BHO

William and Mary: May 1692

Pages 265-307

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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May 1692

May 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 46 snaphance muskets, two barrels of powder, one barrel of musket–shot, and 100lb. of match to be issued for a company of foot to be drawn out of the hospital at Chelsea to do duty at Windsor Castle. In the margin, "Arms for the Chelsey College men." [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 263.]
May 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Hamden Coy, esq., to be captain of the troop, of which Sir William Russell was late Captain, in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse; for Francis Mainge, gent., to be lieutenant of the troop of which Captain George Fletcher is captain in the same regiment; and for Thomas Ovington to be cornet to Capt. Hamden Coy's troop in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse. [Ibid., p. 265.]
May 1.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Sir Thomas Levingston, Lieut.Colonel Hill and three servants to go to Edinburgh; and a pass for Jonathan Fisher to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 223.]
May 1.
Hanover.
George Louis, Elector of Hanover to the King. Sends a letter by the Baron Geuritz to assure the King of his attachment to his service. Holograph. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 90.]
May 1/11.
Ship Prince. in the Downs.
Admiral Van Almonde to [Lord Nottingham]. Has just received her Majesty's command to unite his ships with those under Sir Ralph Delaval, but Delaval departed yesterday from the South Foreland, and the writer does not know where to find him. Requests information, and sends a list of the ships he has destined for the purpose. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 154.]
May 1/11. List referred to above. [Ibid., p 150 sic.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Merignac, gent., to be quarter–master of Major–Gen. Ruvigny's troop of which he himself is captain; for Richard Moyle, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Nehemiah Farmer is captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Henry Row [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 262]; and for John Walcott, gent., to be captain–lieutenant, of the company in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. John Foulk, of which he himself is captain. [Ibid., p. 270.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Admiral Russell. The bearer is the French refugee whom you saw at my office, and I desire you will order him to be received on board such ship where you think he may be most useful. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 435.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Edward Gregory. The bearer is a French refugee going by order to Mr. Russell to serve on board the fleet; I therefore desire you will assist him in getting on board the Admiral's vessel. [Ibid.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke. The Queen has ordered the three regiments coming from Scotland to Gravesend to be landed there upon their arrival; you are to issue orders for their quarter. [Ibid.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Cornelia Van Dyck to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jacob Issen to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for James de Hattenville, recommended by Mons. Rivieret, French minister, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mr. John George Benade, Mr John William Bruder, and Mr. Hinckell, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 223.]
May 2.
Hanover.
Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg to the King. Sends a letter by the Baron of Geuritz to assure his Majesty of his attachment to his service. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 91.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Deputies of Margate. I have received your letter concerning the persons you have stopped coming over into England without any pass; if they are persons of note or consideration or such as there may be reason to suspect of being anyways disaffected to their Majesties, you are to detain them in custody, until you give an account of their names, the occasion of their coming, and what other circumstances may be material; if otherwise you are to take security for their appearance. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 436.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Wilshaw. I have just sent a commission to Col. Gibson for a regiment to be composed of the men belonging to the dockyard, and with one to you to be their colonel. All the commissions except your own, are in blank, and it is left to Col. Gibson and yourself to fill up the names; in case any of the commissions should not be used, you are to return the same to me. I desire to know what ships, English or Dutch, are ready at Portsmouth, and in what forwardness the rest are, and when they will be ready. [Ibid.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Gibson. I send you herewith commissions for a regiment to be composed of people belonging to the dockyard at Portsmouth as you proposed, and to be commanded by the Commissioner of the Navy, Mr. Wilshaw; there are commissions for seven companies, making together 21 commissions, they are all in blank except Mr. Wilshaw's. [Ibid., p. 437.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
A proclamation commanding all papists and reputed papists forthwith to depart from London and Westminster, and from within ten miles of the same. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 76.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Jacob Ploss to go to Harwich and Holland; for Elizabeth de la Heuse, ditto; for John Bayle the messenger with a post horse, etc., to go to Greenwich or Rochester, or any other place where he shall have occasion, being upon their Majesties' service [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 224]; and for James, Earl of Drumlanrig, Sir William Lockhart, and four servants to go to Edinburgh. [Ibid., p. 225.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General, to prepare a bill, appointing Sir Thomas Stamp, knt., Lord Mayor of London, John, Archbishop of Canterbury, John, Archbishop of York, Henry, Bishop of London, Thomas, Bishop of Lincoln, Simon, Bishop of Ely, Thomas, Bishop of Rochester, Edward, Bishop of Worcester, Sir John Somers, knt., Attorney–General, Thomas Trevor, esq., Solicitor–General, Sir Thomas Meeres, knt., George Oxenden, LL.D., principal official of the Arches Court and Vicar–General to the Archbishop of Canterbury's Court, Sir Richard Raines, LL.D., judge of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Sir Thomas Pinfold, LL.D., Advocate–General, Henry Newton, LL.D., Chancellor of the diocese of London, Sir Charles Hedges, LL.D., Judge of the High Court of Admiralty, Sir William Ashurst, Sir Richard Levett, sheriffs of London, William Sherlock, D.D., Dean of St. Pauls, William Holder, D.D., Henry Godolphin, D.D., William Stanley, D.D., residentiaries of St. Pauls, Sir Christopher Wren, surveyor general of the works, Sir William Trumbull, Sir Thomas St. George, and Sir Henry St. George, commissioners for carrying on, finishing, and adorning the said cathedral of St. Paul's, London. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 318.]
May 3.
Malines.
Count de Solms to the King. Is sending Lieutenant–General Talmash towards Flanders. Awaits the movements of the enemy. Hopes to discuss affairs with Mons. Dyckvelt. State of the various regiments. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 92.]
May 3.
Doctors Commons.
Thomas Bedford to Mr. Warre, at the Earl of Nottingham's office. Mons. David Amia, of Gottenburg, said to be one of the King of Sweden's commissaries, has made many claims this war. He, with five or six other persons, claimed the ship Angel Gabriel, Borie Olson, master, and her lading of salt. He also claims the ship Orange, John Kohlar, master, and her lading of salt, some wood in the ship Three Friends, Anthony de Greik, master, and also the lading of the St. Andrew, John Knil, master. I am obliged to acquaint you that this ship (sic) came from Gottenburg, and pretended to be bound to London, and the Judge of the Admiralty, who is now so well, that to–day he came to town to keep court, was so satisfied, that on the 22nd of March last, he decreed the ship to be restored to Jacob Outfal, and Jacob Jergensen, Swedes, and the lading to David Amia. But Mr. Smith, proctor for Joseph Finnis, commander of the Bateman, sloop, being the privateer who took her, appealed from the restitution, and the cause is to be heard by the Lords of Appeal to–morrow morning. Seal of Arms. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 321.]
May 3.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I enclose the copy of a letter from Mr. Bussy Mansell with two examinations sent therein of an English ketch retaken from a privateer, as also an information of Capt. Robert Mitford, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 283.] Enclosing:—
(1.) A Copy of a letter from Bussy Mansell to the Earl of Nottingham. Upon the 21st instant a ketch came into Mumbles Road, called the Elizabeth & Mary of Foy, whereof John Castle was master. In the evening she was piloted into this harbour as a vessel belonging to the said place. But soon after I was informed by Mr. Trotter, Collector of the Customs at Swansea, that she had been taken by a St. Malo privateer, and was navigated under the command of some of her men, upon which I immediately gave orders to the said Mr. Trotter and my own servants to seize the said ketch, and her company, amongst whom there were two men willing to serve their Majesties in the fleet, who I accepted and entertained accordingly; but Jonathan Howard, the master, and the other two men refusing I sent them to Cardiff Gaol. Dated at Britton Ferry 25th April 1692. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 287.]
(2.) Examinations of Richard Williams and Thomas Harrison. [Ibid., p. 289.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Earl of Bedford. The Queen desires you to muster the militia of Westminster in Hyde Park as soon as you can, and to appoint some guards to watch every night in Westminster; you are also to muster the militia for Middlesex as soon as may be. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 437.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Thomas Guenaut to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36. p. 224.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Edward Gibbs, messenger in ordinary to search for Thomas Ashton, and seize him for treasonable and seditious practices. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 320.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Young, messenger in ordinary, to search the house of an upholsterer, "living four or five doors on this side the Rose Tavern, in the Strand," for arms, and having found those arms, to secure them, and to apprehend the body of the said upholsterer and bring him to be examined. [Ibid.]
May 4.
Torgo.
General Schoning to the King. Thanks the King for his letter, and wishes he could give him definite news of what the Elector, his master, will do during the campaign; but he also awaits news from the Imperial Court, as probably Baron Hecheren will have already informed the King; however, he (the Elector) confidently anticipates a favourable reply from the Court at Vienna. Assures the King that his master is actuated only with the desire to do what is best for the public good. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 93.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Marlo Cunningham, gent., to be captainlieutenant of the company, in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Zachariah Tiffin, of which he himself is captain; for William Poynton, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of grenadiers in which Capt. Fox is captain in the same regiment; and for Zachariah Philips to ensign of the company in the same regiment of which he himself is captain. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 262.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 150 snaphance muskets, to be issued for the supply of the regiment of foot commanded by Col. John Hales; and also to cause 100 snaphance muskets, and 216 long pikes, to be issued to Col. Sir George St. George for his regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 263.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Toller, esq. Shows that by an inquisition of ad quod damnum issued from the Court of Chancery, and directed to the Sheriff of Lincolnshire, it is found that it will not be to the damage of anybody if their Majesties should grant to the petitioner license to enclose a path or highway called the Little Lane being within the town of Billingborough in that county, between the lands of the petitioner; in lieu of that said way, he will make another way of the same length and breadth, and as convenient to passengers, and therefore prays for leave to enclose the said way upon the conditions aforesaid. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 288.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Michael Biddulph. I enclose a letter from Sir Robert Cotton, concerning some disaffected people at Lichfield, written from Doddington on May 2nd by Mr. Jackson, that you may examine it, and proceed according to the directions in it from the Council. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 437.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Deputies of Margate. Being informed by a merchant of London, that Mr. Henry Philip Kugelman is a merchant of London, and that he and the two others in his company, of whom one is Henry Berenberg, have come over on their lawful occasions, these persons being three of those six mentioned in your letter as stopped from coming out of Holland, for want of passes, I desire if they still remain in custody, you will discharge them and permit them to come to London to see me. The name of the third person is Melchior Dunte. [Ibid., p. 438.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Governor of New York. The merchants have promised to bear the freight of the servants and goods to New York on board the merchant ships without any charge to you, so that you will have no expense except your servants' victuals, which you must take care of. [Ibid.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Prizes. The Queen desires you to remove Mr. Edward Battine from the employment which he holds under you in relation to prizes, and to put another in his place. [Ibid.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, desiring them to remove Mr. Battine from his employment in the dockyard at Portsmouth, and by the Queen's command to put another in his place. [Ibid., p. 439.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
A proclamation requiring the attendance of the members of both Houses of Parliament. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 77.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Passes for Isaac Sigard and James Nell recommended by Mons. Lombard, a French minister, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Bernandus Kling and Dorothea Vendelars, with four children, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 224]; for Elizabeth Verhoeve, with her little son, ditto; for Suyanne Caillon, ditto; for Charles Rettel, ditto; for Anthony Boubay, with his son Anthony, ditto [Ibid., p. 225]; for Cornelius Langeveldt, ditto; for Maximilian du Pré, ditto; for Jacob Hert and Benjamin Marcks, ditto; for Mr. Wood Rogers, ditto; and for Claesje Pieck, and Cornelia Hüyskyn, with their six small children, ditto; for Viscount Tarbat, and two servants, to go to Edinburgh [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 226]; for John Thompson, the messenger, to go to Deal; and for Lieut.–Col. Cunningham and Mr. Steward to go to Holyhead. [Ibid., p. 227.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I have acquainted you that the Dolphin was added to the Richmond to convoy the transport ships with the forces from Ireland; but in regard the Dolphin may not be able to reach Waterford in time for this service, which will not admit of any delay, the Monmouth yacht, and the Hart ketch, are ordered to supply her place. Her Majesty desires the transport ships with the forces to leave immediately the Richmond and the other two vessels arrive. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 332.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Bayley, gent., to be ensign to Major Anthony Shamborg's company in Col. John Michelburne's regiment of foot; and for Thomas Edwards, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Richard Cooper's company in Col. Thomas Creighton's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 262.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 96 horsemen's tents, furnished, to be issued for the use of the regiment of Dutch Horse Guards, commanded by the Earl of Portland. [Ibid., p. 264.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. The Queen, having ordered the train of artillery to march to–morrow morning towards Portsmouth, desires you to appoint a sufficient guard for its security all along the road, and at the place where it shall remain every night, and to let Sir Henry Goodrick know the route which may be most convenient for its march. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 439.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Gibson. I have read your letter with the information by the bearer, and have heard what he can say, but do not find sufficient grounds for any proceedings further in it. If you discover anything more, have it examined in the county, and proceed in it as there shall be occasion, sending me an account. [Ibid.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to take great care of the prisoners who are, or shall be, committed to your custody, and not to suffer them to have the liberty of the Tower, notwithstanding any former order, till her pleasure is known, nor to permit any to have access to them without the Queen's leave. [Ibid.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Christina Hansdatter, with her two little children, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 225]; for Andrew Hawkes, ditto [Ibid., p. 226]; for John Thompson, the messenger, to go to Ramsgate or any other place upon the coast of Kent, as there shall be occasion; for Peter Waanse to go to Harwich and Holland; for Nicholas de Graeff, ditto; for Henry Allen, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth; for Richard Poyke, senior, the messenger, to go to Deal, or any other place where he may have occasion [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 227]; for Mr. Anthony Moetmans to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Cyriack Cornewall, and Henry Scalke, ditto; for Mr. Ouzeel van Swiete and Mr. John Cousart to go to Gravesend and embark for New York. [Ibid., p. 228.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Young, or any other messenger–in–ordinary, to search in "the Yorkshire house, the sign of the King on Horseback, near Charing Cross," for James Grahme, or any other suspected person or persons, and having found them to seize them on suspicion of high treason, and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 321.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill, containing a warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury, and to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to pay George Stepney, esq., remaining at the Court of the Elector of Brandenburg until the arrival of another minister there, or to his assigns, the sum of 20s. a day for his ordinary entertainment and allowance; to commence from the 30th day of January last past, and to continue until his return. Memorandum; "some alterations were made in the bill about the extraordinaries." [Ibid.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General to prepare a bill containing a grant to Isaac Thompson, Captain Benjamin Graves, Thomas Joell, and John Cuthbert, of a patent for the sole use of their invention of a new engine, whereby a man may be let down to work under water, by the assistance of a certain "diving–habit," which secures the person wearing it from the pressure of the water, and leaves his arms and legs naked, and at liberty; with the help of another engine for pumping air, the said person so let down, may safely continue for an hour at least under water, with great freedom and clearness of sight. [Ibid., p. 322.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Fletcher. I have read your letter of the 6th instant to the Lords of the Committee that if possible what you desire may be done; but nothing can be done at present as the service is so pressing. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 440.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen would have you adjust, with Lord Ranelagh and Mr. Israel Feilding, the proportion of the subsistence money of the army which shall be fit to be paid to Mr. Feilding for bread. She would have the money which was agreed to be paid Col. Villiers' regiment (proportionable to what other regiments had) to be forthwith ordered; I enclose the establishment for the Duke of Leinster and the officers who are to attend him, that you may give the necessary orders. [Ibid.] Enclosure; the establishment referred to. [Ibid.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Victuallers of the Navy. The Queen would have you give order that the biscuit you are sending by sea to Portsmouth is issued from the ships according to such directions as shall be given by Mr. Israel Feilding, Commissary–General of Provisions. [Ibid., p. 441.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of Transport. The Queen would have you provide transport ships, if you have not got them ready, to receive on board the recruits lying in the Tower; these are to remain on board until there shall be convenience for carrying them safely into Holland; the officers for whom they are respectively designed, providing, in the meantime, victuals for them. And if you direct them to fall down forthwith to Gravesend, they may take the opportunity of the convoy coming from Scotland, which is ordered, upon its arrival at Gravesend, to sail to Holland [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 441.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Winchester. I desire you will be assisting to the bearer Mr. John Murray, Deputy–Commissary of the Provisions, in whatever way relates to the execution of his office [Ibid.] A like letter was sent to the Mayor of Portsmouth. [Ibid.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Transport. You are to write to your correspondent at Edinburgh, to furnish the three regiments embarked at Leith, with sufficient provisions to last them till they reach the Thames, where they are to come directly, without stopping at Yarmouth as they were lately commanded. [Ibid., p. 467.]
May 7/17.
Breda.
Commission for Mainhart, Duke of Leinster, to be commander–inchief of the forces in Scotland during the King's absence from England. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 123.]
May 7/17.
Breda.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Desiring them to renew to Mainhart, Duke of Leinster, the commission which he held last year in Scotland and England, during his absence; in the absence of the said Duke, Sir Thomas Levingstone is to continue his command. [Ibid., p. 124.]
May 7/17.
Breda.
Warrant for Sir Thomas Levingstone's regiment to be designated "the Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons." [Ibid., p. 125.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Adam Mulhuyse and Claudy Diel to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Jacob Herwaerden, Doctor of Physic, ditto; and for John Solmeider and Zacharic Scheibel, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 228.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Sutton, or any other messenger in ordinary to search the lodgings of Dr. Robert Lightfoot in Somerset House, for suspicious persons, and having found them, to apprehend them on suspicion of high treason and bring them to be examined [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 323.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to receive into custody Robert Ingram, who, upon his examination, had confessed himself guilty of voluntarily coming out of France into England, since the 25 of March last passed, without leave, [Ibid.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General, to constitute Mainhart, Duke of Leinster, lieutenant–general of all the land forces [Ibid.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Baron. I have received your letter of yesterday concerning the Dutch and Bremen men–of–war, with the foreign ships under their convoy, which you have stopped. In answer you may permit them to sail, taking great care that none of her Majesty's subjects are seamen on board them, and that none of our ships slip away with them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 442.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, junior, or any other messenger in ordinary, to search for Solomon Swale, and having found him to seize him together with his papers on charge of high treason in abetting and adhering to the King's enemies, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 324.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Like warrant to Thomas Newlyn, or any other messenger in ordinary, to seize Capt. Whorwood. [Ibid.]
May 8.
Edinburgh.
The Earl of Melville to the King. This day we have had a pretty good session of Parliament in so far as things were talked before us. Notwithstanding the designed opposition, we carried all the votes by more than two parts of the House. There was much endeavour to obstruct all things but we have put business now in a way and method of doing by settling the way of choosing committees; this was the bar always laid in the way formerly. I did not press this before nor let know what I was empowered to do till your Majesty's affairs in England were advanced and that the delaying longer would have been dangerous and I see that we should have lost ground every day. This was the reason that made this act, which I have sent to be passed this day, and because the want of committees stopped all affairs.
When the opposite party heard this was to be done they were in a manner confounded and put to change their measures, being a kind of surprise so the methods they fell on, was (sic) to press that the vote passed the last session should rather be passed, there being not so great a difference. By this they judged either that the Commissioner would homologate that former vote and so to be a precedent to claim the same for their other vote or else to make use of the negative; both which he industriously shunned. You will see it is conformable to the instructions and rather more, for the officers of state not voting is a matter of no moment; a vote two or three does not import much amongst a great multitude and before things be concluded they come to Parliament where they have their vote. The reason why the officers of state were desired to be in the committees chiefly, is that nothing of concern should be done without their knowledge and so things come in by way of surprise to the Parliament and the King be put to use his negative, which would be sparingly done.
When they saw their design would not take effect, the Duke of Hamilton proposed an act of his that he gave in last year, wherein the officers of state were included and told he was never for encroachments on the Crown, &c., which if it had been true he should not have suffered, and several other things to have come to a vote last year; but this was only to put the bone in the Commissioner's foot, and to take occasion to misrepresent him which I hope you will not be apt to give ear to, until you allow him the honour to wait upon you. If he had been as much concerned, by the tenth part, for your interest, your affairs had not been in this condition. I shall say nothing as to his carriage; you will hear it otherwise.
I have sent the copy of Levingstone's letter and Lieut.–Colonel Bucchan's; we have got no further account. This is a signal mercy at this time though the Jacobins make the affairs small, the combination has been great and deep. I know not if we shall win to the bottom of it, but I have enough to assure me of it, though not yet sufficient proof. The person who brought the commissions and letters over from the late King is escaped, but we have seized a companion of his who came with him, but have not yet put him to a trial and the vessel which brought him over is likewise taken with seven or eight seamen, as I told in my last. But they do prevaricate and are not at all ingenious; but they speak of one Morgan in their confessions that they were to take in Lancaster who would be looked after.
We have persons amongst us to plead for the most guilty and there want, not endeavours to stifle all discoveries. Things here have been so balancing through the great conjunction of several interests to oppose your Majesty's interest, and through the weakness of many honest people, that I might easily judge what was in agitation; yet I thought it not convenient at this time to make use of those powers you gave me, specially having delayed it for so long, and the country being in so unsettled a condition and the people not pleased yet, which is impossible to do until the Church government be settled. I thought it unsafe to precipitate things while matters stood thus.
I have sent up the draft of an Act for the settlement of Church government so near as I could get it brought, both as to answer your desires and to pass with the people. I brought it to the [16] 92; others have other drafts to bring in, relating the [16] 41, some to the establishment [16] 49. The Duke of Hamilton professes to be for the establishment [16] 41, both as to Church and State, the State being the worst as to that, for it was the [16] 49 as to the Church which was most clamoured against.
I beg to know your pleasure as soon as can be. If people can be brought to this I have sent up, there is nothing to be apprehended in it, not by the government, but though there should be some amendments desired, in my humble opinion it is your interest not to strike on it, for on the one side there is but an apprehended inconvenience which may never fall out, and may be well enough provided against, while on the other there is a real and certain one and an imminent danger by a want of settlement. I hope you will not mistake me in this, for I speak the sincerity of my heart and on certain knowledge, and not from bias as others may do.
Major Carstairs will inform you more of this design and has been here having some account from that person who acquainted me this morning; he conceals the informer's name, but I apprehend I know him, and that it is one of the Club. I shall go along this far with the desire that I think it were fit, a pardon be sent down blank for him and for four or five more, both because he will be desirous to bring off some of his friends and that he may have evidences, and I shall manage it the best I can but let it be kept quiet; but for a general indemnity I am not for at this time and can give you sufficient reasons. I wish all our secret enemies were openly in the field, they would do less hurt than as they are, and would unite honest men better.
I have sent Col. Erskine to Stirling Castle, for I am informed there has been a design against it, and to have made the Earl Perth's escape. I desire his Commission and the others I wrote for may be sent; there will be several officers also to change. Also it is needful there will be a change in the Council now that things are going better. The Parliament meets again to–morrow and you shall have an account as to a more particular relation, I refer to you, Mr. Lockart, and my son. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 94.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 20 snaphance muskets, 20 collars of bandoleers, and three pikes to be issued to Lieut.–Col. John Hope, for the supply of his company in the second regiment of foot guards. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 266.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Galwey. Shows that during the late troubles in Ireland he behaved himself honestly and quietly, and contributed to the ease and security of the Protestants there by keeping their plate, etc., in great quantities, and relieving them in prison, and that he never was in arms, nor in any military employment, as appears by an annexed certificate. That though he served in the late pretended parliament, and was a Commissioner of Oyer and Terminer for the county and city of Cork, yet he was chosen by the Protestants, most of the Roman Catholic electors being against him, which also appears by an annexed certificate; and when sitting in the said parliament he never voted anything contrary to the interest of the Protestants, but always on their side, and that it was at the request of the Protestants that he was chosen a Commissioner of Oyer and Terminer. That he took protection from her Majesty's General, and also from the Judge of Assize, and in February 1690 came into England, by their permission and the licence of the Lords–Justices, where he has lived since, in all due obedience to her (sic) Majesty and the laws. That notwithstanding the said protections and license he was indicted in Ireland, during his absence, of high treason and outlawed, and all or most of his estate seized and disposed of, and for no other cause but for being a parliament man and Commissioner as aforesaid; and that if it should be treason in him to sit in the said parliament or to officiate as Commissioner, then he is a proper object of her Majesty's mercy and favour. Prays for a reversal of the outlawry and for his estate to be restored. Referred to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 288.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney–General. Dr. Beach informing me that he fears a fine will be set upon him this morning in the King's Bench for the seditious words of which he was found guilty at New Sarum, the last assizes, I acquaint you that the Queen has ordered a warrant for entering a Nolle Prosequi on this information, which I doubt if I shall be able to get signed this morning, but will offer it to the Queen this afternoon. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 442, and S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 325.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Gibson. This is to acquaint you that the bearer, Thomas Harwood, has brought up the four prisoners with whom he was charged, and delivered them safely. [Ibid.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. I send enclosed [enclosure not entered] an extract from two letters to me from Lord Monmouth at Guernsey, wherein he gives an account of the condition of that place, which I thought fit to communicate to you, that you may consider what is best to be done for the security of the island. [Ibid., p. 443.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
A proclamation to apprehend the Earl of Scarsdale and others for high treason. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 78.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Robert Mallet to go to Harwich and Holland; for Anna Van Meurs, and her little child, ditto; and for Mr. Henry Dedeken, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 229.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Willoughby of Parham, Sir Ralph Ashton, and Col. Royston, or any other deputy–lieutenant and justices of the peace for Lancashire, to apprehend Sir Nicholas Sherburne. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 324.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, senior, or any other messenger, to apprehend Austin Matthews, gent. [Ibid.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
License to Alexander Gawne, —who had been pardoned for high treason, upon condition that he would immediately quit the kingdom and go to France and not return without leave, and who was formerly agent to some regiments, and has some accounts now depending in the Pay Office which will require his attendance for some time— to remain in England till the 24th of June next ensuing. [Ibid.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing a warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury, and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to pay Philibert D'Herveart, esq., who is appointed Envoy Extraordinary to the Swiss Cantons, or to his assigns, the sum of 500l. for his equipage, and 5l. by the day for his ordinary entertainment and allowance to commence from the 25th of March last, and continue until his return. [Ibid., p. 326.]
May 9.
The Hague.
Memorial from Mons, Scheel to the King, enclosing list of Danish vessels arrested in England. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 333.] Enclosure: the list referred to. [Ibid., p. 345.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Commissions for William Lord Eland, Patricius Viscount Chaworth, William Lord Byron, Robert Lord Lexington, Anchitel Grey, esq., Arthur Stanhope, esq., William Byron, esq., Sir Thomas Willoughby, Sir Thomas Perkins, Sir Scroop Howe, Sir William Stanhope, John Knight, esq., John Thornhagh, esq., John White, esq., Gervase Eyre, esq., John Digby esq., Francis Pierrepoint, esq., Francis Sandys, esq., Robert Sacheverell, esq., Thomas Lewis, esq. Francis Stringer, esq., Richard Tayler, esq., Sir Francis Molyneux, Charles Hutchinson, esq., and Richard Slater, esq., to be deputy–lieutenants of Nottinghamshire, and for the Earl of Devonshire, the Lord Steward, to issue out their deputations accordingly; for John Wilson, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Charles Morgan's company in the Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 264]; for John Cotton, George Forde, and George Boone, esqs., to be deputy–lieutenants of the Tower Hamlets, and for Robert Lord Lucas is to issue out their deputations accordingly; for George Huite, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Robert Parsons company in the Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 265]; and for John Harvey, esq., to be deputy–lieutenant of Suffolk, and for Lord Cornwallis to issue out his deputation accordingly. [Ibid., p. 268.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 118 strapped carbines with buckets, 118 pairs of pistols, and 50 horsemen's tents, furnished, with a proportion of flints, to be issued to the Earl of Drumlanrigg. [Ibid p 270.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Tyndall, esq., Thomas Cox, John Sherman, and Henry Longueville, gent. Shows that Robert Price and others, in the 2nd year of their Majesties reign, obtained letters patent, for the sole making of saltpetre, by a new way pretended to be found by them; that the said patentees, without making any saltpetre, have sold their patent to Ralph Bucknall, Richard Goodall, and others who have divided it in 1,200 shares, and have lately petitioned their Majesties in the name of Richard Owen, Thomas Martin, and others to be incorporated, and have actually disposed of several shares though they have made no saltpetre. The petitioners have found an extraordinary way of making saltpetre in great quantities, and in regard the same cannot be carried on without a joint stock, they pray to be incorporated, though not to the exclusion of others. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 289.]
May. 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Bailiff of Lydd. The Queen desires you to stop all persons coming from Holland or Flanders, unless they have a pass from Lord Dursley or from William Blathwayt. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 443.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir John Guise. I have acquainted the Lords of the Committee with your letter, and you may proceed in the enquiry about the persons you mention in order to a due prosecution as their crime shall deserve. [Ibid., p. 444.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Sotherne. I have no way to send the order I received from you to–night to Capt. Price but by the post, and by way of Dublin, and I fear it may arrive too late by that way. It may therefore be very proper to send a duplicate of it to Plymouth to Capt. Greenhill, that he may send some vessel with it to Land's End, or by such other method as he, or you, shall think fit to give Capt. Price notice of the French fleet, and so prevent his falling into their hands. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 444.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit the Countess of Marlborough to visit her lord for this time. [Ibid.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Master of the Packet boat at Harwich. The Queen would have you receive on board, the bearer, Capt. Sutton, with 50 men, being recruits, for Lord Cutts' regiment in Flanders and carry them over into Holland, sending me an account of the names of the persons you receive on board on this occasion. [Ibid., p. 445.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Mr. Thomas Davies, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth, being upon their Majesties special service; for William Rice to return to Exeter; for Richard Poike, senior, the messenger, to go to Rye; for Catherine Emits and Maria Van Zutphen, with their five small children, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 229]; for Thomas Newlyn to go to Shoreham; for Richard Hopkins to go to Pemzen (sic); for Sarah Cradock, Johanna de Vitt, Philip des Tombe, and his servant, Nicholas Duff, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mr. Sutton, with 50 men for Lord Cutts' regiment, ditto. [Ibid., p. 230.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I have received your letter of the 3rd; Brigadier Villiers may remain in Ireland. Her Majesty would have you send away the five regiments to Bristol with all possible expedition. The Irish designed for Hamburg must be stopped, as you will see by the enclosed order. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 332.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Sutton, messenger in ordinary, to carry Anthony Alden, a prisoner in his custody, to Newgate, for speaking seditious and treasonable words against the Government. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 328.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to receive into custody the said Anthony Alden. [Ibid.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the Great Seal of Ireland, for the appointment of Francis Roberts, Thomas Keightley, John Evelyn, junior, Zacheus Sedgwick, and Christopher Carleton, esq., as Commissioners of Excise in Ireland and for the appointment of Lawrence Steele, esq., as secretary to the said Commissioners. [S.P. Signet Office 12, p. 459.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Charles Wright, esq., to be a deputy–lieutenant for the town of Ipswich; Lord Cornwallis is to issue out his deputation accordingly. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 268.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Countess of Clancarty. Shows that by the report of Sir John Temple, Attorney–General of Ireland, it appears that she has a legal demand out of the estate of her late husband, to satisfy the debts due to her thereout. The Attorney–General has omitted in the said report to mention 4500l., for which she stands bound for the debts of her late husband, and what she has paid thereof. The said report was made in her absence, and her agent did not bring proof of the same. It also appears that there is an equitable demand thereout for portions (4,000l. each) for her three daughters. She prays to have the custodium of the estate, which is most of it waste and yields, now, very little, for satisfaction of her said debt and daughters' portions, and that she may be further at liberty to prove the said 4,500l. before Sir John Temple or anybody else, and further that her son may have the favour to be heard by his counsel concerning his outlawry either before their Majesties Privy Council or elsewhere. Referred with an annexed [not entered] report to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 290.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Basil Firebrace, knight, "freighter," and Joseph Hurst, Nicholas Watson, and others, owners of the ship William and James, Adam Spencer, master. Shows that the said ship, being laden at Oporto with 249 pipes, and 17 half–pipes of "Portugal wine," for the proper account of Sir Basil Firebrace, arrived as far as Torbay, on her way homeward, and was taken there by a French privateer and carried to St. Malo. The said ship and cargo being but of small value there, and the customs here being more than the value thereof, the petitioners, being willing to give security that none of the goods of the growth of France shall be imported in the said ship, pray Her Majesty's license to redeem the said ship and cargo, and to bring and unload the same at London as was first intended. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 291.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. The Queen gives leave to Lord Hastings and Sir Edward Abney to see the Earl of Huntingdon for this time. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 445.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen desires you to permit Mr. Chidley to come and speak to the Earl of Marlborough in the presence of a warder, for this one time only. [Ibid.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen gives leave to Mr. Jones, the apothecary, and Mr. Dighton of the Temple, to see the Earl of Huntingdon in the presence of a warder, for this time. [Ibid., p. 447.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for John Maty to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jane Boulede, ditto; for Jacob Schindler, ditto; for James Kitson, a messenger, to go to Portsmouth [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 230]; for Joris Engelbert Merez and John Hogger, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mr. John Scottaewy, ditto. [Ibid., p. 231.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. I enclose a list of such stores as are wanted for the regiment belonging to Chatham Dock, which Her Majesty would have you forthwith sent thither to be kept in store till further use. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 445.] Enclosure: the list referred to. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Richard Atkins. I have received yours of the 9th instant, with your information in it, and it might be very considerably to their Majesties' service if you have any acquaintance with the Deputy–Lieutenants of Leicestershire to let them know the account you have received of the Earl of Huntingdon's horses, that they may perform better what has been recommended to them from the Council. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Mayor. Understanding that you have seized some arms and clothes to day in Coleman Street, I desire you will give me an account what they are, and in the meantime have them kept very close. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir William Hooker. I have received your letter concerning Tilford, who had no such order from me, but on the contrary is turned out from being a messenger and the warrants were recalled by my order; so that I desire you will take care that he be prosecuted as a cheat, or for whatever crime he shall appear to you to have been guilty of. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for Charles Mare to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mrs. Anne Lynch, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 231.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I have received your letter of the 6th, and one from Lord–Justice Coningsby of the same date, and two from Lord Galway, one of April 30th, and the other of the 2nd instant, upon which her Majesty would have you give order for the five battalions to be forthwith embarked and sent away. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 333.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit Mr. Sadler to come and speak to the Earl of Salisbury in the presence of a warder, for this time only. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 447.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Mayor. Since the arms and clothes seized in Coleman Street, belong to the officers of their Majesties' army, you may order that the seizure be taken off, and the articles restored to the parties who are entrusted with the care of them. [Ibid., p. 448.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Benjamin Hechsletter, and his wife, with William Butler, to go to Harwich and Hamburg; for Christopher Kneable to go to Harwich and Germany [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 231]; for Mr. William Carter, agent for Prizes, to go to Dartmouth and Plymouth; for Vincent Jacobsen to go to Harwich and Holland; for Joygen Jonsen to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Hans Jonsen, Olde Jonsen, Hans Milsen, Peter Larsen, Bendix Jorgeson Andrew Hendricksen and Claus Jacobsen, ditto; for Hans Hansen Louensten to go to Harwich and Holland; for Christen Jonsen to go to Gravesend and Denmark [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 232]; and for Mr. John Copping, a merchant to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 233.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Mariscoe, messenger in ordinary, to go to the houses of Mrs. Carr, a corn–chandler in Duke's Court, near Lincoln's Inn Fields, and there search the lodgings of P. Couppe for seditious persons and papers. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 327.]
May 13. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I have the honour of your Majesty's letter of the 16th from Breda, and in answer to it I must humbly acquaint you that we are so far from being able to take precautions beforehand to provide money in case of a great exigency, that it is with all the difficulty imaginable that we have found it, these last three weeks, to pay the subsistence of the army. This disappointment is occasioned by the failing of the Poll Act not only as to the sum itself which we expected from it but even as to the time of receiving it. By the Act of Parliament it ought to be in the Exchequer by the 3rd of May and now upon the 13th, there is not yet come in 20000l. of that money, so that to supply that failure we have with much ado borrowed 20,000l., upon the hereditary excise and applied it to the subsistence and must be forced to do so more than once more before this summer be at an end; for by the best computation we are able to make, the Poll Act will not produce 200,000l. a quarter. The consequence of this in short is, that almost all the payments of the civil government must stop short, and yet the whole credit of the revenue with the funds given by the parliament will make but a very low provision for the necessary weekly payments to the army and navy. The latter indeed, now the fleet is entirely at sea, will not require much more ready money immediately, but, on the other side, we are at the last plunge for money for the army, the ordnance and the transport service, there being no credit to be had almost at any rate, while the threatening of the invasion hangs over us. I hope in a few days that will grow less, since the winds have been so favourable to us, that our fleet is almost entirely joined together without having received any prejudice from the storms, which we may reasonably hope have done the enemy much damage.
I have presumed to make this letter the longer, in regard I have not troubled you often of late, having, among many other mortifications, had a very severe fit of the stone, which for some days made me unable to write or do anything. I acknowledge that my ill health, as well as other reasons, make me desire to be at liberty, but I must own too that no reason can be strong enough to mention it at this time, and you may be very sure that while I have the honour to be in your service I will endeavour to discharge my part in it with the utmost duty. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 95.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Commissions for — Shelden, esq., to be captain–lieutenant of the troop in the royal regiment of dragoons, commanded by Col. Edward Matthews, of which he himself is captain; for Charles Graves, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Capt. Anthony Rodney was captain in the same regiment; for Sir James Bunch to be lieutenant of the troop of which Capt. Robert Killegrew is captain in the same regiment; for Mr. Emett to be cornet of the troop of which Capt. Henry Hawker is captain in the same regiment for Mr. Marsh to be cornet of the troop of which the said Capt. Robert Killegrew is captain in the same regiment; and for Mr. Henry Pinsent to be adjutant of the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 267.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause 20 carbines, 17 pairs of pistols, and 53 horsemen's tents, furnished, for the regiment of horse, commanded by Godard, Earl of Athlone, which were to have been supplied in Holland; and to issue 38 horsemen's tents, furnished, for the French troop of reformed officers. [Ibid., p. 269.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Paul Cloudesly, Peter Le Keux, Hilary Renew, and 132 others [not named]. Shows that, having "with great expense and industry attained the new invention of making, dressing, and lustrating of silks, called black Alamode, Renforce, and Lustrings," King James II. granted, by his letters patent under the Great Seal, to Paul Cloudesly and others the sole privilege of the said invention. The petitioners, for the more effectual carrying on and maintaining the said invention, have lately entered into co–partnership. They have already caused to be made great quantities of the said silks, "at least equalling the manufacture of France," and being further resolved to promote the same to the common good of the nation so as to thereby employ many thousands of poor people, and also prevent the sending of vast sums of money to France for the said silks, they pray to be incorporated by the name or name of the Governor and Company of Alamode, Renforce, and Lustrings Makers. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 292.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit Mrs. Elizabeth Thorold and Mrs. Mary Cornwallis to come and speak with Sir Robert Thorold in the presence of a warder for this time only. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 447.] A like letter was written for Mr. Chidley to see the Earl of Marlborough. [Ibid.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Master of the passage–boat to Harwich. The bearer, Mr. John Nicholas de Barr, belonging to the Elector of Bavaria, who has a pass, has several parcels of goods to carry over into Holland, which he is desirous should go hence to Harwich by water. This is to let you know that, if it appears to you that the said goods are cleared at the Custom House, and he pays you for the freight, according to the agreement you make, you may receive them on board with him. [Ibid.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Cotton and Mr. Frankland. I have communicated your letter to the Queen who desires you to give order to the Master of the packet boat at Falmouth to proceed with such orders as he shall receive from the Lords of the Admiralty, to St. Antonio and there deliver the same to the Commander–in–Chief of the squadron which is convoy to the Bilboa fleet; or in case he meets the said squadron anywhere at sea before he arrives as far as St. Antonio, that he immediately delivers them to the Commanderin–Chief. After this service is performed the master of the packet boat may go to Corunna or return directly to England, as you shall judge most proper. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 448.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Governor of Langer [Landguard ?] Fort. I have your letter of the 13th concerning the Garland; there is an Order in Council that she be permitted to sail. The enclosed —which stated that the hospital ship Society in which were 160 pressed men for the fleet, was stopped by the Governor—was sent me from the Admiralty; the Queen commands me to acquaint you that you must immediately permit the said ship to sail with her men to the fleet, it being the intent of the embargo to procure men for the fleet, and the method you take is the way to hinder it. [Ibid., p. 449.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Rye. I have your letter of yesterday concerning the expresses which were sent on board the Admiral's vessel, and when you send me an account of the charges you have been at, I will order the money to be paid to such person as you shall appoint. [Ibid.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. The Queen desires you to send the Duke of Bolton a list of the quarters of the troops in Hampshire, and a like list of those in Sussex to the Earl of Dorset; so that upon raising the militia of those two counties, those Lords may so dispose of the militia troops as not to interfere with the army. [Ibid.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Commissioners of Transport having lately been ordered to furnish a week's subsistence at Bristol for the troops coming thither from Ireland, and having now represented that there is no money at Bristol (except the Customs and Excise) to pay the troops that subsistence, I acquaint you with it that you may order the Commissioners of the Customs and Excise to accept the agents' bills, drawn upon the Paymaster–General here for the subsistence of the said soldiers on their arrival, or in some other manner provide for this service. The embargo should not be extended to any vessels in the out ports, laden with provisions by the Victuallers of the Navy [Ibid., p. 450.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. Her Majesty would have you give order that the convoy of the troops from Scotland stay in the river until the recruits of horse, &c., and the clothes come to them; they are then to proceed to Williemstad. You are also to protect the men who serve in victualling vessels [Ibid.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Transport. Her Majesty would have you order the ships with recruits and clothes to be ready so as to proceed from Gravesend, with the Sheerness and London Merchant to Williemstad. [Ibid., p. 451.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Rupert Billingsley, Governor of Berwick. I have your letter of May the 8th, and think you do extremely well in securing the two Ords, which I hope you have done by this time and examined all their papers, whether they contain anything against the government of which I desire an account. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 451.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Johannes Danveges and Ellenor, his wife, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Binnevest and Mary Coffina, his wife, with one child, ditto; for Emanuel Castillo and Matatias Moreno, ditto; for Elliner Bonhomme, ditto; for Anthony Van Blootacker, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 233]; and for David Sarrasin and John Cordier, ditto. [Ibid., p. 234.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Thompson, messenger in ordinary, to search for Mr. M. Owen of Gray's Inn, and having found him to seize him, with his papers, upon suspicion of treasonable practises, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 327.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. By an express from Portsmouth we have an account that Admiral Russell joined Sir Ralph Delaval, and Rear Admiral Carter yesterday, off St. Helens, where I believe he will stay till the rest of the Dutch ships have come up with him, which they have doubtless done, by this time, 10 of them passing Dover last Thursday evening. The Earl of Yarmouth is committed to the Tower. The last news we had of the French fleet is that they were, on the 10th instant, off the Start. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 38.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Pass for William Trelon and Nicolai van Luen to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 233.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick to deliver necessary arms for two companies of foot under the command of Capt. Godfrey Richards, and for raising Capt. Thomas Brown and adding him to the regiment of foot of which John Foulk, esq., is colonel. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 268.]
May 16.
Kensington.
Commission for Francis Jobber, gent., to be cornet to Capt. Robert Napier in the regiment of horse commanded by Col. John Coy. [Ibid., p. 298.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Deputies of Margate. Being informed that Moses Dejaco, his wife, and five children, with a servant, have lately come from Holland and are stopped at Margate, they not having a pass; and it having been certified to me that they are all Jews, and in no way disaffected to the Government, her Majesty desires you to permit them to come to London. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 451.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Leinster. The Earl of Portland being sent for by the King to return to Flanders, and it being necessary for him to carry some account of the army here to his Majesty, which no one can give him so well as you can, the Queen desires you to come to town. [Ibid.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit Mrs. Mansfield to see Sir Robert Thorold. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 452.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. You are to permit the Earl of Salisbury to have the "liberty of the leads of the Tower" in such manner as you shall judge proper. [Ibid.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the same, to permit Mrs. Godfrey to see the Earl of Marlborough. [Ibid.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
A proclamation declaring the parliament shall be prorogued until the 14th of June next. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 79.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Abraham Thonnet to go to Harwich and Holland; for Roobrus Gieven and Peter Geerlofsen, ditto; for Johanna Schoonebeck, with her little child, ditto; for Peter Vanden Heuvel and Elizabeth Valkenaer, ditto; and for Jacob Castiliano, David Alvarano, Isaac Hereius, Benjamin Solus, Jacob Amego, Simon Fince, Samuel Josepht and Abraham Bebis, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 234.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. I thank you for yours of yesterday, and in return am to tell you that this morning, since the publishing of the Gazette, the Dutch post has come in, bringing an account that the King went, last Tuesday, to his camp near Brussels, where he still was when the letters left on Thursday. The forces were marching thither, and with more diligence, because the French had designed to attack some place with one army, whilst the Duke of Luxemburg covered the siege with another. From Vienna they confirm the news of the disgrace of the Grand Vizier, who was banished to Rhodes, and his estate confiscated, and all his creatures, who are suspected to favour the French interest, turned out, and one, Hali Bassa, a man of very good reputation, was made Vizier in his place. We have also another good piece of news which is that the Duke of Hanover has come entirely into the interests of the Allies, and has promised, besides the 6,000 men he sends to Hungary, to send 8,000 to the assistance of the Allies on the Rhine.
By the letters of Friday last from Plymouth we have an account that on Wednesday the French fleet was seen from the hills off the Start, and then they made away S.W. to sea, and on Thursday they were again seen from the hills, and on Friday off Fowey, steering westward, so it is supposed they have gone home again; they are said not to have been above 50 men–of–war. This morning the Earl of Middleton, Earl of Dunmore, and Sir Andrew Forrester, all named in the late proclamation, were taken at a quaker's house in Goodman's Fields, and they are committed to the Tower. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 39.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen commands me to send you the enclosed estimate of repairs necessary to be speedily done at the fort at Sheerness, and to desire you to report to her what is fitting to be done therein as soon as possible. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 452.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. The Queen does not desire you should furnish any of the stores mentioned in the list for the dockyard at Chatham, other than such of them as are in the magazine of the Tower. [Ibid., p. 453.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The same to the Collector of the Customs at Dartmouth. Having heard nothing from you lately of the motions of the French fleet, I desire you will give me an account, from time to time, of what you see or hear of it A like letter was sent to the Collector of the Customs at Falmouth. [Ibid.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Pass for John Wissel to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 235.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and Recorder of London, and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Sir John Webb, who was found guilty of murder of George Treknall at the last sessions held at the Old Bailey. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 329.]
May 17.
Galop.
Information about the troops and the plans for the campaign. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 96.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of Transport. The Queen desires you will immediately give notice to all the ships which are to carry the recruits and clothes to Holland, that they forthwith receive them on board, and fall down the river, so as to be ready to go along with the convoy which is appointed to sail to morrow. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 453.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. You are to permit Mr. Bernard Howard to have the liberty of the platform over his lodgings in the Tower, when and as often as you shall think fit. [Ibid., p. 454.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Egidia Graham, Margriet Halkett, and one servant, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Charles Mellish, esq., William Ward, esq., Mr. Pulleyn, and two servants, ditto; and for Peter John, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 235.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger in ordinary, to carry Dubocage Du Haure, Jacque Bertelot, and Jean La Boule, prisoners in his custody, to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 329.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the Solicitor–General's report concerning the Throwsters petition. The report is as follows:—I have considered the petition annexed, whereby the petitioners pray that they, together with such others as they shall nominate, may be incorporated, in order to the carrying on, by the means of certain engines necessary for that purpose, a manufacture of winding the finest sort of raw silks which, as they allege in their petition, is not practised in England. That sort of silk is brought into this kingdom from Italy in very considerable quantities, ready wound, spun, and twisted for making lute strings, and other sorts of silk, which cannot be made without the same.
That which they insist upon, as the ground of their desiring to be incorporated, is that the stock requisite for the effectual setting up and carrying on so considerable a manufacture in England, must be so great that the same is not to be raised unless upon the establishment of a corporation; because if such an undertaking should be carried on only by articles of partnership, the stock will be liable to the particular and private debts of the several partners, and subject to be torn in pieces upon the bankruptcy of any of them.
I do not see, but that such a charter as is desired, will be good in point of law, if it shall be your Majesty's pleasure to grant it; but that which seems to require the chief consideration is how far it will be convenient, and for the public good. Of the subject matter of the petitioners, relating to the silk manufacture, wherein great numbers of your Majesty's subjects are employed, I have endeavoured to inform myself, touching the facts alleged in the petition, and also what influence it might have upon the employment and business of your Majesty's subjects concerned in the winding, spinning, and weaving of silk, in case you should be graciously inclined to gratify the petitioners. To this end I have discovered several Throwsters and others concerned in the making of silk, who acknowledge it to be true, that the finest sort of silk is not wound in England; that a great deal of it being used here is imported ready wound, twisted and spun, as also that, that sort of silk can be wound no other way but by the engines mentioned in the petition. They also say, that if the winding of fine silk in great quantities was carried on in England, the Throwsters will have the the same at cheaper rates, and many of your poor subjects will be employed in the spinning and twisting of the silk so wound here.
So that, in the opinion of those with whom I have discoursed, the encouraging the said undertaking by erecting a corporation for that purpose may tend to the advancement of the silk manufacture in general, and will not prejudice, in any sort, the great number of your subjects, who are employed in the several parts of the silk manufacture. Sufficient provision must be made, by the letters patent of incorporation, to restrain them absolutely from "throwing" or winding any Turkey silk whatsoever.
The proceedings refer the report, &c. to the Attorney–General to prepare such heads for a charter as he shall think fit. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 294.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Daniel Jones. Shows that, being a merchant living creditably in London, as may appear by certificates from several eminent merchants and others, he was accused by one John Tuddor for burglary; the said Tuddor, the last sessions, indicted the petitioner's son (sic), but was not able to prove anything against him and he was acquitted. However, the said Tuddor has since threatened to swear against him, right or wrong, notwithstanding, by the oaths of several evidences, the said Tuddor was heard to declare that he did not know the persons who robbed him. Besides this, several persons have made oath that this petitioner was, before and after the time at which the said Tuddor gives out the burglary was committed, in his own house. To prevent malicious prosecution by the said Tuddor, the petitioner prays for a pardon under the Great Seal. Referred to the Attorney–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 297.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I send you, by the Queen's command, an extract of a letter from Consul Bonenqui wherein he mentions the charges he has been at about some English mariners; and if you have no objection against it, would have you give order for reimbursing the expenses to him. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 454.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Addison, Mr. Pyot, and Mr. Floyer at Lichfield. The enclosed is a copy of the letter which I sent, about a fortnight ago, to Sir William Biddulph; but understanding he lives a great way from Lichfield, and was not there, I desire you will examine the matter mentioned in it, and proceed according to the directions sent down from the Council or in such other way as you shall think fit. [Ibid.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Deputies of Margate. Being informed by the minister of the High German Church in London, that two persons, Godfried Michael Fetter and Theodore Godfried Platz, subjects of the Elector of Saxony, coming over from Holland, are stopped by you at Margate, for want of a pass, I desire you will discharge them, and permit them to come to London unless there is a good cause for detaining them. [Ibid., p. 455.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. It having been represented to the King that Mr. Poley, his Envoy Extraordinary in Savoy, is not in a condition to take his audience for want of arrears, he desires you to give order for paying them to him, or as much as can conveniently be done. [Ibid., p. 460.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Vander Ameyden to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mrs. Clasma Vander Albe with Adriana Scheuring her servantmaid, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 235]; for Thomas Pitts to go to Harwich and Hamburg; for Bartholomew Saxer and Lucas Wentrel to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Lieut.Colonel John Seymour, with John Nutt, and another servant, ditto; for Helie Chevalier, recommended by Mons. Bagnoux, and Mons. Mettayer, French ministers, ditto; for Laurents Maysonny, ditto; for James Clauveau, ditto; for Mary Ally, ditto [Ibid., p. 236]; for Mr. Christopher Sollgaar, quarter–master, Mr. Gerhard Dietrich Fisher, Lieut. Claus Dieckhoff, Christop Walff, and Yoachim Pape, three under officers, Isaac Ledent, Franke Brug, Albrecht Coes, Peter Bent, Michael Clementsen, Frantz Hause, and — Mayler, common soldiers belonging to the Danish troops, and going to Holland or Flanders; for Johanna Van Sul and her daughter Johanna, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid.]; for Nicholas Van Loon to go to Harwich and embark for London (sic); for Peter Van Poterdale, Anthony Adriansen, and Cornelis Andriensen to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 237]; for Christina Bours, ditto; and for Mr. Charles Manley to go to Deal. [Ibid., p. 238.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. The Queen commands you to send away the troops with all imaginable speed, and to order the ships in the Shannon not to fall down lower than is safe, until they have notice of a convoy, which will be given them from Kinsale; I have written to Admiral Russell to detach one for this purpose. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 333.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger in ordinary, to go on board the ship Ann, John Courzon, skipper, or any other ship in the Thames outward bound, and to search for any suspected persons going beyond the seas without a pass, and having found any to seize them with their papers, for treasonable practices, and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 330.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. This morning an express came from Weymouth, with an account that the French fleet appeared yesterday about 7 in the morning about two or three leagues off Portland standing towards the eastward. At the same time we heard from Portsmouth that Admiral Russell was yesterday afternoon out of sight of that place, so that the two fleets must by this time be very near one another. Seal of arms. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 40.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Treasury concerning the Lord Mayor, etc., of London. The report is as follows:—We have considered this petition, and having advised with your Majesty's learned counsel and having caused former grants to be inspected, and having also heard those who have appeared before us on behalf of the said city. We report that we find the petitioners are already entitled to the conservancy of the River Thames and waters of the Medway, and to hold courts of Conservancy, and to have the fines imposed in those courts. But indictments or presentments in the said courts for offences, being often by the offenders removed into the Court of King's Bench by Writs of Certiorari, the officers concerned for the city are seldom or never at the charge of pursuing the same in the said Court of King's Bench, because the fines set there wholly belong to you, and so both the Crown and the city lose the advantage of the fines, and the offenders go unpunished. Considering that the fines imposed in the said Court of King's Bench, upon presentments or indictments removed as aforesaid, have made little or no profit to you since the determination of the grant thereof made by late King James II. to trustees for the said city, before the restitution of the franchises, and that there is little expectation of any profit to arise thereby to the Crown for the future, and that the grant desired may the better enable the petitioners to reform offences and abuses committed in the river and waters aforesaid; we are of opinion that a grant may be made under the Great Seal to the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of London and their successors of all fines or sums of money to be set or imposed in the Court of King's Bench, with a proviso that such grant may be, at any time, determinable at your pleasure.
The report is referred back to the Treasury to give order for a grant to be passed accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 296.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Governor or Deputy–Governor of Deal. Being informed by Mr. Pereyra that two persons, John Gomes Febos, and Emanuel Cohen, going to the East Indies in the ship Resolution, commanded by Isaac Morley, are stopped by you for want of a pass, I desire you will discharge them and permit them to come up to London, unless there is good cause to detain them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 455.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. You are to permit Lady Marlborough to come and visit the Earl of Marlborough for this time only [Ibid., p. 456.] A like order for Lady Brudenell to visit Lord Brudenell. [Ibid.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you, by the King's command, an extract of a letter from Mr. Molesworth, which I received from Holland concerning his arrears, that you may give such orders therein as shall be necessary. I also enclose, by the Queen's command, a letter which came to me from the LordsJustices about an allowance to the First Serjeant, Attorney and Solicitor for their attendance, on their Majesties' behalf, at the Council at the time appointed for examining the claims of such as as pretend to be within the articles of Limerick and Galway. [Ibid.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Wilmot, commander of the Wolf. The Queen would have you deliver into the hands of the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners, or of such persons as shall be appointed by them, the seven Italians, who you took in the Downs, coming from Calais to England. [Ibid.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. There being seven Italians on board the Wolf, taken in the Downs, as they were coming from Calais intending to land in England, without any pass, the Queen desires you to order some of your officers to go on board that ship, and receive them in custody until further order. [Ibid., p. 457.]
May 20/30.
Bethlem near Louvain.
The King to the Commissioners of the Royal Boroughs of Scotland, assuring them of his protection and desire for the advancement of their trade and manufacture, and urging them to be exact in keeping "the staple–port," to perform the articles of contract between them and the town of Camphier; to provide sufficient convoys for the security of the ships during the war; and to direct to the inhabitants to have their ships ready to sail with the convoys. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 125.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter Bergenaer to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Herbert, two servants and four horses, ditto; for Joseph Levi and Isaac Barents, ditto; for Peter Pouelson to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Isaac Chaigneau to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 238]; for Mary Barlie and her daughters, ditto, renewed June 21, with Elizabeth Gode's name added; for Jacob Sarportis and his son, David Pards, and his son, Moses Depas, Isaac Preto, Abraham Corea, his wife, and a maid and a child ditto; and for Thomas Vincent, esq., Morris Hughes, and Thomas Jones, his two servants, ditto. [Ibid., p. 239.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, the Recorder of London, and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to reprieve Thomas Wheeler, alias Richard Tovey, until Wednesday the 1st of June next, he having been convicted at the Old Bailey of felony, in robbing George Smith of St. Johns. [H. O. Warrant Book 6, p. 330.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the Great Seal of Ireland, granting the office of clerk of the Privy Council in Ireland to John Pulteney, esq., upon the surrender of the letters patent of 21 January 25 Charles II., granting the said office to Sir William Davies, John Davies, and Matthew Barry. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 463.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Harwich. The bearers hereof, William Sutton, one of their Majesties' messengers, and Henry Toelaer, being sent by the Queen to the King with the news of our victory at sea over the French, and upon other matters of importance, she would have you assist them in procuring a vessel to carry them over with all speed to Holland, in case there should be no packet boat at Harwich ready to sail. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 457.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Mayor of London. I send this to acquaint you with the happy news of our victory over the French fleet, which, from Admiral Russell's letter, I have great reason to hope will be an entire one, though, as yet I have no particulars of the losses on either side; "but this is enough to make your lordship's and every Englishman's heart rejoice." [Ibid.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to send orders to all the men–of–war in the river (excepting only the convoy lately come from Scotland, and ordered to Holland) to make all possible haste to the Downs, and proceed from thence according to orders. [Ibid., p. 458.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit Lady Dunmore to visit Lord Dunmore, for this time only. [Ibid.] A like order for Lady Westmorland to speak to Lord Middleton. [Ibid.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to Captain Wilshaw. I enclose the Queen's order which you must send away by some trusty person to St. Helens, who must show this order to all the English men–of–war in that port, or who may be passing that way from the Eastward, giving them a copy thereof, but keeping the original in his hands, that he may show it to ships which shall arrive after. I also send a letter from the Queen to the Dutch ships, to be delivered to the same person, who is to show it to the captains of the Dutch ships at St. Helens, or which shall come from the Eastward. [Ibid., p. 459.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. I send enclosed the Queen's order, which you must show to all the English men–of–war now in the Downs, or which came there from the Eastward, giving them a copy, but keeping the original in your own hands, to show it to the ships which shall arrive from the river. I also send a letter from the Queen, to be shown to the captains of all Dutch ships in the Downs. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 459.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir John Lowther. I enclose two papers, that you may peruse them and do therein as you shall see cause. We have received great news of a victory over the French fleet, the particulars whereof you will see in the enclosed papers. [Ibid., p. 460.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Exeter. You have done very well in securing John Tizer, mentioned in your letter, for which there is very sufficient cause in the affidavit, and his own letter, which you sent me. [Ibid.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lovelace. The Mayor of Exeter having sent me a letter, taken in that city, proved upon oath to have been written by Mr. John Tizer, of Magdalen College, Oxford, I enclose you a copy of it, it being directed to Mr. Hyde, living in your lieutenancy. There being sufficient cause to suspect that person of disaffection to the government, I desire you will make enquiries and proceed as you shall see cause. [Ibid. p., 461.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit such of the prisoners as you shall think fit, to walk upon the platforms next to their lodgings, provided it is at such time that they do not meet or, speak to each other. [Ibid., p. 466.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Lewis Persode to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Thompson the messenger to go to Dover and embark for Newport or Ostend; for William Sutton, the messenger, and Henry Toelaer to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 239]; for Doctor Welwood and Mr. Wren to go to Portsmouth; for Lewis de la Fosse, clockmaker, recommended by Mons. Primerose, French minister, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Simon Twrie and Jacob Barremeyer, ditto; for Richard Hopkins to go to Deal; for James Kitson to go to Portsmouth; for Richard Poyke, junior, the messenger, ditto; and for John Bale, the messenger, to go to Plymouth and thence to Falmouth. [Ibid., p. 240.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the commander of the packet boat at Harwich, to receive on board the bearers; William Sutton, messenger in ordinary, and Henry Toelaer, and carry them to the Brill, in Holland; they being sent by the Queen upon matters of great importance. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 331.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry Allen, messenger in ordinary. Whereas several treasonable printed papers were taken up last night in and about Spring Garden, some of which were wet and lately come from the press, you are hereby required to make search in the printing house in Spring Garden for any treasonable or unlicenced papers, and you are also to search for the same in any suspicious house thereabouts. Having found any such, you are to seize them with the person in whose hands or house they are, and to bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 331.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners the Great Seal to issue a commission proroguing the present parliament, until the 14th of June next. [Ibid.]
May 21.
Kendal.
William Birkhead to Mr. Basil Feilding "to be left at Squire Musgrave's Chambers in Gray's Inn." I received yours of the 14th, by the last post, and the ejectment is served in due time, according to order; the widow was then very humble, but is since encouraged, and I believe will now stand trial. Young Mr. Wilson is coming up to the term and will wait upon Mr. Musgrave and give him an account of all proceedings. I most heartily thank you for your kindness done me about the bond with Mr. Auditor. I have here sent you according to direction in yours, the names of four tenants, who, I believe, stand admitted as tenants to King Charles II., and they are but very few and inconsiderable, that will be found to stand so admitted, and never worth the cost of a trial, if the other cannot be brought in. Tenants of the Marquis' fee:— John Fenton of the Hay; John Walker of Grasmere. Tenants of Richmond fee:—James Dixon of Applethwait, and John Middlefell of Langdale. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 41.]
May 21.
London.
John Rooke to Catherine Lady O'Brien, Baroness Clifton at Cobham Hall. I hope you have received mine of last night. I have just received yours of yesterday, and am glad you received the keys and Acts of Parliament safely. Mr. Brockett does not intend that anything should be done in the tenants' business till your further directions. I expected Crump's bill 'ere this; but they have not yet copied it out; as soon as I have it I shall send you a copy and shall speak to the woollen–draper, who has lent the 1,000l. on the estate. When Mr. Brockett has the bill he will draw a bill for you, or do as you shall direct therein. I shall also, on Monday morning, wait on Mr. Martin and give him the fee, and take the bills and answers from him which were left when the answers were sworn to. As to the postilion, I shall send him down by Monday morning's tide, and the things you write for, and the keeper's horn if it can be obtained so early. His livery–clothes, with shoes and stockings that are in his honour's closet, next to the "guilt room," but cannot get at them; the clothes he has, and the shoes and stockings will serve him till he comes up again, the waistcoats and drawers shall be provided. I received the enclosed this evening, and yours to Lady Powerscourt I sent away by this night's post. The enclosed print brings you all the news. There are great rejoicings in London for the great and good news, the guns are discharged at the Tower and the flags there is out. [Ibid., No. 42.]
May 21.
"Prez du Camp."
Memorandum stating that the enemy's army has been seen. Gives an account of it, and of the plans, which, it is rumoured, it has formed. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 97.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The Queen to —. Has heard this morning that the fleet has beaten the French, and is following after them. This may take the fleet so far to the west that the French may take the opportunity of executing their design to land troops in England. Has therefore ordered her ships in the Downs to sail to St. Helen's and join with such others as may be there, and then to sail to the coast of France, and cruise between Havre de Grace and "Cape de Hague." This is a service of the utmost importance. Requests the person addressed to join in the execution hereof, by sailing to St. Helen's, &c, as above, notwithstanding any orders from the Queen's Admiral or from Admiral Almonde. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 158.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit Lord Hastings and Mr. Hope, his tutor, to come and dine with Lord Huntingdon for one time only. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 461.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. You are to allow Lady Shrewsbury, Lady Brudenell, and Lady Westmorland, to come and speak to the Earl of Middleton, and to see Lord Brudenell for this time only. [Ibid.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. You are to allow Lady Dunmore to come and speak to the Earl of Dunmore; and Mrs. Thorold to see Sir Robert Thorold, her brother, for this time only [Ibid.]; A like letter for Mr. Eden to see Lord Fanshaw, in the presence of a warder. [Ibid.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. To allow Mr. Chudleigh to see Lord Marlborough, in the presence of a warder. [Ibid., p. 462.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Transport. You are to give directions to the masters of the ships, who have brought three regiments from Leith, to land their men, as soon as they can, at Gravesend; and having there taken in the provisions for the like number of men, they are to fall down, with all expedition, to the buoy of the Nore, and to sail from there to Holland, under convoy of their Majesties' ships, the Sheerness and London Merchant, if those vessels have not sailed before they come to the said buoy. If they have, they are to go no further, but stay there, and give notice thereof to you, that they may receive further orders. You are likewise to embark immediately the recruits, horses, and other things for the army in Flanders, and send them away with the said convoy. [Ibid., p. 467.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for the Marquis de Tavernia and two servants, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 240.]; for Peter Matthysen and his wife Catherine Mesags, ditto; for Mons. de Vrigny, ditto; for John Cuisinier, ditto; for David Elder, Thomas Cowley, and James Clerke, to go to Portsmouth; for Captain Archibald Young, with two servants, to go Harwich and Holland; for Thomas Newlyn to go to Portsmouth; and for Richard Poyke, the messenger, to go to Gravesend and thence to Rochester. [Ibid., p. 241.]
May 23.
Cowes.
— to Sir Joseph Williamson at "his house in German Street, London." Last Thursday's news from the fleet went on Friday, express to Her Majesty, from Portsmouth. Last night the Sally Rose, Captain Pound, commander, came in here from cruising; her captain says he has heard that the French fleet, of about 40 sail, were divided, making the best of their way homwards, and ours in pursuit of them. That between Portland and the Start he left four French ships, two of them three deckers, the others about 70 guns each, much battered, and "tiding it out the Channel." On the 21st he met with a Genoese, who told him that he spoke with the French Toulon Squadron, off Lisbon, consisting of 20 sail, making the best of their way for Brest. This morning a tender came in from the Duke, by which I learn that Admiral Carter had lost his leg, but is not dead as was said; the burning and blowing up of four of the French three–deckers is confirmed. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 43.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
[R. Yard] to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. Since the accounts in the Gazette, letters have come from Plymouth, dated yesterday afternoon, which give an account that the Sandwich, the Hampton Court, and a Dutch man–of–war, of 76 guns, called the Seven Provinces, had come in there disabled from the fleet, which the latter left on Saturday about 4 in the morning, about a league from Cape la Hogue. They were then in sight of the French and followed them very closely, and they made as much haste to get from them. The French had then left together only 50 men–of–war, though at first they had 72; the wind was S.W. Col. Hastings, commander of the Sandwich, is killed, and Captain Gradon, of the Hampton Court, dangerously wounded; the death of Carter is confirmed. From Flanders we hear that the French are going to besiege Namur, seal of arms. [Ibid., No. 44.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
[The Queen] to —. Understanding that the fleet was off Cape de Hogue on the 21st inst., pursuing the enemy, she requires the person addressed, notwithstanding her letter of the 21st, to join the fleet under Admiral Russell with all expedition. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 162.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I formerly wrote to you, by the Queen's command, to appoint some frigates to cruise on the coast of Kent and Sussex, for preventing the mischief occasioned by the French privateers. I have lately received a letter from Hastings, that our fishery is in danger of being ruined by these privateers, who still infest those parts, and bring in and carry out several dangerous disaffected persons, who furnish our enemies with intelligence, and carry on a correspondence with the disaffected in England, and I think it necessary you should know of it. The Queen desires you to order the St. Martin prize to proceed to Ireland as she was directed. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 462.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose by the Queen's command the petition of John Trachy, John Darby, and William Deacon. She is pleased to give them leave to dispose of their shallop as they desire, and if the Governor of Jersey shall think her proper for the use of the island, and for that purpose shall be desirous to keep her, the purchaser shall, in that case, be repaid his money, or in default, shall retain the shallop to his own use. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 462.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. The Queen's order for the ships proceeding to St. Helens must not extend to the Wolf, which is ordered to the West Indies, so that she may pursue the orders she received from the Admiralty for that purpose, and therefore, I desire you to communicate this to Captain Wilmot. [Ibid., p. 463.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to permit the Countess of Marlborough to see Lord Marlborough, for this time only. [Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Jermyn. The Queen having given leave to John Trachy, John Darby, and William Deacon, to dispose of the shallop, in which they made their escape from St. Malo, I acquaint you with it, that you may give order for her delivery to the party, who shall purchase her, unless you shall judge it necessary to retain her for the service of the island; in which case, let me know what the service is for which she may be proper, and wherein you think necessary to employ her. [Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Thomas Bower. Your letter of the 20th to Sir Edward Seymour having been read to the Queen at the Council, she desires you to send up affidavits concerning Mr. Roope's proceedings in the matter of which you complain. [Ibid., p. 464.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Nicholas Roope. Complaint having been made to the Queen that you stopped an advice boat which was going to the fleet to give notice of the French being under sail, and of the place where they were, she would have you forthwith give an account how the matter of fact was, and what was the reason of your doing it. [Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance. Having received a letter from Mr. Harris, lieut.–governor of Jersey, wherein he writes that there is great want of guns in that island, I give you notice of it, that you take such care therein as shall be necessary. [Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Lord Athlone having recommended Mr. O'Donnell for the payment of the remainder of the 4,000l., the Queen would have you report what can be done on his behalf. [Ibid., p. 465.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen would have you permit the friends or relations of the prisoners, lately committed to the Tower, to have access to them from time to time, as you think fit. In case any who come to see them shall refuse to take the oaths, you must, in that case, permit them only in the presence of a warder. She desires you to send me the names, from time to time, of such persons who shall come to visit any of the prisoners. [Ibid.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord Mayor. The Queen directs you to summon a Common Council, to meet next Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 465.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Galloway [Galway ?]. The orders have already gone for the marching and subsistence of your troops, and I suppose you have received them. I will let you know how the transport ships are to be disposed of as soon as I can. [Ibid., p. 466.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Post warrants for Stephen Gythens to go to Deal [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 240]; and for Richard Poyke to go to the buoy of the Nore. [Ibid., p. 242.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize for the Home Circuit, and the High Sheriff of Kent, to cause Ursula Tucker, widow, to be inserted in the next general pardon, which shall come out for the Home Circuit without any condition of transportation, and to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon her at the last assizes held at Maidstone, for murdering her husband. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 333.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords–Justices to give orders for the remitting and discharging all the King's subjects of Ireland from all arrears of hearth money and quitrents, on account of their poverty, caused by the late war. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 464.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland, grant ing to Charles, Earl of Abercorn, all the estates, of which his brother, Claudius, late Earl of Abercorn and Baron of Strabane, deceased, outlawed for high treason, was seized; the greatest part of which were mortgaged to Brook Bridges, with a clause in the said letters patent, directing that the said mortgage should not be impeached, and granting to the said Earl the dignity of Baron of Strabane. [Ibid., p. 466.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. The enclosed is an extract of a letter which Lord Portland received to day from Admiral Allemonde, and this evening Captain Mees arrived from Sir Ralph Delaval, with the confirmation of his having burnt the three great ships mentioned in the print, and that Mr. Russell had so enclosed 15 more ships, that they could not escape. Seal of arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 45.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Neal, esq., and two others with him concerned. Shows that "the setting up lamplights in the City of London is found of great convenience for preventing robberies." The said lamp–lights have never yet been used in Ireland, but would be of great use there; and the petitioners being willing at their own costs to set up the same in Dublin and other towns in Ireland, and "to stand to the hazard whether the citizens will be persuaded to accept of, and reasonably pay for the same," pray her Majesty's letter to the Lord–Lieutenant of Ireland to pass a grant for 14 years, under the Great Seal of Ireland, to them for the sole use thereof. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 297.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Tyzacke and Thomas Neale, esq. Shows that they, or one of them, being well apprised of the way of an invention, never yet set up or made public in your Majesty's realms, of tanning all sorts of skins for leather without making use of the chiefest ingredients that have been hitherto used for the same, and also of converting some sorts of the said leather in imitation of and with the same tincture, grain, and smell as Russia leather, now about to be set up and practised in England, under the encouragement of a grant lately made by their Majesties' favour to the above–named Tyzacke and others; and the petitioners, as well for the benefit of Ireland as in the hopes of some profit, being desirous to try that invention there, pray for her Majesty's letters to the Lords–Justices of Ireland for passing a grant to them for such tanning and converting of leather in that kingdom as lately was granted in England to the said Tyzacke and others, for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 298.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon report of the Lords–Justices made upon a petition of Frances Lovett, of Dublin, widow, which had been referred to them by Viscount Sydney on 17 April, 1691. [Vide Calendar for that date.] The petitioner states that King Charles II. by his letter patent bearing date the 17th of July, 1677, granted to Christopher Lovett of the said city, alderman, the petitioner's husband, the bleaching yards, weaving, shops, etc., thereunto belonging at Chapelizod; of these she had been dispossessed by King James. Prays to be released from performing her late husband's covenants. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 301.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen would have you give protections to the men belonging to the transport ships, so that they may not be pressed. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 467.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Andrew Jacobse to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 241]; for Gillis Lamberts and Jannetje Jaagers, ditto; for Charles Bernard, ditto; for Anna Snoeck and Jannetje, a dragoon's wife, ditto; for Peter Bersign, ditto; for Mr. John Shipley, ditto [Ibid., p. 242]; and for Mr. David Elder, and five surgeons, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 243.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Strode, esq., one of their Majesties' tenants within the manor of Shepton Mallet, in Somersetshire. Shows that he is seized, for two lives, of a copyhold tenement and eight "doles" of land "on Mendipp," within the said manor, and for the improvement hereof he has laid out above 500l. in building a lodge, dove–house, and warren, without prejudice to anybody. Some persons have lately caused a Quo Warranto to be brought in the Crown Office for usurpation, and have threatened to throw down the dove–cote and other improvements to his great prejudice, as well as to their Majesty's loss. Prays for a Nolle Prosequi or "anything else that the Attorney shall think best for their Majesties' interest." Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 301.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Riccard, master of the pink, called The Orange Flower. Shows that the said pink in September, 1691, took in her loading 1,000 firkins of butter at Stockton, in Yorkshire, bound for Cadiz, and, being on her voyage, was met by two Algerine men–of–war off Lisbon, who took three men out of her, and put on board nine Turks, and " a Dutch renagardo," designing to carry her to Algiers under pretence, she had no pass. That within 41 hours after she had been taken by the Turks she was re–taken by a squadron of Spanish men–of–war, and carried to Cadiz, where she was restored to the use of the owners, but the goods condemned as prize in the Court of Admiralty, from which sentence the petitioner has appealed. He is advised that, by the Civil law, as well as all treaties, if his vessel had been taken by an enemy and re–taken by a friend in less than 48 hours' time, he ought to have paid but the eighth part for salvage, and not so much in this case, the first capture being by a friend, made only upon suspicion. The petitioner having fully proved in Spain that the whole vessel and lading belong only to their Majesties' subjects, therefore prays to have the Envoy at the Court of Spain to intercede in their Majesties' name at that Court to have the said goods restored to him upon payment of reasonable salvage. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 302.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Peirson, and Mr. Nash. I have your letter of the 20th concerning Timothy Evans, with the letters taken upon him. You have done well in securing him, and must keep him in custody till he shall make it appear what the port is to which his ship has gone. If to Dunkirk, he ought to be prosecuted, if to London or Rotterdam, as he pretends, he may be discharged, but not till he has given good satisfaction about it, for his varying in his story to you, and the Deputy–Mayor of Sandwich makes it very suspicious, that he did not design honestly in this matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 468.]
May 26. The same to Capt. Crosse. The Queen desires that if you have no particular orders from Lord Hatton to stay here upon any service, you would sail forthwith to Guernsey, and there follow the orders of the Lieutenant–Governor. [Ibid.]
[May 26.] The same to the Postmaster at Holyhead. Understanding that the packet–boat at Holyhead is stopped by reason of the late embargo, I write to tell you that it was not intended to comprehend any of the packet–boats in that embargo, but that they must be permitted to sail at the usual times without any interruption; and if there are any other of their Majesties' officers concerned herein to whom these directions should be given, show them this letter that they may comply therewith. You must particularly assist the bearer in procuring a packet–boat or vessel to carry him to Dublin without delay, he being sent by the Queen to the Lords–Justices. [Ibid.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Giles Labyn to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Charles Wilcocks and Mr. Richard Townshend, ditto; for John Reinderts, Nicholas Franse, and Michael Jacobse, ditto; for Nicholas Bosmalen and Andrew Globburg, ditto; for Mr. Isaac Longueil and John James, his servant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 243; for Josias Duval, ditto; and for James Kitson, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 244.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
A further account of the victory obtained by the English and Dutch fleet over the French, received from Admiral Russell. Printed. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 46.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. This morning an express came from Admiral Russell with an account of his having burnt 12 of the enemy's ships in the bay of La Hogue. We reckon that they have lost in all about 20 of their biggest ships, and we hope to hear of the destruction of several more. To–day the Lords of the Council went into the City to borrow 100,000l., which will be readily lent them upon this good news. The last mail from Holland being lost, we have no news from there, unless it is, as the master of the packet–boat assures us, that Namur is besieged. [Ibid., No. 47.]
May 26. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. This brings you an account of the ships mentioned in Mons. Scheel's list. No Danish ship have been condemned in the Court of Admiralty that was furnished with passports and certificates according to the Treaty with Denmark in 1670. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 325.]
May 26. An account, signed by Sir Charles Hedges, of ships mentioned in a list given to his Majesty by Mons. Scheel at the Hague on the 9th of May, 1692. [Ibid., p. 337.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lords of the Treasury, concerning Sir Basil Firebrace's petition. The report is as follows: In obedience to your Majesty's order of reference, signified to us by the Earl of Nottingham, upon the above petition of Sir Basil Firebrace and others, freighters, owners, and masters of the ship William and James, setting forth that the said ship was laden at Oporto with 249 pipes, and 17 half pipes of Portugal wine for the proper account of the said Sir Basil, etc. We report to you, That for our better information in this matter we referred the said petition to the Commissioners of the Customs, who have made to us a report, wherein they certify that in a former case of this kind, concerning the Swan pink and her lading (which, coming from the Leeward Isles, was taken and carried into France), the same was laid before his Majesty in Council, and it was ordered that the said ship should be permitted to be brought, with her cargo, into England, and should be admitted to entry and payment of custom, the owners giving sufficient security that nothing but the cargo from the West Indies should be imported therein (except necessary provisions for the voyage); that it appears, as well by affidavits as otherwise, that the said wines are the product of Portugal, and the proper goods of the said Sir Basil, and were taken as aforesaid; that the duty of the said wines (if imported into England) will amount to upwards of 2,000l., and that they see no cause in anything relating to the custom or laws of trade and navigation, why the said goods may not be imported, if you shall be pleased to give licence for the same, the petitioners giving security that nothing but the said cargo from Portugal be herein imported, and not any goods of the growth or product of France, except necessary provisions for the voyage, against which we have nothing to object. Ordered to be re–transmitted to the Treasury to give orders accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 303.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clark. The Queen having ordered some of the Lords of the Council to go to Portsmouth to–morrow morning, you must also go, so as to be there to–morrow night. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 469.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Mayor. The Queen, to ease the City of all unnecessary charges, is willing to discontinue the Extraordinary Guard raised upon her letter. [Ibid.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney–General. Sir Anthony Aucher, who was chief steward of the liberties of the late monastery of St. Augustine, near Canterbury, being dead, I hear there is one who pretends a title to that office, by virtue of a patent passed in Charles II.'s time, granting him this office for life, in reversion, after the determination of Sir Anthony Aucher's interest. I desire you will let me know whether this patent in reversion is good and valid in law; if not, whether their Majesties may not grant this office to whom they please, without any process for setting aside the other. [Ibid.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to give order for taking off the embargo on the coast trade, and to hasten, as much as possible, the grant of Greenwich, as a hospital for seamen, which is now depending before you, or otherwise that you report your opinion in the case to her Majesty with all speed. [Ibid.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Hans Peter Gerber and Maria Van Malen, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Thomas Newlyn, the messenger, to go to Holyhead; for Thomas Davis, the messenger, to go to Newbury; for Mr. Peter Stooter and Andrea Hingstman, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 244]; for George Clarke, esq., with four servants, to go to Portsmouth; for John Van Dorp, Peter Gaudi, and John Spies, with three horses, ditto; and for Archibald Campbell, to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 245.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords–Justices. I have received a letter this morning from Admiral Russell, who says that he has sent a convoy to the Shannon to bring thence the ships with the artillery; so the Queen desires you to dispatch an order immediately for their falling down, that they may be ready to sail as soon as the convoy arrives. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 334.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the master of the packet–boat at Holyhead, to receive on board the bearer, one of their Majesties' messengers, and to sail with him to Dublin, and there land him, he being sent to the LordsJustices upon special service. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 333.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Browne, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Chidley Coote in Sir George St. George's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 252.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Gamon. Shows that John Childrey obtained a judgment in the Court of Common Pleas in trespass and ejectment for lands and tenements in South Morton, in Berkshire, against the petitioner which said judgment is affirmed upon a writ of error in the Court of King's Bench; in this the petitioner is advised there is manifest error, and having no remedy but by a writ of error returnable in the High Court of Parliament, he prays for such a writ. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 303.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Robert Holmes. I have moved the Queen for you to go to Bath, and if you do not think this letter of mine a sufficient authority for you to be absent, I will procure a licence as soon as you will let me know if you desire it. In the meantime her Majesty doubts not, but you have given necessary orders for the Island during your absence. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 470.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose, by the Queen's command, the case of Capt. Phillips, which she would have you take into consideration, and report what is best to be done. [Ibid.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Consul Baker having informed me, that it would be of great advantage to their Majesties' service to distribute among some of the principal officers at Algiers a bale of the very finest cloth, to wit, three half pieces of black, four half pieces of mazarine blue, one piece of scarlet, and one of crimson, I acquaint you with it by the Queen's command that you may order the same to be provided, and sent to him. [Ibid., p. 471.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Post–warrant for Mr. Griffith, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Harding, and Mr. Bartlett, to go to Portsmouth, etc. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 245.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Edward Russell, esq., paymaster of the Navy, to imprest the sum of 1,500l. sterling to William Meester, esq., he being employed in a business of great importance to the service. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 334.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or–Solicitor–General, to prepare a bill for incorporating the Company for Winding Fine Silk. John Barkstead, merchant, to be the first and present governor, Robert Adersey to be the first deputy–governor, Barton Hollyday, Thomas Pilkington, Samuel Howard, Thomas Baites, Francis Barkstead, John Sherbrooke, Humphrey Simpson, John Frank, Richard Taylor, and Thomas Lissingham, to be the first assistants. Provisoes are to be contained in the charter to restrain the said corporation from throwing or winding any Turkey silk, and that, in case at any time within ten years, it shall be found that the said company is not for the public good, or that it is prejudicial to trade or the silk manufacture, and is so declared by Order of Council, then, upon two years warning and notice given to the Company, the charter is to be void. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 335.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, junior, messenger–in–ordinary, to seize Thomas Marshall, gent., on a charge of high treason. [Ibid., p. 345.]
May 28.
[Cowes.]
— to Sir Joseph Williamson, at his house in Jermyn Street. Last Thursday evening most of their Majesties' Navy, under Admiral Russell's command, returned to St. Helen's; the rest, being about 30 sail, under Sir John Ashby's command, were left on the coast of France towards Havre, into which port it is said some of the French fleet have entered; the smaller ships have gone towards Brest. In this glorious victory, it is generally agreed, we have destroyed above 20 sail of the French three–deckers, besides transport ships, and this without the loss of one of ours, which I am told are to be hastened out again, and that the designed descent into France will now be vigorously pushed on. It is said the Toulon squadron was not joined, so that the French were not above 60 odd sail, but were fought by a much less number of ours, viz., under 50, the rest not being able to get into the fight. The French had not notice of ours being joined till it was too late to avoid fighting. Last night three companies more of Colonel Hastings' regiment came into this island, and the rest are daily expected; it is said they will be encamped upon St. George's Down. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 48.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Pass for John Rudolph Herwagen to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 245.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, to cause arms to be issued for the use of the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Brewer. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 271.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Henry Bulstrode, one of their Majesties' gentlemen ushers [and] daily waiters. Shows that he, conceiving that the setting up a Royal Oak Lottery in the islands of Jamaica and Barbadoes (as it is in England) may in time create some revenue to the Crown, and in no way interfere with the interest of the present patentees, is willing to make the experiment at his own hazard, and to venture a stock, and set up the Royal Oak Lottery there. Prays her Majesty's letters patent granting to him and his assignes, licence and authority to set up the same in those islands for the term of seven years, as it is set up in England. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 305.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ruth, the wife of William Phillips. Shows that one Jane Hipton, the wife of George Hipton, having eloped from her husband, deluded the said William Phillips to live with her, whereby a great part of his fortune has been consumed. The said Jane Hipton had often assaulted the petitioner, and procured her husband to abuse her, for which she prosecuted the said Jane Hipton at the sessions in Middlesex, but the prosecution ceased by their Majesties general pardon, and they have since continued in their riotous living, and accused the petitioner of clipping, and caused her to be imprisoned, and during her confinement they took away from her, in goods and money, to the value of above 250l. The said indictment being not prosecuted, though found two sessions since by the Grand Jury, the petitioner has been admitted to bail. She prays to stay all proceedings on the said indictment by directing the Attorney–General to enter a Nolle Prosequi thereto. Referred to the Attorney–General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 306.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the Solicitor–General's report concerning the petition of Mr. Cloudesley and others. I find that his late Majesty, King James II., granted to Paul Cloudesley, William Sherrard, and Peter Duclew, their executors, administrators and assigns, his letters patent, for the sole use, exercise and benefit of their invention of making "lustrating" and dressing of "alamodes renforces and lute strings" for the term of 14 years, and I find that they, together with several others named in the petition, have attained to great perfection in the said art. In regard that the establishing the said manufacture in this kingdom may be of public use and benefit, as well by employing many poor people, as preventing the transmitting great sums of money to foreign parts for the said commodities, I think it reasonable for you to gratify the petitioners in their request by incorporating them under the Great Seal of England, and by granting them and their successors such powers and privileges as shall be necessary to enable them to carry on and promote the said manufacture and invention according to the tenor and purport of the said letters patent. Referred to the Attorney–General to prepare heads of a charter for incorporating the petitioners. [Ibid., p. 307.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Bishop of London. Consul Baker, at Algiers, has written to me that he has been forced to take up money there at the interest of 4 per cent. a month, to pay the Dey's disbursements for five English seamen, captives at Sallee, who escaped thence to Algiers, which with their charges there, passage to Leghorn, and travel thence by land, may amount to their Majesties 40l. bounty for each man. I acquaint you with this by her Majesty's command, that you—who are more particularly informed of the sense of the Committee in these matters—may take such care at the Committee hereof, that the Consul may be reimbursed all his expenses on the accounts of the seamen. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 471.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Passes for Hendrina Ruys, with her two children, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 245]; for John Evertse, ditto; for Peter Janse Rodel and Jacoba Croese, ditto; for Thomas Creecher, his son Benjamin, and Clement Barlin ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 246]; for the ship William and James, Adam Spencer, master (upon the petition of Sir Basil Firebrace, of London, and other owners and freighters), which was laden with Portugal wines and taken in her voyage from Oporto and carried to St. Malo, to come from there to any port in England, she having no French goods on board except provisions [Ibid., p. 247]; and for Capt. South, and Mrs. Salisbury, and their servants, William Jones, Henry Beetson, and George Wilcox, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 248.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and the Recorder of London, and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death, passed upon Thomas Wheeler, alias Richard Tovey, until the next sessions to be held at the Old Bailey. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 334.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor–General, to prepare a bill containing a grant to Geoffrey Boys, esq., of the office of chief steward of the liberties of the late monastery of St. Augustine, near Canterbury, and also of the court of record there, in the room of Sir Anthony Aucher, deceased. [Ibid., p. 338.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of William Duncomb, their Majesties' Envoy Extraordinary to the King of Sweden, from the 10th of January to the 10th of April, 1692. [Ibid., p. 339.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Alexander Stanhope, their Majesties' Envoy Extraordinary to the King of Spain, for nine months, from the 21st of May, 1691, to the 21st of February, 1691–2. [Ibid., p. 340.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. There is not one word of news but what is contained in the enclosed, unless it is that we have an account to–day from Deal that a Danish vessel had come into the Downs, and a report that the crew saw two great French men–of–war, much disabled, off Beachy; if so, we hope some of our men–of–war will meet with them. The three sail which went on Saturday to the fleet are expected back to–morrow or Wednesday, and then perhaps we may know somewhat more of their commission. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 49.]
May 30./June 9.
On board the Hardenwick off Dover.
Justus Van Hogenhoeck to [Lord Nottingham]. Has sailed from Portsmouth with three frigates, by order of Admiral Almonde, to cruise before Dunkirk, and join the English ships; Captain Van Zijl being commander in the North Sea. If he find no English ships there he will return to the Downs. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 166.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Commission for William Hazlerigge, gent., to be ensign of the Company of which Capt. Andrew Boisemorell is captain in Col. William Selwyn's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 272.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Rochester. Application having been made on the behalf of Mrs. Nash, that she may be bailed, it is thought reasonable that you should accept of such bail as you shall think sufficient for her appearance at the next sessions or assizes, where you are to take care that she is prosecuted, unless she will discover. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 472.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. By the enclosed information you will see the undue practices of the French towards our seamen, whom they take prisoners, in foreing them, by ill–usage, and threats of worse, to serve on board their ships. It being certain that many of our seamen were on board their French fleet in the engagement, it is very probable that they, or the greater part of them, were constrained in like manner to go on board against their wills; this being "so great a violence, contrary to the general usage of all nations in war, and against the articles of the cartel," her Majesty would have you complain of it to the French Intendant, with whom you correspond, and desire redress that nothing of this kind may be done for the future, but that the cartel may be fairly observed on their side, as it is on ours, in setting the prisoners at liberty without employing any threats or ill–usage "to debauch them from their allegiance." You must endeavour to have these men discharged without delay. [Ibid.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Lord President having sent me your letter, I have ordered the bearer, one of the messengers, to attend you and follow your directions. He has in his hands a warrant, which is not yet served, and by virtue of that you may search and seize any suspicious person who, upon proof against him, may be further prosecuted. [Ibid., p. 473.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Passes for Adam Beaune to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. George Badcocke, ditto; for Lieut.–Colonel Richard Fowler and John Sharpe, William Hatfields and James Cross, his servants, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 246]; for John George Meyer, ditto; for Engelbrecht Van Broeck, ditto; for Mr. Frederick Happe Mr. Christopher Wambold, Mrs. Stripp, and Mrs. Reusnerus, ditto; for Mrs. Ann Lynch, and Frances, her daughter, ditto; for Lieut.Colonel Parsons, ditto [Ibid., p. 248]; and for Mr. Peter Torner, David Langerman, George Babbe, and Christian Mevius, with one servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 248.]
May 31. Allowance of the bill of James Vernon, for his extraordinary charges, in returning from Vienna to Holland, for himself, a clerk, and a servant, "a great part of the way by post," and for the carriage of his goods from Vienna to Amsterdam, and from thence to the camp; in all 60l. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 339.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. The Lords and others who were lately committed to prison have entered their prayers to be tried at the King's Bench, so that they may have the benefit of the Habeas Corpus Act. The Earl of Rochester, the Earl of Portland, and Lord Sydney are expected back this evening from the fleet. To–day the Dutch post came in with letters of Thursday last from the King's camp at Meldert, about seven leagues from Namur. They tell us that the Elector of Bavaria with the Spanish horse and the two Bavarian regiments of Cuirassiers, had joined them, that the Baron De Fleming with 18,000 Brandenbergers would join them the next day, and then the King would have an army of 60,000 foot and 24,000 horse. That the King had sent all the heavy baggage away to Louvain, and would march again the next day (which was Friday) to fight the French; so that we are in daily expectation of hearing of a battle. These letters also say that the news of our victory at sea had occasioned a great consternation in the French camp. Sir John Ashby has rejoined the fleet at St. Helens without any further action. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 50.]
May. An account of the Swedish ship. Angel Gabriel, and three Danish ships "mentioned in Mr. Grey's letter." [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 329.]