BHO

William and Mary: June 1692

Pages 307-344

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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June 1692

June 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 540 cartouch boxes, and 60 granado pouches to be issued for the use of the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Zachariah Tiffin. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 271.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Norrys, esq., to be captain-lieutenant of the troop, in the regiment of dragoons commanded by Col. Robert Echlin, of which he himself is captain [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 271]; for John Sabine, to be lieutenant to Major Joseph Sabine's company, in Sir John Morgan's regiment of foot; and for Peter Abraham Cucut, gent., to be ensign to the same company. [Ibid., p. 272.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon petition of Lord Bellew. Shows that he was taken prisoner and dangerously wounded at the battle of Aughrim, and continued prisoner and under cure for above five months, and though released, is yet still under cure. That his wife has been in England since August, 1688, and that she is heir to 500l. a year, and has 3,500l. on mortgage in trustees' names for her use, all which, with the petitioner's estate, was seized in July, 1690. That his personal estate, to a considerable value, was taken by their Majesties' army in Ireland and converted to their uses, and all his houses and furniture, etc., burnt and destroyed. That being deprived of all his personal and real estate, and having grown weak and infirm, is reduced to a lower condition than can be expressed, his wife receiving no manner of subsistence. Prays to have some relief for him and his wife as their Majesties shall think fit. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 308.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose the extract of a letter to me from the Lords-Justices of Ireland, concerning the ship Henry, being one of the transport ships which carried the Irish to Brest, and likewise the copy of a letter, from the Commissioners of Prizes to Mr. Deyos, their sub-commissioner in Ireland, relating to the same subject, that you may give such directions therein as the case shall require; so that all pretence of a breach of the capitulation on our part may, as far as is possible, be avoided. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 473.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Pierson and Mr. Nash. Mr. Edward Bushell, a merchant of London, has made oath, that he believes the ship called the Guardian Angel, of which Timothy Evans was pilot in a voyage to and from Portugal, has arrived at Rotterdam, he having seen two letters to that purport—one from the merchant to whom she was consigned, and the other from the captain of the ship; having known the said Timothy Evans for many years, believes him to be an honest man, and loyal to their Majesties. I therefore desire you will discharge him. [Ibid.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Passes for Tobias Schwartz to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 248]; for George Coning, ditto; for Roeloff Hansen, ditto; for Mr. William Bidwell, ditto; for Coenrad Pietersen Havekam, ditto; and for Lawrence Losscher, ditto. [Ibid., p. 249.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send, by the Queen's command, the enclosed estimate for the monthly pay of the officers and servants of the marching hospital, that you may examine it by what has formerly been proposed in matters of this kind, and lay before her your opinion what may best be done. [Ibid.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the Bishop of Exeter. I have received yours of the 30th of May, with the note enclosed of the names of the persons and the services performed, but without any notice of what may be fit to be given upon each article; which, if you will let me know, I will give order for paying the money to such person as shall be appointed to receive it. [Ibid., p. 475.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Mr. Philip Colas, a French minister, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. William Cradock, ditto; for Mr. James Charron, ditto; for Mr. Henry Shute, Mr. John Stacy, and Mr. John King, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 250]; for Captain John Fowler, Captain Robert Lamb, and Edward Chaplin, their servant, ditto; for Henry Allen, a messenger, and Charles Marys, to go to Newcastle or thereabouts [Ibid., p. 251]; for John, Lord Burleigh, and William Cecil, esq., his brother, Lewis Berrard, Helkiah Bedford, Culpepper Tanner, Anthony Chameau, and Abraham Du Paquier, their servants, to go beyond seas and travel in the dominions of friendly princes and states, and to allow them to embark at any port in this kingdom to go thence to Holland. [Ibid., p. 252.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I have transmitted what you wrote me concerning the transport ship Henry to the Lords of the Treasury, and also the copy you sent me of the Commissioners of Prizes' letter to Mr. Deyos, that they may give such order as shall be proper in this case, and take care to prevent, as far as possible, any breach of the Articles of Limerick. You are to appoint a monthly fast in Ireland, as the same is observed in England; the Queen leaves it to you to appoint a day. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 334.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to give orders for paying 670l. to Peregrine, Earl of Danby, the amount realised by the sale of two old French ships, and an old bylander taken by the Bridget, Capt. Robert Marshall, commander, which was tender to the Resolution, commanded by the said Earl, and brought into Portsmouth, where they were appraised by the officers of the Prize Office, and condemned as lawful prize in the Court of Admiralty. The charges connected with the condemnation and sale are to be deducted from the said 670l. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 341.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Admiral Russell's letter to the Earl of Nottingham containing an exact and particular relation of the victory and success over the French fleet. Printed. [S.P. Dom. William, and Mary 4, No. 51.]
June 2. Admiral Russell to the King. I knew Lord Nottingham would give your Majesty the account of what success your fleet has had against your enemies, which has prevented me from troubling you before on this subject, I humbly beg you will please to believe it has not proceeded from want of that duty I shall always pay to you, but purely out of consideration not to give you more trouble than was necessary. It has pleased God to give success to your Naval forces, and if your Majesty is pleased to believe that I have not been wanting for my endeavours to perform what may conduce most to your service, I shall have, in that thought, all the joy and satisfaction imaginable. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 98.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles, Earl of Monmouth, part owner, and the rest of the owners of the South Dyke yacht, Thomas Robinson, commander. Shows that the said yacht, being sent express from the coast of England to give notice to the fleet that the French fleet was on our coast, and on her voyage back met with a vessel called the Prince William, Jaques Verdouck, master, laden with French wines and brandies, and other goods of the growth of France, which she took as prize and brought into Portsmouth; but as the petitioners' yacht has a commission granted from their Majesties, as other men-of-war have in her Majesty's employment (but manned and victualled at the petitioners' own cost and charge) they are informed that they can have no benefit of the said prize. They pray her Majesty to grant them the said vessel with all her lading to their own use. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 309.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Judge Dolben. The Queen desires you to hold the Assizes for the county of Bucks at the town of Buckingham, thinking it best for the ease of her subjects of that county, who are to attend them. In the winter they are to be held at Aylesbury, and in the summer at Buckingham, according to the rule heretofore practised. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 475.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Harwich. I am informed that a gentleman, whose name is Vrigny De Jusgné and who had my pass, is stopped at Harwich upon suspicion, because some letters were found concealed in his hat; but these were only letters of recommendation on his behalf from some friends in England. I have received a very good character of his honesty and good affection, and I desire you will discharge him, and permit him to pass beyond the seas. If there is any other officer at Harwich concerned herein, I desire you will acquaint him with it, that this gentleman may be no longer hindered from continuing his journey. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 475.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. John Nash. Being assured by persons of good credit, that Andrew Baumgaerten, David Bove, and Francis Peter Payferie, three persons lately come from France, whom you have stopped at Deal, are French Huguenots, and have made their escape hither for shelter and refuge, I desire you will discharge them, and permit them to come to town; their friends having promised that they shall appear before me. [Ibid., p. 476.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Ouzeel Van Swiese, of Leyden, and Mr. John Cousart, of Amsterdam, to go to Gravesend and thence to New York, in America [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 250]; for Chambarge d'Haas to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Meier, ditto; for Dirk Beker, ditto; for Mr. Edward Joselin, ditto [Ibid., p. 251]; for Christopher Laersen to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Mr. Charles Sclater to go to Greenwich and embark for Sweden; for Gyles Van Deuch to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 252]; for Mr. Peter Justice and William Hasklever, John Klock and George Koning, servants, ditto; and for Robert Downes to go to Gravesend and New York. [Ibid., p. 253.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Beake and Nicholas Hill, messengers in ordinary, to search for Mr. George Knipe, and having found him, to seize him together, with his papers, on the charge of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 342.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize and Gaol Delivery for the Norfolk Circuit, to cause Henry Cole, John Williamson, and Richard Busbey, who were convicted of robbery at the assizes held at Aylesbury, in Buckinghamshire, to be inserted in the next general pardon which shall come out for the Norfolk Circuit, upon condition of transportation. [Ibid.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Great Seal to grant a commission of review for rehearing and determining the dispute between Abel Reensterne, Tobias Degums, Claus Jansen, Ernest Bakeman, Hans Lampers, the widow of Paul Husman, and Peter Artman, subjects of the King of Sweden, and John Fletcher, the former persons being owners of a ship called the Hercules, of which the said Peter Artman was, or is, master. The said ship and lading had been taken and seized by the said John Fletcher, commander of a privateer called the Dolphin, by virtue of a commission granted to him, and were, by the Judge of the Court of Admiralty of England, decreed to be restored to the said Peter Artman, the master, for the use of the above-named persons; but afterwards, upon an appeal, the same were condemned to the said John Fletcher, as a lawful prize. [Ibid., p. 343.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a writ of error, for the reversal of the outlawry of John Galwey for high treason, in sitting as a member in the late pretended parliament; and for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland granting him a free pardon. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 469.]
June 4.
"Park" near Louvain.
Warrant for a privy seal for Mr. Alexander Higgins to be their Majesties' Accountant. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 126.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Moses Ferme to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Furssen, ditto; for John Fabry, ditto; for Henry de Vie, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 253]; and for Aeltze Vander Broeck, with her little son, ditto. [Ibid., p. 254.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to give order for the payment of 100l. to John Codnell, in consideration of the service performed by him, in rescuing an English ship out of the hands of the French. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 344.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Joseph Williamson, keeper of the State Paper Office, to deliver to Sir Charles Hedges, knt., Judge of the Admiralty, all the papers relating to the affairs of the Admiralty now remaining in the said office, in order to lay them up among the records of the Admiralty. [Ibid.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords-Justices of Ireland to permit Theobald, Lord Caher to bring a writ of error for the reversal of his outlawry for high treason, he having represented that by the Declaration of 1688 it was promised to all subjects the free enjoyment of their estates, in case they should lay down their arms and retire to their respective habitations before the 10th of April then next ensuing, and that he, upon the publication of the said declaration, being then a captain of foot in the Irish army, quitted that service before the said date, and was not after that time in any military employment. Being, however, in Cork upon his own private affairs, he was, upon the surrender of that city, made a prisoner of war and sent to England, where he remained a prisoner in the Tower until be was admitted to bail about February last. Since his being brought a prisoner to England he was indicted and outlawed for high treason, all his lands being seized, so that he has nothing left to maintain himself and his children. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 500.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Corker. Shows that he is a faithful subject, and continues to do good service to the Government in the station where he is placed, and that he has never had any satisfaction for the services he has done. Prays, therefore, that the Treasury be directed to examine his allegations, and if found true, that he may have some reasonable satisfaction out of such arrears as he shall discover to be due to their Majesties. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 310.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon Sir John Temple's report concerning Lord Massereene's petition. I have examined the state of such particulars as the petitioner now desires to have reported upon, which are concerning two parcels of salmon belonging to him which have been seized for the use of your forces in Ireland, and find, that during the siege of Londonderry about 60 tons of salmon were taken from the petitioner's agents at Culmore Fort, and carried to Londonderry for the use of that garrison, and that the usual price of good salmon was then 15l. per ton there, as appears by the annexed report of Mr. Harboard, dated the 15th of August, 1689, then made to the Treasury concerning that matter.
I also find that the petitioner's agents in Ireland had taken and "barrelled up" a great deal more salmon at the fishing in the Bann, near Coleraine, in the year 1689, being about 140 tons; 63 tons whereof were sold by the petitioner to a merchant in London at 14l. 10s. per ton, and the rest ordered to be sent to Liverpool.
That your Majesty by Order in Council, dated the 9th of September, 1689, was pleased to order that the Officer-in-Chief commanding at Coleraine, should take care to preserve the said salmon, and in case your affairs should not stand in need thereof, should permit the petitioner's agents to dispose thereof for the petitioner's best advantage.
That afterwards the late Duke of Schomberg, by his order dated the 10th of November, 1689, required the then Governor of Coleraine not to suffer any of the said fish to be removed without his special order. That afterwards six tons of the said salmon were disposed of for the use of your ships which lay at Portrush, and of the soldiers at Coleraine, and the rest kept so long there that the petitioner could not make good the sale that he made of the 63 tons to the merchants in London, who made a protest on the 24th of March, 1689–90, against the petitioner for not delivering the said fish to them, and the petitioner was forced to sell his fish at a great under-value afterwards.
By all which means the petitioner has been at a very great loss, and I conceive deserves such satisfaction as you shall think fit to make him, both for the salmon made use of for your forces, and for the damage sustained by him in detaining the rest of the fish from him whereby he lost the benefit of the bargain that he had made for it. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 310.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Gibson. I have your letter of yesterday, acquainting me that you had been served with a Habeas Corpus, for removing Mr. Cooper to London, which you must obey, and so you must do if you should ever be served with another. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 476.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney-General. I desire you will attend the Queen at the Cabinet Council at 12 o'clock to-morrow or sooner, if it will be convenient to you. [Ibid.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Abraham Van Braam to go to Harwich and Holland; for Geertruydt Gellickhuys, with her small child, ditto; for Mr. William Pyne, ditto; for Henry Graham, esq., and James Loftus, his servant, to have the same privileges as those granted to Lord Burleigh in the pass given to him on the 2nd of June; for Robert Knollys, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 254]; for Tunnis Barent, a seaman, to embark at Gravesend, and pass over to Denmark, ditto; and for Maynardt Andries, a seaman, ditto. [Ibid., p. 255.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill for signature incorporating the borough of Warwick. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 345.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. To-day two Dutch mails came in with letters of the 30th past and the 2nd instant (our style) from the King's camp, which give an account that the town of Namur was surrendered to the French by capitulation on the 26th past, the garrison retiring into the castle, which held out still, and was likely to do so for some time. The King advanced on the 29th to the River Mehaigne which alone separated his from the enemy's camp, over which he caused a great many bridges to be made, with a firm resolution to attack the enemy the next day; but there fell, the day and night before, so much rain that the thing was prevented. The army continued in the same place when these letters left, the low ground on each side of the river, by reason of the continual rain, being so full of water, that it was impossible for the present to pass over to attack the enemy, so that they awaited only fair weather to commence the attack. In the meantime this nearness of our army gave the French a great diversion, and was the reason they could not push on the siege so vigorously as they might otherwise have done. They had not yet begun to attack the castle, their batteries playing, hitherto, upon the new fort on the same hill with the castle. Above 500 deserters have come over to us. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 52.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Judge Dolben. Since I wrote to you that the Queen thought Buckingham the most proper place for holding the Assizes, she has been importuned to change that resolution; she is informed that you had some objections to it, which she would know, so that if they are satisfactory she may revoke her former order, which as yet she does not think fit to do. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 477.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I have acquainted the Queen with the misfortune that has happened to the Dunkirk, and she has hereupon commanded me to tell you, that she would have orders sent to such of the men-of-war which come from the fleet to the Downs, as you think proper, to proceed to Harwich; and in case Lord Portland has not gone from thence, to convoy him to Holland, and having done so—or if Lord Portland should have sailed from Harwich upon the arrival of the convoy from the Downs—to return to such station as you shall appoint. And because some menof-war may be expected with the colliers and others from before Dunkirk, his Majesty would have the like orders sent to the buoy in the Nore, to be executed by such of those men-of-war as shall first arrive there. [Ibid.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Francis Bowes. I have your letter of the 3rd instant, with the enclosed copy of an information, upon oath against Mr. Timothy Williamson, who must be prosecuted for his offence, and I desire you will bring him over to the next Assizes, and take care that he is brought to trial. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 478.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing the presentation of Ralph Holden, clerk, to the rectory of St. Ives, in Cornwall, in the diocese of Exeter, void by the resignation of John Tindal, clerk. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 125.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Lawrence Plante to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. David Danon, ditto; for Teunis Janse, ditto; for Emanuel Hachelaer, ditto; and for Stephen Gythens, the messenger, to go to Harwich. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 255.]
June 7. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Warre. The St. John, Soren Sorensen, master, was ordered to-day to be restored. The Rusticus Polonus was pretended to be bound from St. Sebastian to Dantzic on account of merchants at that place; but there were great suspicions of her trading with France, and the claimers not proving their property, and the ship not being furnished with papers and documents as it ought to have been, she was condemned. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 349.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Fowle, gent., agent to Viscount Massereene. Shows that, about the 27th of June, 1691, several persons pretending their Majesties' authority, came to the said lord's house and woods in Ireland, saying they would fell trees for the Navy, whereof the said lord complaining, he was assured that the orders issued on that occasion were only for surveying such woods as might be proper without felling any of them, and that they should not be felled till the owners had given their consent upon such terms as should be adjusted. But so it was that the said persons proceeded to mark and cut down about 145 trees of the best growing near his park, called the manor of Deer Park, in the county of Antrim, which have been measured and their respective scantlings computed to be of a very great value, but much more esteemed by his lordship, because he would not have them felled or sold upon any account but for their Majesties' service, in case trees "of that extraordinary length, contents, and scantling" could not be provided elsewhere. That upon their Majesties' orders to the Admiralty concerning this matter, the petitioner was appointed agent to attend them, and has waited 12 months; and in regard the said 145 trees are computed by workmen and valued by a skilful carpenter at 3l. 15s. 0d. per load, making in the whole 781l. 2s. 0d., he prays, on behalf of the said Lord Massereene, to have satisfaction for the said trees at that rate. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 312.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Baldwin Leighton. Shows that he was one of the first officers who appeared in England for their Majesties' service, to the hazard both of his life and fortune as would appear by certificate if required, and that he had, besides, the copy of a letter signed by the King, owning his fidelity and service. His Majesty was pleased to send him into Ireland with several hundred blank commissions, the disposal of which was left to his care with other instructions. That besides his pains and charges, he paid off two small merchant-ships, which attended him nine weeks upon the expedition. His Majesty has since given him the office of Warden of the Fleet, for which he had a patent, but it is stopped at the the Great Seal, though he does not know the reason; which expense, and his losses at sea and in Ireland for his Majesty's service, amounts to upwards of 2,400l. Therefore he prays, either to be reimbursed his losses and expenses, or for some other compensation. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 313.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Huxford, Peter Plummer, Charles Webb, and William Hunt, seamen, lately serving on board the Arcana galley. Shows that the said vessel was built by the appointment of several merchants and others in London, and was intended by them for a privateer, and that a commission of marque was obtained for Capt. John Wood as commander thereof under the seal of the Admiralty, empowering him to take ships, etc., of the French king or his subjects. That accordingly the said galley was manned and set sail with the petitioners and other mariners about April, 1690, and arriving, the month following, at Dover, they found the Countess of Southesk, having a pass from the Earl of Nottingham for the quiet embarking of herself and her servants for Flanders. The said captain, having agreed with her for her transportation to Nieuport, afterwards landed her at Calais, and as soon as the said galley returned the petitioner gave information thereof to their Majesties' Council, where they attended from time to time, and at the last summer assizes at Maidstone, and at the High Court of Admiralty where the said galley was condemned. As they have never received a penny of pay for their service in the said galley, nor any allowance for their long attendance upon the said process, for about 18 months, nor for any other charges of imprisonments whence they were bailed by Mr. Aaron Smith, they therefore pray to have the remaining five sixteen parts of the said galley which are forfeited by the owners who did not come in at the trial to make oath of their ignorance of her going to France. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Captain Connor O'Brien. Shows that his grandfather, Teige O'Brien, of Dromore, in the county of Clare, next brother to Donogh, Earl of Thomond, was, in 1641, seized in fee of several manors and lands in the said kingdom of Ireland, and his sons Dermot O'Brien (who died without issue), and Terlagh O'Brien, his father (?) were also seized of considerable estates, all which by due course of law would have devolved upon the petitioner as heir to them. That his father, upon the restoration of King Charles II., obtained his Majesty's letter of the 7th of March, 1660, directed to the then Lords-Justices of Ireland, to settle and establish him in all his said estate of which he had been dispossessed by the late usurped powers; but the same land was given out before to "transplanted persons," who, by his Majesty's declaration, were not to be dispossessed until they were reprized. Whereupon the petitioner's father, by his agent, agreed with his cousin, Col. Daniel O'Brien, late Viscount Clare, to include his estate in such grant or proviso as he should obtain for his own grandfather Daniel, then Viscount Clare, a third brother of the said Earl of Thomond, but yet in trust for the petitioner's father, which the said Lord Clare undertook and gave a note in writing to that effect; whereupon the petitioners desisted from any further prosecution in the Court of Claims, and left the same wholly to the management of the said Lord Clare.
Lord Clare, through the favour of his Majesty to his family, obtained, in his own name, a grant as well of his own grandfather's estate as of that of the petitioner's grandfather, which however was in trust for his father, and by force thereof has enjoyed, for above 20 years last past, all the rents and profits of all the petitioner's ancestors' said estate, for his own proper use. The petitioner's father and agent, who was his younger brother, are both dead, and the said instrument of trust is miscarried by the late troubles in Ireland. Whereas the said Lord Clare found the petitioner would be entitled to the said estate as heir-at-law to the said Teige, and Terlagh, he procured the petitioner, by express name, to be attainted of high treason by the late pretended parliament in Ireland for being in their Majesties' service. Therefore, considering that the said estates have been and still stand incumbered with debts contracted by the said Viscount Clare, almost to the full value, and also that the said estate being in the possession of the said Lord Clare, is now to be seized into their Majesties' hands, the said lord being an " adherer " to King James, the petitioner prays to be restored to the possession of his said estate or for a grant to him of a custodium of it. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 319.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. I desire you will send me a list of the prisoners in the Tower, and let me know the time when each of them was examined. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 478.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The same to Captain Richardson. I desire you will send me the names of all the prisoners of state in your custody, and let me know the time when each was delivered to you. [Ibid., p. 479.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the keeper of the Gatehouse to the same effect as the above. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you the enclosed letter from the Duke of Schomberg, by the Queen's command; and in regard this matter has been a long time depending, and you will perceive by his letter the necessity of dispatch, her Majesty would have you give the necessary orders in it. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. I send you the enclosed "state" of Mr. Higgin's case that you may examine it, and report how you find it. [Ibid., p. 480.] Memorandum. The above said case of Mr. Higgins was concerning two troopers belonging to Col. Coy's regiment, which, with Quarter-master Palmer and twelve more troopers, committed several abuses in his house, and took some horse by force. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 480.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords of the Treasury. I send, by the Queen's command, the enclosed memorial from Col. Robert Echlin, concerning money for the recruits, and accoutrements of his regiment, that you may prepare the requisite orders. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. This is only to accompany the enclosed extract of a letter from Col. Nicholson, lieutenant-governor of Virginia, which I thought fit to transmit to you, that you may consider it and give directions therein. [Ibid.] Enclosure:—
Extract from Col. Nicholson's letter from " Virginy, James' City, " February 26, 1691–2. I beg that an order may be sent about the houses, and other appurtenances, on the land found to escheat to their Majesties, for it may sometimes happen that, upon the land of very little value, there may be a house or more of great value, especially if towns are to be. I conceive that the tobaccos, which are carried from one plantation to another, are to pay their Majesties 1d. per pound according to the Act of Parliament. I must move your lordship, that directions may be sent concerning this. I am in hopes to have, by the fleet, directions about the Exchequer Court, and that all their Majesties' collectors in these parts be obliged to take the oath for observing the Acts of Trade and Navigation. When orders come about the Quit rents, I hope to be able to advance. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Dirck Jansen and Mary Joosten to go to Harwich and Holland; for Thomas Roelossen, ditto; for Lewis de May, ditto; for Anthony Guenall, ditto; for Johanna Sappels and her two children, ditto; for Ernst Henderick, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 256]; and for Mr. William Storrs, ditto. [Ibid., p. 257.]
June 8.
Dover.
Robert Jacob to Messrs. Becceler and Geertz. I was at Deal yesterday, and went on board the ship Christian the Fifth with the captain's letter to his mate for my giving them my assistance, but I never saw such a crew of ill-men on board a ship, I mean the privateer crew, who are about the number of 16 or 20, and the major part of them were very much in drink, and lived as if the ship were all their own, and had all things at their command to the great disheartening of the ship's company, who I prevailed with to have a little patience, and we would get it remedied, the privateer riding all the time very near the ship to see after her. I have carried the scrivener of the ship with me to several tradesmen at Deal, where I have given him credit for such provisions as should be wanting until I had your further order. It would be very proper to give in security at Doctor's Commons about the said ship, that she shall not stir till after a hearing at the Court, that the hellish crew may be removed from on board, for, at their pleasure, they lend out a long boat of the ship for several days, which ought not to be from that ship, and if it should be lost, may be to the hazard of the ship. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 361.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Thomas Hopson, esq., to be captain of the company, of which Lieutenant-Col. Anthony Hastings was late captain in the first regiment of foot guards, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg; and to take his rank as youngest lieutenantcolonel of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 272]; and for Lieut.Col. Henry Davies to be deputy-governor of the Castle of Southsea, under the command of Lieut.-Gen. Thomas Talmash, governor of Portsmouth, to hold the same in succession to Capt. Richard Carter. [Ibid., p. 274.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dame Ann March, widow. Shows that she was "possessed and settled" of a plantation in the island of Nevis in the West Indies, left by her husband, Sir Thomas Warner, governor of St. Christopher, which plantation she surrendered to her son, Col. Philip Warner, of Antigua, now deceased, in consideration of 400l. per annum to be paid to her in England, during her life. There being already eight years passed and no articles performed, and she being of great age, and in some measure deprived of her sight, and suffering other infirmities, is reduced to a low condition, and cannot, by reason of the war, "the current of the law being stopped in those islands," force to justice the persons concerned. Prays for a letter to the Governor-in-Chief of those islands, that a special court may be held for a trial of such actions as shall be brought against the heirs or executors of Col. Philip Warner and others. Referred to the Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 315.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing the presentation of Richard Fyson, clerk, and M.A. to the rectory of Suckley, in the county and diocese of Worcester, void by the death of Benjamin Herbert. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 124.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Baptista Van Kuyser to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Derck Hendrickse, Amerentia Simens, Janje Van Vorschott, and Sara Visch to go to Harwich and Holland; for Reynier Martens, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 257]; and for Mr. Henry Ford and Mr. James Salle, ditto. [Ibid., p. 258.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords Justices. I will write to the Prince of Hesse, and speak to Mons. Hoffman as you propose concerning Lord Iveagh. I have acquainted the Queen with Capt. Oliver's circumstances, and she gives him leave to be absent from his command in Col. Foulk's regiment, and to remain in Ireland. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 335.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Nicholas Hill, messenger-in-ordinary, to search for Robert Young, and Stephen Blackhead, and having found them to seize them for high crimes and misdemeanours, and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 355.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. Lord Newburgh, who was in the Proclamation, has likewise surrendered himself, and both he and the Earl of Scarsdale are upon bail. Several ships of the fleet have come to Spithead to repair their masts and rigging, and will be ready to sail again in a few days. The train of artillery which lately came to Portsmouth is now shipping there, and the transport ships which lie in the river are hastening thither. The Earl of Portland left here last Tuesday, but the Dunkirk, which was appointed to be his convoy, ran aground in going out of the river, and was forced to throw her upper tier of guns overboard; she then got off again. This delayed his departure. Lord Forbes and Mr. St. George have likewise come in. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 53.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Tatham, chemist, showing that he has found out and contrived a new engine, consisting of a small copper boiler and a wooden vessel, for brewing and distilling all sorts of liquors cheaper than was ever practised. Prays for letters patent for his invention for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 314.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of the Earl of Scarsdale, the Earl of Newburgh, Lord Griffin, Lord Forbes, Mr. Griffin, Mr. James Grahme, Mr. George Porter, Mr. Henry Slingesby, Mr. Oliver St. George, and Mr. Adderley, to appear the first day of the next term at the King's Bench, and, in the meantime, at the Council Table, when and as often as they shall be summoned. The lords to be bound each in 5,000l., and their two sureties in 2,500l. each; and the commoners in 3,000l. a piece, with two sureties likewise, each in one 1,000l. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 481.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. A similar order in regard to the Earl of Lichfield. [Ibid.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Commissioner Trevor. The Queen—intending that the parliament shall be prorogued next Tuesday, but not having yet resolved upon the day to which the prorogation shall be made, which will not be settled before next Monday afternoon at Council— would have you give order for a commission in the usual form to be prepared, leaving a blank in it for the day when the parliament is next to meet. The persons who are to make the prorogation will be the same mentioned in the last commission, whose names are here enclosed, and the quorum likewise is to be the same. On Monday you shall have a warrant in form. [Ibid.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The same to Admiral Russell. I received the enclosed petition of Sieur Pierre Gaudy, from Lord Portland, who knows the contents of it to be true, and I have otherwise received a good character of the petitioner; I recommend him to you, by the Queen's command, to be placed on board the fleet, and employed in such manner and station as you shall think most convenient. Some further care may be taken of him upon the return of the fleet into port at the end of the summer, and in the meantime I hope, by his experience on the coast of France, he may be of use to you. [Ibid., p. 482.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. The Queen desires you to require the colonels of the five regiments, who lately came from Ireland, to take an account of all their officers, how they have paid their quarters, and at what rates, and particularly you are to send for the lieutenant-colonel of the Earl of Meath's regiment, acquainting him and them that she expects a speedy and exact account hereot, and that if any complaint of this nature comes against any officer he shall be discharged. The Queen also hears that the troops at Petworth turn their horses into the meadows, and particularly that this has been done in the grounds belonging to the Duke of Somerset; and that, at Chiswick, they are quarterel in private houses, and pretend to pay but 3d. a day for three meals, " and will not pay that neither." [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 482.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing a presentation of Nathaniel Crow, clerk to the rectory of Stoke Climsland, in the county of Cornwall and diocese of Exeter, void by the death of — Pyke, incumbent. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 125.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Thomas Gherardi, Mr. Frederick Gherardi and Mr. Cagnony, with Girolamo Pozzi, their secretary, and John Baptista Pazzy and Piero Mancini, their two servants, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 257]; for Elsken Kosbeyers, ditto; for Jacomin Van Hops and John Schade, ditto; for Henry Oerlandt, ditto; for James Fortin and Elizabeth Linard, and her two children, ditto, this pass was renewed on the 1st of July; and for Peter Coster, ditto. [Ibid., p. 258.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Nicholas Hill. messenger-in-ordinary, to seize Capt. Hamilton, with his papers, on suspicion of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 349.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland granting to Sir Arthur Trevor, Speaker of the House of Commons in Ireland, executor of Arthur Trevor, of the Inner Temple, deceased, the possession of the estates of Donough, Earl of Clancarty, forfeited for high treason, till the moneys due from the said estates, for which they were mortgaged in 1661 by Donough, late Earl of Clancarty and Viscount Muskerry, his son and heir, to Arthur Trevor, of the Inner Temple, esq., shall be paid. [S.P. Signet Office 12, p. 470.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to —. Requires him, by the Queen's command, to act in concert with her Majesty's ships in doing damage to the enemy, and to hinder their privateers from going to sea or returning to harbour. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 170.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to supply arms, etc., to the company of miners, commanded by Capt. John Pitt. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 273.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Samborne. Shows that by his long study and pains, and at his great charges " he has invented, contrived, and perfected a certain exercise called Fives, which is moderately expensive and in itself innocent and harmless, and very much conducing to the health and refreshment of such as practice it, the same being never heretofore publicly practised in England." Prays letters patent for the sole use and advantage thereof in England, Wales, and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 316.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Lloyd, of London, merchant, owner and freighter of the Adventure, William Parker, master. Shows that the said ship coming from Portugal, with wines and oils, bound for London, on her voyage home was taken by a French privateer, and carried to Brittany; the ship and cargo being of small value there, and the customs of the wines and oils very considerable, he prays for leave to bring the ship and cargo to London, giving security that nothing of the growth of France shall be imported in the said ship. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Ashby, Andrew Stacy, George Moore, and Thomas Nix, gent., and others, showing that they with several others concerned with them, have brought to perfection the way to make "good merchantable pitch and tar" (which was never yet made in England, but brought from foreign parts, occasioning thereby vast sums of money to be remitted from hence) not only for the use of the Royal Navy, but also to furnish the other ships which annually use great quantities thereof. But in regard it will require several thousand pounds stock to carry on the said undertaking, and that when raised it cannot be so well managed as by a joint stock, they pray to be incorporated by the name of the Governor and Company for making Pitch and Tar, obliging themselves to deliver annually for their Majesties' use 100 "last" of pitch, and 100 "last" of tar at such price as the officers of the Navy shall from time to time think reasonable. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 317.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Sir John Fenwick and Mr. Orby to appear the first day of the next term at the King's Bench, and in the meantime at the Council Table, when and as often as they shall be summoned; they being bound in 3,000l. a piece with two sureties each in one 1,000l. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 483.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Paul Gardon and Judith, his wife, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 258]; for Herman Van Geyn, ditto; for Abraham Blancard, ditto; for Timothy Doekes, ditto; for Cornelia Tretenbach and Wyve Gerritz, ditto; for Sirach Goudt to go to Harwich and Norway [Ibid., p. 259]; for Jan Van Markerck to go to Harwich and Holland; and for John Thompson, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., 260.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland releasing Frances Lovett, widow and executrix of Christopher Lovett, of the city of Dublin, alderman, from the covenants contained in certain letters patent dated 17th July, 1677, made to the said Christopher, leasing to him, for 21 years, the bleaching yards and weaving shops at Chapelizod, near Dublin. The Warrant recites that for the better carrying on of the linen manufacture, King Charles II. had granted to the said alderman 1,200l. as stock, in utensils, such as looms, geers, and yarn, to be delivered up at the expiry of the lease and that the said Frances had greatly suffered as a Protestant and for having refused to furnish the late Irish and French armie with shirts and tents, whereupon her goods were seized by one Broomfield, a Quaker, in order to furnish the said army. The covenants referred to were as to the said Lovett keeping up twenty looms for the linen manufacture, besides what he kept up in working and making tapestry. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 473.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. This morning the Dutch post came in with letters from the King's camp of Monday last, which tell us that his Majesty's army, as well as the French, continued still in their camps, and the weather remained very rainy; but, notwithstanding the weather, our forces were in very good health. The French were much more inconvenienced than we, being obliged to go six leagues for forage. In the meantime the castle of Namur and the new fort made a brave defence. The French had taken a small work called the Devil's House though, as it said, it cost them 1,500 men, and on Sunday last they attacked the counterscarp of the new fort, but were beaten off with great loss. Upon the whole matter, the besieged make a good defence, and it is hoped the French may be baffled at last. Our army was to march on Tuesday last, but his Majesty's design was not known. The fleet continues still at St. Helens, but it is said the Blue squadron is going out upon some design, and in the meantime a great many transport ships are ordered to Portsmouth from the River and other places. Since my last the Earl of Lichfield, Lord Forbes, Lord Griffin, and several others of those named in the late Proclamation have surrendered themselves. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 54.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Governor, or Lieut.-Governor of Portsmouth, to deliver such number of guns, now or lately mounted on the works, to the order of the Clerk of the Delivery now in the garrison, to supply the broken guns taken out of the fleet. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 272.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Gilbert Heathcote and Arthur Shallett, of London, merchants. Shows that they had two ships laden with wine and soap, etc., from their factory in Catalonia bound for London, viz., The Mariner's Adventure. Thomas Blake, commander, and the Sarah and Anne, Samuel Prins, commander, and that on the 5th day of March last the said ships were taken by a French man-of-war, and carried into Marseilles after seven hours engagement, in which the captain and six men were killed on board one of the said ships, and two men on board the other, and the remaining men were put in prison at Toulon, where they still suffer great hardships, not having yet found a way to get home. Forasmuch as the goods are all of the growth of Spain, and will pay her Majesty considerable custom if permitted to be bought and brought with the poor prisoners to London, the petitioners pray for a grant " to buy the said ships and ladings again, " upon giving sufficient security to bring away nothing of the growth of France more than necessary provisions for the voyage. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 318.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Warre, showing that Francis Minshull obtained a judgment against him in an action for 300l. in the King's Bench Court, affirmed since in the Exchequer Chamber, in which judgment there is manifest error. Prays for a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [Ibid., p. 321.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Manlove, esq. Shows that John Cook obtained a judgment in an action of trespass against him in the Court of Common Pleas, which was affirmed before the said late King, and that lately an execution is awarded against the petitioner upon a writ of scire facias in which there is manifest error as he is advised. Having no other remedy at law but by a writ of error returnable in Parliament, he prays for the same. Granted. [Ibid., p. 323.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing the presentation of Benjamin Collier, clerk, to the vicarage of Sutterton, in the county and diocese of Lincoln, void by the death of Samuel Whiting. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 125.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Thomas Hebert, Mr. James Angelras and Mr. Michael Isarne to go to Harwich and Holland; for Stephen Guillebert, ditto; for Francis der Kinderen, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 260]; for Mr. Charles Astley, ditto; for Mr. Henry Turner, ditto; and for Mrs. Sarah Forrester, a maid, and a footboy, ditto. [Ibid., p. 261.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to John Tatham, chemist, of the sole use of his invention of a new engine, consisting of a small copper boiler, and a wooden vessel, of a new fashion, for the brewing and distilling all sorts of liquors and spirits. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 349.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
The Queen's instructions for the more due and regular payment of the quarters of the forces. Printed. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 55.]
June 13. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Warre. I send you letters of Mons. Guldestolp and Mr. Duncombe, which relate to a Swedish ship, and of Mons. Fouleresse, containing complaints by the Danes against some English privateers. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 353.] Enclosing the letter above referred to. [Ibid., pp. 357–363, and 367.]
June 13.
Dartmouth.
A copy of a letter from Capt. Charles Stocker, commander of the Cloudsley, galley. Saturday last my galley, under command of Lieutenant Lidstone, between St. Albans and Portland, met a French privateer, which after five or six hours chase he took, and to-day has brought her into this harbour on board which are 57 men. The galley stopped at Weymouth, where the French privateer on Saturday night was carried by Mr. Lidstone before the mayor of the said place, and there made affidavit. The contents of which were to this effect, that on Tuesday last this privateer came from St. Malo, and that there were 28 sail of men-of-war at that place, which made their escape from the French fleet after the battle there, three of which are three-deckers, and all the rest two- and-a-half deckers, and that this privateer was sent out on purpose to observe the motion of the English fleet, and that the Toulon fleet were at Brest. I am just going to sail in the galley myself, there being two other small privateers on this coast which daily annoy us. On board this privateer there were four Irishmen, Mr. Lidstone put Mr. John Wheeler on board a ketch tending on the Windsor Castle bound up to the fleet, who promised to deliver them to the Flag. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 299.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the consideration of Sir William Russell's case. Sir William having a mind to dispose of his command on behalf of a near relation, very well qualified, having been lieutenant-colonel, he would not do it until he had first spoken to Col. Coy, his colonel, to beg his consent, which being asked, his answer was that he could not grant it, having been bid 500 guineas for that troop. Afterwards Col. Coy told Sir William that he made no exception against the gentlemen proposed, but that it would be a wrong to the lieutenant who had served so well. Nevertheless Col. Coy has disposed of that troop in favour of Mr. Hambden Coy, his brother, who was lately but a cornet, and then was made lieutenant over all the cornets, and now a captain in Sir William Russell's troop, over all those lieutenants' heads, whom the colonel pretended he would not wrong so much. The said Sir William Russell thinks himself hardly used to have his commission given away whilst he was attending the Lords of the Treasury by the Queen's order. Whereas the colonel alleges that Sir William Russell has not been with the regiment since he left Limerick, which is true; but he can show the colonel's leave to go to Dublin, and Baron De Ginckle's license to be absent during three months, which was approved by his colonel as may appear by a letter from him in answer to what he wrote about it, which letter bears date at Belfast, December 23, 1692 (sic); and since his arrival in England the said Sir William has been employed more in looking after horses than for his own affairs; he did not receive money for recruits till the 12th of March, 1692, and made afterwards what speed he could to buy horses and laid out the whole money he received as may appear by the annexed account. Sir William further declares that he has not received any subsistence since he left Limerick, excepting five guineas, but he acknowledged that Col. Coy made him receive four months personal pay some little time before it was paid to the rest of the army. Referred to the Earl of Ranelagh, and George Clarke, esq. [S.P. Dom Petition Entry Book 1, p. 320.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William, Viscount Montgomery Shows that the Marquis of Powis, his father, in 1688, when he left England, was indebted to several persons in great sums of money, for which the petitioner became bound for his said father who had made provision for satisfying the same. The petitioner was outlawed for high treason in August, 1689, and the said estate seized to their Majesties' use, so that he is not able to satisfy the debts. Prays for a grant, by lease or otherwise, to subject the premises to the payment of the said debt, and the interest thereof. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 383.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. I have yours of the 12th, and since you are of opinion that a recognizance cannot be taken for the prisoner's appearance in any other place but a court of justice which has cognizance of the cause, the Queen would have you take bail for the lords and gentlemen mentioned in my former letters, to appear at the King's Bench the first day of the next term. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 483.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen desires you to take bail of Lord Clifford, to appear the first day of the next term; he to be bound in 5,000l., and his two sureties in 2,500l. each. [Ibid.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. The Queen intending to appoint Col. Beeston upon the death of Lord Inchiquin, to be lieutenant-governor of Jamaica, with the like powers as were granted to his lordship, would have you consider of it, and give order for preparing the necessary dispatches for a lieutenant-governor as soon as may conveniently be, in regard it will be necessary that he should make all haste thither. [Ibid., p. 484.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to give order for paying to Capt. Bourke the sum of 100l., which she is pleased to bestow upon him in consideration of his good services at Galway. [Ibid.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. I enclose, by the Queen's command, the petition of Mr. Thomas Pitt, on behalf of himself and the parish of Stratford, in Wiltshire, that you may examine the complaint, and give order for the punishment of the offenders as there shall be cause; and in the meantime take care that there are other quarters appointed for the soldiers, who are to remove from thence. [Ibid.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Transport. Col. Wynne and Col. Echlin, colonels of two regiments of dragoons in Ireland, having bought up horses here in England for recruiting those regiments, the Queen would have you provide shipping for transporting them into Ireland, in like manner as the same was allowed to the regiments which are in Flanders. [Ibid., p. 485.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. The Queen would have you put Abraham Harrison, esq., into the commission for the peace for Kent. [Ibid.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. I send you the enclosed petition of Elias Brag, by the Queen's command, who would have you examine the case for which the petitioner is imprisoned, upon your arrival at Bristol, and report the matter to her with your opinion what may be done in it. [Ibid., p. 491.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Mr. John Frederick Tonnier to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 260]; for Sander Cornelis, ditto; for Mr. Francis Pereira and Thomas Becker, ditto; for Wouter Geelham and Peter Vertangen, ditto [Ibid., p. 261]; for Mr. George Dumaresque, ditto; for Peter Pillot, ditto; for Mary Molenaar, ditto; for Mrs. Metje de Hoorn, and one maid servant, ditto; for Mr. Justinus Pegin, ditto; for Johanna Mandhuy, ditto [Ibid., p. 262]; for Isbell and Elizabeth Goerlee, ditto; for James Gally, ditto; for John Landicer, ditto; for John Thompson, the messenger, ditto [Ibid., p. 263]; and for Philip Bogvet and Bertrand Goffo, to go to Chester and Ireland. [Ibid., p. 264.]
June 14.
London.
The Marquis of Carmarthen to the King. I think the subject upon which I now write to your Majesty is of the greatest importance that ever can happen both in relation to your person, your government and the future happiness of this kingdom, and I find it in everybody's expectation to have something more done in pursuance of your late victory at sea, the opportunities for it seeming to be so very obvious. I find also the greatest part of the Cabinet Council both zealous in their wishes and unanimous in their opinions that there is now an opportunity to destroy a great part of the French naval force; insomuch that I cannot but join in what my Lord Nottingham has written more at large on this matter to my Lord Portland, and further adds that, as I believe, a sufficient land force would certainly encompass what we propose to do either at St. Malo, or Brest, or both, so that the omitting to endeavour it will be looked upon as an unpardonable crime in us not to advise, and will have the worst of consequences with a Parliament if it should fail for want of a due prosecution; amongst many other illhumours which it will create it will most certainly and unavoidably make them never give more for the support of any troops beyond seas. I should hope that 7,000 or 8,000 men added to what is here already, might be sufficient for this work, and pardon my presumption to say that as to your interest and to the advantage it would bring to this nation, it is impossible that your sparing that number can be of equal prejudice to your affairs abroad.
I acknowledge that my zeal makes me liable to your censure unless your goodness will forgive it, but I hope you will consider how critical the time is for it, and that there is not a probability of ever seeing a like opportunity. I am glad (besides the concurrence of the general and flag officers) to find by Mr. Russell's letter this day such warm expressions upon this subject, and we seemed to be so inflamed upon it in the Cabinet, that most of us have offered to the Queen to give our personal securities to borrow what money shall be necessary for this expedition; as for my own part I am ready to do to the utmost of my ability.
In short there needs nothing but your concurrence in this matter and I hope God will put it into your heart to add this blessing to those in which you have been so happy an instrument to these nations, and which will give you an establishment never to be shaken.—Ends abruptly. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 99.]
June 14. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Warre. The three Danish ships, sent from Amsterdam to France in ballast, were not furnished with passes agreeable to any treaty or convention with Denmark. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 373.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions for James Bruce, esq., to be captain of the company, of which Capt. John Gordon was late captain in Sir David Collier's regiment of foot; and for Patrick Murray, gent., to be captainlieutenant of the company in the same regiment, of which he himself is captain. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 273.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Col. Sackville, to appear the first day of the next term, he being bound in 3,000l., and his two sureties in one 1,000l. each. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 483.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Wilshaw. I have your letter of yesterday, and desire you will send me as soon as possible, the names of the eight or nine ships you mention to be at Spithead, and of any others that may be at Spithead or Portsmouth—those which do not want refitting, as well as those which do. And that you will let me know what orders are left for them. I desire you will send the enclosed to Admiral Russell by the first safe conveyance. [Ibid., p. 485.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Nash. Having received an account that Dupont, the Frenchman, whom you seized coming into England without a pass, is a protestant, I desire you will discharge him. [Ibid.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Isaac Jacobsen and Elias Isaacse to go to Harwich and Holland; for Samuel Simson, Philip Barents, and Abraham Nathans, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 263]; for Arnout Van Dongeren, ditto; for Anthony Van Neercassen, ditto; for Mr. Elkana Hickson, and his son, ditto; and for Nicholas Vilner, Anne his wife, and Charles, his son, to go to Harwich and Flanders. [Ibid., p. 264.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a pardon to Sir John Webb, "gent.", of the murder of George Ticknall, beadle, and of the manslaughter of Thomas Carrington. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 350.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting 200l. a year to Elizabeth Foulke for the support of her and her children, she being the widow of Garrat Foulke, esq., who died from the wounds he received at the fight at Aughrim. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 479.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. William Crighton, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 264]; for Hendrick Helbers, ditto; for John Klein, ditto; and for Mrs. Mary Waldegrave, Anne Waldegrave, her daughter, and Katherine Berghuyse, her servant maid to go to Harwich and from thence to Holland or Flanders. [Ibid., p. 265.]
June 16.
Admiralty Office.
Orders from the Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. Matthew Aylmer, commander-in-chief of the Mediterranean squadron at Kinsale. On your arrival at Kinsale you are to take under your command four English ships, together with three Dutch ships and fireships which went with you into the Straits, and follow the orders given you by the Lords Justices of Ireland. You are to order the other men-of-war to stay at Kinsale with the merchant ships under their convoy until they shall receive orders from this Board to proceed for England or till they have notice from Admiral Russell. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 303.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Arthur Moore, esq., showing that he has much improved the useful invention of lights for the street during the nights; and being desirous "to communicate the same improvement for Ireland," he prays to have letters patent passed in that kingdom for the term of 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 321.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Capt. Bourke and Henry O'Niel, his servant, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Beatrix Vander Holst and Grietje Boudewyns, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 265.]
June 17. —to Mr. Molesworth. The three ships called the City of Copenhagen, the Charlotte Amelia, and the Wisdom of Solomon went from Amsterdam to France in ballast. As for the Hope of Frederickshall, she did not have a good pass. The other ship called the Hope of Christianstadt, Hans Hansen, master, was taken by a privateer. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 371.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Caroletta Hastings, widow of Lieut.-Col. Anthony Hastings. Shows that her husband presented a petition to the King for the grant of a pension of 504l. 14s. 1d. per annum to be issuing and payable out of the land revenue in North Wales. Her husband after a sharp engagement at sea with six or seven French ships received several wounds of which he died and left the petitioner with a child in a miserable condition. Prays for the said pension "or three lives in it." Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 322.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Basil Firebrace, knight, freighter of the ship Friend's Adventure, Charles Cowper, master. Shows that the said ship was laden at Oporto with 133 pipes, and nine half-pipes of Portugal wine for his own account, and, on her voyage homeward, was taken going into. Falmouth by a French privateer and carried to St. Malo. As the customs of the wines are more than the value, he prays for a license to bring and unlade the same at London, giving security that none of the goods of the growth or product of France shall be imported in the said ship. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Marshall, late commander of a fireship called the Thomas and Elizabeth. Shows that, in the engagement against the French in July, 1690, he was instrumental in saving for their Majesties the Ann from being burnt by the French, as may appear by a certificate of Captain Tyrrell, and Lieut. Caverett, the captain and lieutenant of the said ship, and having lost his papers in the engagement he could not pass his accounts, so that his wages for the space of 19 months or thereabouts is refused to be paid for that reason; as he has served the Crown for the space of 27 years and above, part of the time in Sweden for King Charles II., and as he has been out of employment these 14 months, and never had any allowance in consideration of his service, which has reduced him and his family to great want, he prays for a pension as a superannuated sea-captain. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 323.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of the Earl of Salisbury, to appear the first day of the next term at the King's Bench, he being bound in 5,000l., and his two sureties in 2,500l. each. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 486.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen would have you carry the Earl of Salisbury, a prisoner in your custody, before Lord ChiefJustice Holt, in order to his being bailed. [Ibid.] A like letter of the same date in regard to Col. Langston. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. Col. Langston, and Major Langston, are to appear before the Lord Chief-Justice at 4 o'clock this afternoon, in order to their being bailed. I thought fit to acquaint you with this that you may take the same care in relation to them, as you have been directed to do with other officers to be bailed. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Col. Langston, and Major Langston, to appear the first day of the next term, at the King's Bench, they being bound in 3,000l. a piece, with two sureties each in 1,000l. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send enclosed two papers: one relating to the Hospital of Dublin, and the other concerning the completing and closing the muster-rolls for six months, commencing the 1st of January last past, that you may consider them and report your opinion what is fit to be done therein. [Ibid., p. 487.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen, being moved upon the enclosed petition of Capt. John FitzGerald, has been pleased to order him the sum of 10l., and you are to direct the payment thereof to him. He had left a troop in the Irish army, for which he was allowed halfpay, and obtained leave from the Lords-Justices to come over to England, where he had been these 14 months, without employment or subsistence; he now desires to go over to Flanders. He prayed for his arrears. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Martin Roosis to go to Harwich and Holland; for Anna Visschers, and her little daughter, ditto; for John Olard and Nicholas Patron, ditto; and for Alexander Eustace, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 266.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The Queen approves of the fortifications of Kinsale which you propose, and she desires it to be done as soon as possible, and would have the charge of it born out of the money allotted for Ireland. I have written to the Lords of the Treasury about remitting the quit-rents, that the same may be extended until Easter. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 335.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to carry Major Langston, a prisoner in his custody, to Lord Chief-Justice Holt, in order to his being bailed. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 351.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasurer of the Chamber, to cause 20l. to be paid to the gentlemen of the Chapel Royal, as of a free gift, and in lieu of three deer. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief-Justice and Recorder of London, and the Sheriffs of Middlesex, to cause Robert Lacy to be inserted in the next general pardon, which shall come out for the prisoners of Newgate, without any condition of transportation. [Ibid., p. 352.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for James Vantol, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Richard St. George is captain in Sir George St. George's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 273.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 500 cartouch boxes, and 500 bayonets, whereof 60 are to be long, for the Grenadiers, to be delivered to Col. William Beveridge, being for the supply of the regiment of foot under his command. [Ibid., p. 274.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioner of Accounts. I send enclosed [not entered] the copy you desired of me in your letter concerning the pay of the Danish troops in his Majesty's service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 487.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for John de L'Amy to go to Harwich and Holland for Mr. Theodours Vlack, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 266]; and for Wolfgang Fredrich Bauvenfeindt, Georgio Angerer, Franciscus Scaguller, John Sauter, and Christoph Azwanger, ditto. [Ibid., p. 267.]
June 20. Allowance of the expenses of James Johnstoun, esq., EnvoyExtraordinary to the Elector of Brandenburg, from the 24th of July, 1691, to the 27th of February, 1691–2. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, pp. 352 & 353.]
June 20.
"Our Court at St. Germans."
Blank commission, signed by James II., and countersigned by Lord Melfort for a lieutenancy in a troop of horse. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 56.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 458 snaphance muskets (58 to be strapped for the Grenadiers), belonging to Colonel John Beaumont's regiment of foot, to be exchanged for such as are more serviceable. These unserviceable arms were purchased by the officers of the regiment in lieu of those lost or broken in service in Scotland and Ireland. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 276.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth, Countess-Dowager of James, Earl of Castlehaven. Shows that King Charles II. by letters patent under the Great Seal of England, granted and confirmed to James, late Earl of Castlehaven, several quit-rents reserved and growing due out of some particular lands in Ireland amounting in all to 500l. per annum, which grant was to the said Earl, his heirs, and assigns in fee simple until the sum of 5,000l. was paid. By the said letters patent the Earl had power in his Majesty's and his successors' names to take and execute process out of the Exchequer for the said quit-rents to his own use, and to distrain; and also the said Earl had a special authority to assign the said rents, either by deed in his lifetime or by his last will, as by the said letters patent dated the 17th of September, 1684, may more fully appear. The said rents were paid to the said Earl in his lifetime, and he settled the said rent on the petitioner as her jointure, having no other way to provide for her. Since his death she has been paid the 500l. per annum, as it became due until the beginning of the late trouble in Ireland, and then she was robbed of all she had by Rapperees, principally because she had been charitable to the English protestants of that country. Besides this she is not paid the said rent, though she is not indicted or outlawed; and having nothing else to live upon she will be utterly ruined; prays, therefore, for the continuance of the payment of the aforesaid rent. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 324.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lord-Justices concerning the petition of Mr. Fanshaw and others. [See under date 2nd March, 1692.] In obedience to her Majesty's order of reference in the case of William Fanshaw, esq., and Mary his wife, etc. We have for our better information referred the same to Sir John Temple, who having returned the annexed certificate, we are of the same opinion with him that the petitioner, Mrs. Fanshaw, has a right to 800l. per annum jointure out of the estate of William Sarsfield, esq., her late deceased husband, by virtue of an agreement made before their intermarriage, and also of a portion given by the late King Charles II. But as to the inheritance claimed by the petitioner, the infant, though there be some proof that the said William Sarsfield agreed to settle the lands upon the issue of their bodies, yet no such settlement being made, and it being uncertain whether it should have been limited to the issue female as well as male, and the said William Sarsfield having by his will only charged the said estate with one 1,000l. for the portion of his daughter, and 50l. per annum for her maintenance, we conceive she is not entitled to any further provision out of that estate; all which is submitted to her Majesty's royal consideration. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 325.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Katherine Walker, daughter of Col. Paul Smith, and Magdalen, his wife. Shows that her father, having been a great sufferer for his service to King Charles I., and being made a partaker of the Royal Oak Lottery, he enjoyed the same during his lifetime, and her mother had 20l. per annum allowed her out of the said lottery by the late King. Her mother is lately dead, having lain long in a languishing condition, and the petitioner and her children are left very poor. Prays therefore to have the continuance of the said pension. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 326.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir James Hays, bart., showing he has done great services to the Government, as the Lords Nottingham, Sydney, and Mr. Johnstoun [can testify] and having been dangerously wounded, and having suffered a long sickness which has reduced him to great want, he prays for some relief in his present condition. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 326.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you, by the Queen's command, the enclosed papers concerning two ships belonging to Mr. Sarsfield. She would have you forthwith send orders for stopping the unloading of them and lay this matter before her in Council on Thursday next for her further directions. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 488.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. The enclosed petition of Edward Evans, I send you by the man himself, who, if he makes out the matter alleged in his petition, will deserve your favour, who, I doubt not, will take care to do him justice, as well as prevent such disorders for the future. [Ibid.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Governors of "Bethleham." The Queen would have you discharge Mr. Richard Stafford out of Bethlehem, and deliver him into his father's hands. [Ibid.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Passes for Hans Reyman to go to Harwich and Holland; for Cornelis Pietersen and Barbara Caspars, ditto [Ibid.]; for Isaac Duchay, ditto; and for Mr. James Frith, a minister, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 267.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I have acquainted the Queen with the estimate you sent me about the repairs necessary at Limerick, which she approves of, and desires you to give order for it to be done as soon as possible, and would have it born out of the money allotted for Ireland. I desire you will transmit me the bills of which I sent you the heads sometime since, as soon as possible. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 336.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I send you the petition of Mr. Thomas Fawle, Lord Massereene's agent, and the affidavits and testimony of the officers employed by the Commissioners of the Admiralty, that you may examine the matter and adjust the points in difference upon the fairest terms between their Majesties' and his lordship, that the timber may be used as it was designed for the Navy. [Ibid., p. 336.]
June 21. Viscount Sydney to the King. There is one thing likely to happen which will cause a great deal of change in your affairs, it is the loss of my Lord Commissioner Trevor, who is now in much danger, he was attacked three days ago with a fit of an apoplexy, and it was followed with a fever which is enough to carry any man out of this world. If he should not recover, you will have some difficulty to find a Speaker that has honesty, ability and good affection. Yesterday morning my Lord Nottingham, my Lord Rochester and myself met about the further discovery of the plot, and not being able to make any great progress in it, we fell to the consideration of what you should do in case this man should die. Everyone named all they could think of that could in any manner deserve to be recommended in that employment and upon the whole debate it was concluded that Sir Christopher Musgrave was the fittest man. My Lord Nottingham and my Lord Rochester said a great deal for him and would answer for him, that he would serve faithfully if he undertook it. I had nothing to say against him, but his behaviour ever since you came to the Crown, which could not as I thought be excused, though they said a great deal for him, and desired me to let you know what had passed in this matter. As to the other which is concerning the great Seal, they were both of opinion that it would be for your service to have it in the hands of one man. I was inclined enough to concur with them, if I would fix upon a man that was fit for it, which I confessed I did not know. My Lord Rochester said he did, but would not name him at that time, which is all I can tell you of this conversation. I will not mention anything else as I know you have a particular account from very good hands. Our impatience for letters is very great and my concern for your safety and happiness I cannot express. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 100.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Major Arthur Ormsby to be major of the regiment of foot commanded by the Earl of Meath; for James Sterling, gent., to be lieutenant of Major Arthur Ormsby's company in the same regiment; for Henry Glover, gent., to be ensign of the same company [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 275]: for Walter Raleigh, gent., to be lieutenant of the company in which Lieut.-Col. Henry Sands is captain in the first regiment of foot, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg [Ibid., p. 278]; for Lieut.-Col. Francis Edgeworth to be major of Col. Samuel Venner's regiment of foot, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment; for — Chamberlain to be ensign to that company; for — Hitchcock, gent., to be lieutenant of it [Ibid., p. 279]; and for Walter Raleigh, esq., lieutenant in the company commanded by Lieut.-Col. Henry Sandys, in the first regiment of foot guards, to be captain of foot. [Ibid., p. 300.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Robert Cotton and Mr. Frankland. I desire you would put the letters directed to Mr. Blathwayt in a bag, and seal it as you used to do, and then deliver it to this messenger to be carried to Harwich and put into the hands of the master of the packet-boat, and charge the master to deliver it to Mr. Vanderpoole at Brill, or, in his absence, to the person who takes care of the letters, and bring a receipt of the delivery. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 489.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrant for Peter Lespilier, and his wife, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Paul Thebaud, ditto; for Peter Willemsen. ditto; for John Butts, esq., to go to Gravesend and Denmark; and for Nicholas Hill, one of their Majesties' messengers-in-ordinary, to go to Harwich. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 268.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 1,000 barrels of powder to be forthwith carried into Holland and delivered to — Meisters, esq. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 275.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Commission for William Bretton, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Lieut.-Col. William Matthews is captain in the first regiment of foot guards, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg [Ibid.]; for Ferdinand Richard Hastings to be ensign to Capt. George Raworth's company in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 276]; and for John Fontanier, esq., to be a reformed captain in Viscount Galway's regiment of horse. [Ibid., p. 277.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Crofts, of Churchtown, in the county of Cork, showing that he and his family are protestants, and, that he, at the beginning of the late revolution in Ireland, sent over his only son, who was admitted lieutenant in Sir Edward Dering's regiment, and is still, to this day, in the same regiment. He had but 60l. per annum of free estate, which was settled on his son upon marriage, but being a great dealer in cattle, and having a stock of 5,000l. or 6,000l. value upon several farms, he could not come over himself being in hopes to preserve his stock, but seeing most of it destroyed by Rapparees and that the same violence broke upon protestants and papists, the high sheriff of the county had a troop offered him to suppress them, and the petitioner was made lieutenant of that troop by reason of his great knowledge in all the bye-roads; he accepted the post so as to be enabled to revenge the injuries he and other protestants had suffered. While the King was before Limerick he was made a close prisoner in Cork, but he nevertheless supplied his Majesty's camp by his agent, James Griffith, and sent his commission at that time to Sir Robert Southwell, with an attestation of several protestants of the said country how instrumental he had been to preserve their cattle and houses, and had his Majesty's protection granted under his signet. After the surrender of Cork he behaved himself much to the advantage of the protestants, by guiding all parties for the destruction of the enemy, being made lieutenant of a militia troop under Captain Taylour as may appear by the certificate of the Lords-Justices and General Ginckle. Prays to have a pardon granted to him for having acted by his first commission. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 327.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. I send enclosed a warrant for sending 1,000 barrels of powder to Holland; and her Majesty would have you write to Mr. Meisters and give him notice thereof, and by what ship you send it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 489.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
A Declaration requiring all officers and soldiers to observe strict discipline, and for the payment of quarters. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations, Vol. 5, p. 80.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for Adrian Sohner, Jacob Horn, Matthias Gieske, Philip Schwers, Christian Meurer, John Michel Faust, John Gettenburgh and John Brardts to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 268]; for John Gysberts and Wessell Berents, ditto; for Mr. Isaac Craeyesteyn ditto; for Hans Jurgen Katzenbergh, ditto; for Jacob de Voss and Jacob Rose, ditto; for Captain FitzGerald and Mr. Oliver Lynagh and John Daniel, their servant, ditto [Ibid., p. 269]; for Maria Magdalene, ditto; for John de Coning, ditto; and for Richard White and John Coxe, ditto. [Ibid., p. 270.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and the Recorder of London and Sheriffs of Middlesex, for a further reprieve of Thomas Wheeler, alias Richard Tovey. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 353.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill revoking and determining certain letters patent, appointing John How, esq., "keeper of our Pall Mall, in St. James's Park, and of the house there called the Mall House, and a little garden thereunto belonging." [Ibid., p. 354.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to prepare a bill, containing a grant to Thomas Samborne, of the sole use of his invention of "a certain exercise called fives, which is moderately expensive, and in itself innocent and harmless, and very much conducing to the health and refreshment of such as practise it." [Ibid., p. 355.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council upon the report of Lord Chief-Justice Holt, concerning the charter to the Corporation of Nottingham. [S.P. William and Mary 4, No. 57.]
June 23. Sir Charles Hedges to [Mr. Warre.] I herewith return you Mons. Scheel's memorial, and desire you would acquaint the Earl of Nottingham that the ship therein mentioned was restored on the 23rd of June last. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 377.] Enclosing the Memorial referred to. [Ibid., p. 381.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Anthony Berniere, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Major Theophilus Rabyniere is captain in Col. John Foulke's regiment of foot; for John England, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Tucker is captain in the same regiment; for Peter Parry, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. John Hedlam in Col. William Beveridge's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 278]; and for Edward Booth, gent., to be ensign to Capt. William Warner in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 280.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 60 snaphance muskets to be issued to Col. Francis Du Cambon. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 276.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter De Vivent, a reformed captain in Lord Galway's regiment, showing that there is 318 days of his pay due to him after the rate of 6s. 3d. a day, amounting to 99l. 7s. 6d., as appears by Mr. Fox's certificate. Prays for the payment of the said sum. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 327.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lady Ellen Aylmer, on behalf of herself and her two children, Sir Justin Aylmer, bart., and Luke Aylmer, both minors. Shows that a settlement was made upon her when she married Sir FitzGerald Aylmer, bart., deceased, of some lands in Ireland. Her said husband died in 1685, and she became seized of her jointure and guardian to her children. In 1687, being sensible of the great incumbrances which lay upon the said estate, she carried her two children to France to be brought up there at the cheapest way she could contrive; but the wars happening in Ireland, her design was frustrated and she, with her children, are all outlawed in Ireland, though they have been all this while in France, and the eldest is not 10 years old. Prays for an order to reverse the outlawry, and for a pardon. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 328.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Master Wardens and Assistants of the Trinity House of Deptford Strand. Shows that whereas application is made to them by the owners and masters of ships trading westward of Plymouth to erect a lighthouse upon the Eddystone as a safe direction for ships hereafter to avoid that dangerous rock, upon which so many of their Majesties' subjects have perished, and that in consideration of such a hazardous undertaking the said Masters and Owners voluntarily offer to pay them after the same rate and proportion they now do to the light upon Dungeness, viz., one penny per ton outwards, and the like inwards, for all ships and vessels passing by the said lighthouse, excepting coasters which are to pay but 12d. per voyage; now the petitioners being well satisfied that the placing and maintaining a light upon the said rock will be of the greatest use and benefit to navigation in general, and to their Majesties' own ships in particular, whilst during the war with France they will greatly frequent Plymouth, and having thereupon resolved to do their utmost endeavours for accomplishing so good a work, they pray letters patent for demanding and taking the duty of one penny per ton outward and as much inward, from all ships and vessels passing by the same (coasters excepted), the said payment to commence upon kindling the light. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to consider and report. [Ibid., p. 333.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Monsieur Hoffman. I have received a letter from Hamburg, in which I am informed that the Irish have arrived there, but that the Baron de Goedens pretends that he has received no orders for the marching or subsistence of these troops; so that they run the risk of dying of hunger. I am writing to tell you of this, so that you may write on this subject, and that your orders may remedy this inconvenience, and I pray you to take prompt measures as the affair concerns the Emperor's service too nearly to be neglected. [H.O. Letter Book Secretary's 2, p. 489.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Huntingdon. I have acquainted the Queen with what you wrote to me about your horses being seized and detained. I believe they will be restored upon her directions in Council, ordering that the horses of all protestants which have been seized shall be restored to them as soon as they make it appear that they are the true owners of them. This, I believe, will be sufficient in your case; but if not, I will receive her Majesty's further pleasure as soon as I know where the difficulty lies. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 490.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Capt. Wilshaw. I desire you to send the enclosed by the first convenient opportunity to Capt. Mees, who is probably cruising between Cape La Hogue and Havre, or if not there, perhaps further west towards St. Malo. You are to give directions for flinging the letter overboard in case of danger. [Ibid.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke. The Queen would have you acquaint all the officers of Lord Galway's and Col. Langston's regiments, now going to Holland, to be careful not to take any more of the provisions on board the transport ships for their men or horses than what shall be necessary on their passage; those ships being designed for further services, which by taking the provisions will be "disappointed," and therefore all such will be strictly required and deducted out of their pay. [Ibid., p. 491.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. John Meyn to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Lieut. Terence O'Bryan and Andrew FitzGerald, his servant, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 270.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize and Goal Delivery for the Western Circuit, to cause George Crowther to be inserted in the next general pardon, which shall come out for that circuit without any condition of transportation, he having been found guilty of felony at the assizes held at Bristol in August, 1690. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 356.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a pardon to Gerrardus Beeckman, late of Midwort, in the King's County, in the province of New York; Surgeon Myndert Coarten, late of New Utrecht, in the same county, yeoman, Thomas Williams, late of West Chester, in the county of West Chester, in the said province, mariner, Johannes Vermullie, late of Harlem in the county of New York, yeoman, and Abraham Brasier, late of New York, in the same county, labourer, they having been found guilty at New York on the 31st of March, 1691, of high treason; and also to Abraham Governor, late of New York, yeoman, who was, at the same time, indicted and found guilty of the murder of Josiah Browne, of New York, labourer. [Ibid.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for discharging the King's subjects in Ireland from arrears of hearth-money and quit-rents due to Easter last. [S.P. Signet Office 12, p. 480.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland granting to John Lowther, Edward Ford, Francis Chantrell, Arthur Bush, Charles Monk, and William Downes, of all wrecks in the river Shannon between the city of Limerick and the entrance to the said river, happening before the 24th of June, 1695, reserving to the Crown a fifth thereof. [Ibid., p. 481.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of 550l. and such revenues as have arisen from the bishopric of Londonderry during the late vacancy, for the repairs of the ruined churches in Londonderry. [S.P. Signet Office 12, p. 483.]
June 24.
From on board ship, before Dunkirk.
Justus Van Hogenhoeck to [Lord Nottingham]. Has received his letter of the 10/20th, and will act according to her Majesty's intentions. A French ship with six guns has been taken and sunk off Calais. Two ships of the Admiralty of Rotterdam are here. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 176.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Woodcock, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Andrew Armstrong's company in Sir James Leslie's regiment of foot; for Abraham Petipeire, gent., to be lieutenant, to Capt. Edward Pope in Col. William Beveridge's regiment of foot; and for — Reverson, gent., to be ensign to the same Capt. Edward Pope. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 278.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Commission for William Maynard, esq., and Samuel Clarke, esq., to be deputy lieutenants of Suffolk; Lord Cornwallis to issue out their deputations. [Ibid., p. 280.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Chief-Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Sir Philip Constable, bart., and Henry Lawson, esq., to appear the first day of the next term, at the King's Bench. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 491.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster I enclose by the Queen's command an information against Sir Robert Gore from his colonel complaining of his disobedience to Gen. Ginckle, and praying the bestowal of his company upon Mr. Brook. The Queen desires you to examine it, and report your opinion. [Ibid., p. 492.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose an estimate of what is necessary for the repairs of the walls of Limerick, which the Queen has directed to be done; but in regard the charge of it is to be borne out of the money allotted for Ireland, her Majesty would have you consider what branch or part of the establishment of that kingdom may best be stopped and applied to this service. I also send a paper about the corporals of the regiments of horse, that you may consider it, and give necessary directions. [Ibid.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Passes for Christiana Cornelissen and two small children, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Doux, Isabeau, his wife, and one child, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 270]; and for Henry Doison ditto. [Ibid., p. 271].
June 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords Justices. The Queen would have you give order to Sir John Hanmer, governor of Cork, to deliver the barge which belonged to their Majesties' ship Breda, to Mr. Thomas Burrows, clerk of the check at Kinsale, for their Majesties' service. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 337.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir William Dolben, one of the Justices of the King's Bench, and Sir John Powell, one of the Barons of the Court of Exchequer, Justices of Assize and Gaol Delivery for the Norfolk Circuit. William Beckwith was sentenced to death at the Assizes, held for Huntingdonshire in the year 1687, for murdering Robert Moreton, but the execution of his sentence was then respited until further order, and the King was pleased, by his warrant dated the 12th day of February, 1689–90, to direct that his name be inserted in the next general pardon for the Norfolk Circuit. The King was induced so to do upon circumstances which since appear to him, and to us upon further examination, not to have been truly represented; and the murder, whereof the said William Beckwith stands convicted, was accompanied with such aggravations as render him no fit object of mercy. We therefore revoke and determine all warrants for his reprieve and for his being inserted in the general pardon, and all and singular the clauses therein contained. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 43.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause some qualified person to be sent to take a survey of such ordnance–found in the several garrisons of Portsmouth, Hull, Landguard Fort, Tilbury, Sheerness, and the batteries on the river Medway—as is fit to supply the ships of war; such to be dismounted and applied to that service. He is likewise to cause "Drake or taper-bored guns" to be mounted in the place of those taken. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 280.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for Victualling the Navy. I received a letter, this morning, from Admiral Russell, wherein he says that butter and cheese are wanting in the fleet, which will occasion the spending of their other provisions faster than need be; you are therefore to send such victuals to the fleet with all speed. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 493.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Passes for Anne Hamel to go to Harwich and Holland; for Nicholas Vander Motten, with his son, ten years old, ditto; and for James Du Perrou and John Girardot, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 271.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses, incurred by Charles, Lord Dursley, Envoy Extraordinary from their Majesties, to the States General of the United Provinces, and plenipotentiary at the Congress, from the 6th of March, 1691–2, to the 6th of June, 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 358.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a pardon to Robert Lacy, convicted of clipping coin. [Ibid.]
June 27.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I send you the enclosed copies of examination of several French prisoners, sent hither to-day from the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 307.]
Enclosing:—The examinations referred to. Andrew Wate, master of the "James" of Dieppe says he saw the late engagement being but two leagues off; 13 three deckers, French ships, were burnt at La Hogue and 3 more at Cherbourg. James Cattel of the James says likewise and heard there were five or six companies of King James's Irish at La Hogue. John Ducatell says that the English firing ashore and the army firing from the shore caused great destruction to the French seamen, a great part of King James's army had been disbanded. Nicholas Woodbee says there was no looking for seamen in France this summer. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 311.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Adams, esq. Shows that his estate, worth 700l. per annum, lies near Mullingar which was all wasted by their Majesties' army. That he supplied the said army with 1,600 or 1,800 barrels of corn for forage, etc., besides grass for many thousand horses, and 5,000 or 6,000 loads of firing during their encampment. That when firing grew scarce, all his houses except two, were pulled down and the timber and his trees cut down and burnt and that he never had any compensation, though he has sustained loss to the value of 6,000l. or 7,000l. Prays, considering his losses and the good intelligence he gave to the army and his heartiness to their Majesties' service, to have employment in Ireland, and a grant of something for his present relief, and to carry him into Ireland, and a lease of some of their Majesties' land near Dublin, with a house, till he can improve his own. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 329.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Commissioners of the Treasury made upon the petition of Gilbert Heathcote and others. [See before, under date 13th of June.] We have considered the same, and for our better information therein we referred the said petition to the Commissioners of Customs who have certified us that the said petitioners have severally made proofs of their respective properties in the said several ladings, and that they are really and bonâ fide goods of the product of Spain and Portugal respectively, and being such, their cases seem to them to be the same with that of Sir Basil Firebrace, lately before your Majesty, upon which they are informed he has obtained your license. The Petitioners see no cause why they may not enjoy the like favour, they giving security as in the former case, that nothing but the respective cargoes from Spain and Portugal be imported in the said ships, and not any goods of the growth or product of France against which we have nothing to object. Retransmitted to the Treasury to order accordingly. [Ibid., p. 330.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lords Justices concerning Mr. Pottinger's petition. In obedience to her Majesty's order of reference upon the petition of Thomas Pottinger of Belfast, merchant, we have examined the allegations therein set forth and find, by the testimony of the Earl of Drogheda, Sir John Topham, knt., JudgeAdvocate of their Majesties' army, and divers others, persons of quality and credit, who personally appeared before us to evidence the same, that the petitioner was very serviceable to their Majesties' affaires, as he was "Soveraigne" of Belfast at the first landing of the army under the late Duke Schomberg, and was at considerable expense for his zeal to their Majesties' service on divers occasions. For all which, we conceive the petitioner may be an object of the Queen's bounty to be extended to him, in such manner as she shall think fit. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 335.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Governors of Landguard Fort. The Queen desires you to admit into Landguard Fort all such seamen as shall be sent to you by the Vice-Admiral of Suffolk, for the service of the Fleet, and that you keep them there until the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty shall order them hence. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 493.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to pay Sir Henry Bellasis, 200l. in consideration of the he will be at in looking after the embarkation of the troops, for this expedition. [Ibid.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Joost Carol and his wife to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mary Luco, ditto; [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 271]; for Eler Kortham and Luder Loof, ditto; for Capt. Francis Contales, to go to Harwich and Flanders [Ibid., p. 272]; for Mary Catherine Bellings and Lucy Creagh, her woman, to return from France to any port in this kingdom; for Mr. John Wolstenholme and a servant, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 274]; and for Mr. Edmund Loftus, to go to Harwich and Flanders. [Ibid., p. 275.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Pasces for the ships Adventure, William Pasker, master; Sarah and Anne, Samuel Prins, master; and Mariner's Adventure, Thomas Blake, master, to come from France, whither they had been taken after capture, to any port in England. The passes are granted on the petitions of John Lloyd, Gilbert Heathcote, and Arthur Shallett, all merchants of London. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, pp. 272–273].
June 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to George Shipside, messenger in ordinary, to take into custody Peter Boneau, a Frenchman, lately a soldier in their Majesties' army, and carry him to Derby, and there deliver him into the hands of the mayor of that borough, in order to his being prosecuted for rape. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 359].
June 28. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. The time of the year is now come that I shall be obliged, for my health's sake, to beg your leave that I may go into the country to drink the waters, and that you would be pleased to dispense with my attendance at the Treasury for that time at least, in case you should still be averse to my humble request that I may have leave to retire from it for good and all; I should hope that might come more seasonably to you at this time than formerly it has done, because you have others now in your service that are not only more capable of serving you there but everywhere, than I am sure I can pretend to be. I only know that to the least little I have endeavoured to serve as well and faithfully as it was possible for me to do and I hope your own experience may be sufficient to satisfy you that whenever you have any real use of my service your commands will always be stronger with me and more prevalent than any reason or inclination of my own. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 101.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Commissions for George Brooks, esq., to be captain of the company, of which Sir Robert Gore was late Captain in Col. Abraham Creighton's regiment of foot; and for William Leister, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Captain William Carey is Captain in Col. William Beveridge's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 279.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Yates. Shows that, in February, 1689, he loaded a small vessel called the Hopewell of Hull with 40 tons of lead of the value of 400l. or thereabouts, bound from thence to London or Plymouth, and afterwards for Cales [Cadiz ?] in Spain, putting Robert Sanderson on board, with orders to sell and dispose of the goods as he pleased; but before the ship came to any port in England, she was taken by a French privateer and carried to Dieppe where she was made prize and condemned as such, and the master and men made prisoners. Nevertheless it was suggested that the said Sanderson voluntarily went to France with his cargo, and that the petitioner gave order for the same; and though absolutely false, yet about two years since he was committed to prison upon suspicion of high treason for six months together, and was, in the Easter term 1691, discharged in Court, and in Michaelmas term following was again presented for the same pretended fault, and a bill found against him in Middlesex for high treason, and being prosecuted by a tedious and chargeable prosecution, he is ruined, and his wife with five children reduced to want. Prays for a Nolle Prosequi. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 329.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Clark, shows that his Majesty thought fit, upon his accession to the Crown, to make him collector for the excises for the county of Hereford in consideration of his service; but being discharged in March last, for no other cause, as he was told, but only to make room for others, he prays to be restored to his employment. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 332.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I am informed that, of the 40 shallops, only 27 arrived at Gravesend last night, and I cannot hear where the rest are. The Breda also was at the Nore, and had no orders, and the captain was in town. I hope some immediate care will be taken in these things. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 494.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrant for John Conrad Jackes to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Heyns, ditto; for Magdalen Godfrey, a child of eight years old, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 274]; for Sophia Jans and two children, ditto; for Joseph Jacobs, Samuel Simons, his wife, and two children, and Isaac Simons, ditto; for Susanna Vander Bosch, with three children, ditto [Ibid]; and for Charles Couchman one of their Majesties' messengers, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 275.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and Recorder of London, and Sheriff of Middlesex to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death should it be passed upon George Pitt, junior, esq., if he be found guilty, at the next sessions at the Old Baily, of manslaughter. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 359.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Commission for Stephen Thomas, gent, to be a reformed lieutenant in Henry, Viscount Galway's regiment of horse. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 279]; for Col. Wolgand (sic) William Romer to be first engineer of the train of artillery, for the present expedition by sea [Ibid., p. 281]; for Col. Richard Ingoldsby to be AdjutantGeneral of all the foot forces employed on the present expedition; for Thomas Brereton, gent. to be Quarter-Master to the Earl of Meath's regiment of foot; for James Villemisson, gent., to be a reformed lieutenant in Henry, Viscount Galway's regiment of horse; for Daniel Criespian, gent., to be adjutant to Col. John Coy's regiment of horse; for Edward Waile, clerk, to be chaplain to the same regiment [Ibid., p. 282]; and for John Wood, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Edmund Hale's company in Col. John Hale's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 284.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Capt. Atkinson. The Queen would have you go down to Portsmouth to-morrow morning, to be assisting in the embarkation of the troops, and the distribution of them, according to what proportions they are capable of, and most proper for the service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 494.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Bembo (sic.) I desire you to be at my office morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock. [Ibid.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir James Leslie. I have your letter of the 24th instant concerning Capt. Davies; he has remained here, as I am informed, with the Queen's leave having been wounded in the campaign in Ireland, and having since been ill, whereby he has not been able to attend upon his command. It will not be proper to remove him. [Ibid.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Chief Justice Holt. The Queen desires you to take bail of Sir Theophilus Oglethorpe, to appear, the first day of the next term, at the King's Bench, he being bound in 3,000l. with two sureties each in one 1,000l. [Ibid., p. 495].
June 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. You are to take bail of Anthony Le Grand as above. [Ibid.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Mr. Andrew Bongar, and Mr. David Boue, recommended Mons. Brocass, French minister, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 275]; for Mrs. Drage, Maren Madtzdatter, her servant-maid, and Anne Macken a child of two years old, to go to Harwich and Denmark; for Nicholas De Gens, and John Mars, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter D'Vernet. ditto; for Monk Broerez Tulp, ditto; for Henry Bruggeman and George Risterbad, ditto [Ibid., p. 276]; for Mary Dirchsen, ditto; for Capt. Atkinson, to go to Portsmouth; and for Mary Dircksen to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 277.]
[June.] [The Queen ?] to the Commanders of the Dutch ships at Falmouth. Capt. Hughes, commander of the Pearl, having been ordered to go with the ships under his command, which came from Bilboa, and to join Admiral Russell, the persons addressed are required to unite and sail with the said captain. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 174.]
June and July. Journal of the events which have taken place in the Low Countries with the allied forces. The movements of the Prince of Waldeck are referred to and it is stated that six battalions of English had arrived. Some propositions for the future movements of the troops are given. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 102.]