of weekly money, to put an end to the grievances and extravagant trade of buying of Tallies, and to prevent it being entailed for ever upon the nation. In order to this, I also intend to direct the officers of the Customs to see what further impositions may be laid upon the trade by altering the present rates and duty paid at the Customs House, that by this means and by excises upon several commodities, the greatest part of next year's charges may be provided for without taxing the land for more than will be requisite to give an immediate credit for carrying on the service till these excises and impositions shall come to bring in money weekly. Nothing of this kind is likely to have a good effect unless it be well thought of and digested beforehand, and both the measures and persons agreed upon that must carry it on in the House of Commons; and upon this occasion I am afraid you will find Mr. Jephson's lose is irreparable.
Pursuant to what I wrote you in my last we have concluded with Sir Joseph Hearne and by this packet my Lord Sydney will receive a bill of Exchange for 10,000l. sterling, payable at sight in Genoa and Leghorn to his orders, as you shall direct him, and we shall continue to send him constantly bills for 5,000l. a week, every week, till the whole sum be completed for the first payment to the Emperor, etc. We chose to send the bills to my Lord Sydney because he has opportunity of taking your direction how to dispose of them every week as there may be occasion.
Since you went away we have sent into Ireland, at three several times, 72,000l., and next week we hope to add as much more as will make it up to a full 100,000l. The last letters from there give us expectations of hearing some good news from Athlone very speedily.
In a former letter I have humbly acquainted you that we found the present Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer very peevish and uneasy in all occasions relating to your revenue, and there is one depending at this time wherein his ill humour may prove of the last prejudice, if some care be not taken to prevent it.
The Bankers, who have a great debt owing from the Crown upon their patent for a perpetual interest, about a year since, began a suit for it in the Court of Exchequer and last term obtained a rule of that court to give a positive judgment upon it, in the first week of Michaelmas term, which will be in the beginning of November. There is no great reason to expect that the judgment will go for you while this judge, or at least while his ill humour, continues; so that in a matter of so great a consequence as this carries with it, there seems to be a necessity either of pleasing or removing him before next term. I confess I think the latter is the better way, for it does not seem to be a very good method to gratify men only because they are peevish.
My letter is most unreasonably long already and yet I must not end it, until I acquaint you, by the Queen's order, that upon consideration of the case of the Earl of Clarendon, the Lords of the Committee were of opinion that it would not be advisable to try him in the interval of Parliament on the evidence of Lord Preston and Mr. Crewe; partly because of their particular circumstances and partly because of the vote of the House of Lords in the last session that a peer should not be tried but in Parliament. This being the case, though the Queen would not admit him to bail, there being two witnesses against him for high treason, yet for the recovery of his health she has consented he should remain in custody at his own house upon Lord Rochester and Lord Lovelace's security till he should be summoned by Lord Lucas to render himself at the Tower. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 107.]
July 3. Pass for Mr. Francis Beyer to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 283.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Margaret Thomas, of Deptford, widow. Prays for the payment of the wages due to her for the service of her son, Robert Thomas, deceased, being a gunner of "Grain Islands," and also a gunner in the Cleveland yacht; she being very poor, and 85 years old, prays for an order for the payment of the said sum. Referred to Sir Henry Goodrick, Lieutenant–General of the Ordnance. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 336.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Derby. The bearer hereof, one of their Majesties' messengers, will put into your hands the soldier accused of having committed rape at Derby, with other insolences, with which he is charged, that you may prosecute him according to law. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 496.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Duke of Leinster. The Queen having thought fit that the officers under guard should be discharged from their confinement, desires you to give the necessary orders herein, requiring from each of them a solemn promise not to express the least resentment, when they are at liberty, against any person whom they may suspect to have done them any ill offices. She will not, however, allow these officers to enter upon the exercise of their respective employments, but expects to receive further satisfaction by their future behaviour, before employing them in her service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 497.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The same to Captain Wilshaw. I desire you will send the enclosed to Admiral Russell with all expedition, and give directions to the commander of the vessel who carries it, to go, in the first place, off St. Malo, and if he does not hear where the fleet is, he is to enquire of the Governor of Guernsey, and proceed according to such intelligence as he shall receive. You are also to give him instructions about throwing the packet overboard. [Ibid.]
July 4. Passes and post warrants for Johanna de Grave, with her little son, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Nicholas Van Vliet, ditto; for Jacob Petersen and John Perus, ditto; for John Hoffman, ditto; for Mr. Peter Courcellés, ditto; for Magdalen Hullon, and Magdalen, her daughter, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 284.]; for Benoite Juge, ditto; for Judith Lucas, ditto; for Mr. Cornelius Henry, Nathaniel De La Porte, and Gerard Hatley, ditto; for Mary Bontandon, ditto; for Andrew MacSweeny, Franck Hanstone, William Mac Donel, Henry Fleming, Richard Gallagher, and Robert Harrison, to go to Harwich and Hamburg; for Paul Le Bert to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 285]; for Mr. Francis Mcer to go to Portsmouth, Southampton or thereabouts; for Peter Terracon to go to Harwich and Holland; for Isaac de Stepane, an Armenian, ditto; for Mr. Henry Londys and John Petit, ditto; for Isaac Moyne, ditto; for Francis Clarke, the messenger, to go to Torbay [Ibid., p. 286]; for Mrs. Diana Smith and Elizabeth Cole to go to Harwich and Flanders; and for Mr. Richard Way, ditto. [Ibid., p. 287.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General, to prepare a bill containing a pardon to George Pitt, junior, esq., for the manslaughter of John Hoyle, esq., whereof he was convicted at the last sessions held at the Old Baily. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 360.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Robert Wolseley, esq., Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector of Bavaria, for the quarter ending June 3rd, 1692. [Ibid., p. 361.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. We have an account to–day from Plymouth, that our fleet—after having been in very bad weather on the French coast, which forced them above twenty leagues to the westward of Ushant—designed for St. Malo, with the first fair weather. The Oporto—of merchantmen has arrived safely, consisting of 33 sail. The Gazette contains what has come from abroad. The Duke of Wurtemburg with his detachment was to have surprised Mons, but the design did not succeed, and we lost two colonels who were "snapped" by a French party. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 58.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I enclose a copy of a letter I have received from Sir Paul Ricaut, and two other papers received from Mr. Blathwayt, and likewise a copy of a letter from Dantzic, that in case Capt. Dublets, mentioned in the last, should be taken either in that, or any other vessel, you may see that he is not exchanged amongst the prisoners of war, till further order. I also send you, by the Queen's command, a letter which I received from the Commissioners of Prizes, with an affidavit from Bridlington in it, that you may examine the matter, and give necessary directions therein. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 498.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose, by the King's Command, a paper from President De La Tour, that you may give directions therein. [Ibid.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. I enclose you a letter, sent me from Gravesend, with a certificate of the damages done to an innkeeper there, by Lieutenant Gurney turning 54 horses into his meadow, that you may examine the matter, and give necessary directions. [Ibid., p. 499.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. I have your letter, wherein you tell me you have stopped Mr. Ralph Hartwick, coming out of France. I desire you will examine him; and if you find that he has brought any intelligence over with him, or has come with any ill design against the government, to send him up in safe custody to me. If you cannot find any particular ill intention in him, you must yet commit him to prison for coming from France without leave, contrary to a late Act of Parliament, and prosecute him accordingly. [Ibid.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Governor of Pendennis Castle. I enclose, by the Queen's command, a copy of an affidavit as to an injury done to a master of a Spanish ship, whereof the Spanish Ambassador has complained. The Queen would have you send up an account of this matter as soon as possible. [Ibid.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Adam Springall. Understanding that two persons seized upon suspicion of being concerned in the robbery of Lieut. Laland, were discharged by you, I desire an account how you came to release them, there being good evidence of their guilt, by reason of the blood upon their clothes, and in other respects. [Ibid., p. 500.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Cotton and Mr. Frankland. The Queen would have you give order, to receive on board the packet–boat, the 107 soldiers mentioned in the enclosed list [not entered] and to carry them to Holland without paying for their passage, in the same manner as the recruits for the army in Flanders, are carried over hither. [Ibid., p. 506.]
July 5. Passes for Elizabeth Harrison and Mary Slawter to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 286]; for Louise Du Bois, ditto; for Moses Jouet, ditto; for Daniel Guy, ditto; for John Tecklenburg and Frans vander Hoof, ditto; for Mr. Christopher George De Bismarck, Mr. Andrew Achats de Bismarck, Mr. Frederick William D'Alvenslebe, and Mr. George William Peticts, recommended by Mons. Peicker, ditto [Ibid., p. 287.]; and for Joseph Whatschkofsky, recommended by Mons Scheffer, ditto. [Ibid., p. 288.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. The Queen—being informed that the bills which the Lord Chief–Justice Reynell, and the Attorney and Solicitor–General were ordered particularly to take care should be prepared, are not yet drawn—is extremely displeased with the delay, and thinks it proceeds from their unwillingness that a Parliament should be called in Ireland, which their Majesties thought necessary for the peace of it as well as their own service, and this aggravates the neglect of her commands, which I have, since the departure of these gentlemen, repeated to you, and am again commanded to let you know that the Queen expects the bills, especially those which were directed to be first drawn, to be forthwith transmitted hither on paper that no more time is lost. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 337.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. The Queen having resolved that Mr. Lowther shall be in the Commission of the Revenue, the orders in form will be forthwith despatched. I have laid yours and Lord Justice Coningsby's letters before the Queen; the Lords of the Treasury have the matters under their consideration. [Ibid., p. 338.]
July 5. R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. The Dutch post came in this morning with letters from the King's camp at Genappe, which brought the following account: The French army lies on both sides of the Sambre about La Bussiere, on one side and Haine St. Pierre and Haine St. Paul on the other; but we hear that they design to go and encamp at Cambon near Ath, having left 25 battalions and 2 regiments of horse at Namur. On the 29th Sir Robert Douglas and Colonel O'Farrell, being demanded by a trumpeter, were sent back from Mons, having been civilly used by the Governor during their stay there, and sent back without any ransom. The same day a French party coming very near our camp, in hopes to have got some booty of horses, were discovered and pursued by some of our men, who cut most of them off and took some few prisoners. The Prince of Vaudemont feeling very ill has gone to Aix for the recovery of his health. The Hanover troops will join us next Saturday. We have had great rains for 30 hours together; it is not yet known when we shall remove from here. The French King has gone to Versailles, where he was expected on the 15/25th instant. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 59]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Thornton. Shows that he is an inhabitant of Dublin, who has been serviceable to their Majesties, being of the militia of that city, and that he believes himself capable to serve the offices of that kingdom with stationery ware; prays for letters patent for the same. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 336.]
July 6. Passes for Theophilus Grattop and John Godfried Dieringer to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Wicher Traaf, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 288.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Governor of Deal. I desire you will discharge the men in your custody, belonging to the ship Madonna Della Keve; their names are, Fran Albura, Giacome Lapi, Gio Battista Pulini, Gio Corso, Fran Di Livorno, Giuseppi Vezini, and Andrea Pulino, and permit them to go on board the said ship, and that you restore the ship's shallop to her captain, Virginio Polleno. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 500.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. Capt. Lowther, a captain in Col. Hale's regiment, having pressed a servant belonging to the bearer, Mr. Kempton, out of his shop in Long Lane, I desire you will send to the said captain and order him to discharge the man's servant. [Ibid.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. The Queen thinks Mr. Gouge and Dr. Wake are very fit to succeed the Bishop of Lincoln in the livings of St. Martin's and St. James's, and desires you to make the grants accordingly. [Ibid., p. 503.]
July 7. Passes for Paolo Albertini and Scipione Arrigoni, to go to Gravesend and Italy; for Catharina Bossemans to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Le Clerk, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 288]; for Elizabeth Cook, to go to Harwich and Flanders; for Jacob Marcet, Paul Horard, John George Weisbach, and Louis Osterwald to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peternella Verhoef, ditto; for Maria Walgraef, ditto; for Paul Meronnet and John Dumont with his wife, Mary, ditto [Ibid., p. 289]; for Margaretta Mullers and her two children, ditto; and for George Hill and Andrew Teuchler, ditto. [Ibid., p. 290.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Margaret, Viscountess Purbeck. Shows that she is the only child and heir to Ulick, late Marquis of Clanricarde, and that the sum of 20,000l. was secured to her by letters patent in Charles II.'s time for her portion on the estate of Clanricarde in Ireland, payable to Viscount Muskerry, her first husband; that her said husband, dying without children, devised the said 20,000l. to her, whereby she became entitled to the said sum; that there is, of that sum, 5,000l. unpaid, besides interest; that the late Earl of Clancarty, and the said Viscount Muskerry, his son, by their obligation became bound to the Marchioness of Clanricarde, her mother, in the sum of 8,000l. "conditioned" for the payment of 500l. a year until lands of the yearly value of 500l. should be settled upon her for life; that the said 500l. a year was never paid, nor were lands of that value settled upon her; that her mother died intestate, and she taking the administration became entitled to all arrears amounting to 5,000l., which is still due and unpaid; that after the death of her mother, and the decease of Viscount Purbeck, her late husband, she inter–married with Robert Fielding, esq., who now stands outlawed and attainted for high treason, and the said debts are forfeited to their Majesties.
Hoping to recover something of it, which is the only support of herself and family, she prays for a grant of the several debts, and the securities for the same, to the Bishop of London and Sir Francis Compton, knt., in trust for the separate maintenance of herself. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 337.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John St. Leger, esq. Shows that he, with his family, is reduced to very great straits by the wasting of his estate in Ireland; that he suffered by the Irish army, to above the value of 6,000l., and that upon this his Majesty was pleased to bestow 100l. upon him, of which the greatest part was laid out in putting himself in condition to serve with his regiment of dragoons, and he did last summer without pay. Being in hope to discover some concealments of mortgages, bonds, and other debts, which are unknown to the Commissioners of the Revenue, he prays for a grant of the benefit of them, paying the fourth part of what he shall discover. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 338.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Nehemiah Scott, gent., and Benjamin Tudman, goldsmith. Shows that having found that many irregularities are committed in collecting briefs for charity, they have discovered a method for performing the same to general satisfaction. They pray for a reference to the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal in order to have letters patent for their discovery. Referred accordingly. [Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ignatius Purcell. Shows that he never acted under King James, save only as a justice–of–the–peace for the county of Dublin, and was very serviceable in that office to the protestants, as may appear by certificates; that immediately after the "breach of the Boyne," he submitted to the government and took protection, following his husbandry. Yet he was indicted and outlawed upon no other ground but that he had been a justiceof–the–peace, and on that account all his real estate had been seized on, although he has been so serviceable to their Majesties' army, the royal camp being pitched on most part of his corn at Cromlin, whereby he has been damnified to the value of 1,000l. Prays for an order to reverse his outlawry and for a pardon, "the rather for that he is aged above 63 years, and is tenant but for life." Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 339.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Francis Hamon, lieutenantgovernor of Landguard Fort. Shows that, in King James's time, he was sent lieutenant–governor of that place in order to reside there to prevent the abuses which were committed in embezzling the stores, etc. He was assured by Col. Eyton, then governor, that 10s. per diem should be allowed, besides the profit of the fort; and having done the duty without any allowance for these 4½ years, and ViceAdmiral Killegrew, the present governor, having taken away the profits of the fort from him, he prays to have an allowance settled for the future. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 341.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Capt. Mees. I received yours of the 7th instant, in answer to which, I can only acquaint you, that the walk you mention in Epping Forest, is not in the Queen's gift, but in the Lord Chamberlain's. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 501.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to pay John Adams, esq., 50l. [Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the same The Lords of the Admiralty have represented to the Queen, that the undertakers who have orders to build four fourth–rate ships, by her Majesty's command, desire an advance of 1,000l. upon each ship. The Queen thinks it reasonable they should receive it, and would have you give orders for the payment thereof. The said lords have also represented that the marine regiments, upon the return of the fleet, will not be received anywhere into quarters, unless their old ones are paid, and the Queen would therefore have you pay the same. I send you a letter from the Navy Board to the Admiralty, about furniture for the Charlotte yacht, wherein the Queen would have you give necessary orders. [Ibid., p. 503.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Having laid before the Queen your report upon the petition of William Blackford, she has ordered him to be reprieved for a fortnight, and directs that he be again examined as to what further account he can give of the persons mentioned in his confession, and what evidence he can bring against them. [Ibid., p. 505.]
July 8. Passes for Nicholas Vander Motten, Maria Francisca Van Deventer, his wife, and two young children to go to Harwich and Holland; for Joseph Pereira and David Alvarenga, ditto; for Hans Strive, John Loegardt, Knudt Madtsen, David Visscher, and Peter Spring to go to Harwich and Denmark [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 290]; for Anthony Papillon to go to Harwich and Holland [this pass is marked as not delivered and was renewed on 1 August]; for John Mauger, ditto; for Magdalena Vermeers, ditto; for Mr. Cox, ditto; and for Ham Hebert, ditto. [Ibid., p. 291.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty for a grant to Charles, Earl of Monmouth, and the rest of the owners of the South Dyke yacht, of the ship Prince William, Jaques Verdouch, master, laden with French wines, brandies, and other goods of the growth of France, which ship they took as prize, and brought into Portsmouth, when on their way back to England, after giving notice to our fleet of the French fleet being on this coast. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 362.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Great Seal, to prepare a commission for proroguing the present parliament until the 22nd of August next. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 363.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Edward Dixie, gent, to be lieutenant to Capt. John Baird in Col. Zachariah Tiffin's regiment of foot; for — Poulton, clerk, to be chaplain to the same regiment; and for Thomas Russell, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. James Watson in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 284.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney–General. The enclosed are the heads of a charter for the East India Company, of which I must desire you to prepare a draft in form. I have sent you a copy of the bill, which was read in the House of Commons, which being, in most things, agreeable to the present resolutions, may perhaps save you some trouble, and forward the dispatch of the draft, over which no time should be lost. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 501.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Potts and Mr. —. I have acquainted the Queen with what you wrote in your letter of the 6th instant about the arms, which you had seized at Lichfield; she would have you send them up by the carrier, directed to Sir Henry Goodrick, at the Tower, and give him notice of it. [Ibid., p. 502.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Col. Wilson has expended 54l. in bringing his regiment of foot into their Majesties' service, upon the surrender of Limerick, of which the Lords–Justices of Ireland have paid him 10l. The said colonel has also delivered 77 muskets and 6 carbines to the stores in Ireland, at the rate of 5s. each, according to what was allowed upon the breaking up of the Irish regiments, as the said lords inform me. The Queen desires you to pay him the 44l. remaining due to him. [Ibid.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I enclose a letter of Mr. Waring from Deal, by the Queen's command, who would have you consider of what he proposes about the quarantine, and give necessary directions therein. [Ibid., p. 503.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen having approved of what you have proposed about advancing 4,000l. for building four fourth–rate ships, I have acquainted the Treasury with it, to give order for the same, and the Queen desires you to proceed in finishing the contract. Having told the Queen of the account I received from you, of what some of the commanders of the fireships had done in the late action against the enemy, she was pleased to declare that Capt. Fleetwood Ems, Capt. Thomas Heath, and Capt. James Greenway, should have the same full reward for the ships they burnt at La Hogue, and Sherbrook [Cherbourg], as if the same had been done in the open sea, particularly Capt. Heath for burning the Admiral's ship; and that Capt. Edward Littleton, should in the like manner, have the same reward for endeavouring to burn the ships of war at La Hogue, as if he had succeeded, and that Capt. John Knapp should have a reward for his endeavours. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 504.]
July 9. Passes for Mrs. Martha Cuningham, recommended by Mons. Gradin, minister of Jersey, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jacob Vanden Burgh, Nehemias Periatt and Peter Cornelisse, ditto; for Catherine Menties, with a child of six years old, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 281]; for Andrew Teller, with his wife and three children, the eldest 16 years old, and Lawrence Ramoun, with his wife and one child, ditto; for Mrs. Coulon, and a child eleven months old, ditto; for — Sultzberg and — Fritch, ditto; for Mr. Richard Huddleston, ditto; for Mr. Kyrby, Mr. Abema and Mr. Pickering, and one servant, ditto; for Mr. Hans Bauman and Egbert, his servant, ditto; for John Gerritsen, ditto; and for Margareth Kazin, with her two children, ditto. [Ibid., p. 292.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I enclose the draft of three bills, which her Majesty would have you send back, in form, with all speed. You are not to allow any more fees to the first serjeant, the attorney, or solicitor, for their attendance at the Council at the times appointed for examining the claims of such as pretend to be within the articles of Limerick and Galway, the Lords of the Treasury having reported that they do not think it proper. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 338.] Enclosing, an act confirming the acts of settlement and explanation, and the resolution of doubts by the Lord Lieutenant and Council upon the said acts; an act of recognition of their Majesties' undoubted title to the Crown of Ireland; and an act declaring all attainders made in the late pretended Parliament to be void. [Ibid., p. 339.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and the Recorder of London, and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon William Gee, alias Richard Johnson, for burglary, until Monday the 25th instant. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 360.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and the Recorder of London, and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon William Blackford for clipping coin, until Monday the 25th day of this month. [Ibid., p. 364.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
License for Alexander Gawne to remain in England until Michaelmas next, he having been unable to perfect his accounts depending in the pay office of the army. [Ibid.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson. Letters came from the fleet yesterday dated the 4th instant, in the roads of Guernsey, which gave an account that Admiral Russell had that morning held a council of war, at which it was resolved that it was not safe for the White Fleet to go before St. Malo, because of the foulness of the ground in several places, and the great strength of the tides; but that a squadron of 25 ships should be detached on that service to see what could be done, and afterwards return to the body of the fleet off the Start where they would, till then, keep their station. The transport ships, with 40 flat–bottomed boats, arrived in the Downs last Monday, where they were till yesterday, because of contrary winds. The Duke of Leinster remains only for the news of their arrival at Portsmouth, and will then immediately go thither, Sir Henry Bellasis being already there has prepared everything for the embarkation. Col. Langston, Col. Hales, and the other officers who were under military confinement are discharged from the same upon promise that they will not show any resentment towards their superior officers, upon whose information they were at first taken up. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 60.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Sayer, esq., ViceChamberlain to the Queen. Shows that he holds, by lease from the Queen–Dowager and other trustees, the manors of Chertsey and Hardwick, and other hereditaments in Surrey, for which 19 loads of hay, and 16½ quarters of oats are reserved yearly to the Crown, which, after the said Queen's decease, are granted in reversion for 41 years. He prays to have the payment and delivery remitted to him during the said Queen–Dowager's life. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 349.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Nicholas Burmester and Lawrence Hommell to go to Gravesend and Hamburg; for Samuel Toryn and Josua Simon to go to Harwich and Holland; for Nathaniel Cuthbert, ditto; for Robert Liens and Reinier Roelant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 293]; and for Michel Bouchaud, ditto. [Ibid., p. 296.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Captain John Robinson, Commander of the Charlotte yacht. Shows, that acccording to command, he received on board one Mr. White, and two messengers, in order to seize a privateer called the Treasure, bound for France, which, after "a long fatigue," was taken in Dover Pier, and that he has been at a great charge in victualling these persons, besides other expenses in bringing up the said vessel to Greenwich, she having lost her anchors, cables, &c. Having received nothing for all his charges, and the vessel not being worth 50l. and as (although condemned by the Court of Admiralty above a month ago) she remains still in his custody, he prays to have the said vessel bestowed upon him. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 339.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the owners and merchants of the Three Brothers, Daniel Hudson, master, the Endeavour, Robert Ford, master, the Providence, Henry Edgate, master, and the John and Thomas, Mr. Stone, master. Shows that the said ships have lately arrived from Barbadoes; and having notice that all ships arriving from thence should perform a quarantine, they certify that neither of these four ships, now arrived, have had, in all their voyage home, so much as a man sick of any distemper. The eight weeks passage, "being a double quarantine," and many of the seamen being impressed from on board the said ships, and in respect both as to the charge and want of goods they will be great sufferers by that means, they pray to have the said ships exempted from quarantine. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 340.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney–General. I send you an Order in Council for incorporating Mr. William Tindall and several others, in order for making saltpetre in their Majesties' dominions, and desire you will prepare such heads as may be agreeable to the directions of the said order, as you shall think proper, together with the names of those who are to be the first members of the Corporation. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 504.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Solicitor–General. I send you an Order in Council for incorporating Sir Matthew Dudley and several others, in order to work mines of copper and other material in New England, and desires you to prepare such heads, together with the names of those who are to be first members of that corporation, as you may think proper. [Ibid., p. 505.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose, by the King's command, the extract of a letter from President de la Tour, which I received from Mr. Blathwayt, that you may give necessary directions. I also enclose, by the Queen's command, a paper from the lieutenant–general and principal officers of the Ordnance, that you may give proper directions in it. [Ibid.]
July 12. Passes and post warrants for Morgan Kennedy to go to Harwich and Holland; for Abraham L'Orange, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 293]; for Mr. Christian Tileman, Mr Frederick Hoffman, Mr. David Heinsius, and Mr. Christopher Saal, ditto; for Mr. Thomas Morris, ditto; for Mrs. Savage, ditto; for John Grasseler, ditto; for John Gerrit Daveman, ditto [Ibid., p. 294]; for Coert Warming, Armetje Tilemans, his wife and five children, ditto; for Jannetje Stevens and Annetje Marel, ditto; for John Lanvay, ditto; for Mr. John Smith Apendorp and Jocobus Smith, Cornelius Petersen, and Jorgen Master, his servants, ditto; for Mr. Clifton Harcourt to go to Harwich and Flanders [Ibid., p. 295]; for the Sieur Paul to go to Harwich and Hamburg; and for Samuel David Bernis to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 296.]
July 12. Viscount Sydney to the King. The occasion of my sending this express is to convey a proposal for the raising money for Ireland, which, indeed, is so infinitely necessary that it will be impossible to carry on your business in that Kingdom without it. This, without doubt, is the best proposal that has been made; several others were not to be thought of. I showed this yesterday to the Queen and to–day to my Lord Godolphin who, though he is not very apt to approve anything of this kind when he does not propose anything himself, yet could not much dislike it, and said I did very well to send it to you, and if you please it might soon be finished.
You must consider that 30,000l. is at this time a great sum, and people are not yet very forward to lend their money upon Irish funds, which makes the moneyed men ask more interest than is ordinary. But this is not unreasonable, for it will cost you but 1,400l. a year at present, and if any of the Commissioners fail, there will be so much saved, which is now likely as Mr. Evelyn is very ill.
You will see that Mr. Lumm proposes to be one of the Commissioners of the Revenue, which I would be very glad of, because he understands it extremely well, but if you be so engaged to Sir John Lowther for his brother–in–law that he will not be satisfied with the pension or being a riding commissioner which has been commonly used in that country, then Mr. Lumm must have the pension and Mr. Lowther be the commissioner; but I am sure it will be more for your service to have it otherwise. However, Mr. Lumm must be Deputy Paymaster if the proposal goes on and Mr. Robinson may have the pension till something else be done for him.
I have been with the Lords of the Treasury and I have told them the necessity of having some money for Ireland; they received me very civilly. But as soon as I was gone they thought no more about it, and I see plainly enough that some of the Treasury do not care how anything goes. My Lord Godolphin is angry upon my Lord Marlborough's account, Mr. Hampden upon his nephew's. Sir Edward Seymour is out of town. Sir Stephen Fox yields to my Lord Godolphin in everything, and Mr. Montague says nothing.
I have troubled you enough in money matters. I believe the Club (you know who I mean) are framing some design that is not for your service; whether my Lord Godolphin be in it or no I cannot tell, but he has put off his journey to Tunbridge, which he was fond of a month ago and that gives me some suspicion. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 108.]
July 12. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. Your Majesty will receive by this post a proposal from one Mr. Lumm for the advance of 30,000l. sterling upon the credit of the quit rents of Ireland, and my Lord Sydney says that upon the granting or refusing of this proposal his going into Ireland wholly depends, and though I am of opinion that money may be extremely much wanted in Ireland yet one may buy gold too dear, and there are so many articles in this proposal which seem to me not to be reasonable, that I confess I am afraid of the consequences of it. For besides the ordinary interest of the country, which is 10 per cent., he desires to be deputy–paymaster in the room of Mr. Robinson, who I have heard was an able man and fit for his place; yet he does not only insist upon this as absolutely necessary, but would make it a part of his bargain to be a Commissioner of the Revenue besides.
Now the consequence of this in my opinion must necessarily be, that here in England, where we have such perpetual occasion of borrowing money for the public, we shall never be able to procure any considerable sum without the advantage of a place or two beyond the ordinary interest, which would make the service so uneasy to all people that nobody would think themselves secure in any employment. This is a thing so obvious that I should scarce have thought it necessary to trouble you with a letter upon the subject but that I have received the Queen's commands to give you my poor thoughts upon it. [Ibid., No. 109.]
July 13. Passes for Captain Allan MacDonel, Æneas MacDonel, and John MacDonel, his servants, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 294]; for Mrs. Eleanor Fen, Mrs. Anne Fen, and Mary Roberts, their servant, ditto; and for Matthias Roos, ditto. [Ibid., p. 296.]
July 13.
London.
[Lord Godolphin] to the King. I am at some pains to know how far your Majesty is pleased to approve of the method we have taken to return the money to Italy and also what directions you will think fit to give about the second payment, which, if you do not dislike, may be continued in the same terms, and in the same manner, and from the same funds as the first payment is now making, upon which I shall humbly expect your Majesty's pleasure.
The success at Athlone has been so great and so unexpected, that we are in hopes it may soon be followed by the entire "reducement" of Ireland, and in that case, with a fleet at sea so strong as ours is now, we are in great hopes that something may be attempted upon the most unguarded parts of France with success, by the troops that might be spared from Ireland; and therefore you will forgive me saying that my Lord Sydney's last letter by your command was no small affliction, as to that particular, to us who were full of these hopes. One thing more as to this matter: your Majesty will give me leave to prophesy to you, which is that you will find parliament very uneasy to pay a greater number of troops in Flanders, for they grumble too much already at the great sums of money that go out of England; they will never repine at any charge of invading France and with a fleet of their own. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 110.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King desires you to place Lord Mountjoy upon the establishment of Ireland, as Master of the Ordnance there, with the salary of 500l. per annum. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 506.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Chief Justice Holt. The Queen has reprieved Mr. George Peyton, who was to be tried to–day at Dorchester for killing John Meader, in case he should be found guilty, as he was then in the execution of his office, in pressing men for the London, and upon other favourable circumstances mentioned on his behalf; she has done this that she may receive an account from the judge who tried him of the truth of his case, and how far the circumstances may entitle him to her favour. [Ibid.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, ordering them to emit a proclamation for a further continuation of the adjournment of Parliament from the 15th of August to the 16th of November 1692. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 126.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
The same to the same. You have done well in appointing a general thanksgiving to God for the success of our fleet from the designs of our enemies. We return hearty thanks to those who offered to levy taxes on their own charge for our service when the danger was so imminent before the victory. We require you to put, with all diligence, the oaths of allegiance and assurance to all heritors, and to cause all Scotchmen to appear before you, who have gone to France since our descent into Britain, as war is declared with France, and proclaimed in all our kingdoms. You are to cause process of treason against the Duke of Gordon, and other Scotchmen who have been about King James in order to join with French and Irish forces to make an invasion upon our kingdoms, and such as have corresponded or had intelligence with the said Duke. You are to do the same against the Earl of Seaforth for his invasion with forces from Ireland, and his behaviour since. You are to prosecute Lord Bellenden, and the officers sometime in Sir Thomas Levingstone's regiment of dragoons, who have been too long detained prisoners without being brought to a trial. We have appointed 400l. sterling to be paid to the lawyers who have assisted our solicitor by your order. We approve of your diligence in putting the country in a posture of defence, and we desire you to consider means for making the militia more effectual to be joined with the standing forces army to repress foreign invasion or internal commotions, and you are to take legal advice how this may lawfully be done. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 127.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Lord Montgomery was nominated one of our Privy Council in the last commission; but as he has not come to take his place and the oaths, nor has he attended during the danger of an invasion from France in our absence, we require you to signify to him that he is no longer a member of the same, and to receive in his place Mr. Francis Montgomery of Giffan. [Ibid., p. 129.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
Instructions to the Lords of the Treasury in Scotland. You are to receive the papers, rolls, and other things belonging to the Treasury, the state of the revenue, real or casual, and give information what wards, marriages, &c., are at disposal, and what processes are depending relating to any concern of the Crown; to put in execution all former instructions standing unrepealed given to former "Treasuries"; to take exact account of the magazines and stores, and to call before you the persons entrusted therewith; you have power to stop payment of precepts drawn by former "Treasuries"; you are to give the usual allowance for secret intelligence; you are to appoint chamberlains as you see fit; you are to discover concealed rents; you are to take care that no gifts be passed wherein lands, duties, rights, or casualties belonging to the Crown are contained; you are to pay the pensions, &c., set out in an accompanying list; you are to appoint chamberlains for "up–lifting" forfeited estates; and you are to "make trial" of what sums have been granted to us or our predecessors and are withheld. [Ibid., p. 129.] Enclosure. The list of pensions referred to above. [Ibid., p. 130.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. We are resolved to continue the Lopnesses pension. You are to pass James Hamilton's commission for uplifting the Bishops' rents as it stands. We allow you to treat with our general pay–master, that the contract with him may be renewed in these terms, that he will be obliged to pay our army as formerly for the half–poundage, without any other salary, but 100l. sterling; or else that you add this further burden to his part of the contract, that he becomes obliged to provide all the horses and dragoons in Scotland with straw and oats, at the rate of 5d. each horse, in the 24 hours, for a stone–weight of sufficient oat–straw, and two–fourth parts of oats, whether they be marching, or in quarters. We allow you lodgings in our palace of Holyrood House in our absence, reserving always the royal apartment, and will give orders to the Duke of Hamilton to that effect. We are resolved to "entertain" no more troops than we have fund to maintain. We are resolved to have the artillery companies complete—one of their "fusiliers" and the other "pioneers"; they are to guard our palace of Holyrood. We have interposed with the town of Camphier to take an "arrestment" upon the effects of the Scotch merchants upon some rupture of the contract concerning the staple, which would have ruined the trade there, and it is just that you renew the former proclamations for the merchants, keeping the staple port at Camphier, during the years of the contract. You are particularly to see the processes of treason and others mentioned in our letter to the Privy Council, exactly prosecuted. You must be diligent to have the witnesses and proofs in readiness against such as have been with King James, or with the French or Irish forces designed for the invasion, and any who have kept correspondence with King James; also against all who went to France after our descent into Britain. We have thought it necessary to "proceed forfeiture" against the Duke of Gordon, and all others who have joined the designed invasion. We have likewise ordered a process of treason against the Earl of Seaforth, Lord Bellenden, and those who were lately officers in Sir Thomas Levingston's regiment of dragoons, who have long been prisoners without a trial. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 133.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
Warrant for passing a commission under the Great Seal of Scotland to John, Earl of Tweeddale, and others for stating and auditing the accounts of the Treasury to the term of Michaelmas last past, 1691; and to allow or disallow any articles according to justice, and to grant, subscribe, and deliver, to and in favour of the Treasury, full and ample discharge of accounts, &c. [Ibid., p. 136.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
Commissions for Major Scipio Hill to be lieutenant–colonel of Lord Newbottle's regiment of dragoons, and also to be captain of a troop in that regiment [Ibid.]; for George Wishart to be major of Lord Newbottle's regiment of dragoons, and also to be a captain of a troop in that regiment [Ibid., p. 137]; for Samuel Levingston to be lieutenant of Capt. Hunter's company of grenadiers in Col. Hill's regiment at Fort William [Ibid.]; for Charles Cunningham to be ensign of Major Forbes's company in Col. Hill's regiment of foot, at Fort William [Ibid., p. 138]; and for Sir William Hope of Kirkliston, to be deputy–governor of the Castle of Edinburgh, whereof David Earl of Leven is governor, and to be lieutenant to the company or garrison there. [Ibid.]
July 14.
Genappe.
Passes for Mr. Edward Pain to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Adrian Van Wambecke Mr. Anthony Seloffe and John Hollard, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 296]; for Lawrence Ramoun, Mary Chrironne, his wife, and one child, ditto; for Jan Janse Van Mirop, with his wife Tryntje Claes, and three children, ditto; for John Lambert, ditto; for Jacob Publer, ditto; for Mr. Astorre Rizzardi, ditto, this pass was renewed on the 15th of August [Ibid., p. 297]; for Mr. Thomas Alchorne and Samuel Bucknall, a servant, ditto; for Moses France, ditto for Elias Trip, ditto; and for Mr. Abraham Soanes, Francis Read, Michael Evans, Henry Matthews, and a boy, being five mariners, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 298.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. Having received from Mr. Blathwayt, the King's pleasure upon several matters proposed by yours of the 18th May, I enclose a copy of it. I also send you a copy of an information by one Henry Crymes that you may take care of this matter. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 339.]
July 14/24.
Genappe.
Copy of the Scotch Establishment. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 61.]
July 14.
London.
The Marquis of Carmarthen to the King. I am sorry to find you have so small hopes of doing anything considerable in Flanders, and the slowness of our proceedings here makes me as hopeless of anything which may be expected from this side of the water; but it is apparent that the untimely finding of money for the several services which call necessarily for it, is the principal cause of this backwardness and in the meantime the enemy have been making all those defences for their security which were heretofore wholly wanting. I have seen two private letters from Paris, which say the King has given orders for the immediate fortifying of both Brest and St. Malo as strongly as they are capable of being made. My own fears, I confess are, that not being strong enough to undertake a siege at either of these places, our success will be very doubtful if not hazardous, and I find we shall go about, we do not know what, if we shall attempt anything at Rochfort; besides the sea officers think it will be too late in the year to go so far with the great ships.
These considerations, together with the probable ill–consequence in Parliament of having done nothing after such a success, make me apt to move anything, rather than to do nothing, and therefore I presume to put into your thoughts whether it would not be possible to take Dunkirk, there being not the least suspicion of an enemy by land there, and their expectations being wholly taken up of finding us at St. Malo or Brest, insomuch that it would be a surprise to them, and I suppose the garrison to be but very weak, and we are able to bring 17,000 foot against it, with a sufficient train of artillery, so that if you could cover the siege with the army, I should think this to be feasible. Because I know not how wild this nation may be (not knowing the posture of your affairs), I have not said a word of it, but to the Queen herself, who gives me leave to name it to you, because it would be a work highly acceptable to the nation and Parliament if it could be done, and if it can be made practicable, your orders for it must be given without delay and with greater privacy than to the whole Cabinet at first, for I am assured you are not served with secrecy there.
I fear the gentleman, whom Lord Portland knows, who pretended to make some good discoveries concerning the late plot against the government will not be able to do much in that matter. I believe him to be well intentioned, but that he did not know very much, and he has not yet given any written information, although he promised to do it in three or four days after Lord Portland's departure.
Instead of improving the intelligence by the way I hoped, I find my principle correspondents fallen under the suspicion of their friends, and words have been repeated, that I have spoken to very few persons and which is yet a greater obstruction to our intelligence and an encouragement to their obstinacy and secrecy. They have daily experience of our laws being too weak to do them any greater prejudice than such a short confinement as rather gives them opportunity to understand one another's minds more exactly and to take truer measures of what they ought to do. Insomuch as I am confident their hopes were never greater than they continue to be at the present time, some promising themselves a winter assistance from France, but most depending upon an ill–humour in the Parliament (in which they have the concurrence of the republican party), and thereby a kind of certainty of not finding the necessary supplies for another year. If therefore such a project as I have mentioned could be encompassed, I should hope it would blow away a great part of the storm.
Postscript.—I have heard that the Duke of Leinster and Lord Galway have written that they think the troops, designed for the descent, sufficient for that undertaking, and yet they are daily complaining here of the contrary, and pressing for more horse than can either be spared or transported. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 114.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Commission for Alexander Dallons, esq., to be a reformed captain in Major–Gen. Ruvigny's regiment of horse. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 277.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Carter, widow, showing that her late husband, Rear–Admiral Carter, was unfortunately slain in the late engagement with the French, leaving her with two children in a very low condition. She prays her Majesty to order such provision for them, so that their present necessities may be relieved, and a future livelihood settled, "so as it may be a lasting provision for them all during their lives." Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 342.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Cornet John Grace and Frances, his mother, showing that their ancestors, "since 400 years ago," have lived in Ireland and have always been faithful to the Crown of England in all revolutions; that when King James came into Ireland, his grandfather and father became concerned in the said King's army, and soon after died; that in Michaelmas term, 1690, John, Richard, and Robert Grace were indicted for adhering to King James, and thereupon outlawed, though John Grace died five months before he was indicted; that upon the marriage of Frances (being the sole daughter and heir of Richard Grace) with the said Robert Grace, eldest son and heir of John Grace, in consideration of the said marriage, and 1,500l., for her portion, they settled their respective estates on the issue male of the said Robert and Frances; that there was only an estate for life left in the said John, Richard, and Robert Grace; and they being actually in Limerick when it surrendered, they are comprehended within the Articles of Limerick; and though their estates are preserved as aforesaid, they have nothing to fear for a crime which was not well in their power to avoid. They therefore pray to be admitted to bring a Writ of Error for reversing their outlawry. Referred to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 348.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. You are to despatch the necessary orders to the dragoons, which shall remain behind after the troops are embarked at Portsmouth, to do duty there in the absence of the garrison. The Duke of Leinster is to detach 200 dragoons, out of Brigadier Leveson's and Col. Matthews' regiments, and to send them on board the fleet. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 507.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Archbishop of Canterbury. I enclose [enclosure not entered], by the Queen's command, a memorial presented to the King by the Envoy of the King of Denmark, that you may consider it with the Bishop of London, and make your report to her Majesty what you think fit to be done. [Ibid.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Matthews. The enclosed petition of Mrs. Rebecca Walklate having been presented to the Queen, she desires you to return an answer to what is alleged in it, relating to yourself, concerning 71l. 16s. 6d. due to her husband, who died lieutenant of a troop of dragoons in your regiment. [Ibid.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen, being pleased to appoint Col. Thomas Becher to be governor of the island of Innisherkin, near the harbour of Baltimore, in the west of Ireland, and to grant him 10s. per diem, would have you give order for placing him upon the Establishment of Ireland, as governor of that island. [Ibid., p. 508.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I enclose, by the Queen's command, a letter to me from the Lords Justices and Council of Ireland, with the petition of Mr. James Hamilton enclosed in it. She would have you consider his request, and report your opinion what is best to be done. [Ibid.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen being pleased to reprieve uutil the 25th day of this month, John Towers, a prisoner in Kingston Gaol, condemned for clipping, upon this allegation, that he may be useful in discovering and convicting several offenders in that kind, desires you to examine the truth of this allegation, and report your opinion, what reason there is to expect this service from him. [Ibid.]
July 15. Passes for Mrs. Gurtruydt Muysser, and Mary Messell to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 298]; for Mr. Joseph Banks, ditto; for James Laoundes, ditto; for Peter Corbet, ditto; for Marc Bruyn, ditto; for Michael Van Buyl, ditto [Ibid., p. 299]; for John Misener, ditto; for Mr. William Read and William Thompson, his servant, ditto; and for Samuel Beltzer, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 300.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize and Gaol Delivery for the Home Circuit, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon John Towers, who, at the last assizes held for Surrey, was found guilty of clipping. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 365.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Similar warrant on behalf of Daniel Scole, found guilty of murder. [Ibid.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Sotherne. I desire you to let me know, whether the Lords of the Admiralty have sent any orders to the victualling ships at Portsmouth, to sail to the fleet, If not, I desire you will take care they may be despatched presently with directions to them to tide it, in case the wind should be contrary, the Admiral telling me that he has not above 14 days' provisions left. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 509.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Chief Justice Treby. The Queen has been pleased to reprieve Daniel Scole, a soldier in Brigadier Leveson's regiment, who was condemned for murder at Kingston Assizes, until Monday the 25th instant, that she might in the meantime receive a report from you, whether you conceive him a fit object of her mercy. Another reason for this reprieve is that any disorder may be avoided which might happen by the execution while the regiment is quartered at Kingston, whence it is to remove in a few days. [Ibid.]
July 16. Passes for Salomon and Arent Emanuels, brothers, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Christian Wagener, Christopher Stockloffins, John Ohmunger, and Peter Crus, recommended by Mons. Ezzard, the Lutheran minister, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 300]; for Mr. John Jordan, ditto; for Mr. Adolff Gerstenberg and Mr. Philip Bourdon, ditto; for Maria Van Hagen, Willemina Van Esch and Johanna Van Leenwen, ditto; for Mr. John Edwards, ditto; for Cobus Van Meurs, with his wife, Claertje Van Meurs, and their three children, ditto [Ibid., p. 301]; and for Johanna De Lange, ditto. [Ibid., p. 302.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. Having laid before the Queen yours and the Lords of the Admiralty's papers about the boat belonging to the Breda, she has commanded me to acquaint you to give order for delivering it to Mr. Burrows, Clerk of the Cheque, at Kinsale. [S.P. Ireland King's Letters Book 1, p. 340.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. On the 13th Vice Admiral Rooke rejoined the fleet in Torbay, not having found it practicable to make any attempt upon the French ships at St. Malo; he stood in so near to the shore that he had 8 or 9 men killed by the enemy's shot, among whom was Captain Partridge, commander of the Griffin. The Duke of Leinster and Lord Galway went away last night to Portsmouth, where the troops were to begin to embark to–day. Yesterday the Dutch mail came in; it brought the following news from the camp at Genappe, dated July 7/17. The Duke of Luxemberg lies still at Soignies with his right wing reaching to Waast. Yesterday Bouffleurs marched from Givry with the troops, which he commands apart, and encamped at Haine St. Pierre, and Haine St. Paul. The Hanover troops have been delayed in their march by the late bad weather; they will be, to–night, at Cortricke near Louvaine in order to join us. They write from Germany that "Lord Ambassador Harbord" left Vienna on the 1st instant (new style) and that he was at Presburg on the 2nd, going down the Danube towards Belgrade. He expected to have audience of the Grand Vizier, in his camp at Semlin, who had expressed a desire to see him there; and upon the occasion of the Dutch Ambassador sending to compliment him on his advancement to that dignity, he discovered his good disposition towards a peace, if it were proposed upon reasonable terms. The troops which left us some days ago under the command of Count Horne are returning again, being now encamped on this side of Brussels. Orders are again given to forage the forces to–morrow, so that it is possible we may remain here some days. We have an account from Germany that strong detachments were marching from the Moselle and Flanders to reinforce the French army, and that Marshal de Lorge was thereupon going to pass the Rhine at Philipsburg, which it was believed would oblige the Germans to pass that river, to secure the country of Swabia from the enemy's ravages. The French King returned to Versailles on the 16th instant. It is still said that the Duke of Savoy designs to besiege Pignerol. The Spanish troops were expected in his camp at Iligon(?) on the 2nd instant. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 62.]
July 16. Mons. de Foubert to Sir Joseph Williamson at his house at Cobham. Inquires after his health and says that nothing important has happened since the loss of Namur; that the Duke of Leinster has gone to embark with his army and set sail. Seal. [Ibid., No. 63.]
July 18. Passes for Mons. Don Francisco Bernardo de Quiros, EnvoyExtraordinary from the King of Spain, and twenty servants to go to Harwich and Holland; and for William Blaeu, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 302.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses incurred by Philibert D'Herveart, esq., resident at Geneva, from the 2nd of February, 1691–2, until the 25th of March, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 368.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Robert Lloyd. Shows that he served as ensign, beutenant, and captain in the Prince of Denmark's regiment, commanded by Sir Charles Littleton, from the year 1667 till the regiment was disbanded, during which time he behaved himself faithfully according to his duty and the trust reposed in him. Having qualified himself, by taking the suitable oaths, and being now above 60 years of age, he prays that the Queen will grant that he may be inserted in the list of the small quarterly pensions for half–pay, according to his said qualification as captain. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 311.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Weeks, showing that, in June 1691, he petitioned the Queen—as one of her poor tenants in the manor of Bradwick, in Devonshire, and part of the Duchy of Cornwall—that the rent of 10l. per annum, charged upon his tenement, might be discharged; upon which her Majesty ordered all arrears to be abated for the time past. But the said rent of 10l. per annum still growing upon the said tenement, and he not making 20l. per annum out of the same, and having a wife and nine children and nothing to support them but that tenement, he prays for a total discharge of the same, paying yearly only the old and accustomed rent of 8s. 3d. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 342.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Exeter. I have received your letter about Mr. Tizer concerning whom I wrote to you on the 21st of May, that you should take care to prosecute him according to law. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 509.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing a conge d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield and Coventry empowering them to elect a bishop, the see being now void by the death of Dr. Thomas Wood; and likewise to prepare a letter, in the usual form, recommending to the said Dean and Chapter William, Bishop of St. Asaph. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 126.]
July 19. Passes for Mrs. Anne King, Mr. Edward King, Elizabeth Stanley, and Owen Stoakes, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Lieutenant Heeker, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 302]; for Mary Jasperz, Ells Jans, and Eiizabeth Jans, and five children, ditto; for Peter Merliere, and Mary, his wife, to go to Harwich and Sweden, recommended by Mons. Le Pin; for Mrs. Catherine Wogan and Anne Barents, her maid and her child, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for John Brower to go to Harwich and Denmark. [Ibid., p. 303.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I enclose an extract from a letter from Hamburg, by the Queen's command, who would have you inquire into the matter of "these shoes," how they came to be delivered and carried out of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 340.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General to prepare a bill containing a grant of the dignity of baronet of England to John Wentworth, of North Elmsall, in Yorkshire. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 366.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to grant to Samuel Huxford, Peter Plummer, Charles Webb, and William Hunt, five–sixteenth parts of the Arcana galley. The said vessel was fitted out for a privateer, and a commission of marque was granted to John Wood, her commander; but the said John, about April 1690, received on board the Countess of Southesk with her servants and goods, &c., and landed them at Calais. The said Samuel Huxford, and the others then serving on board the said galley with other mariners at no purchase or pay, declared against this proceeding, and on their return informed the Privy Council of it. [Ibid.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. Our fleet sailed from Torbay last Friday to the westward. The transport ships, with the flat–bottomed boats, arrived last Saturday at Spithead. The regiments which are to embark on them are encamped near Portsmouth, and will begin to embark to–morrow. The Duke of Leinster and Lord Galway arrived there on Saturday evening. Yesterday the Dutch mail came in with letters of the 14th from the King's camp which was still at Genappe, and the Duke of Luxemberg at Soignies. The letter tells us no news, but put us in expectation of some very considerable, for they all say that preparations were making for some enterprise. The Chevalier Granville, one of the conspirators against the King's person, had been at a trial before a court martial, but it was not yet ended. The Duke of Savoy had finally resolved to besiege Pignerol, and bad begun to raise his batteries. Seal. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 64.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for William Stoughton, clerk, to be chaplain to Col. Henry Row's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 284.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney–General concerning the petition of the Master, Wardens, and Assistants of the Trinity House of Deptford Strand. The report is as follows:—I have considered this petition, and I find that by an Act of Parliament made in the eighth year of Queen Elizabeth, the said Master, Wardens, and Assistants are entrusted and empowered, from time to time, at their discretion, and at their own costs, to make, erect, and set up so many beacons or lighthouses for sea marks as should seem requisite to them for avoiding dangers to ships, and at their own costs, from time to time, to continue, renew, and maintain the said beacons and lighthouses. The said Master, Wardens, and Assistants, at the general desire of the masters and owners of ships trading to all parts westward of Plymouth, having undertaken to erect a lighthouse upon a dangerous rock called the Eddystone, where the lives and goods of many of your subjects have been lost, and to maintain the same at their own charges, you may, by law, grant to the said Master, Wardens, and Assistants, liberty and power to demand and take a reasonable toll or duty of all ships and vessels passing by the said lighthouse, to be erected and continued for security of navigation. It appears to me, by the subscription of great numbers of masters and owners of ships, that the duty of a penny per ton is a reasonable toll. Referred to the AttorneyGeneral to prepare a warrant accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 343.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. The Queen would have you lodge 500 tents at Portsmouth, with all expedition, not to be removed till further order. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 510.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney–General. I send herewith the drafts of five Irish bills, which you are desired to consider of, that you may be prepared to answer such questions as the Lords may ask concerning them; you are to make such remarks as you may think proper, and to be at my office to–morrow evening at 7 o'clock, bringing the bills with you. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 510.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Having received a letter from Mons. Jurieux, on behalf of Mons. Londye, praying the payment of his arrears in respect of his necessitous condition, and having received from Mr. Blathwayt a request of the messengers attending the King in Flanders for 100l. to be divided among them, I send them both to you, by the Queen's command, that you may give necessary directions. [Ibid.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I have received a letter from the Duke of Leinster wherein he desires, for the encouragement of the army and in regard the subsistence of the soldiers determines to–morrow, that you will order that the agents may receive one week more in London, that so the country may be satisfied and there be no reason of complaint. [Ibid., p. 511.]
July 20. Passes for William Vinckenberck, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 303]; for Peter Pierredon, ditto; for Antonio de Cubelos, on the Portuguese Envoy's pass, ditto; and for John Pieterson, ditto. [Ibid., p. 304.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder of London and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Thomas Wheeler alias Richard Tovey. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 369.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Charles Hedges, judge of the High Court of Admiralty, to condemn to Sir Stephen Evance, Thomas Pitt, William Scawen, Sir Henry Furness, Charles Horde, John Horsley, William Bateman, John Nicholson, and Robert Clayton of London, merchants, all prizes which have or shall be taken by the Arcana galley, which they have, at their own charge, fitted out as "a manof–war" against the French. [Ibid.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upou the petition of Robert Longfield of Kilbride in the county of Meath, in Ireland. Shows that he, being an Englishman born, went into Ireland in 1664, and being bred up in the Court of Exchequer there, he was employed in the affairs of the Revenue from 1669; that, in February, 1688, he was sent, by the then government in Ireland, and commanded to serve the then Commissioners of the Revenue as Clerk of the Quit Rents without any commission, but depending merely upon the will and pleasure of the Commissioners; that he was returned a member of the pretended Parliament which sat at Dublin, but did not intermeddle or give any vote in regard to those transactions which tended to the destruction of the Acts of Settlement on which his estate depended; that after the happy success at the Boyne he delivered the papers he had in his custody to his Majesty's use, continuing in Dublin, and relying upon his Majesty's mercy, and several declarations, particularly that of the 7th of July, 1690, being in hope that anything done by him as Clerk of the Quit Rents would [not] be construed criminal. Notwithstanding this, he was indicted of high treason, and process issued against him thereupon; but the LordsJustices were pleased, by their order of the 9th of May, 1691, to direct Sir Richard Reynell, Lord Chief–Justice of that kingdom, to bail him; upon which, having taken the oaths, the said process was superseded, and though he is not convicted or outlawed, yet he is disquieted in the possession of his estate. Having a wife and six small children, he prays for a pardon and their Majesties' order for quieting him in his estate. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 344.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Sherlock, Edward Hammond, Nicholas Rice, Derby Long, John Grady, Terence Mc Donogh, John Delamar, Michael Hickey, and Arthur Keef, esquires. Shows that by the Articles of Limerick, all persons comprised in the said Articles, of what profession or calling soever they be, are freely to exercise and practise their profession or calling; that by an Act of Parliament in England for abrogating the oaths of Supremacy in Ireland, and appointing other oaths, it is provided, in pursuance of the said Articles, that the said Act should not disable any persons, within the qualifications mentioned in the said proviso, from practising their profession of barrister–at–law, provided such barrister–at–law shall make out his claim according to the qualifications expressed in the said proviso before the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, on or before the last day of Michaelmas term next. The petitioners being barristers–at–law and entitled to the said Articles, have exhibited their respective claims in the Court of King's Bench in Ireland; but some doubts have arisen, from the Justices of that Court, because the petitioners have only practised their profession since the death of King Charles II., and their Majesties in Council, being the proper judges of the sense and meaning of the said Articles, they pray that it be signified to the Justices of the King's Bench in Ireland, that notwithstanding the said doubt, they may be admitted to the practice of their profession of barristers–at–law. Referred to the Lord Chief–Justice of the King's Bench, or of the Common Pleas. [Ibid., p. 345.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dame Elizabeth Monins, widow. Shows that she is, by letters patent, entitled to the office of Water Bailiff of the River Severn for a term yet in being, under a rent to the Crown; that some persons have endeavoured to invalidate her patent by Scire facias in their Majesties' name in the Petty Bag Office, to which she pleaded above a year ago. Yet there has been no replication put to her plea or any proceedings against her for these four terms last past; so that she cannot proceed in the execution of the said office, or be discharged of the said suit. That the due execution of the said office is not only required of her by the said Letters Patent, but is of public benefit, and the neglect thereof of public mischief. Prays her Majesty to grant her warrant to the Attorney–General to award a Nolle Prosequi to the said Scire facias. Referred accordingly. [Ibid., p. 346.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ellen Fagan (widow of Richard Fagan, esq., deceased), and Christopher Fagan, son and heir of the said Richard, a minor. Shows that, by declarations of the 22 February, 1688 [–9], a full pardon was promised to all those who should lay down their arms; that her husband laid down his arms, and retired to his habitation, where he was killed by the rapparees for asserting their Majesties' authority; that the said Richard Fagan was indicted and outlawed in Ireland for high treason, and his lands, etc. seized by the Commissioners of the Revenue. And conceiving that it was not their Majesties' intention that any person rendering due obedience to the said declaration should be indicted, they pray to be admitted to bring a Writ of Error to reverse the said sentence of outlawry. Referred to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 349.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of several tradesmen, "whose names were subscribed." Shows that Capt. Rodney, in the second marine regiment, is indebted to them in several sums of money amounting in all to 53l. 5s., which he will not discharge though well able. They pray that the arrears of pay due to him may be stopped towards their satisfaction. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 362.]
July 21. Passes for Margareth Kalyn and her two children, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Rawlins, esq., and one servant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 304]; for Hendrina Court, ditto; and for Elizabeth Francia, and Dominick Francia, to return out of France in any ships or vessels employed by the Commissioners in transporting Prisoners of War, and to land in any part of the Kingdom. [Ibid., p. 305.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Sir Paul Ricaut, their Majesties' resident at the Hanse Towns of Hamburg, and Bremen, from the 1st of January last past, to the 1st of July, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 373.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Thornycroft and Capt. Edward Thornycroft. Shows that their brother Henry Thornycroft, ensign in Col. Beaumont's regiment, had unfortunately a quarrel on the 4th of April last with Mr. Campbell, and had the misfortune to kill him in his own defence, for which he is forced to "abscond;" and in regard all the provision made for the subsistence of their brother will go to private persons, in case he be found guilty of manslaughter, the petitioners pray for a pardon before trial, and to have the matter referred to the Attorney–General to examine and make report thereof. Referred accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 347.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Evelyn, esq. Shows that the Lords of the Treasury have thought fit to add the term of 30 years to a lease of certain lands at Deptford, in Kent, of which there are yet above 70 years unexpired, and for which a considerable sum of money was paid, deducted out of a great arrear of many thousand pounds [due to him ?]. He prays therefore—in consideration of the loss sustained by him in consequence of King James going out of England, when he should have been satisfied [of the arrears due to him ?]—to have a grant of the additional term for 305l., the sum mentioned by the Deputy Surveyor to the Treasury as a competent fine for the augmentation of so few years. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 347.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney–General concerning Sir Thomas Lane's petition. The report is as follows:—I have considered the petition of Sir Thomas Lane, Mr. Edmond Harrison, Mr. Robert Hackshaw, and several others (being above 30 in number) who are proprietors of several great tracts of land in divers of your Majesty's plantations in America. They pray that they may be made a corporation for the carrying on and accomplishing several very considerable designs, viz., the discovering and working of divers mines and minerals of copper, quicksilver, etc.; the settling a fishery in the said plantations; the establishing a trade with divers nations of the Indians on land; " the making of salt by the sun;" the furnishing of masts for your Majesties' and your subjects' ships; and divers other things, whereof mention is made in the petition, and by which, as they allege, your customs will be much increased, and your kingdom enriched.
The petitioners allege that it is not possible for them to raise so great a sum of money as is absolutely necessary for the beginning or carrying on so many and such considerable undertakings, unless you will be pleased to incorporate them for the said ends, and to grant to them such powers as are requisite in that behalf. That which is most considerable in relation to the matter of this petition, is, not whether by law such a corporation may be erected, but whether the erecting thereof will be for the interest of your government, and for the general advancement of the kingdom, of which I am not a competent judge; but if the Committee of Trade and Plantations or the others to whom the petition may be referred approve, I conceive the incorporation is legal. Referred to the Lords of the Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 350.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Adolph Curtius, esq., son of Sir William Curtius, bart., deceased. Shows that his father was resident of King Charles I. and King Charles II., with some princes of Germany, in which service he spent his life and estate; that, among other meritorious services, he procured a supply of 50,000l. from the estates of the Empire for King Charles II., during his exile, entertained the present King's mother and two of his uncles for a fortnight together, assisted and served several hundreds of English and Scotch and Irish during the Civil war, attended the Secretaries of State, after the stating of his account until 1678, when he died actually in the King's service, " for which he never had so much as the postage for letters paid." The petitioner has spent eight years, besides his estate, in soliciting the payment of 14,255l. due to his father, as appears by an account signed by King Charles II., together with a privy seal for 2,000l., whereof, 500l. only has been paid, and obtained a reference in King James's time, before the happy revolution. And whereas their Majesties are entitled to the Abbey of Newenham in Godlington parish, in Bedfordshire, to the value of 200l. per annum, becoming forfeited to King Charles II., as part of the estate of — Whitebread, and other jesuits attainted of high treason, the petitioner prays for a grant of their Majesties' right to the said Abbey, etc., with power to recover the same at his own charges by due course of law. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 354.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Duke of Leinster. Having acquainted the Queen with what you wrote to me on the 21st instant, she commands me to tell you, that the King having declared formerly that all the colonels should take their precedency, according to the dates of their commissions, without any distinction between those who had their commissions from the King when he was the Prince of Orange, and those who had their commissions since his accession to the Crown, she would have you observe this rule in determining all questions of this kind. But as Col. Beveridge's case is distinct from the rest, the regiment not being raised for which he had a commission, she thinks he is not comprehended within that rule, and ought not to be allowed the benefit of it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 511.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Van Ermelen and John Chapiot to go to Falmouth and embark for the Groyne; for Col. Walter Burk to go to Harwich and Holland; for Catherine Roelands and her child, ditto; [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 305;] and for Susan Halshall and Mary Halshall, with Elizabeth Harvey, their servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 307.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the Kings' Bench, and the Recorder of London, to take bail of William Dixy and Robert Smith, the former convicted of burglary, and the latter of felony, and since inserted in the general pardon for convicts of Newgate without any condition of transportation, for their appearance at the next sessions. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 372.]
July 22. Viscount Sydney to the King. I am sending another proposal which I think will be for your service. That you have been extremely abused by the officers of the kingdom of Ireland, there is no question, and if we can find a way to make these gentlemen refund, it will bring a great deal of money immediately into your Exchequer, and in some measure prevent the like for the future. This must be done by way of commission, which I am told I should do myself, but it will have more force and power if I have it in command by letter either from yourself or the Queen; when it is done, I am sure it will be thought well done, and I hope to have some honour by it. I expect with great impatience your resolution as to the other proposal, that I may begin my journey. I am not yet out of hopes of having a Parliament this year, though the LordsJustices and lawyers have done all they could to obstruct it. My Lord Nottingham will tell you the particulars of this and also the whole progress of the descent. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 115.]
July 23. Passes and post warrants for Martin Van Oorle, Joost Claese, Peter Scheffer, and Lerrit Renders, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Bronckhorst, Leendert Sanders, and John Klinger, ditto; for Henry Janse, Van Voorden, and John Baptist Cruytzer, with Elizabeth Peters, his wife, ditto; for Mary Jacobsen, ditto; for John Haution and Mary Elizabeth, his wife, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 306]; for Symon Chapman to go to Chester or Holyhead; for Mr. Robert Bell to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mr. Robert Warford, Mr. Joseph Page, Mr. John Owen, Mr. William Pillini, and Mr. Thomas Sweet, ditto. [Ibid., p. 307.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords.–Justices. I return you four of the bills which you sent Lord Sydney, with such alterations as have been thought fit to be made in them. It has been represented to the Queen that you have given orders to the judges, in their respective circuits, to direct that all persons who are not actually outlawed, and who depend only upon his Majesty's several declarations, etc., should now be indicted in order to be prosecuted to outlawries, and that even several of them who are now actually outlawed, should be again indicted, in order to rectify some errors in the former process, and this without any distinction between such as have faithfully complied with those declarations, etc., and such as may have acted otherwise. The Queen finding that the King (whose journey, upon several accidents, has been delayed much beyond expectation) before he went to Holland directed Lord Sydney what he should do in cases of this nature, desires me to send you a copy of the said directions on that behalf, which I enclose. —[S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 340.] Enclosure—the four bills above referred to; the King's directions to Lord Sydney are not entered. [Ibid.]
July 23.
Kensington.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Surrey, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon John Towers until the 5th of August next. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 370.]
July 23.
Kensington.
Warrant to Edward Russell, esq., Paymaster of the Navy, to imprest the sum of 3,000l. sterling to William Meesters, esq., "who is employed in a business of great importance to the service." [Ibid., p. 371.]
July 23.
Kensington.
Same to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon William Gee, alias Richard Johnson, until Monday the 8th of August next. [Ibid.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson. The Earl of Monmouth arrived here on Wednesday last from Flanders, but brought no news, having left the camp before our last letters. Three more regiments of horse, viz.: Lanier's, Athlone's, and Schake's (?), are ordered thither and probably are embarking by this time. The Prince and Princess of Denmark are going to Bath next week, but before they go they will come for some time to Berkeley House, which they have hired. Dr. Wake having their Majesties' presentation to the living of St. James', went to the Bishop of London last Tuesday to demand induction; the Bishop answered that the church was already full, he having presented and inducted Dr. Birch; so it must now come to a trial at law. Yesterday we had news from the Fleet, of the 16th instant, which was that they were then plying between the Start and the coast of France. The letters from Portsmouth of the 21st, say that four regiments were shipped the day before at Southampton and Cowes; that the regiments of foot, which lay encamped under the walls of Portsmouth would embark on the 22nd, and the horse the day following; and that they hoped to be all at sea in three or four days. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 65.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. I have received yours of the 23rd and 24th instant, upon which the Queen commands me to tell you that she does not think fit to make any alterations in such instructions as the Dutch men–of–war may have received from the respective Admiralties, or from Mons. Allemonde, who probably intended that, though there should be no English men–of–war in the Downs, yet that should not hinder the Dutch from proceeding. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 572.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney–General. Having sent to the LordsJustices the three bills prepared by you, I have received them again in form, with some alterations made in them by the Lords–Justices and Council, with their reasons for doing so, all which I send you here enclosed with the bills themselves as they were prepared by you, that you may consider the alterations and report your opinion on them on Wednesday afternoon next at 5 o'clock at my office. I also transmit to you a bill about the militia, sent to me by the LordsJustices, but not in form, that you may consider and make observations upon it [Ibid.]; The acts, in form, mentioned in this letter are: An Act of recognition of their Majesties' undoubted title to the Crown of Ireland; an Act confirming the Acts of Settlement and Explanation; and An Act declaring all attainders in the late pretended Parliament void. [Ibid.]
July 25. Passes for Anthony Gerbrandus to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 307]; for Antonio Feguers, with his wife and one son, ditto; for John Hovelingh, ditto; for Mr. William Shele, and John Delms, his servant, Mr. Wm. Marshall, Mr. Christian Kranse, and Mr. John Schlaft, recommended by the Lutheran minister, ditto; for David Bouzanquet, recommended by Mons. Bertheau, ditto; for Thomas Gogeaed, recommended by Mons. Conbet, French minister, ditto; for Mr. Charles Morgan and Mr. Daniel Twigden, John Allen and Thomas Browne, their servants, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 309.]
July 25.
Kensington.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Norfolk to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Thomas Clark, for "highway robbing," until a month after the expiration of the reprieve already granted him. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 372.]
July 25.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I enclose you a copy of a letter from Mr. Stock at Deal, dated the 23rd instant, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 315.]
Enclosing:—
Copy of a letter from Mr. Stock dated at Deal, 23 July, 1692. The fleet I mentioned are now forced to the Downs, and prove Dutch merchant–men from Amsterdam, mostly for Cadiz, under convoy of their men–of–war. But before they came in, two great Dutch ships arrived to join such of their Majesties' ships as were here bound to the fleet. I had formerly orders from Admiral Allemonde to send all Dutch men–of–war to St. Helens, which orders have not been countermanded since the fight, nor confirmed, so that I do not know what to do in this case. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 319.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Officers of the Ordnance. The Lords–Justices of Ireland, having written to me that it will be necessary to send over 1,000 barrels of powder to supply the garrisons there, her Majesty would have you examine, by the accounts in your office, what may be necessary on this behalf. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 513.]
July 26. Passes and post warrants for Maria Cortenall and Jan Janse to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 308.]; for Mary Plantin, ditto; for Mrs. Blanche Ron and Mary Cook, her servant–maid, to go to Harwich and Holland or Flanders; for Peter Langenbergh to go to Harwich and Holland; for Henry Leggat to go to Torbay and thence to Plymouth; for Richard Hopkins to go to Portsmouth [Ibid., p. 309]; for John Sleuter and Paul Vanhouse to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 310.]; and for Mr. Barthelemy Conly, a merchant, and Peter van Bustler, his servant, to land in any port in England, and to return back into Flanders. [Ibid., p. 311.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment to Philip Savage, Clerk of the Crown of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, of so much as the allowance after the rate of 40s. for each person who has or shall be indicted by him, amounts to; he having represented that he has prosecuted about 4,000 persons for high treason of which they stand outlawed, and their estates seized. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 485.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment out of the revenues of Ireland of an allowance of 10s. a day to Col. Thomas Becher, Governor of the Island of Inisherkin, near the harbour of Baltimore. [Ibid., p. 487.]
July 26. Mons. de Foubert to Sir Joseph Williamson at Tunbridge. A post came from Holland yesterday, but as no news came, I have no tidings of my two cavaliers. I have just heard that the Duke of Leinster embarked with the whole of his army last Sunday, and as the wind is favourable I expect they have sailed. I hope Tunbridge will do you good. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 66.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Tunbridge Wells. The Dutch mail of Tuesday came in yesterday with letters of the 18th from the King's camp which was still at Genappe and the Duke of Luxemburg at Soignies. The Marquis De Boufflers had marched with his body of troops towards Namur to observe the forces of Brandenburg. It was the talk of our camp that they should endeavour to recover that place, and to that purpose a train of artillery was shipping at Maestricht, which the French themselves seem apprehensive of, for they do not only, with extraordinary diligence, repair the fortifications, but have likewise sent away the women of quality with their best goods to Dinant; though, after all, some are of opinion that the King's design is elsewhere. The trial of Chevalier De Granville had not yet ended, but, in the meantime, he sufficiently owns the part he had in the conspiracy against his Majesty's life and that he was put upon it by the Court of France. In Germany the armies do nothing, the Confederates continuing on one side of the Rhine and the French on the other. There are letters from Savoy which say that the Duke had laid aside his design of besieging Pignerol, and was resolved to march directly into Dauphiny and to that end had divided his army into three parties. The forces are all embarked at Portsmouth, and we expect every hour to hear they have sailed. The James galley has brought a French privateer of 18 guns and 150 men into Plymouth, which they took after a dispute of four hours. The last letters from Plymouth say likewise that the Fleet was about eight leagues off the Start. A vessel which came from Cork to Bristol reports that two of our frigates had taken and carried into Kinsale a French man–of–war of 50 guns, which is likewise confirmed by letters from Ireland. The letters from Portsmouth of yesterday, say that the Duke of Leinster went on board last night in order to sail with the first fair wind, which we conclude they have had to–day, it being here at N.E. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 67.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon a letter from the Dean and Prebendaries of Ely to the Earl of Nottingham. The letter certifies that Thomas Ingram, one of the vergers of the said church, is an honest diligent man, and in all respects duly qualified for a beadsman's place in the said church, if her Majesty shall grant him one. Granted on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 351.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of Viscount Sydney to the Queen, dated 25th July, 1692, concerning Mr. St. Leger's petition. The report is as follows:—I have considered this petition. As to the nature of the said concealed mortgages, bonds, and other debts, the petitioner says they were made and owing to several forfeiting persons in Ireland; but the particular persons from whom or to whom the same were due, he is unwilling to name, till such time as a commission, or commissions, of inquiry is ready to be issued forth, lest thereby, he might be prevented in the discovery. As to the value of the said concealments, &c., the petitioner says, he believes and hopes he may discover as much as will amount to 6,000l. I believe he must have been a very great sufferer by reason of the late rebellion in Ireland, and that the damage he has sustained there, during that time, by the burnings, robberies, and other depredations of the Irish armies, may amount to what in the said petition is suggested. By this he and his family are reduced to great necessity, whereof you seemed sensible in bestowing upon him your bounty in the said petition mentioned. I believe that the services mentioned in that petition were performed by the petitioner as is therein set forth, and I am of opinion that you may signify your pleasure to your chief Governor, or Governor of Ireland, for the time being, to issue forth a commission of inquiry by and with the advice of the Attorney or Solicitor–General. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 352.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney–General, dated 25th June 1692, concerning Mr. Tyzack's petition. The report is as follows:—I have considered this petition, and have seen the letters patent therein mentioned, whereby your Majesty has been pleased to grant to John Tyzack the sole use of the invention mentioned in the petition in this kingdom, and if you are disposed to gratify the petitioner, I do not see any objection, in point of law, but that such letter as is desired may be directed to the Lords–Justices of Ireland. Referred to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 355.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth Philipina, CountessDowager of Bronchorst and Styrum, on behalf of herself and the rest of the co–heirs of Sir James Catts, deceased. Shows that the said Sir James Catts, and others, having purchased some lands in Hatfield Level in Yorkshire from King Charles I., and having borrowed 2,000l. of Sir William Courteen, and a commission of sewers being awarded them for assessing the said lands, Sir James Catts and Van Valkenburgh paid their assessments. In 1637 his Majesty ordered the Commissioners to sell so much of the defaulters' lands as would pay their respective arrears and discharge the remainder of the said debt, and the Commissioners, in obedience thereunto, adjusted (the year following) with the defaulters their respective arrears; viz.:—Vernatty and Vanpeines to be 538l. 13s. 4d each, and Corsell's to be 373l. 14s.; but, upon promise of payment, the sale of the said lands was forborne for six months. A commission of bankruptcy was soon after awarded against Sir William Courteen and the defaulters took advantage thereof, and did not pay their arrears. The Commissioners of Bankruptcy afterwards assigned the said bond, which the petitioners and the rest of the co–heirs of Sir James Catts have been forced to pay, besides great expenses. They therefore pray that the aforesaid order of 1637 may be renewed, with directions to the present Commissioners of Sewers for the said Level to call the occupiers of the lands of the said Vernatti, Vanpeine, and Corselli before them; and in case they find that no satisfaction has been given for the said arrears, or the remaining part of the said bond, that then they proceed to sell such part of the defaulters' lands to reimburse the petitioners. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [Ibid., p. 387.]
July 27. Passes for Cornelis Hoefnagel, Nicholas Wissums, and John Ross, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Arientz and Gerrit Van Lent, ditto; for Hieronymus Gors, ditto; for Frederick Van Rhemen, ditto; and for Zemant De Hoog and Francis Heysius, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 310.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Maris, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend Matthew Smith and Henry Smith, on suspicion of high treason, and to bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 374.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Charles Hara, Sir Thomas Millington, and others, the patentees and proprietors of the convex lamp–lights. They having obtained letters patent for the sole use of the said lamp–lights in England, and having brought the same to perfection, pray for letters patent for the sole use of the said lamplights in Ireland. Referred to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 355.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Campion, Thomas Crude, Anthony Row, Thomas Mall, George Boon, Thomas Neale, John Dewy, Arthur Moor, and John Tyzack, on behalf of themselves and others. Shows that England and Wales abound greatly in mines, especially lead, a great part whereof remains unwrought to the loss of the public; and that so great a part of the wealth of the kingdom remains useless, partly because there is not sufficient diligence and application in discovering the mines and that many owners of land where mines are cannot, or dare not, undertake the same themselves. The petitioners propose, as a means to prevent this loss to the nation and for adding to the real stock and wealth thereof, that they and certain others may be incorporated for that purpose, to the intent only to enable them to act safely by a joint stock. They do not desire to interfere with any charter already granted, nor pretend to work any mines but their own, and such as they shall buy or purchase, or shall agree with the owners of the soil for the working thereof; and in case they or others concerned in the said corporation shall enter upon the working of any mines which shall contain such quantities of silver, which of right belongs to the Crown as royal mines, they will, in such cases, make agreements with the Society of the City of London of Royal Mines, or the Company of the Mineral and Battery Works according to their respective charters or in such other manner as their Majesties shall direct, and will be contented to answer to the Crown a larger proportion of the clear profit than has ever been answered in such cases. They do not pretend to preclude the Crown or any subject from causing any mines to be worked or from granting or farming any mines whatsoever, except only such as they shall be lawfully entitled to by purchase or otherwise; so that the said Corporation, if granted, cannot prejudice any persons in their property or profit, but may be of great advantage to many proprietors, and will be a certain advantage to the kingdom in general. The petitioners pray for letters patent incorporating them, and such others as shall be named for this purpose, in order to the digging and working of mines and minerals, by a joint stock and for buying, refining, and purifying ores by such name of corporation, with such powers and conditions as her Majesty shall think fit. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [Ibid. p. 357.]
July. 28.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Maxwell. Her Majesty does not think fit to give you leave to go into France, but will give order for your release out of prison, provided you give security to appear as often as you shall be summoned. I desire to know what bail you will give and in what sum, whereupon I will move the Queen for further direction. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 573.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
A proclamation to explain a clause in a late proclamation for encouraging seamen, and mariners to enter themselves on their Majesties' service, dated the 21st of December, 1691. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations, Vol. 5, p. 81.]
July 28. Passes for Charles Drakenbergh to go to Harwich and Holland; for Benjamin de Vulaine, Judith, his wife, and their two children, ditto; for Christopher Van Hoogstraten, ditto; for Vincent Johnson, recommended by the minister and churchwardens of St. Catherine Coleman, London, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 311.]; for Nicholas Wasson, a weaver, recommended by Mons. Primerose, French minister, ditto; for Adrian Margo and Annetze Overkerch, and two children, ditto; and for Henry Gerritse, ditto. [Ibid., p. 312.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General to prepare a charter incorporating a company for making and refining saltpetre, with proviso that the said company shall within one year furnish the office of Ordnance with 200 tons "of the best white saltpetre, duly refined," at 70l. the ton, and afterwards, any quantity required, not exceeding 1,000 tons, at the same rate unless the ordinary market rate be below that sum, and in that case at the ordinary market rate; Memorandum. That the company understanding that their Majesties propose to erect a hospital for aged seamen—undertake to pay 1,000l. yearly towards the support of the said hospital. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 374.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General to prepare a bill, containing a grant to the Mayor, Bailiffs, and Burgesses of the borough of Plymton Earl in Devonshire, of all their ancient and lawful privileges, and particularly the liberty of having justices of the peace, and the yearly fairs and weekly markets enjoyed by them, with the addition of two new fairs, one to begin on 1st of August and to continue for three days following, and the other to begin on the 23rd of February and also to continue for three days. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 382.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General to prepare a bill, containing a grant to John Dyve, esq., of the office of one of the clerks of the Privy Council, in the place of Charles Montague, esq., with a fee of 250l. per annum. [Ibid., p. 383.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to prepare a bill for incorporating the Royal Lustring Company in England. Thomas Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery to be the first and present governor, Peter Le Keux, the first and present deputy governor; John Blondel, Lewis Gervaize, Paul Cloudesley, William Sherard, Peter Lause, Stephen Noguier, Paul Rey, John Le Keux, Peter Floyer, Joseph Paice, William Grosvenor, and Robert Hackshaw to be the first and present assistants. A proviso is to be inserted that nothing in the new grant shall discharge any covenant or proviso in James II.'s charter, granted in the 2nd year of his reign, to William Sherrard and Peter de Clue. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 383.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Davies, messenger in ordinary, to seize Thomas Gibbon for coming from France into England without a pass, and on suspicion of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 472.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Tunbridge Wells. The letters from Portsmouth of yesterday give an account that on Tuesday afternoon the Duke of Leinster set sail from Spithead and yesterday morning from St. Helens, taking his course towards the westward, with about 200 transport ships and 14 men of war, Dutch and English, which are their convoy. Admiral Russell, as we understood by the last letters from the Fleet, designed to meet them, having ordered Sir John Ashby, with part of the Fleet, to cruise, at the same time, on the coast of France. The Gazette contains all the foreign news which we had by a Dutch post yesterday. They still keep us in expectation of some sudden action, and particularly of the siege of Namur or Dinant by the Brandenburg forces. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 68.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Adam Stubbs. Shows that he has been, for many years, a soldier in the service of the Crown, and rode in Captain Leigh's troop in the royal regiment of dragoons, and was in most of the engagements in Ireland, in the reducing of which, about two years ago, he was disabled, and made incapable of future service. He has a wife and three small children and prays for an almsman's place in the Cathedral Church of Oxford. Granted, on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p., 356.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney–General. I send you an Order in Council for incorporating Constantine Vernatti and several others as a company to smelt down lead ore, with pit and sea coal, and to make the same into lead for all uses. I desire you will prepare such heads, as may be agreeable to the directions of the said order, together with the names of those who are to be first members of that corporation. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 513.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clark. The Queen approves of the quarters mentioned in your letter, and would have you give orders for a troop of dragoons to be quartered in the Isle of Wight. [Ibid., p. 514.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Ordnance. The Queen hearing that there is great want of bedding in the barracks at Portsmouth, would have you give order to provide this want. [Ibid.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. The Queen desires you to put into the hands of the magistrates, upon your return to England, the men who killed the lieutenant in Col. Selwyn's regiment. [Ibid.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen would have you give order to pay David Stuart 20l. which she is pleased to bestow on him in consideration of his good services. [Ibid.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Gibson. I have yours of the 27th and 28th instant, with which I have acquainted the Queen, who has ordered the Officers of the Ordnance to furnish the bedding wanting in the barracks. She approves of the care you have taken of the sick men, who were left behind, and would have you continue it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 515.]
There is entered here, apparently as a postscript to this letter, a note about the Dutch ships joining the fleet.
July 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. The Queen desires you to give orders to the troops, when they are in quarters, to patrol upon the road, for preventing the frequent robberies which are committed. The recruits intended for Lord Cutts' regiment at Caworth must be sent over to Flanders, as soon as they can; Lord Cutts will appoint some one to conduct them over and defray all the charges, so you must order them to march, so as to be in readiness to embark. [Ibid.]
July 29. Passes for Jacob Hauser and Caspar Schintz to go to Harwich and Holland; for Edward Smith, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 312]; for Mary Vallian and Catherine, her daughter, ditto; for Gaspar le Chandelier, Mary, his wife, and their three children, ditto; for William Bighum, ditto; for Eve Smith and her little child, ditto; for Capt. du Rosoy, recommended by Mons. Mettayer, French minister, ditto; for Gaspard Bernall, and a black woman, a servant, Mosch de Crasto, Samuel Alvarenga, Mosch Pacheco, Rachel his wife and Isaac, their son, Isaac Bernall, Joseph de Medina and Rachel his wife, Francisco Pereira and his wife, Joseph Salthiell, Barzilay Guilady, and Moseh Valensin, jews, ditto [Ibid., p. 313]; and for Mr. George Bridgeman, ditto. [Ibid., p. 314.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. Recites that the Master, Wardens, and Assistants of the Trinity House, Deptford Strand, have by their petition represented that application has been made to them by the masters and owners of shipping, trading to all parts westward of Plymouth, to erect a lighthouse or beacon upon the Eddystone rock off Plymouth, as a safety for ships to avoid the dangerous rock, upon which the lives and goods of so many have perished, and offering to pay for the support of such light, the same rate and proportion as they now do to the light upon Dungeness, viz., one penny per ton outwards, and the like inwards, for all ships and vessels passing by the lighthouse, excepting coasters, which are to pay 12d. per voyage. The said master, wardens, &c., being satisfied that this will be of great use to the navigation in general, have prayed for letters patent for their demanding and taking the said duties from all ships and vessels passing the same, to commence upon kindling the said light. Full and free liberty and licence is therefore granted to the Master, Wardens, and Assistants aforesaid to erect the said light and take the dues as suggested. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 378]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the appointment of Francis Roberts, Thomas Keightley, John Lowther, John Evelyn, and Zacheus Sedgwick as commissioners of excise in Ireland, and for the same persons and Bartholomew Van Homrigh and Christopher Carleton to be chief commissioners and governors throughout Ireland for all other revenues payable to the Crown. [S.P.D. Signet Office 12, p. 488.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, pardoning Ignatius Purcell of all treasons and misprisions of treason, he having represented that he never acted in the late reign in any employments whatever, civil or military, save only as a justice of the peace for Dublin which office he held in Charles II.'s reign and acted very kindly towards the protestants. Immediately after the battle of the Boyne he submitted himself and has ever since lived at home. [S.P.D. Signet Office 12, p. 490.]
July 29.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre, Secretary of the Earl of Nottingham. I send you an extract from a letter of Mr. Bourke, together with the copy of affidavit made by Thomas Jumpe before the Mayor of Liverpool, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 323.] Enclosing:—
(1) Affidavit made 26 July, 1692, by Thomas Jump of Liverpool, master of the Supply of Liverpool, before the Mayor there. He declares that, on Saturday last, he came over the bar of Dublin, in order to proceed on his way to Liverpool, when a wherry "came on board" with the King's jack, which he took to be the Custom House wherry, manned with the officers thereunto belonging; but it proved to be manned "with English, Scotch, and most Irish." These commanded him to come to an anchor, and came on board and plun dered him, and took about 200l. from him and the passengers, 100l. of which belongs to Mr. Peter Atherton, of Liverpool, merchant, and owner of the ship. This done they brought the deponent on board their privateer of 22 guns, there being another of 18 guns also in the Bay of Dublin, and those on board the privateer said they had taken 40 sail of ships since Wednesday last. The deponent says there were 17 masters then on board the privateer that took him. That morning the privateers had taken half a score of ships in half an hour—one of them the packet–boat. Those on board the privateer enquired how many men–of–war were here, and whether the Richmond frigate was ready, and whether any shipping were in Hoylake, because, if there were any, they said they would burn it [Ibid., p. 327.]
(2) Extract of a letter from Mr. Willam Bourke, dated, Liverpool, 26 July 1692. A vessel of this place arriving here to–day from Dublin, giving an account of two French privateers lying in that bay, I thought it necessary that the master should make his depositions before the Mayor of this town, which he did accordingly, and which I have enclosed for you to communicate to the Lords of the Admiralty. They are the same privateers that took their Majesties /?/ Hart, with the "cheese vessels," under her convoy, of this plac [Ibid., p. 331.]
July 30.
Kensington.
Commission for Charles Salisbury, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. William Harmer's company in the Earl of Monmouth's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 284.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Overing. Shows that he has, at great costs and charges and after much study and labour, invented and found out a new engine to convey air into pipes by "new contrived" bellows with plates covered with leather for securing the head and retaining the air about the upper part of the body, which gives liberty for a man to see, walk, and work for a considerable time many fathoms under water, and which will be useful for taking up plate, guns, wrecks, etc. Prays for letters patent for his invention. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 358.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mons. Hoffman. I have received a letter from the Lords–Justices of Ireland in which they inform me that the shoes at Hamburg have been taken from the King's stores and given to the Irish soldiers; so that Lord Iveagh has no right to keep these shoes as belonging to him, nor to sell them. They have been given to the soldiers and they ought to have them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 516.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Having acquainted the Queen with the enclosed report of the Lords–Justices of Ireland upon Lord Athlone's petition, which I received from Mr. Blathwayt, I transmit the same to you that you may consider and report your opinion thereon to the Queen. [Ibid., p. 518.] The report was concerning the particulars and values of some lands formerly belonging to Lord Slane, desired to be granted to the Earl of Athlone, amounting per annum to 144l. 2s. [Ibid.]
July 30. Passes for Isaac Patras, John Baptist Colomb and Marc Anthony Cottereau, recommended by Messrs. de Joux and Rouissillon, French ministers, to go to Harwich and Holland; for David Zur Linden and Hans Muller, ditto; for Herman Van Wyck, with his wife and one son, aged 13, ditto; for Abraham Crick and Anne, his wife, ditto; and for Mary and Jane Mercier, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 314.] (fn. 1)
July 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. The business of the lawyers of Galway will be considered when the Act of Indemnity comes to be prepared. Understanding that the packetboat, with the letters of the 16th instant, was taken on this day sennight, I enclose a copy of the letter I then wrote to you. The Admiralty has ordered the Centurion and Portsmouth, now at Kinsale, to cruise for some time in the Irish Channel, in search of the French privateers. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 342.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard ?] to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Tunbridge Wells. This morning a Dutch post came in and brought letters of the 25th June from the King's camp at Lambeque, which gives this account:—On the 22nd we passed the river Senne and encamped in this place; the same day the French army decamped from Soignies and marched to Enghien. His Majesty resolved to attack them, and accordingly the army began to march very early yesterday morning. The enemy was encamped on a rising ground with their left towards Enghien and a wood lying before them, encompassed with a thick hedge, so that there was no coming at them but by the sides of that wood, and the way lay through several hedges and ditches which the French had possessed themselves of. Whilst the army was advancing there was firing on both sides with cannon, which lasted about four hours. Between one and two o'clock the fight began on our left wing with ten battalions of foot, whereof four were English, commanded by the Duke of Wurtemburg who fell upon the enemy with so much vigour that they beat them from hedge to hedge and drove them beyond some of their cannon, which we were possessed of for some time. But the enemy came down upon our men in greater numbers, and the foot which was to have supported them having not yet advanced we could not maintain that post. The fight lasted with great heat for three hours and it is reckoned that we had between 3,000 and 4,000 killed and wounded on our side, and that the enemy's loss is, at least, as great. There being so many difficulties to get to the enemy by the situation of their camp, it was thought advisable to desist, and about six o'clock orders were given for returning to our camp which was done in great order. We only left behind two pieces of cannon, and some ammunition waggons breaking on the way we set fire to two or three of them. On our side Lieut.–Gen. Mackay, Lord Mountjoy and Lord Cutts [but see list following] are killed and several others wounded whose names I cannot yet write exactly. Of the French we hear the Duke of Maine is killed and the Duke of Luxemburg and the Marquis de Boufflers both wounded. A vessel has come into Portsmouth which met the Duke of Leinster with the forces at sea, who are doubtless by this time on the French coast; they stood to the westward. Appended is a list of the chief persons killed and wounded in the action referred to. Killed: Lord Mountjoy, Lieut.–Gen. Mackay, the Earl of Angus, Sir Robert Douglas, Sir John Lanier, Col. Hodges, Col. Lowther, Lieut–Col. Hawley, Lieut.–Col. Foxton, Lieut.–Col. Warcup, Lieut.–Col. Bristoe, Lieut.–Col. Colthrop, Lieut.–Col. Hamilton, and four Dutch colonels, all of the Guards. Wounded; Lieut.–Gen. Tettau, Major–Gen. Scaeke, Lord Cutts, Col. Cholmondeley, Col. Stanley, and Sir Charles Graham. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 69.]
July 30.
On board the Albemarle at sea.
Sir Francis Wheeler to the Earl of Nottingham. I have received your commands to come to London, concerning my intended voyage to the West Indies, from the Admiral. I have desired his leave to stay till her Majesty's orders come down, in relation to the proceedings of the Army. In case they should be put ashore in England, then I will go ashore the next day, but if they undertake any expedition, then I beg leave to stay to see them landed, because the manner of doing it is very well worth a young man's while, and because that game is to be played by me in the West Indies; and therefore, besides my own private satisfaction, I reckon it is for the King's service, provided I do not stay above ten days. One of my pressing propositions to you is relating to hospitals, and if it is true, what we hear from all hands along the coast, all will be little enough to keep the men alive, since in the West country they do not fail of averring that the plague is at Barbadoes, which will make a terrible havoc among new men. Pray God the news may not be true or else there is little sign of doing any service in those countries. It is perfectly the reverse of what is in these parts, for the fleet of England was never so healthy as it is at this time. I find as yet only six ships named to go with me, viz., my own ship, which I desire may be the Resolution, the Chester, Ruby, Advice, Dragon, and Experiment, which I think is an inconsiderable strength, and therefore hope you will add more, for it is absolutely necessary that we must be masters of the sea; and all that are there must come home except the three that went last with the convoy, and one of those is at Jamaica. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 413.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Capt. Van Zeyl. The ships sent by the King may be of great use in the present expedition of the Fleet, and they daily increase in the Downs, but the Commissioners of the English Admiralty have no ship of war there to convoy the said ships to the Fleet as speedily as the service requires. The Queen therefore desires you to send a ship into the Downs to convoy the said ships to the Fleet, or at least until they meet some English ship to which their protection may be committed. [Ibid. 5, p. 180.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Matthews. The Queen would have you direct the agent of your regiment to pay to Major William Culliford, so much of the pay as remains in the agent's hands; and, for the future, to pay the said major his half pay in the same manner, and at the same time, as the other officers of your regiment receive their pay. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 521.]
July 31. Passes and post warrants for Frances Saverra and her three children, recommended by M. Legard, curate of St. Martin's, to go Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 314]; for Mr. Alexander Maria, ditto; for Thomas Davis the messenger, ditto; for Richard Hopkins to go to Dartmouth; for Francis Clarke to go to Portsmouth; for the abovesaid Thomas Davies to be received on board a packet boat at Harwich, he being sent by the Queen to the King, and to sail with all speed to the Brill, where he is to land [Ibid., p. 315]; for Mary Wilson to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 316]; and for Jonathan Compton, esq., ditto, renewed on 11th August. [Ibid., p. 325.]

Footnotes

  • 1. This pass in entered again on p. 315.