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William and Mary: April 1692

Pages 212-265

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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April 1692

April 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for William Pulteney, esq., and Ralph Hawtry, esq., to be deputy-lieutenants for Middlesex, and for the Earl of Bedford, lord lieutenant of that county, to issue out their deputations accordingly [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 252]; for Theophilus Gardiner, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Paul Rapin's company in Col. Henry Rowe's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 254]; for Joshua Churchill, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Thomas Brent's company in Lord Monmouth's regiment of foot; for John Brereton, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Richard Pye's company of grenadiers in the same regiment; for William Graham, gent., to be lieutenant to Major John Dalyell's company in Sir David Collier's regiment of foot; for James Sincklar, gent., to be ensign to the same company [Ibid., p. 255]; for Lewis De Senegua, gent., to be reformed ensign in Col. Peter De Belcastell's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 279]; and for Alexander Godart to be quarter-master of the troop in the Earl of Oxford's royal regiment of horse, of which he himself is captain. [Ibid., p. 281.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth Pomroy, widow of Captain George Pomroy, late commander of the Rupert, showing that her husband was so seriously wounded in the engagement against the French off Beachy Head, in June 1690, that he died soon after, leaving her in a deplorable condition, with 3 small children. Prays for some allowances as has been given to Capt. George Aylmer's widow in the like case. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book1, p. 269.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Proceeding upon the petition of John Braman, esq., Thomas Firmyn, merchant, and Dionisius Andrew, esq. They show that briefs " to collect the charities of persons well disposed for relief of those ruined by fire, etc.," are now granted, and that for want of a settled method, excessive charges are sustained, in such collection and issuing. For preventing the like hereafter they propose to keep an office in or near London, " where all persons will undertake the transmitting such letters patents or briefs to all the parishes, &c., in England," and where all money so collected shall be paid, and a just account be given thereof, once a year according to such rules as shall be established. They pray to have a patent granted to them for 21 years, and demand for their reward two thirds less than the charges heretofore expended. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [Ibid., p. 270.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Bishop of Ely. I desire you will send me the copy of the statutes of St. John's College, Cambridge, if you have it, and I will return it safely to you again. [H.O. Letter Book, (Secretary's) 2, p. 405.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Rowland Gwynne. The Queen desires you to attend the Council on Thursday morning next. [Ibid.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Lords of the Council having examined Justice Evans concerning the complaint of Lieutenant Serles, he alleged in his own defence, that what he did was upon an affidavit, that this lieutenant has pressed an apprentice from his master which caused some disorder among the common people, and that it was not only upon this affidavit that he committed the lieutenant, but chiefly for the lieutenant's security against the rabble who were very much incensed against him for that action.
Having acquainted their lordships with the extract of Capt. Condon's letter, which I received from you, concerning the ship Henry, Robert Savage, master, laden with French wines and linen, their lordships think it necessary you should order the ship to be put into the hands of the officers of the Customs, and acquaint the Lords of the Treasury that you have done the same. [Ibid.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a lease of a farm in Ireland to be granted to Major Walter Delamar and Major Edmund Power for a term of years, and for the payment of their arrears of pay, they having been serviceable in bringing in the horse upon the breaking up of Colonel Luttrell's troop. [S.P. Signet Office12, p. 449.]
April 1. Abstract of the constant weekly payments in respect of the troops abroad to commence from the 1st of April 1692. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 63.]
April 1/11.
Portsmouth Harbour.
A. den Boer, commander of the Dutch Fleet, to —. Acknowledges the receipt of his letter from Whitehall of 30 March, and sends a list of his ships, as requested, with other particulars. [H.O. Admiralty5, p. 100.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Major John Langston. Shows that the late Col. Thomas Langston had an arrear due to him from King Charles II. for service at Tangier, and afterwards, for want of money, entered into a bond to Col. Boynton for 400l. The same Col. Boynton dying, Mrs. Tobyn, being executrix, received only 200l., and has arrested the petitioner for the remainder, which proceedings hinder him from going to Flanders, where he is commanded to go. Prays for payment of the said arrears, due to Col. Thomas Langston, and a discharge from his confinement and arrest. Referred to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 269.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to give order for the payment of 50l. to Col. Edward Wilson, which her Majesty is pleased to give him. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 407.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Matthews. I send, by the Queen's command, the enclosed copy of Mrs. Bickerston's petition about 50l. which she alleges is due to her, so that you may return your answer to it. [Ibid., p. 409.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Margareth Buttler to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 191]; and for John de Piper of Amsterdam, ditto. [Ibid., p. 198.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I enclose a list of such bills as her Majesty would have you prepare against the sitting of Parliament in Ireland. I have acquainted you that she would have you hasten away the Irish designed for the Emperor's service. Kinsale is the place where they are to embark, and the ships, which are to carry them, will speedily be sent from Bristol thither. The Queen has ordered a squadron of men-of-war to sail forthwith to the soundings, and that a convoy be sent thence to the mouth of the Shannon for the security of the ships with the artillery. You will do well therefore to order them to fall down as low as they safely can, to be in readiness to sail upon the convoy's arrival. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book1, p. 318.]
Enclosing
The list of the bills referred to in the foregoing letter: A bill to attaint those who were killed or died in rebellion, and for vesting the estates of others in the Crown. A bill of indemnity against private suits. A bill for settling the militia. A bill to settle the book of rates, and improvement of their Majesties' revenue and trade in Ireland. A bill for better securing and regulating the Excise. A bill for regulating the collecting of the chimney money. A bill for encouraging the linen manufacture, and for discharging the penalties and forfeitures incurred for not sowing hemp and flax. A bill for naturalizing all protestant strangers. A bill to encourage and oblige the clergy to residence, and to avoid pluralities. A bill for the ease of protestant dissenters. A bill for distribution of intestates' estates; and a bill for preventing frauds and perjuries. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book1, p. 319.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Viscount Galway. I have received your letter wherein you tell me that the artillery horses will not be in a condition for service, or to embark, until the 15th of May, which will render them almost useless, because it will scarce be possible to get them to Portsmouth by the time which you know is prefixed for using them. I should be glad to know whether it is possible to make them fit to be shipped sooner, and also what number there are of them. The transport ships for the five battalions will, I hope, be in Ireland by the 15th instant, and there is order given for convoy for the artillery ships from the Shannon, and also for these troops to Portsmouth. The parsonage in Guernsey, which you desired of Lord Hatton was given away before I received your letter, or else Lord Hatton would readily have given it to the person you recommended. [Ibid., p. 320.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson. Not having received any letters from abroad since Tuesday last I know very little news to write by this post, all I can say is that Col. Trelawny's regiment set sail on Wednesday last from Portsmouth for Ostend; that we had an account yesterday from Bristol that a ship had arrived there, which came from Nevis on the 1st of February, and says the French had not then made any attempt upon us, and seemed to have no such design; the man-of-war which came lately from France with some supplies of men and stores for the Leeward Islands, being about to return thither, to serve in their main fleet this summer. Next month, three of the new ships will be launched, built in pursuance of the late Act of Parliament, to wit: one of 80 guns to be called the Cornwall, another of the same to be called the Devonshire, and the other of 70 guns, which is not yet named; and these three ships they propose to have quite fitted for the sea by the end of May. Lord Sydney has fixed his departure for Ireland for the 18th of this month. Imperfect. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary4, No. 21.]
April 3/13.
Portsmouth Harbour.
A. den Boer to—. Touching the Dutch ships, and Captain Brakel. [H.O. Admiralty5, p. 104.]
April 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Charles Hedges. I enclose a copy of a letter from Mons. Guldenlieu to Mons. Lente at the Hague, which more particularly explains his property in the ship and lading, than that which he wrote to Mons. La Fouleresse, whereupon application has been made by Mons. Lente to the King, who desires that Count de Guldenlieu be gratified, and used with as much favour as may be by restoring his ship and goods with reparation, if there is cause. You will see that he claims in like manner the Mary, of Larwick, and has desired a passport for preventing the like misfortune; the King has granted it, being satisfied that the ship belongs to him. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 406.]
April 3. General disposition of the army in Flanders and Brabant. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 64.]
April 4.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Matthew Pearson, gent., to be quarter-master of Sir George St. George's regiment of foot; for Henry Talbot, gent., to be adjutant of the same regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 252]; and for Lee Backwell, gent., to be cornet to Major Henry Boad's troop of horse in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. [Ibid., p. 287.]
April 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Theodore Maes of Haarlem to go to Harwich and Holland; for Dirck Janse, ditto; for Mrs. Henrico Rendtorff, ditto; and for Mr. John Mauger, a merchant, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 198.]
April 4.
The Hague.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. After giving directions for the providing of food and ammunition for the army he is going to Maestricht to be nearer his troops and the allies. He hopes to be able to consult with Count de Solms on various matters. Discusses the prospects of the next campaign. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 65.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of David Lambert, commander of the ship Breda. Shows that, when he was commander of the ship Newcastle, convoy to the last Turkey fleet, he took two small prizes, which he publicly sold. By the false information of seamen he was prosecuted in the Admiralty Court for the sum of 25,000l., and was forced to give bail for 40,000l. After many witnesses had been examined there appeared to be due from him but 470l., as he owned at first. This sum he has been sentenced to pay to their Majesties; but considering the charges he has been at in regard of this vexatious suit, he prays to have the same remitted. Refereed to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 271.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Margaret, Viscountess Purbeck, showing that before her marriage with Robert Fielding, esq., she possessed some " dressing plate " to the value of 400l.; that after her marriage her said husband possessed himself of that plate, and being now attainted of high treason, the same is forfeited to their Majesties. The petitioner has discovered where the said plate is, but cannot receive it without has a grant from their Majesties; therefore prays for a grant of the same for her separate benefit. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen having thought fit to give directions to the several Lords-Lieutenant of the inland counties for impressing seamen, she would have you send down such a number of blank press-warrants to them as shall be necessary for empowering them to perform this service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 407.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen having directed several allowances to be made by the Lords-Lieutenant of the inland counties to such seamen as shall be impressed by them for their Majesties' service, I send you enclosed, by the Queen's command, an extract of the Order of Council on that behalf, by which you will see more particularly what her Majesty has thought fit to direct on this occasion; and she would have you issue such orders as shall be necessary to the officers of the Excise for paying to the respective Lords-Lieutenant or Sheriffs what they shall disburse for their Majesties' service pursuant to this order, and would have you further direct the several Sheriffs to allow and pay to the conductors what shall be fit for their pains. [Ibid.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The King being satisfied with the diligence of Capt. Price, captain of the Smyrna Merchant, in his service, desires you to appoint him captain of a better ship, as soon as he shall return from convoying the Irish to Hamburg; this latter ship to be then ready to cruise between England and Holland. [Ibid., p. 408.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
Passes for James Glasbrooke to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 198]; and for the Anne, a ketch of Dover, —Yeames commander, appointed for carrying over the Queen-Dowager of England, and her servants to France, to sail from Dover to Calais, or any other port in France, and to return to England. [Ibid., p. 199.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. The QueenDowager is still at Dover, expecting fairer weather, when she will pass over to Calais in a yacht hired for that purpose of Sir Henry Johnson. We are told that there is a final resolution taken about settling an East [India] Company, according to the address of the House of Commons, with a little alteration in some of the proposed regulations; the particulars we do not yet know, but probably they will become public to-morrow, in the evening, when the governor and some of the principal members of the company are to attend the Cabinet Council. To-day the Dutch letters came in, of Friday last. The King was still at Loo, and it was yet uncertain when he would leave that place, and whether the first interview between him and the Elector of Bavaria would be there or at Breda. In Flanders things continued very quiet, but the French were preparing an encampment between Ath and Tournay, but at the same time kept their eyes towards their sea-coasts, where they intend to have a body of 18,000 or 20,000 men under the Marshal De Bellefond. The late King James goes with the French King to Flanders, and has accordingly ordered his equipage to be provided. The Duke of Savoy intends to besiege Pignerol. These letters from Holland give an account likewise of the arrival of the Duke of Ormond and Lieut.-Gen. Tollemache with Lord Scarborough's troop of Guards, Col. Wyndham's regiment of horse, and Eppinger's dragoons, which were landed at Williamstadt. Seal broken. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 22.]
April 5. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. I have given you an account of the order for sale of the ship, City of Sluys, and her lading, consisting of deal, tar, and masts for ships, bound for Dunkirk, and have nothing more to say at present concerning Mons. Lyencrona's memorial, save that there was little reason for him to trouble you about another ship, mentioned in the same, called the Lyon, of Smoland, for he could not be ignorant that, before his complaint, there was a particular direction at the Court of Admiralty to prosecute the privateer which took her. As to the other long memorial, of the 4th of April, the thing itself will show that the matter which the Secretary calls a prejudice to the royal authority, tending to the entire ruin of the King of Sweden's subjects, is nothing but an ordinary commission agreeable to the practice of all nations in such cases, granted by the court for their benefit, in order for them to prove their property in the ship and goods. The two ships called the Guldenlew, and the Mary, of Larwick, were ordered to-day to be discharged, but the privateer makes show as if he intended to bring the case of the first before the Lords of Appeal. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 285.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Commission for John Clayton, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Malcom Cathcart was late captain in Col. Zachariah Tiffin's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 252.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. The Queen desires you to send directions to all the officers of Lord Monmouth's regiment to repair immediately, without the least delay, to Southampton, and there to embark on board the Isabella, yacht, and pass to their respective commands in Guernsey and Jersey. Mr. Harris, the Lieutenant-Governor goes to Southampton to-morrow or Friday and these officers must go at the same time. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 409.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen having been acquainted with the enclosed report of the AttorneyGeneral of Ireland upon the petition of Mrs. Ann Bagnall, has commanded me to transmit it to you, that you may give orders for a Custodium to be granted to the petitioner of all her jointure lands for her own maintenance at the rent of 20l. per annum, and likewise a Custodium of so much of the rest of the petitioner's husband's late estate, seized into their Majesties' hands upon his outlawry, as was formerly of the yearly value of 200l., for the maintenance of her children. [Ibid.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen wishes to bestow 50l. upon Richard Griffith, master of the Trial, of London, who with great courage rescued the said ship out of the hands of the French (after they had taken her as a prize) and brought her safely into Falmouth; I am commanded by her to acquaint you with it, so you may give order for paying the same. [Ibid, p. 410.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Mr. Nicholas Hill, one of their Majesties' messengers, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mary Stalwyck, ditto; for Peter van Blanken, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 199]; and for Adriana Kerfs, with her daughter, ditto. [Ibid., p. 200.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance, to order certain stores to be sent to Jersey and Guernsey with all possible expedition; the same to be shipped on board such men-of-war in the Thames as are appointed by the Admiralty. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 292.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to permit Charles Throckmorton, esq., to bring a writ of error for the reversal of the outlawry for high treason against him. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 452.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland for the appointment of St. George Ash, as Provost of Trinity College, near Dublin, vacant by the promotion of Dr. Robert Huntington to the bishopric of Kilmore. [Ibid., p. 453.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland for the donation of the bishopric of Kilmore to Dr. Robert Huntington, D.D., and Provost of Trinity College, Dublin, and for his investiture, consecration, and for the restitution of the temporalities of the said bishopric, void by the deprivation of William Sheridan, late bishop. [Ibid.]
April 6.
Ordnance Office.
The Officers of the Ordnance to the King. We are informed that the company of miners, employed last year in Ireland, under the command of Capt. Pitt, are designed to be broken; we conceive it will be necessary for your service, that such a company should be employed in the intended expedition by sea, and therefore, according to our duty, submit to your wisdom to consider continuing the said company, upon the same footing, for six months at least, or during the said service. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 23.]
April 6/16
Before Portsmouth.
Admiral Evertsen to—. Touching damages sustained by the Dutch ships. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 108.]
April 6/16.
Before Portsmouth.
List of ships; apparently an enclosure in the preceding. [Ibid. p. 112.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick and the Principal Officers of the Ordnance, to cause certain pieces of brass, and a quantity of strong powder, according to the late invention of Sir Polycarp Wharton, to be forthwith made and provided for the service. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 253.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to cause 135 horsemen's tents, furnished, and 50 pairs of pistols for the use of the regiment of horse, commanded by Sir John Lanier. [Ibid., p. 254.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Theobald, Lord Caher. Shows that by his Majesty's declaration of the 22nd of February 1688 a full and free enjoyment of their estates was promised to those who should lay down their arms before the 10th of April. That accordingly, before the 2nd of April, he gave up his commission and lived quietly and peaceably, and that after that time he never acted in any public employment whatsoever. That by accident, being in Cork at the time of the surrendering of it, he was made prisoner of war, and remained in the Tower till her Majesty ordered his enlargement upon bail. That he was lately ordered to be sent into France by way of exchange, but upon his supplication to live under their Majesties' government, he had liberty to remain. That his estate being seized to their Majesties, he has no manner of way to subsist, and his children must perish if they are not relieved. Prays for an order to reverse his outlawry, and to be restored to his estate. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 272.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Robert Holmes. I am commanded by the Queen in Council to tell you to obey the Order of Council of the 24th of March, and that until it is obeyed your petition will not be taken into consideration. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 410.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose a copy of the paper received from the Office of Ordnance, by the Queen's command, concerning the charge requisite for the stores which are directed to be sent to Jersey and Guernsey for the security of those islands, that you may give order for paying to the Treasurer of the Ordnance, such sum of money as shall be necessary for this service. [Ibid.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. You have received a list of some persons whom the Earl of Bedford recommended to the King as fit to be put into the commission of the peace for Westminster and Middlesex, and of others whom he did not think proper to be continued in it, of which his Majesty approved; thereupon Lord Sydney told you to make the alterations accordingly. Nothing having yet been done by you, Lord Bedford has again considered that list and made some changes in it, which he thought necessary for their Majesties' service, as you will see by the enclosed, if compared with the former. You are to order the Commission to be renewed, adding and omitting the names respectively mentioned in the enclosed paper. [Ibid., p. 411.]
Enclosure:—Justices to be put out for Westminster and Middlesex. Sir Cornwall Bradshaw, knight; John Robins, esq.; Robert Hastings, esq.; Robert Fairebeard, esq.; Henry Higden, esq.; Charles Peters, esq.; Ambrose Istead, esq.; Nehemiah Arnold, esq.; William James, esq.; and Thomas Butler, esq. Justices to be added for Westminster and Middlesex. Sir Henry Marwood, bart.; Sir Richard Bulkeley, bart.; Sir Michael Cole, knight; Hugh Squire, esq.; George Booth, esq.; Joseph Offley, esq.; John Herbert, esq.; Richard Fowler, esq.; Maynard Colchester, esq.; — Yates, esq.; Sir Edward Waldoe, knight; Isaac Fansham, esq.; John I field, esq.; Francis Merrick, of Norcott, esq.; Samuel Collis, doctor of physic; William Robinson, esq.; — Plumtree, esq.; and John Marshall. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 411.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mons. Arffe to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jacob Siltart, ditto; for Mrs. Elizabeth Lloyd, Mrs. Jane Atkins, and Mary Waller, her servant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 197]; for Capt. Patrick McIlvain, his wife, 3 men servants and one maid servant, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Nicholas Van Loon, one of his Majesties postillions, ditto; and for Michell Michell, Elias Isaac Polack, David Franco Drago, and Heschall Abrahams, four Jews, ditto [Ibid., p. 200]; for the Viscountess Gormanston; Mary Preston, her daughter; Francis Preston; Rose and Mary O'Ncille, her three nieces, — Welch, her woman, Mary Hugh, her maid-servant, Charles Letham, her page, and —Barnewell, her man-servant, to return out of France to any port in England; and for Elizabeth and Catherine Hunloke, with Mary Jolly, their maid servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 201.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The Queen desires you to re-pay to Col. Edward Wilson 60 pistols, and money for the arms disbursed by him, if his allegations appear as he has set forth. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 321.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson. As to the time of Lord Sydney's setting out for Ireland, I can only say that he has let the Commissioners of the Admiralty know that he will go from here on the 18th of this month, and intends to be 8 or 10 days on his journey to Chester and that the convoy which is to attend him may be ready by that time; and I have not heard that he has altered his resolution. I will make it my business to be certainly informed of his moves and acquaint you with it.
I have hitherto forborn to give you an account of an affair, Sir Rowland Gwynne has of late engaged himself in, because I could not do it with the certainty such a matter required; but now that is brought to an issue and made public I will trouble you with the history of it: about a fortnight ago Sir Rowland goes to the Queen and pretending a mighty zeal for her service tells her that all offices and employments were sold in Ireland. The Queen bade him acquaint Lord Sydney with it, that he might enquire into the matter. Sir Rowland answered that he was the most unfit man in the world to be applied to, for he took the money. The Queen told this to Lord Sydney, and he sent for Sir Rowland and asked him what ground he had for the information he had given the Queen concerning him, that he expected he would produce his authors, (sic) and if he did not he should look upon him as the inventor of it. Sir Rowland was out of countenance but did not disown the thing, and promised he would recollect himself and endeavour to produce those he had this report from.
Accordingly he was summoned before the Council yesterday week, but before they met he came to Lord Nottingham and desired he might be permitted to speak to the Queen before the business was brought before the Council. The Queen ordered him to attend the Cabinet Council the next day where he appeared, owned that he had told the Queen there was report about town that offices were sold in Ireland, but disowned he had said anything about Lord Sydney and had the confidence to say the Queen was mistaken. He was thereupon summoned before the Council this day when he said the same over again owning the first part and denying the other. Mr. Pulteney, besides what the Queen was pleased to say herself, declared that Sir Rowland had not at first denied the thing to Lord Sydney (he being present) but had promised to produce his authors; some other witnesses proved, too, that Sir Rowland had owned the matter to them. After all, the Lords asked Sir Rowland whether he had anything more to say; he answered not before your lordships and the conclusion was that the Queen ordered it to be entered upon the Council books that the report of Sir Rowland Gwynne was groundless and scandalous, and that she was fully satisfied of the falseness of it, and that this be published in the next Gazette. It is believed that the next thing will be to put him out of his place of Treasurer of the Chamber.
Yesterday the Governor and some of the chief of the East India Company, as also several of their adversaries, appeared before the Cabinet Council; they were asked their opinions upon two heads; first what stock they thought the trade could employ, and secondly what value of English manufacture they could export in a year, to which they answered at first differently, but at last agreed that the stock might be 1,600,000l. or 1,800,000l., and the export of our manufacture to the value of 100,000l. These questions make people think that it is resolved to establish a new company. Yesterday one Harrison was tried at the Old Bailey, and found guilty of the murder of Dr. Clinch. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 24.]
April 7.
Ordnance. Office.
The Officers of the Ordnance to the Earl of Nottingham. Sir Henry Goodrick has signified to us, it is her Majesty's pleasure, that Sir John Lanier's regiment of horse should be supplied with 135 horsemen's tents, and 50 pairs of pistols; we have therefore sent you the enclosed warrant for the royal signature, and till we have received it, signed by her Majesty, we cannotbe justified in delivering the said tents, &c.; this affair presses as the said regiment is now shipping. We have likewise enclosed a memorial to her Majesty concerning the company of miners employed last year in Ireland which we desire you to lay before her Majesty for her determination assuring you it is absolutely necessary they should be continued in pay for this years expedition. Seal of Arms. [Ibid., No. 25.]
April 7. Memorandum of the Lord President relating to Mr. Joy [Tey ?], He is to answer whether he was partner in the bargains made by him with the Commissioner for Prizes for the ship Eleanora either before or after the sale made to him of the said ship. [Ibid., No. 26.]
April 7.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Is sending lists and despatches to the King, and awaits orders from the Hague. Begs the King to send ammunition and other necessities. Shows how important it is, these, should be sent. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 66.]
April 7.
Admiralty Office.
The Commissioners of the Admiralty to the Earl of Nottingham. We enclose an extract of a letter just received from Mr. Stock, muster-master at Deal, dated yesterday. We have sent the Marshal of the Admiralty down thither for the "Rotterdamer" therein mentioned with orders to bring him up to attend this board. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 275.] Enclosing:—
An extract of a letter from Mr. Stock. Yesterday I understood that a couple of Ostend men-of-war had brought in a prize taken out of a fleet of French merchantmen bound from Bourdeaux, Rochelle, and Nantes, for the Coast of Normandy, and Picardy as far as Dunkirk. I went on board the prize where I found the steersman who told me he was a Rotterdamer and had been taken in a small vessel going to Biscay, and carried into St. John de Luce. I asked him what readiness the French fleet was in; he told me that the Admiral with about 50 sail more of men-of-war, were out of the harbour riding in the road ready to sail, and that some of them had already been at sea, but put back by bad weather. That there was still in the harbour about 16 sail of great ships, several of them with three decks, and amongst them some fireships; I asked him also if there were any soldiers thereabouts and shipping preparing to transport them, he absolutely told me there was none, but heard there were 18 gallies at Havre. Dated at Deal 26th April 1692. [Ibid., p. 279.]
April 7.
On board theGoes before Ports-mouth.
Maerten Barduse Boom, Captain of the Goes, to—. Having lost two anchors and two cables in the storm, asks permission to come into Portsmouth and refit. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 78.]
April 7.
Dover.
The Earl of Faversham to the the Earl of Nottingham. By the Queen-Dowager's command, I send this to desire you to let Sir William Booth have her pass for more vessels to transport her to Dieppe, because those she has here are not fit for Dieppe though they were for Calais, as it is said. Holograph. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 82.]
April 7.
Dover.
The same to the same. Her Majesty being resolved now to go by Dieppe has commanded me to let you know it, and desires you to acquaint Queen Mary, with it, so that she may order the convoy, which was to have gone with the Queen-Dowager to Calais, to go to Dieppe, or another man-of-war which may be thought more fit, for two men-of-war are now in those roads. Holograph. Seal of Arms. [Ibid., p. 86.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Pass for John Dingemans to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 201.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of Charles, Lord Dursley, Envoy Extraordinary from their Majesties to the States General of the United Provinces and plenipotentiary at the Congress, from 5th December, 1691 to the 6th March following. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 292.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Gibbs, messenger in ordinary, to search "upon the road, in the inn, or at any other convenient place," the travelling waggon from Dover, usually coming to the King's Head in Southwark, and which is expected, or probably will be there, sometime to-morrow being Saturday, and likewise to search the waggoner or any servant or servants, belonging to the said waggon, or any other person in the company for letters or papers; information having been given that the said waggoner, or some belonging to, or employed by him, have received some letters or papers, of a treasonable nature, or otherwise dangerous to the peace of this kingdom. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 293.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, and the principal officers of the Ordnance, to cause a certain number of trench tents, furnished, for the use of the regiment of foot, commanded by Charles, Earl of Monmouth, and 20 carbines, 20 pairs of pistols, and 90 horsemens' tents, furnished, to be issued for the regiment of horse, commanded by Col. Francis Langston. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 253.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Commissions for David de la Touche, to be ensign of the company in Col. John Beaumont's regiment of foot of which he himself is captain; and for Thomas Bush, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Haymond Rooke's company in Col. Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 254.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. I desire you will have an affidavit made of what concerns the mayor of Sandwich and send it up to me as soon as you can. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 412.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Cotton, and Mr. Frankland. I send you herewith a packet for Don Juan de Angulo, at Madrid, which I desire you to transmit thither with very great care, and give a strict charge about it, particularly to the master of the packet boat, that, in case of being taken by the French, he will throw this packet into the sea, in time enough to prevent its coming into the enemy's hands. [Ibid.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Henry Goodrick. I send enclosed an account of the stores desired for Guernsey, that you may consider it, and let me know which of them are needful, with all speed. The principal officers of the Ordnance having represented their opinion to the Queen that the company of miners employed last year in Ireland, and designed to be broken, should be continued, in regard they conceive it will be necessary for their Majesties' service that such a company should be employed in the intended expedition by sea, I desire you will let me know whether the King has appointed any such company for that service. [Ibid., p. 413.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Johnson. You must keep the French spy, mentioned in your letter of the 29th of March, a close prisoner until further order. I am glad the inhabitants are so hearty, and you may assure them that care is taken for their defence and protection against any attempts of the French, by sending a squadron of men-of-war, which must not however lessen your diligence and endeavours for the safety of the island. [Ibid.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir John Powell. I desire you will send me an account of the trial of Dr. Beech at Salisbury at the last assizes, that I may acquaint the Queen with it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 413.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The enclosed is the extract of a letter from Sir Henry Goodrick, which, having been read at the Cabinet Council, I transmit to you, that you may give necessary directions. [Ibid., p. 414.]
Enclosure:—
There is a debt to the gunsmiths of London of 22,000l. for goods received and some upon contract, which remaining contract cannot be proceeded in, without an immediate supply to those very poor men of at least 3,000l. and a promise of the remainder monthly. This is the more necessary, because the stores of small arms are extremely exhausted by completing the regiments, the fleet, and the spare arms in case of a battle in Flanders or France, so that upon any emergency England will be almost disfurnished, but may be supplied with a competent number if this is granted. [Ibid.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Mons. de Rouvray, and his wife, to go to Chester or any other port and embark for Ireland; for Gregoire Gougeon to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 201]; for David Robert de la Jonquiere, ditto; for John Guy to go to Holyhead; for John Walter to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Capt. Claes Hooft, a "wachmaster," a corporal, a trooper, and two servants, belonging to Lord Portland's regiment, ditto. [Ibid., p. 202.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I send you here enclosed a copy of the instructions ordered to be sent to RearAdmiral Carter, by which you will see that care is taken in relation to the regiments, &c., to be transported from Ireland. I must desire you to order the ships in the Shannon to fall down as low as they can with safety so as to be in readiness. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 323.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners for keeping the Great Seal of England, to prorogue parliament on Tuesday the 12th instant until the 24th of May next ensuing. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 294.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to cause a writ or commission to be passed appointing Sir George Treby, knt., Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas. [Ibid., p. 296.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to cause a like commission to be passed for Sir John Somers, knt., to be Attorney-General. [Ibid.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to cause writs to be issued calling to the state and degree of serjeant-at-law, the following persons: Sir George Treby, knt., Thomas Gooding, George Prickett, Samuel Eyre, Littleton Powis, Henry Goold, John Darnell and John Rowe, esqrs. [Ibid., p. 297.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to cause a writ to be passed appointing Thomas Trevor, esq., to be Solicitor-General. [Ibid.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a grant to John Williams of Exeter, and Sir Henry Marwood of a patent for the sole use of their art of taking fish by a light, which they can cause to burn some fathoms under water, with which, and a light above water, they can draw the fish which are in the compass of a league in the sea to one place, and can therefore take greater quantites and varieties of fish than can be taken by hooks or nets, which will be of great use to the public, both for food and oil. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 298.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing George Wooddeson, as deputy to Sir William Trumbull in the office of Clerk of the Signet. [Ibid., p. 299.]
April 9. Petition of Sir Henry Goodrick to the Queen. Asks that she may declare her pleasure whether such arms, tents, and other ordnance and accoutrements, shall be delivered to the horse and dragoons, as is now demanded by the officers with pressing instance, as the King has already ordered to be issued to the foot.
If so, it is proposed that she should direct Lord Ranelagh, or the Paymaster, that the first cost be deducted at each pay in proportion from the respective regiments of horse, foot, and dragoons, to be paid over by his order to the Treasurer of the Ordnance to replace the said stores as was the King's intention.
That she should grant a warrant to the Ordnance to make the said issues, when adjusted with the General.
There is a debt to the gunsmiths of London of 22,000l. for goods received, and some upon contract, which remaining contract cannot be proceeded in without an immediate supply to these very poor men, of at least 3,000l., and a promise of the remainder monthly.
This is the more necessary, because the stores of small arms are exhausted by completing the regiments, the fleet, and the spare arms in case of a battle in Flanders or France; so that upon any emergency, England will be almost disfurnished, but may be supplied with a competent number, if this suggestion be accepted. Signed. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 27.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. Lord Sydney, who had designed to set out for Ireland on the 18th of this month, has put off his departure for a week or ten days longer, because the man-of-war which is to convoy him could not be at Chester by the time which was at first arranged. Our foreign letters, which came in yesterday, bring no manner of news, but only say that the King was still at Loo, and that things continued very quiet in Flanders, but great preparations are made on both sides, and in all appearance the chief scene of the next campaign will be there. The French pretend to have on that side 130,000 men divided in three armies, one of which is to be commanded by the French King himself; at the same time they give out that they will make a descent upon us, but this all sensible men look upon as a grimace to amuse their people, and to answer the report of our intending to make a descent upon them. Seal of Arms. [Ibid., No. 28.]
April 9. Memorial of Thomas Bedford, Deputy-Registrar of the Admiralty. The ship Lady Anne, Henry Peterson, master, was, about six weeks since, taken by Capt. John Edwards, commander of the privateer, Resolution, and brought into Rye. The master and some of his men being examined, deposed that the said ship went with a lading of wool, cheese, powder, blue, "lamb-black," tin, and some other goods from Tonningen in the Dukedom of Schleswig, and Bredstadt in Jutland, to Rouen, where he delivered the said lading to French merchants, and the master says that his present lading was to be delivered to Laurence Jessen, and Cornelius Vanderslot at Bredstadt; but neither he nor his men declare to whom the lading belongs, saving a small parcel to the master, and there is suspicion that part of the outward lading was taken in at Hamburg, before the ship went to Tonnington (sic). As to the ship, the master swears that Graf Revenslow, a subject of the King of Denmark, is the sole owner of her, and a claim is given in his name for the ship and goods. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 289.]
April 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Lieut.-Col. Fridrich Van Vittinghoff, and one servant, belonging to the Dutch regiment of Horse Guards, to go to Harwich, and Holland; and for Capt. Henry Gachon and Thomas Hootles his servant, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 202.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
Commission for Philip Gery, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Thomas Porter in the regiment of foot, of which Charles, Duke of Bolton, is colonel, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Norton; and a pass for Maurice Bedsworth, gent., ensign to Major Thomas Hooper in the same regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 256.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Smith. Shows that, being a mariner, he entered on board the Albemarle under Sir Francis Wheeler, and being sent on shore to press seamen he happened to meet "bad company," and being drunk went, with others, to the house of Mr. Upton, where they committed a robbery; his companions would have bound the mistress of the house, who was great with child, but he prevented it and was by one of the rest wounded in the arm. He has since been apprehended for that offence, and was convicted on Wednesday last at the Old Baily. As he has voluntarily confessed his crime, he prays to be transported. Referred to the Recorder of London. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 273.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Lechmere, Edward Harris, esq., Nicholas Lechmere, John Conon, James Stancliff, and Richard Lechmere, merchants, and others, showing they have found out ways and means for making great quantities of salt petre of materials arising within this kingdom. As making quantities sufficient to supply the occasions of these kingdoms will require a great sum of money, they pray to be incorporated. Referred to the Attorney-General. [Ibid., p. 274.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Plasse to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 202]; for Mr. de St. Paul de Hauteroche and one servant, and Mr. Henry de Fergusson, and one servant, ditto; for Peter Frotté, ditto; and for John Niewenhove, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 203.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
Partial allowance of the bill, of Robert Molesworth, esq., envoy, extraordinary from His Majesty to the King of Denmark, from the 25th of August 1691, to the 25th of November 1691, and from the 25th of November 1691 to the 25th of February 1692. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, pp. 300 and 301.]
April 11. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Warre, at Lord Nottingham's Office. I find by our registry books that an English mariner, having been in service for several years in the Mediterranean, arrested Capt. Augustini for his wages, and remembers it was urged by the said Augustini that, by agreement, the said mariner was to have no more than a share of such pillage as should be taken, which was according to the custom of all corsairs in those parts; but on the other side it was sworn that the said mariner did not go voluntarily into the service, that when any prize was taken, he and other English mariners were kept on board their own ship, and the natives only permitted to board and pillage, and that it was customary for them to constrain foreigners into their service and use them in that manner.
In regard it did not appear to the Court that this mariner had received one penny for five or six years' service, or that he ever had any manner of pillage or made any agreement as was pretended it was thought reasonable upon a full hearing of both parties to allow him some small matter for the loss of so much time, which was done accordingly. Augustini appealed from the sentence, but I understand he afterwards compounded the matter which is all I can say, only there is now a Dutch mariner who makes the same pretences and his case is now depending. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 293.]
April 11.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Earl of Nottingham. We enclose a copy of a letter from Mr. Taylor to the Navy Board, concerning a ship of his called the Three Eagles, John Keetman, master, now at Amsterdam, which is employed to fetch masts from Riga for the stores at Portsmouth. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 90.] Enclosing:—
Mr. Tayler to the Navy Board. I have a ship lying at Amsterdam, "the Three Eagles," John Keetman, master, but she is not suffered to proceed with the particular convoy, now ready to sail for Elsinore with some ships employed to fetch stores for the service of the States, unless I send a letter from the Secretary of State, to the States General, to signify that my said ship is employed to import stores from Riga to Portsmouth. Copy. [Ibid., p. 94.]
April 11/21.
Before Portsmouth.
Admiral Evertsen to [Lord Nottingham]. Has received orders from his Majesty to return home. Refers to a Dutch ship commanded by Captain Jacob de Jongh, at Spithead. [Ibid., p. 118.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Commission for Richard Adams, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. James Tankred in Sir James Leslie's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 256.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Cooke, gent. Shows that about the 7th of March last, he was assaulted by one Gilbert Sweat, about 8 o'clock in the evening, who set upon him with the intention to rob him, as he had good reason to suspect, having then a charge of money about him; and being closely beset by the said Sweat, a notorious malefactor, he was forced to draw his sword in his own defence. In the scuffle, the said Sweat received a wound of which he died the next morning, whereupon the petitioner was indicted at the Old Bailey and found guilty of manslaughter, though he stood in his own defence, and knows not how the deceased came by his wound. Prays for a pardon of the said offence. Referred to the Recorder of London. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 275.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney-General concerning the petition of Messrs. Braman, Firmin, and Andrews. I have considered this petition, and find that the Kings and Queens of England have frequently granted their letters patent for collecting the gifts and charities of well-disposed people for the relief of such as had been great sufferers by fire or other calamities, and I believe it to be true that the persons intrusted to collect the money so given to the uses above mentioned, have very often misapplied the same, to the injury and damage of the persons intended to be relieved by such charitable benevolence.
I conceive that the erecting such a public office as is desired in the petition may not only be a means to prevent the like frauds and miscarriages for the future, but will be a great benefit and advantage to the sufferers by such casualties, by the better securing and hastening the payment of the money collected to their use.
Now in regard that the petitioners are men of integrity and fair reputation, and are willing to give good security for the due and faithful execution of the said office, I am of opinion, that it may be proper for your Majesty to gratify the petitioners' request, by granting them your letters patent, authorising them to keep and execute such an office as they propose for 21 years. Referred to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. [Ibid., p. 276.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Isaac Thompson, engine-maker to their Majesties. Shows that with the assistance of Capt. Benjamin Graves, Thomas Joell, and John Cuthbert, he has found out and contrived a new engine, useful for diving and going under water, and which may be advantageous to all persons for searching wrecks and the like. Prays for a patent for him and the above-named persons for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 277.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Hastings. I enclose the petition of William Dixsy, by the Queen's command, who desires you to give an account of what you know concerning the matters alleged by him in this petition, and I desire your answer as soon as possible. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 414.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Jermyn. The Queen desires you to repair to Portsmouth, and there embark on board the man-of-war, ordered by the Admiralty to carry you to Jersey, whither she would have you go with all speed, it being necessary for their Majesties' service that you should be there as soon as can be. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 415.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for Victualling. The Queen having appointed Mr. Israel Fielding to take care of the provisions which you are ordered to put on board the transport ships attending the fleet for this expedition, the Lords of the Committee think it necessary you should, from time to time, communicate your proceedings in this matter with him from time to time, whereby he may discharge better the duty of his place in distributing the provisions. [Ibid.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Deputy-Recorder. The Queen would have you forbear executing the sentence of death against William Dixsy, a seaman, and now a prisoner in Newgate, for some days, until I can have an answer from Col. Hastings in relation to some matters alleged by the said Dixsy in his petition. [Ibid.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Ralph Fenwick to go to Harwich and Holland; for Joost Crull, ditto; for Abel Marie, John Toulier, and Peter Toulier, his son, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 203]; and for Mr. Charles Stanley, the Earl of Derby's brother, and two servants, ditto. [Ibid., p. 204.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Prince of Hesse. By order from the Queen I recommend you Colonel Wilson, whom the LordsJustices of Ireland employed with success after the surrender of Limerick in persuading the Irish to submit to their Majesties. I believe he will be very useful in conducting the Irish to Vienna, and will prevent desertions by the way; he is a good officer, especially understands the subject of fortification, and I pray that he may obtain some post. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 329.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty to give order for impresting to Admiral Edward Russell the sum of 1,500l. out of any money imprested for the service of the Navy. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 316.]
April 12. A memorial concerning the garrison of Plymouth, presented by the Earl of Bath to the Earl of Nottingham. There now are only ten companies of Colonel Earle's regiment in garrison at Plymouth, which by reason of the great drafts for his other regiment lately gone to Flanders, which was recruited out of this, are very weak, and most of them newly raised men. It will be absolutely necessary for the defence of this garrison against a surprise, to send thither one complete regiment more, and a troop of horse or dragoons. There is a citadel, consisting of seven bastions, with outworks, besides St. Nicholas Island, which, of itself, will require at least 100 men to guard it. As for the stores, carriages for the guns, and barracks for the soldiers, Sir Henry Goodrick, and the Board of Ordnance (having had lists delivered to them, of what was wanting, and knowing what supplies they have lately sent) will be best able to give information of what remains yet defective. But by this night's post, orders shall be sent to the Lieutenant-Governor there, to remit up a perfect account of the present state of the garrison.
It is likewise proposed that (as has been formerly practised in time of war) there may be laid in the citadel, a quantity of biscuit, cheese, beef, and other provisions sufficient for the maintenance of 1,000 men for three months, only to be made use of in case of necessity, and if not used, to be returned to the Victuallers of the Navy. An engineer should be forthwith sent down with instructions to inspect and repair such things as shall be necessary for the present defence of the garrison and port. Lord Lansdowne is ready to go down to his government. Signed. Endorsed "Read at the Committee the same day." [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 29.]
April 12.
Maestricht.
Memorial concerning the Magazines in Flanders. In case of the "grand dessein" it will be necessary to send provisions from England. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 67.]
April 12.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emmanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to the King. The Prince of Vaudemont is going to see you, and I am impatient to hear the orders which are given to him; and he is anxiously hoping that he may be trusted with the plans for the next campaign, so that he may be better able to further them. Holograph. [Ibid., No. 68.]
April 12. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. The ship Chesnut Tree, mentioned in the enclosed, was bound on her outward voyage from Altena to Oporto, and then taken by one of their Majesties' ships, but was restored upon a full hearing, as being bound from one free port to another. Afterwards, returning from the said place, laden with sugar, shumack, and other goods for Altena or Hamburg, she was taken by [Robert] De la Mayn, an English privateer. In my opinion, as the case stood before me, it was one of the clearest that I have met with since the war, and she was again decreed to be restored; but the privateer thought fit to appeal, and I understand she was condemned by the Lords Commissioners of Appeals for Prizes. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 297.]
Enclosure (?). Memorial by the Proconsul and Senator of the city of Hamburg on behalf of Robert De la Mayn, dated 5th April 1692. [Ibid., p. 301.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Commission for John Jackson to be ensign to Captain Tooke in Col. Thomas Earle's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 255.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Samuel Venner, and the rest of the officers of his regiment. They state that in April, 1691, Mr. Richard Harnage, then agent to the regiment, received of Mr. Fox two months' full pay for the officers of that regiment under the then command of Col. Daniel Dering; but instead of applying the money as it was designed, the said Harnage kept part of it for his own use, pretending a debt from the said Colonel Dering, and the rest of it for his agency, whereby the officers have suffered much. They pray for an order to the said Harnage to pay them the money received for the use of the regiment. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 274.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of inn-holders, victuallers, cornchandlers, and farriers of Northampton, showing that five troops of Sir John Lanier's regiment of horse having been quartered there, departed on the 26th of March last, and left the sum of 563l. 13s. 10d. for their quarters, unpaid, and delivered a note from each officer, under his hand, upon Mr. Freckleton, their agent, for what was due from them; upon application to the said agent for performance of the same promise, the petitioners were told that he had no money though there was lately four months pay received by him. They pray for an order to the said agent to pay them speedily what is due to them. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 275.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney-General. I enclose the case of a French protestant, upon which I desire your opinion, that I may lay it before the Queen. Also I desire you will let me know whether a pardon of manslaughter, after conviction and sentence, does, by the general words usually inserted on those occasions, remit goods and chattels forfeited for that crime, where no special clause is inserted in the pardon for restitution of these goods and chattels. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 416.] Enclosure:—
A French protestant merchant, having lately escaped out of France with what he could save of his effects, consisting of brandy wine, and other French goods, has come to Dartmouth purely for shelter and refuge without any intention of breaking the law where the ship with the loading lies without having broken bulk. Query; whether this ship, with her loading, may not have leave, by law, to sail out of that port to the dominions of some neutral prince or state, where the owner can dispose of his goods ? [Ibid.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send enclosed copies of a letter from Lord Coningsby, and Mr. Nash, at Pembroke, which have both been read at the Committee, that you may give such directions therein as are necessary. [Ibid.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke. The list of the quarters presented by you, having been considered and approved at the Committee, I desire you will give orders for marching and quartering the several regiments accordingly. [Ibid., p. 417.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for William Phillips to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Fredricksen and Erasmus Clang, ditto; for Mr. Joseph Bradford, ditto; for Mr. Edmund Arwarker, his wife, and Thomas Morison, his servant, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 204.]
April 13.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Encloses a dispatch stating what preparations will be necessary for an intended siege. Horses must be found for the English artillery. Discusses the movements of the army. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 69.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen—having reprieved to the 22nd day of this month, Robert Lacy, a prisoner in Newgate, who was condemned for clipping, upon this allegation, that he may be useful in discovering and convicting several similar offenders—desires you to examine the truth of this allegation, and report your opinion what reason there is to expect this service from him, and how far you conceive him a fit object for mercy. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 417.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Cramer and Thomas Jacobsen to go to Harwich and Holland; for Anna Marinis, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 204]; for John Cross, Richard Gorin, Richard Whiteing, and William Harwood, being four of the Earl of Monmouth's watermen, to go to Portsmouth, and pass over to Guernsey; for Daniel Solinieres to go to Harwich and Holland; and for the yacht Dove of Denmark, Robert Lawley, master, being one of the vessels provided for carrying over the Queen Dowager of England, and her servants to France, to sail from Dover to Dieppe or any other port in France, and to return to England. [Ibid., p. 205.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I have received yours of the 5th and 7th instant, which have been considered at the Committee, and I am commanded to acquaint you that it is not thought fit to take off the embargo in Ireland, in regard that if it were once done the seamen would get into Ireland, and find an opportunity of proceeding thence to the Plantations, or some other parts, to the great prejudice of their Majesties' service in manning the fleet. For preventing this inconvenience in the transport ships going to Ireland, the officers of the Customs in the several ports whence they sail, are ordered to take security from the respective masters, &c., for bringing back the seamen they carry out. But since it will be better to prevent, than to punish, an abuse of this kind, and that what may accrue by the forfeiture of the bond, will not be equivalent to the loss of so many men, her Majesty would have you give strict orders to the officers of the Customs, in all the ports, where the transport ships may chance to come, to take an exact account of what seamen come in each ship, and to take care that all the same mariners return with each ship without any connivance as the person offending will answer it at his peril. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 323.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Coningsby. I have received yours of the 3rd which by the Queen's command, I have sent to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 324.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize, Oyer and Terminer, and General Gaol Delivery, or to two Justices of the Peace for Kent, to take bail for John Law, of Maidstone to appear at the next assizes, he having been found guilty at the last assizes, of the manslaughter of Thomas Wyatt. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 302.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and to the Recorder of London, and the Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Robert Lacy, a prisoner in Newgate, for clipping the current coin, until Friday the 22nd instant. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 303.]
April 14.
Ordnance Office.
Answer of the principal officers of the Ordnance to a petition of Sir Henry Goodrick. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 20.] Annexing:—
(1.) Petition of Sir Henry Goodrick to the Queen. Shows that by his instructions and by warrants to the Office of the Ordnance in particular, by the general instructions and warrants in case of the vacancy or absence of the Master-General in the service of the Crown, either by sea or land, he is constituted and commanded to be always one in all contracts to be made, in directing all receipts and issues of stores of war, and in all orders relating to the payment of money, &c.
That nevertheless the Clerk of the Ordnance, with the rest of the Board, contrary to all custom, have assumed to themselves (or any three of them) a power to act as Master-General exclusive of the said Lieutenant-General in all the afore-mentioned particulars contrary to your orders and warrants, whereof many instances have been laid before the Board.
Now, lest any inconvenience may accrue to your service in this present expedition, through delays or orders to the persons acting under them, they resolving to insist on their pretended right, the Lieutenant-General prays you to cause the said Board to attend you in Council, and to bring with them the Book of Instructions for guidance of the said office, with their last book of entries of warrants for employments, and to direct Mr. Hubbard, Mr. Whitheing, Mr. Whittaker, Mr. Blake, Mr. Criche, Mr. Snapes, and George Kidd, to appear the next Council day, that you may direct the settlement of the said office. [Ibid No. 30i.]
(2.) Copy of the foregoing petition, [No. 30ii].
April 14.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. To-morrow Admiral Russell goes down to the fleet at the Buoy of the Nore, where I believe all the great ships are by this time, they having lain already at the Blackstakes ever since the 6th of this month to fall down with the first fair wind. The Earl of Monmouth is going to Guernsey to command there in the absence of Lord Hatton, the governor, his regiment being quartered in that island, and at Jersey, and at the same time a good squadron of men-of-war is going to cruise thereabouts. Sir William Booth, who takes care of things relating to the Queen Dowager's voyage, has now hired a Danish yacht, which is at present in the river to attend her Majesty over to Dieppe, and a pass is granted accordingly for the said vessel. The Queen was let blood yesterday, having been indisposed with a cold for three or four days last past, but she is very well again now. Several lords and others of the late King James' Privy Council have received letters from him wherein he desires them to come over to be present at the birth of his Queen's child, which will be about the middle of May, in which case he says the French King, his dear brother, would give them passes for their safe arrival and return. The said lords to whom they were addressed have brought them all to the Secretary of State to be communicated to the Queen and Council. Seal broken. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 31.]
April 14.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. The Count Cerclaes, with Mons. Mean, has been to see him, and the latter has begged him to ask the King, if the former may be appointed to act in concert with the Elector of Bavaria; the States have every confidence in him. This proposition is discussed, and also the claims of the other persons named if the Count should not be appointed. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 70.]
April 14. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. This gives an account of some ships pretended to be real Danes, but condemned as prizes.
The ship Radthuyst, or Maison la ville d' Altena, was condemned by default, no claimer ever appearing in court, or appealing from the sentence.
The Salamander, Nicholas Brack, master, sailed from Dieppe to Bordeaux, and there took in wine, brandy, and vinegar, and being bound for Dublin, was taken off Waterford, and condemned, and no appeal made.
The St. Jacob, Boy Jacobson, master was pretended in her outward voyage to be bound from London to Lisbon, and to have been taken in her passage by a French privateer and carried to Havre, but the claimers making no proof of the French capture, or of their property, she was condemned and no appeal made from the sentence.
The Love or Amity, John Shoomaker, master, was said to be bound from Gluckstadt to London, but was taken on the French coast, twenty leagues out of her way to London though the wind was fair for that port, and the master, on examination, declared that he would answer no questions concerning the ship and lading, and there being no evidence to whom the ship belonged, she was condemned.
The Providence was taken on her voyage from Bourdeaux to Dunkirk and condemned.
The Fortune or Golden Fortune being laden with coals at Newcastle, and bound for France was also condemned, and the sentence confirmed by the Lords of Appeal.
The Orange went from London to Newcastle, and there took in 600 or 700 pigs of lead, pretending to go to St. Sebastian, and being taken by one of their Majesties' men-of-war, stole away and sailed directly for Havre de Grace, from thence to Bordeaux, and St. Martins in France, where she took in her lading, and pretended to be bound for Gluckstadt, but was taken and condemned.
The Faith was a ship claimed by one, Clans Royen, of Christiansadt, and had not been in any port belonging to the King of Denmark for almost two years before she was taken; her last voyages of which we hear, were from Norway to Dunkirk, and from thence to the Thames, where she took in a quantity of lead and other goods, pretending to go to Bilboa; she was taken by a French privateer and carried to France. But it appeared plainly that she went voluntarily to St. Martins, and was ordered from thence to Bourdeaux by a French merchant who supplied all necessaries, and having taken out the lead and other goods, put on board a cargo of wine and brandy, which was taken and condemned and no appeal made.
The Arms of Copenhagen, is a ship which appears to have been much used by the French trade, three fourths of her were claimed by Mons. Leers, who is said to be the King of Denmark's Consul in France, and has been a great claimer during this war.
The St. Andrew went directly from Amsterdam to Bourdeaux, and there took in wine and brandy, which she delivered at Dantzic, and then returned to Amsterdam.
The Prince William was bound from Amsterdam to Nantes and being taken was pretended to be bought by some Danes at Amsterdam, just before the voyage; but it appeared that the goods were put on board there though the bills of lading were signed at Copenhagen, that the claimers were inhabitants of Amsterdam immediately before the voyage, that the master was made free of Copenhagen only just before the ship set forth, and a letter to the French merchant, to whom the goods were consigned, was concealed.
The five last of these ships were mentioned in a memorial given to Lord Sydney by Mons. de la Foularesse, and the rest in one or more to you. There are but a few of the ships which have been claimed as belonging to the subjects of Denmark. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 309.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Francis De Saussure, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Charles Carrell's company in Col. Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot; for Thomas Jones, gent., to be captain-lieutenant to the company in Col. Tobias Purcell's regiment of foot, of which he himself is captain [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 255]; for Ralph Congrave, gent., to be captain-lieutenant of the company in the Princess Ann of Denmark's regiment of foot, commanded by Col. John Beaumont, of which he himself is captain; for Benjamin Cuttle, gent., to be lieutenant to Major Holme's company in the same regiment; for Henry Le Cocq Des Moulins, to be ensign to Capt. Towneley's company in the same regiment; for Sir Bradwardine Jackson, bart., to be ensign of the company in which Capt. Thorncroft is captain in Col. John Hale's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 256]; and for Arnold Lesto, gent., to be ensign of the company in Sir Henry Bellasis's regiment of foot, in which he himself is captain; and for Adiel Mill, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. John Jones' company in Col. Tobias Purcell's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 257.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to give order for a yacht to carry Mr. Wolseley, their Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector of Bavaria, governor of Flanders, into Holland. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 417.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen—having directed letters to be written from the Council to the Lords-Lieutenant of the inland counties, to cause all seamen and suspected seamen to be impressed for her service in the fleet, and having observed that very little fruit came of the like orders last year, and that this year also it is to be feared from what has been done in Kent, that these orders will not be so effectual as is necessary in the present conjuncture, unless some further care is taken by you—desires you to immediately send such officers as are fit to be relied upon into the several inland counties, to press such seamen as lurk there, and for preventing an unnecessary charge in sending such of those which the Lords-Lieutenant shall cause to be impressed, as are not fit to serve on board the fleet. And that the persons to be employed may discharge their duty better, you are to direct them to make their application to the Lords-Lieutenant and Deputy-Lieutenants for their assistance; and for preventing any abuse in discharging any whom they have caused to be impressed, they are to return them the names of those persons whom the officers shall impress. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 418.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Henry Goodrick. The Queen desires you to buy 100 draught-horses for the artillery, and would have you add 100 wheelbarrows to those ordered to be sent to Guernsey. [Ibid., p. 419.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Christina De Pass, with her four children, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Lucas Traphoff, Jurgen Knappert, Elizabeth Dircksen, Anne Mary, her daughter, and Dirck, his (sic) son, being two or three years old, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 205]; and for Mrs. Westcombe, and Samuel Beckett and Mary Laycock, her two servants, ditto. [Ibid., p. 206.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of William Churchill, stationer, for stationery furnished for the Earl of Nottingham's office, from the 24th of June to the 24th of December 1691, amounting to 168l. 3s.; and from the 25th of December 1691 to the 25th of March 1692, amounting to 87l. 5s. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 304.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment out of any of the revenues in Ireland to William, Bishop of Kildare, on behalf of the children of Benjamin, late Bishop of Ossory, for the arrears of rent due for that part of the house near Trinity College, Dublin, commonly called Chichester House, wherein the Parliament usually sat, which was in 1673 leased for 99 years at a rent of 180l. a year to Sir Henry Ford for the King's use, which rent has not been paid since Christmas 1687. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 454.]
April 15. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I have been so troubled of late with sore eyes that your Majesty has been saved the trouble of my letters by it for some time. This day brings the first westerly wind we have had a great while, which has occasioned the detaining of the troops much longer than I doubt is convenient, and now the wind is fair, I believe there are not enough ships ready to transport, at once, all who are ready to embark.
Of the loan upon the Customs, which was desired for sending away the army, we have had about 80,000l., and find we cannot depend upon much more from the City at this time; so that the rest of the unappropriated money of the Land Tax, which is not above 60,000l., and the weekly receipts of the Double Excise is all we shall have to provide for the 22,000l. a week, regular subsistence to the army, besides all other extraordinary demands for the troops still left to be embarked, and also for the land service of the ordnance, another vast expense, as it is designed, till the receipt of the poll money comes in, which we do not expect, naturally, till about the end of May, and therefore it will be an absolute necessity that we try to get some money immediately advanced upon that fund, and the rather because all the loans of money upon the Land Tax will be yet short of what is necessary to be furnished weekly to the Navy, before the fleet can go to sea.
The directions are now all given for the charge of the descent; the transport ships will require, in ready money, at least 20,000l., and the victuallers for the provisions about 25,000l. The Ordnance, according to their estimate, agreed to by your Majesty at your going away, about 123,000l., not including the further demands of the Duke of Leinster upon that article. We have provided for the four months' pay and for the clothing of the Irish troops, and for some part of their recruits, and shall weekly give directions for the remainder, if the money will hold out for it; but these payments, on all sides, being so immediately pressing for the public service, it is impossible to provide at the same time for the numberless wants and complaints in payments relating to the civil government.
Sir Rowland Gwynne's impertinence has made so little doubt here of your Majesty's displacing him, that amongst other pretenders I hope you will forgive me for naming Sir John Lowther's brother. All I can say for it is, that I find he takes the removing of his brother from Ireland extremely much to heart, and at the same time, that I do not meet with anyone that has a truer zeal to your service. There remains yet a great difficulty in the new commission for the revenue of Ireland. Mr. Culliford was heard at the Treasury as to the charge against him, and though there was nothing that could amount to a legal proof, yet the Board was of opinion it was not advisable at this time to continue him in that service, and Mr. Dickinson, who was the only man of experience beside Culliford, that we could depend upon, absolutely declines the service; so that we are wholly at a loss, at present, in that matter, and unless we can find one or two of more experience than these five that remain, it will not be fit to alter the commission. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 71.]
April 15.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I send you the enclosed copy of a letter from the Collector of the Customs at Newhaven, by the Lords of the Admiralty's commands, so you may lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 251.] Enclosing:—
A copy of a letter from Mr. Charles Pratt, collector of the Customs at Newhaven. Our coasts are and have been very much infested lately with French privateers. About ten days ago, a vessel from the westward, bound, as is supposed, for London, and laden, was boarded by a French privateer close by our shore at the haven's mouth, and carried off. Two or three days after another ship fired a gun, which being a usual sign when vessels are in distress, three men of this place, with William Goodyer, boatman, went off to help and bring her into the harbour, but when they were under the command of her guns they could see that she was French built, and being too late to go back, they went on board; notwithstanding they were all French, they were civilly entertained by the captain and freely dismissed. She was laden with salt, bound for Dieppe, but their compasses being bad they mistook their way, and took this for Dieppe. Last Friday another vessel coming from Holland, bound for Bristol, laden with goods, some belonging to Lord Sidley [Sydney ?], as the master of the vessel told us, was, about nine o'clock in the morning, four or five leagues off this harbour, set upon and taken by a French privateer, who after having plundered her, set the vessel on fire, and gave the master and men, except the mate who they carried with them, the boat of the said vessel to bring them ashore, and about four o'clock in the afternoon they arrived here. If we had any privateers to cruize off this place it might have been prevented. Dated Newhaven, 12th April 1692. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 255.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I enclose a copy of an Order in Council delivered to me, and desire that in pursuance of it, you will direct John Corbett and Robert St. Clair, mentioned in it, to be summoned to attend me. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 419.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney-General. I enclose, by the Queen's command, the abstract of a letter from the Lieutenant-Governor of Portsmouth, on which I desire you will let me know your opinion as soon as you can, that I may receive directions. You will perceive how much this concerns the safety of the nation in respect not only of the question in general at this time, but also of the importance of that place in particular. [Ibid.] Enclosure:—
The Lieutenant Governor of Portsmouth, having desired billets of the mayor for quartering 60 men, being recruits lately come to the garrison, representing the necessity of it, in regard there was not room for them in the barracks, where the soldiers lay already, three and three in a bed, and that he did not desire to have them quartered in any but public houses; some difficulty was made in complying with him in it, on pretence that, though they could not say there was any law against it, yet there was no law for it. Afterwards the Mayor, with the Town-Clerk, came to the LieutenantGovernor and told him, he dared not concern himself anymore with the quartering of soldiers, being certainly informed he should be sued at law if he did it; whereupon the Lieutenant-Governor has desired directions what he shall do. [Ibid., p. 420.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Bishop of Exeter. I have acquainted the Queen with your letter of the 12th, and she is pleased to grant your request on behalf of Mr. Tindall and Mr. Holden, and I shall prepare a warrant for Mr. Holden when you let me know the proper time for it. [Ibid.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose, by the Queen's command, a paper which I received from the Lords-Justices of Ireland, that you may prepare what you shall think fit to be offered to Her Majesty when the bills relating to the branches of the revenue, mentioned in this paper, shall come to be considered, in order to transmit them to that kingdom. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 421.] Enclosing
The Officers of the Customs to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. We have considered what alterations or amendments might be made in the acts of Customs, Excise, Licenses, and Hearth Money for their Majesties' advantage, and the better and more effectual charging and bringing in the revenues arising thereupon, and report to you: (1.) That in the Act of Customs we have not observed any defect or matter necessary to be altered or added. (2) In the Act of Excise, there arises some dispute on the words, page 155, charging 4d. per gallon on strong waters, which leaves it doubtful whether that duty is chargeable or not on the first extraction or spirit, and indeed the King's Council have given their opinion in the negative, mhich might be amended by new wording that paragraph as follows:—"For all aqua vitœ, spirits, or strong waters made or distilled within this realm, whether of foreign or domestic materials, to be afterwards sold or vended, to be paid, upon every gallon, by the first maker or distiller thereof, 4d.; on page 176, third line, these words following to be left out: ' to sell again in their shops.'" This however would not be of any considerable advantage, the kingdom in general not disputiug it, the opposition being only in Dublin. (3.) The Acts of Licenses are not defective except in not allowing distress to be taken for duty. (4.) The Hearth Money Acts are in every respect strong and coercive. Some loss happened by the favour of the Justices of the Peace in granting certificates to widows exempted by the Act; but as a check against that abuse the Collectors of Revenue were authorised to act as Justices of the Peace.—Custom House, Dublin, 26 March 1692. [Ibid.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I desire you to send me a copy of "the Institution of Volunteers," which serve on board the fleet, with such alterations as have since been made therein. Her Majesty upon consideration of the case of the volunteers, who have listed themselves in her service, has commanded me to desire you to cause them to be entered into pay from the time they respectively listed themselves, upon certificates thereof, upon oath, from their several officers. [Ibid., p. 425.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lieutenant-Governor of Jersey. The Queen is informed that a privateer of Jersey, some weeks after the surrender of Limerick last year, took out of one of the transport ships, appointed pursuant to the capitulation of that place to carry the Irish, etc. from Ireland into France, a quantity of combed wool, belonging to Capt. Burke, and the locks of all the soldiers muskets, and kept the said vessel about four days, contrary to the articles of that capitulation; she therefore desires you would diligently examine who the privateer was that committed this action, and either arrest him or cause the owner to give sufficient security to answer all costs and damages for or by reason of his having acted like this. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 425.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Joseph Herne. I enclose, by the Queen's command, a copy of the regulations of the charter of the East India Company, which she approves of and would have you communicate them to the Company, that they may return their answer with all speed whether they are willing to agree to them. [Ibid., p. 426.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Frances Lee to go to Harwich and Holland; for Frederick Le Sage and Ernestine Van Ass, his wife, ditto; for Willemyntje Greecke, and one child, and Margaret Yanse, and three children, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 206]; for Simon Floras to go to Harwich and pass over into Flanders; and for Mr. Lorents Hanssen and Andres Rosmunsen to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 207.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. Monsieur VanHomrigh, writing from Ireland that about 100 of the artillery horses will presently be fit to be embarked, the Queen has ordered the Commissioners of Transport to send to Cork shipping for 250 horse, to consist of the 100 artillery horses, and 150 officers' horses. As to the artillery horses, which shall remain behind after the said 100 are sent away, her Majesty would have you sell them either now, "or when they are fat," as you shall judge fit. I desire you will do all that is possible to complete the Irish regiments designed for the Emperor's service. Rear-Admiral Carter will not come to Ireland as soon as was intended, there being another service which he has to perform first, and which will take up some few days; however, the artillery ships in the Shannon must fall down, and be in readiness to sail, for the convoy will be sent to Kinsale. The transport ships for the five battalions will sail hence very suddenly, and you are to dispose those battalions so as they be in readiness to embark; but they are not to be put on board until the convoy is sent for them. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 324.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
Leave granted to Francis Lindley, esq., high sheriff of Lancaster, to reside out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 42.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. I have yours of the 14th, and have been to enquire at the Treasury Office, where Mr. Squill tells me that the order lies ready for giving you tallies whenever you please to call for them upon the additional exercise which you may turn into ready money, allowing about 4 per cent. for the same. Admiral Russell went yesterday to view the fleet at the Buoy of the Nore. Capt. Mees has gone out with six men-ofwar to cruise to the northward, and Rear-Admiral Carter is going with another squadron to the Westward. Lord Monmouth goes to-morrow or the next day for Guernsey, where he is to command. Sir William Booth has at last hired a Danish vessel or yacht which lay in the river to carry the Queen Dowager to Dieppe. The warrants are now signed appointing Sir George Treby as Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Sir John Somers, Attorney-General, and Mr. Trevor, Solicitor-General, but he is not to enter upon his place of Chief Justice, till he is made a serjeant, the ceremony whereof will not be performed till Monday week. Yesterday the Dutch letters of last Tuesday came in. The King is still at Loo, but returns to the Hague about the end of this week. In Flanders all things continued quiet. Yesterday Harrison was hanged, but he denied to have been concerned in the death of Dr. Clench, for which he suffered. Seal broken. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 32.]
April 16.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Monsieur Dopft has gone to Brussels with the memorial here enclosed for Count de Solms. Gives his views on the subject of the regiments which ought to be joined to the King's army. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 72.]
April 16. [Sir Charles Hedges ?] to Mr. Warre, stating the case of the City of Sluys, so that it may be represented to the Earl of Nottingham, and reasons for the sale of her and her lading, consisting, as it is said, of masts of an extraordinary size and goodness, and other naval stores. She had been seized by an English privateer about the 31st of January, and brought to the Isle of Wight. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 313.]
April 17.
Whitehall.
Pass for Thomas de Augustin, an Armenian, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 206.]
April 17.
Copenhagen.
Christian, King of Denmark, to the King. Speaks of the interview he has had with the Duke of Wurtemburg, by whom the King had sent a letter, and states how glad he is to learn that the King wishes to strengthen the friendship between them which, on his side, he is but too glad to do. Signed. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 73.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Commissions for William Fitz-Jeffery, gent., to be adjutant to the royal regiment of horse, commanded by Aubrey, Earl of Oxford [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 258]; and for George Mortimer, gent., to be cornet to Capt. Kirk's troop, in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 261.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to appoint some men-of-war to attend the Queen Dowager on her passage from Dover to Dieppe, and to see her safely within sight of Dieppe. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 423.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
The same to Admiral Russell. The bearers hereof, William Jones and William Stamp, are two of the Governors of Waterman's Hall who are appointed by the Lords of the Council to go down and take an account what watermen are entertained on board the fleet, in order to the better executing the directions given to them for their Majesties' service in pressing more men. I desire you will give them leave to take the names of all watermen entered on board any of the ships in the river, and that you will direct the captain or commander-in-chief of each ship to sign the list which shall be taken by them of the watermen on board his ship, so that these two watermen, on their return, may not misrepresent their numbers. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 424.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Henry Goodrick. The LieutenantGovernor of Portsmouth having represented that there are 350 "Snaphance muskets" for arming some of the companies, appointed to serve as part of the garrison for the defence of that place, her Majesty desires you to forthwith give order for lodging 350 of these muskets in the magazine at Portsmouth to serve for the safety of the place. [Ibid.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for William Gyrard, Edward Alpinwat, Richard Alaxy, Thomas Warthingbett, John Warmoly, and Thomas Robarty, to go to Harwich and Holland, or Flanders; for Mr. John Henry Vermuller to go to Harwich and Holland; for Paulus Tobias a mariner, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 207]; for Nathaniel Vergnon, a French protestant, ditto; for Lodewyck Cornelisse, ditto; for Mr. John Stitt to go to Harwich and Holland, or Flanders; for Lambert de Greve and Peter Beckestein to go to Harwich and Holland; for Baethasar Veltes, ditto; for Mr. Aaron Bousquet and Mr. Luc Le Maystre, ditto [Ibid., p. 208]; and for Mrs. Cornelius Verhaest, and her young son, Adrian Van der Lustre, Amerentia Beyl, and Rebecca van Quickelberg, ditto. [Ibid., p. 209.]
April 18.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. As to the troops which have just been sent, I have a very good account of their condition. The enemy appear quiet. The ammunition ordered by the King has not been sent. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 74.]
April 18. List of the King's regiments at Malines, Vilvorde, and Lierre [Ibid., No. 75.]
April 18. Sir Charles Hedges to [Mr. Warre]. The Catherine, Hans Hansen Levenstein, master, and her lading taken by Capt. Edwards, a privateer, appears to me to be "good prize" according to the convention, and so was condemned on the 22nd of March last. The Lyon, Christopher Lorents, master, was taken by Capt. E. Snow, another privateer, and carried to Jersey, and was also condemned. The ship Madam Ann mentioned in yours of the 8th, said to belong to Count Reventclau, I doubt will not prove so. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 317.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dr. Robert Gorges. Prays for the examination and confirmation of his report from the LordsJustices, one concerning the surrender of letters patent and the other for the payment of the entertainment due to him as secretary to the Duke of Schomberg. Referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 277.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of 19 Irish officers (not named) who deserted the Irish army. Shows that upon his Majesty's proclamation for encouraging and providing for any that would quit the Irish army, they left their posts, &c., and were paid till the 9th of December at half pay; they have nothing to depend upon, and pray to have their arrears or part thereof. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 278.]
April 19.
The Tower.
Report by Sir Henry Goodrick, upon Sir Martin Beckman's petition. Having received your Majesty's command, by intimation from the Lord President, to report my opinion upon the petition of Sir Martin Beckman. I find it was thought highly necessary by the late King James to constitute a "comtroller of the fireworks," as well for regulating the expenses of stores in his royal laboratory as for the better educating and instructing the "fireworkers" and others employed therein, who, upon the great skill and experience of the said Sir Martin Beckman, was pleased, by a warrant dated the 11th of August, 1688, to constitute him in that employment. This warrant not having been renewed to him by your Majesty is the reason why the annual salary of 200l. thereunto belonging, has been discontinued since the last of September 1689. However, Sir Martin has ever since continued his care in supervising the said fireworks, &c., and has invented and made use of a much better and quicker fire for your Majesty's fireships than was ever before practised, which will render them of far greater use than formerly. I therefore recommend the said Sir Martin Beckman to your favour. [Ibid. p. 284.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. The Queen desires you to take care to send back no more French prisoners to France, till Mr. Blathwayt's servants are all released. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 425.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Cotton and Mr. Frankland. The Queen wishes you to give orders to all masters of the packet boats employed between England and Holland, or Falmouth and Corunna, that in case of certain danger from an enemy, they throw the mail overboard, in time to prevent the letters falling into the enemy's hands. [Ibid., p. 426.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Charles Hedges. I send enclosed the petition of William Chaire and his papers, by the Queen's command, who would have you examine the case and report your opinion, what she may fitly do in it, and if the petitioner deserves to be relieved, and to be freed from all further vexation. [Ibid., p. 430.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Peter Codercq (sic) to go to Harwich and Holland; for James Passet, ditto; for Charles Maris, one of their Majesties messengers to go to Portsmouth, &c.; and for Mrs. Wilson and four children, a maid and a man servant to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 209.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I received your letter of the 12th yesterday, but before I had it, 7,000 bushels of corn were sent into Ireland, and Mr. Henley has orders to send away the remainder with all speed, making up the 3,000 barrels which you desire. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 325.
April 19.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. The Earl of Monmouth left here last night for Portsmouth, whence he is to pass to Guernsey to command. He has taken 21 French reformed officers to command the militia of that island. The Princess continues as well as can be expected in her condition. I am told that she is about taking Berkeley House at the end of St. James Street for two years. Most of the great ships have fallen down to the buoy of the Nore. The Dutch are likewise very forward, so that the whole fleet will now be very quickly at sea. The Dutch letters of Friday have just come telling us that the King intends to stay a week or ten days longer at Loo where the Elector-Palatine will go and see him. The letters from France say that they made great preparations on the coast of Normandy. Seal. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 33.]
April 19. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. My last gave your Majesty an account of the difficulty we still had about the Commission of the Revenue in Ireland. Mr. Culliford, upon the hearing at the Treasury, not being thought fit to be continued at this time, and Mr. Dickenson having absolutely declined the employment, we could not think the other five persons named by your Majesty would be sufficient for the service without some one experienced in the business of the Customs to which these five gentlemen are wholly strangers, and for this reason we have humbly recommended one Mr. Carleton, who is at present collector at Cork, to the Queen to be sixth Commissioner, but she would not direct it till she had acquainted you with it, which she was pleased to say she would do by this night's post. Mr. Carleton is not known to any one of us at the Treasury, so he is not recommended for any friendship but upon a universal good character of his being an honest and experienced officer. Whether your Majesty will at the same time add a seventh commissioner, and who that seventh shall be, whether Mr. Travers formerly named upon this occasion to your Majesty or any other, is most humbly submitted; but it ought to be speedily determined, having already been but too long delayed. We are plagued every day by my Lord Chief Baron beyond all patience, but yet Sir Edward Seymour is so careful of your Majesty's money, that he will by no means consent you should pay for removing him out of his employment. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 76.]
April 19.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I send, by order of the Lords of the Admiralty, the enclosed papers, which were taken out of a French vessel run on the Goodwin Sands, and transmitted hither by Capt. Clarke of the Swiftsure, for you to lay the same before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 259.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
[The Earl of] Nottingham to [Admiral Evertsen ?]. Requests, by the Queen's command, to be informed of the total number of the Dutch ships, and as some of them want anchors and cables, which the English magazines are unable to supply; the Queen wishes to know how many of the ships, by supplying one another, can be made ready for present service at sea. The rendezvous of the English ships is off the flats of the Foreland. [Ibid. 5, p. 116.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the Queen that Capt. Mark Anthony De Moncal shall receive no prejudice as to rank or command by having been removed from a captaincy in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot in order to be a captain in Col. Francis Du Cambon's regiment of foot, in which he is now a reformed captain and adjutant. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 257.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for Sir John Morgan, bart., to be colonel of the regiment of foot, of which Col. Tobias Purcell was late colonel. [Ibid.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick and the Principal Officers of the Ordnance, to cause 100 snaphance muskets to be issued to Col. Earle. [Ibid., p. 258.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ursula Tucker, widow, now a condemned prisoner at Maidstone. Shows that she and her late husband, Symon Tucker, lived at Birchington, in the Isle of Thanet, about two years ago, and her husband soon after dying of a wound he received in his thigh, the Mayor of Dover committed her to gaol upon suspicion of being guilty of his death. She removed herself, the last term, by Habeas Corpus to the assizes in Kent, in order to her trial. Upon her trial, one Chewney, who dressed the said wound, swore (though falsely) that she inflicted it, and she, having no witness there, and being an ignorant woman, and knowing not how to ask pertinent questions which would have established her innocency, was convicted of murder, and now lies under the dreadful sentence of being burned for the same.
She is now able to make it appear, by several depositions hereunto annexed, that her said husband, before his death, often declared that he gave himself the said would, and that she was innocent thereof, and prayed his father (a professed enemy to the petitioner) not to prosecute her for it, and declared also that the wound was not at first mortal, but became so by the ignorance of the said Chewney. She therefore prays for a pardon. Referred to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 278.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Captain John Pointz. Shows that divers letters patent have been granted for the taking up and recovering of ships, goods, &c. which had been shipwrecked and cast away; and likewise many letters patent have been granted, of late, by their Majesties for the taking up of wrecks by persons who never designed, nor yet began to recover the same, in pursuance of their said grants, but have only divided their said patents into shares, and sold them at extravagant rates, by which their Majesties' intentions are frustrated, the purchasers, &c., loosers, and those that would have taken up the said wrecks hindered.
The petitioner has been, for 36 years, well skilled in taking up anything out of the sea, and has been very successful in the premises, and has, of late, found out several new inventions relating to the matter; he therefore prays for a patent for 14 years for raising wrecked ships on which no former patentee is at work. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 279.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Sieur Josias Caillon, a French Protestant, and a merchant of the town of Savinien [St. Vivien ?] upon the river Charente, coming lately into Dartmouth with his ship and such of his goods and effects as he could bring out of France, I transmitted his case and request, by Her Majesty's command, to the Attorney-General for his opinion what could be done by law therein. Having laid his report before Her Majesty she approved of his opinion, and desires you to give order to the officers of the Customs at Dartmouth to permit the said Josias Caillon, with his ship and goods, to sail thence to any neutral port. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 426.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Clarke. The Queen would have you bring to me, to-morrow morning, an account of where all the troops are quartered, as well those ordered for Holland, as those designed to be kept here. [Ibid., p. 427.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Gibson. The Queen desires to have Col. Purcell's regiment disembarked, if Rear-Admiral Carter has not sailed or gone out of reach before you receive this. I hear a privateer belonging to Lord Danby has taken a French vessel, whereof I desire you would send me the master in custody if the prize should be at Portsmouth, or be brought in thither. [Ibid.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Philip Margas to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 209]; for Louise Beaujon and her child, ditto; for Mr. George Vernon, Mr. James Bond, Mr. John Hodgson, Mr. Charles Frye, and Mr. John White, ditto; for Richard Hopkins, the messenger, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 210.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill for ratifying the articles granted to the island and garrison of Boffin in Ireland, by Sir Henry Bellasis, governor of the town of Galway, on the 10th of August last past. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 326.] Annexing
A copy of the said articles under eleven heads. [Ibid., pp. 326– 328.
April 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Great Seal to cause writs to be issued calling the following persons to be serjeants-at-law, viz., Sir George Treby, knt., Edward Smith, Henry Goold, John Darnell, and John Rowe, of the Middle Temple, esqs., Francis Purly, Nathan Wright, and Joseph Girdler, of the Inner Temple, esqrs., Thomas Gooding, George Prickett, Roger Moor, Reginald Brittland, and Thomas Burton, of Gray's Inn, esqs., Samuell Eyre, William Coward, and Littelton Powis, of Lincoln's Inn, esqs. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 305.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill containing a pardon to John Laws, gent., for the manslaughter of Thomas Wyatt, of which he was convicted at the last assizes held at Maidstone. [Ibid.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Letters Patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting to Sir Richard Bulkeley, bart., and his heirs for ever, a market upon every Friday for all sorts of live beasts to be held at Dunlavan, and another to be held at the same town every Saturday, he having represented that his ancestors planted a colony of English protestants in Dunlavan, 29 miles from Dublin, and that Charles II. about 1664, granted to his father a weekly market every Wednesday, and two fairs yearly in the same town, at 20s. rent. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 456.]
April 20. State of the regiments in Flanders. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 79.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick and the Principal Officers of the Ordnance to issue arms to the colonels of the following regiments now in England: Horse.—The royal regiment; Col. Villiers'; Col. Coy's; Lord Galway's and Col. Wyndham's. Dragoons.—The royal regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 261.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Henry Houghton and Richard Jones to go to Harwich and Holland; for Peter Beson, ditto; for William de Reus, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 210]; for Henry Allen, one of their Majesties' Messengers in ordinary, with a post horse and guide, to go to Edinburgh, being on special service; for George Shipside, the messenger to go to Rochester; for Stephen Gythens, a messenger, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Thomas Newlin and James Manners, two of their Majesties' messengers, to go to Sandwich or Deal. [Ibid., p. 211.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The Queen commands me to acquaint you that she would have you send away, with all possible speed, the five battalions designed for England which were ordered to embark at Cork. For more expedition the transport ships are now directed to sail to Waterford, and there to receive the battalions on board; but in regard some of these ships may have sailed for Cork before these orders can reach them, you are to order the embarking of the troops, and the sailing of the ships (which must come away together under the same convoy) in such manner as may be most convenient and necessary for the speedy performance of this service. The transport ships are to return to Bristol, or any other port nearest London in the Irish Channel, which they can first make, and stay there after the troops are disembarked till further order, taking great care that the provisions are not embezzled. The Richmond frigate is ordered to proceed from the Downs directly to Waterford with all speed, but in regard the transports which she is to convoy arrive at that port before she can get thither, the Queen desires you to order these transport ships not to sail from Waterford till the convoy has come, so that both sail together. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 329.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and to the Recorder of London and Sheriffs of Middlesex, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon Robert Lacy until further order. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 306.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to cause William Dixsy to be inserted in the next general pardon, which shall come out for the convicts of Newgate, without any conditions of transportation; and in the meantime to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death passed upon him. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 306.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Manners, messenger in ordinary, to go to Sandwich in Kent, and there summon Mr. Bartholomew Combes, mayor of Sandwich, to come up and answer such matters as shall be objected against him, for dismissing one Captain Gibbon, who confessed to the said mayor that he had come from France, contrary to the late Act of Parliament. [Ibid., p. 307.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Manners and Thomas Newlyn, messengers-inordinary, to go to Deal and receive into custody the masters of two French ketches, taken on the 19th instant by Capt. Bridges, captain of their Majesties' ship Portsmouth, and brought into the Downs [Ibid.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill incorporating the following persons as the Company of Salt-Petre Makers; Ralph Bucknall, esq., to be the first governor, Richard Goodall, esq., to be the first deputy governor, Thomas Martyn, esq., Richard Owen, esq., Edward Le Neve, esq., Thomas Werge, esq., George Moor, Benjamin Rookeby, Thomas Powell, William Tirrey, Samuel Shepherd, merchants, and William Bucknall, gent., to be the first and present assistants. [Ibid., p. 308.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Great Seal, to cause a writ to be issued for calling Charles Bonython of Gray's Inn, esq., to be a serjeant-at-law. [Ibid., p. 315.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Sir Cyril Wyche, knt., to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 457.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the principal traders to the Canary Islands on behalf of themselves and the English factors there. Shows that they are great sufferers in their estates for the want of a due observation of the privileges warranted to them by the treaty with the crown of Spain.
The 6th article expressly says that a book of rates shall be fixed in every Custom House so that each trader may know what duty he is obliged to pay, yet the same has not been performed, but the traders are left to the arbitrary will of covetous farmers.
The 9th article grants the same privileges as were formerly given to the English in Andalusia, which is that they may set a price on all salt and dry fish, imported by them. Yet this is not observed, but, on the contrary, the magistrates in every town set what price they please, and compel the petitioners to sell it at the same.
The 38th article positively declares that the English shall enjoy the same privileges, etc., whether they concern their persons or trade, which have been granted, or shall be hereafter granted, to the subjects of the most Christian King, the States-General, the Hans Towns, or any other kingdoms, in as full ample and beneficial manner as if the same were particularly mentioned and inserted in the Treaty. And although it be granted to the Hans Towns that they shall pay no custom or duty for any sorts of provisions or for ammunition, cordage, sail, canvas, and other commodities, yet the English are wholly denied the same privilege and many thousand pounds are annually extorted from them for those customs. On the 25th of January, 1689, a petition was presented to his Majesty representing the same grievances and by his command it was remitted to his Envoy at Madrid in order to obtain relief; but to this day, the petitioners have received none.
They pray the Queen to give such further directions, as to her princely wisdom shall seem meet, that her subjects be not imposed upon, and that the articles of peace and privileges of commerce granted by the Treaty may find a just observance. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 287.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Capt. Bridges. I desire you will deliver the masters of the two French ketches, whom you have taken, into the hands of the bearers hereof, their Majesties' messengers, who, by the Queen's command, I have sent to Deal to bring them up in safe custody before me to be examined. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 428.
April 22.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Henry Goodrick. The Queen desires you to send a quantity of flints to Guernsey by the first convenience. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lucas. The Queen desires you to take especial care of the prisoners in the Tower, as well those in your custody, as those which are prisoners of war. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord-Commissioner Trevor. The Queen having been moved, at the request of the Bishop of London, about the Justices of the Peace for Westminster and Middlesex, thinks fit that the commissions should be renewed with the alterations mentioned in the lists now before you, with this difference only; that Mr. Richard Woodward (whose name I struck out of the list yesterday of those who are to be removed) should be continued a justice of the peace, and that Ralph Marshall be inserted instead of John Marshall, the last person mentioned in the list of those who are to be added. The Queen approves of these two lists and would have the commissions dispatched accordingly without delay. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Adrian Brouwer to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 211]; for Emilia Van Mabeeck, ditto; for Conrad Grieben and Cobus Jansen, ditto; for Peter Jacob, an Armenian, ditto; and for Henry Gautier, ditto. [Ibid., p. 212.]
April 22.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to the Earl of Nottingham. I send you the last account we have of the readiness of the bomb vessel. She is ordered down to the buoy of the Nore to join the fleet. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 267.] Enclosing:—
An extract from a letter from the captain of the Salamander to the Lords of the Admiralty. I have received on board my guns and gunners' stores, mortar-pieces, &c. We yet lack certain iron work which on Saturday I came to Greenwich to hasten, and on the way was taken with pleurisy. Dated at Gallions Reach, 18th April 1692. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 271.]
April 22./May 2.
Portsmouth.
Captain Decker to [Lord Nottingham]. Has had an answer from the Commissary of the Dock, that he is unable to supply what is required for the Dutch ships. After consultation with the captains under his command, has resolved to sail to the rendezvous at the flats of the Foreland, on receipt of the first order in the Queen's name. [Ibid. 5, p. 122.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
[Lord Nottingham] to the Dutch Commander at Portsmouth. Has received his letter of the 20th, and acquainted the Queen with its contents. Her Majesty has signed a letter, requesting him to come to the flats next the Foreland. He would not be safe where he is, if the French fleet should make an attack on him. Copy. [Ibid., p. 126.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Commission for Chidley Coote, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Vincent Googene was late captain in Col. Richard Coote's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 257.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen commanded me to send you the enclosed establishment for a hospital for the landmen at sea, and likewise the paper relating to the commencement of the pay to the Commissary of the Stores, and the other officers intended to be employed "in the service of the descent" that you may adjust that matter. I also send you an extract of a letter from Mr. Cox, Envoy-Extraordinary in Switzerland, concerning what is due to him. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 429.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I send you by the Queen's command, that you may give necessary directions therein, an account of Lord Sydney's goods, horses, coaches, and waggons, which are to go in the transport ships to Ireland. [Ibid.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for Capt. Erasmus Dreschenbergh, with his servant, Henrich Pieterse, to go to Harwich and Holland; for William Patterson, ditto [S.P Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 212]; for Orandar Demasarett, an Armenian, ditto; for Thomas Le Mesurier and Thomas Owens to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Daniel Collins to go to Harwich and Holland; for Johanna Van Elderen, with her daughter Catherine, eleven years old, ditto; for Grietje Boudewyns, ditto [Ibid., p. 213]; for James Douillac, ditto; for Alexander Fenouillet, ditto; for Capt. Lodewych Greber and his servant, ditto; and for Christian Menting, his wife Vytge, and three children, ditto. [Ibid., p. 214.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. You having recommended Mr. Daly to me I have no objection to his receiving the effects of your favour to serve in Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 330.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Gibbs, messenger in ordinary, to make strict search for Col. Parker, and having found him, to apprehend him for high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 312.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, junior, messenger in ordinary, to make strict search, with the assistance of a constable, for Mr. Wood and George Sheles, and having found them, to seize them, together with their papers, and bring them to be examined for uttering seditious words against the government. [Ibid.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty to give order to Edward Russell, esq., Treasurer of the Navy, to pay 100l. per annum to Elizabeth Pomroy, widow of Capt. George Pomroy, who was slain in an engagement at sea against the French in 1690. [Ibid., p. 313.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, the Recorder of London, and the Sheriffs of Middlesex, to cause Robert Lacy to be inserted in the next general pardon which shall come out for the convicts in Newgate, upon condition of transportation. [Ibid., p. 314.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, junior, to apprehend Samuel Kendrick on suspicion of high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [Ibid., p. 315.]
April 23. [The Queen to the Dutch Commander at Portsmouth.] Requesting him to repair with the fleet under his command to the flats next the Foreland. The Admiral of the English fleet has been directed to sail to the rendezvous, and Thomas Wilshaw, esquire, commissary for naval affairs at Portsmouth, has been ordered to furnish the Dutch ships with what can be spared out of the English magazines. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 126.]
April 24.
Meastricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Has been ill, and therefore obliged to delay writing. Asks that orders may be given for the hospitals at Ghent, Bruges, and Namur. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 80.]
April 24. Information as to the French troops which are marching towards Mons and other towns. [Ibid., No. 81.]
April 24.
Leige.
Count Cercleas de Tilly to the Prince of Waldeck. Condition of the garrisons on the enemy's frontier. Copy. [Ibid., No. 82.]
April 24./May 4.
Portsmouth.
Captain Decker to Lord Nottingham. Has arranged with the other captains to sail with as many ships as can be made ready to the appointed rendezvous, according to her Majesty's order. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 134.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Commission for John Jeffery to be ensign to Capt. William Kingsley's Company in Col. Samuel Venner's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 258.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter Greve, merchant and freighter of a Swedish vessel called the St. Lawrence. Shows that, by an Order of Council of the 21st instant, her Majesty was pleased to dismiss Capt. Baker and Lieut. Thomas Miles out of her service, for having, with others belonging to the Sterling Castle, taken out of the said Swedish vessel certain goods. The said Capt. Baker has made ample satisfaction for the said goods, though it appears he was the least concerned in it. Prays to have the said Capt. Baker restored to his command. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 280.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Gibson. This is to acquaint you that the bearer, Alexander Kilgore, has brought up the three prisoners with whom he was charged, and delivered them safely, [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 430.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke. The Queen would have you summon all such colonels of the regiments quartered in the country, as are now in town, to attend her at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. [Ibid.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney-General. I desire to speak to you at 9.30 to-morrow morning at my office. [Ibid.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for William Morris to go to Harwich and Flanders or Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 214]; for Peter du Sentier, and John Colet to go to Harwich and Holland; for Daniel Tirart, Elizabeth his wife, and two children, ditto; for Mr. Archibald Primrose, and one servant, to go to Edinburgh; and Mr. Jolinde Coan and Mr. John Leckie to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 215.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to receive and keep in safe custody Robert Mitford, charged with high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 313.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Clerk, marshal of the Admiralty, to carry the said Robert Mitford, a prisoner in his custody, to Newgate. [Ibid.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Marris, to apprehend Col. Parker for high treason. [Ibid., p. 314.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant, to Simon Chapman, to apprehend the said Col. Parker, or any person, or persons, suspected of high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [Ibid.]
April 25.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I send you the enclosed extract of a letter from Commander Wilshaw, dated at Bussleton yesterday, so you may lay it before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 263.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Sherbrook, Samuel Howard, Robert Aldersey, and Humphrey Simpson of London, merchant, Thomas Bates, Barton Hollyday and Thomas Lessingham of London, silk-throwers, on behalf of themselves and others. They show that they and several others concerned with them, have, with great expense and industry, brought to practice a certain useful and cheap way, by engines, of winding the finest raw silk which was formerly brought ready wound, spun, and twisted from Italy. They propose to bring raw silk from Italy, Turkey, and other countries, and by that means to employ, in winding and twisting the silk, vast numbers of poor people here, and save considerable sums of money paid for the silk now imported ready twisted from foreign parts. In regard such undertaking will require several thousand pounds stock for the management of the same which cannot be raised, nor the undertaking so well managed, as by a joint-stock, they pray to be incorporated by the name of the Governor and Company for winding fine raw silk in England. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 281.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Robert Cotton and Mr. Frankland. Notwithstanding the order you have given and lately renewed to the Masters of the packets boats at Harwich, not to receive any person on board their vessels without a pass, one Kendrick came over in the Spanish Princess on the 21st of March last. I desire you will inform yourselves of this matter, how the master presumed to bring this man into England, and let me know his pretence for so doing, that he may be dealt with as he deserves. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 431.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Romney. The Queen is informed that four men apprehended upon suspicion of coming out of France on some treasonable design against their Majesties, were suffered by the persons charged by you to bring them before me, to make their escape; she would have you cause sufficient recognizances to be taken of them, with good sureties, to appear at the next assizes, and answer this crime and offence. [Ibid.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Huntingdon. I have received your letter, and acquainted the Queen with it, who commands you to come to town and then expect her pleasure upon what you wrote to me. [Ibid.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Henry Goodrick. The Queen commands me to send you the enclosed memorial, presented to her by Sir Robert Holmes, and would have you give an account what arms and stores are at present in the Isle of Wight, and what it is necessary that island should be supplied with for its defence and security, and thereof to make report to her. It having been represented to her, that it would be for their Majesties' service to send 1,000 arms to Hull to be disposed of to the militia of Yorkshire, as there shall be occasion, they paying for the same at the rates which the King allows, she would have you report what may be fit to be done in it. [Ibid., p. 432.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jens Anderson to go to Gravesend and Denmark, for Mr. John Nicholas Debar, belonging to the Elector of Bavaria, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 215]; for Peter Christopherson to go to Gravesend and Denmark; for Godfrey Stevens and William Johnson to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Rodolf Steiner, ditto; for James Gaches, ditto; for Capt. William Cattepoel and his servant, ditto; for Jacob Baroe and Jacob Bodrigo, ditto [Ibid., p. 216]; and for Michael Raiman and Jacob Beson to go to Gravesend and Denmark. [Ibid., p. 217.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Randolph Sparrow to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 218.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill for revoking and determining certain letters patent constituting and appointing Sir Rowland Gwynne, as Treasurer of the Chamber. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 315.]
April 26.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. As to the forage. Encloses an account of what the Bishop of Bamberg has written to him about the Elector of Bavaria. Count de Wailburg has passed here on his way to Germany. Is just going to Aix. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 83.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Commission for Daniel Deligne, esq., to be deputy-lieutenant of Lincolnshire, and for the Earl of Lindsey, lord-lieutenant of that county, to issue out his deputation. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 259.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Thomas Duppa. Shows that in the years 1686 and 1687, being sub-collector of the tenths of the clergy in the diocese of Exeter, he employed under him, Thomas Blight of Bodmin, and with the approbation of the then Bishop, took a bond of the said Blight of 2,000l. penalty, for his faithful accounting of what he should receive of the said tenths. When his Majesty landed in the west, Blight and his family declared themselves papists and the said Blight was then in arrear, 439l. 9s. 2d. After his Majesty's accession to the Crown the petitioner sued the said Blight for the recovery of the said debt, but he had not sufficient to pay the same. He (the petitioner) having given bond to the late Bishop is threatened by his executrix, and therefore prays his Majesty to accept the said bond of 2,000l., &c. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 282.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Martin Beckman. Shows that he has served the Crown, both by sea and land, these 47 years, and above; and prays, in case their Majesties do not think it fit to continue him any longer as "a Comtroller of the Fireworks," that he may be paid his arrears till Christmas, he having done service up to that time, particularly in setting out all the fireships for this year's expedition. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 283.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieutenant Martin Laycock. Shows that he begged the fine of John Davies, minister of Penn, in the county of Bucks, which fine her Majesty was pleased to grant; but the said Davies is an obstinate man, and unwilling to pay the said fine but by composition, and the charges of the courts in that case are so great that he is now no nearer the payment of his debts, which are above 60l. A certain John Cradock, rector of Rickinghall, in the county of Suffolk, was convicted at his Majesty's suit, during Michaelmas term last, and fined 100 marks, and the petitioner prays to have the said fine bestowed upon him, and that Craddock may be discharged out of the King's Bench prison where he now lies upon the payment of the 100 marks. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 285.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Stock. I desire you will be assisting to the bearer in procuring a boat to carry him to Sir Ralph Delaval's ship off the South Foreland or elsewhere as soon as the squadron appears. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 432.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Sandwich. As you undertook before the Lords this afternoon to find out Gibbons, so it is expected you shall do it. As soon as you know where he is, seize and detain him in custody, and immediately send me an account. [Ibid.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen desires you to stop all persons coming from Holland or Flanders unless they have a pass from Lord Dursley, his Majesty's Envoy-Extraordinary at the Hague, or a pass from William Blathwayt, attending the King in Holland and Flanders, and you are to take care in observing these directions. [Ibid. p. 433.] Like letters of the same date were sent to the Mayor of Rye, the Mayors or Chief Magistrates of Romney, and Hythe, the Mayor of Margate, and the Deputy-Governor of Deal Castle. [Ibid.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Bishop of London. I enclose the papers relating to the redemption of captives at Salee. As you chiefly have the care of those matters in your hands, I have, by the Queen's command, transmitted the papers to you that you may deliver them to the Committee appointed for these affairs, to be considered what is fit to be done therein. [Ibid.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Capt. Charles Pool, Capt. William Born, Mr. John Elers, a minister, Mr. Hallungius, Franciscus Durlac and six servants to go to Harwich and embark for some place not specified; for Capt. John Van Gils to go to Harwich and Holland, renewed on 14th June following upon Mr. Scheffer's note; for Daniel Pontet, ditto; for Lieut. Charles Salomon Pagney, ditto; for Magnus Frederick Herpstein and Axel Sternhoff, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 217]; for Mr. William Sutton, one of their Majesties messengers in ordinary, to go to Dover, being upon special service; for Susanna Overhiel to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Mr. John Ryp, ditto. [Ibid., p. 218.]
April 27. Lord Melville to the King. I have received yours wherewith your Majesty has honoured me, with additional instructions, which will be carefully and faithfully observed, in so far as lies in my power. Affairs here have altered much of late, but it is only what was covered over before, now more openly appears. There is nothing of it new to me though it is so to others. Sir William Lockhart, or my son, will give you an account of the proceedings in Parliament yesterday and how affairs stand here. There was never a nation or people I believe more infatuated than we seem to be at present.
The Jacobins being joined with the Club have brought in all their strength to the Parliament, except a very few, some three or four noblemen, who yet scruple the oaths, if they had done this last year in the Convention, the throne might have been yet to declare vacant as to King James. Whether they will be able to outvote us or not, I know not, but they gained ground by the adjournment which I know your Majesty did on weighty considerations, though it had bad effects here. There was but one vote passed in the House yesterday and your friends carried it by a great many. It is true three or four of the Club went along when they saw it going. I touched upon the Act rescinding the Act of 1669, concerning the Supremacy. By this, however, it may be misrepresented, which I lay my account with. Your Majesty loses nothing which I am confident you would desire. The reasons which forced me to give royal assent to these two votes, passed a day or two sooner than your Majesty mentioned, were because if it had been delayed it would have given the opposite party great advantage, and we should have lost many of our own and would have increased the jealousies of the people to such a height that it might have been difficult if not impossible to retrieve. All the wit and malice of men, I may say of hell, seem to be set at work to do mischief.
On account of your Majesty's affairs in England and my being restrained for a time, the combination is become so strong that I do not think it safe at present to follow these methods which otherwise might have been fit and convenient, not so much because I fear their strength in itself though the party be numerous, but because by lies and forgeries they had much abused the people. The Duke of Hamilton was the first proposer and presser that this Act concerning the Supremacy should be touched; he also was the first proposer that an Act might be brought in for liberty of speech. I shall make no inferences on this, but I like not the smell of it and yet to stop it will make a great noise in England.
I am persuaded of a correspondence between some here of different parties and some in England, and it is not only expectation from Ireland and France, but that intelligence which helps to keep people in opposition to your Majesty's interests and the settling of the country.
I am sorry for the limitations your Majesty gives, on your own account and not out of bigotry, but I shall endeavour to observe your commands. I am straitened how to find a way to make a breach upon another head rather than this, for this would do you an irreparable prejudice and give your enemies an extraordinary advantage, so I leave it to your serious consideration what to do in it; for my part I see no remedy if your Majesty do not speedily satisfy your people, but all must go in confusion.
I know I am likely to be extremely misrepresented in giving this advice, and that if I did not serve the best master in the world, I might ruin myself by doing it, especially if anything displeasing should follow it, but I speak my true sentiments as to what I consider to be to your Majesty's interest. I am very positive in this if all the statesmen in Britian should be of another sentiment, that it is truly your Majesty's interest at this time not to displease the people on this head as to their Church government, for nothing else can satisfy them. I am displeased enough with many of that profession and they are prejudging themselves, but you need not apprehend what I find by Mr. Carstairs you do. You have enough in your hand to restrain all exorbitancies; the affair is mightily misrepresented in the world and understood but by few. I am, notwithstanding all this, as little for the pragmaticalness of churchmen as any man in Britain. I think they often need a bridle; I look upon their work as relating to the souls of their people, that they are to use persuasion, and no action; it is in the magistrates power, notwithstanding their general assemblies be granted them, to keep them within their bounds, and it is the better for themselves they be so. I might say enough to clear further this and take of what Tarbat, Sir George Mackenzie and several others often say in this affair, but it is mostly prejudice and bias that moves them. But I weary your Majesty and I am not to justify churchmen's miscarriages. You brought two from Holland, one of one persuasion, and one of another, who have done more mischief than thousands. But I say this only, though there were greater ground for apprehending prejudice than there is, it seems altogether necessary to give way to it at this time if the people press it, even though your Majesty were inclined to alter all. If the country were once brought to a settlement, men will change in many things.
I beg you a thousand pardons for this presumption, but the weightiness of the affair presses me, for to lose the people in whom you only can confide, when you have none to trust in besides, would be very dangerous consequence.
I have sent the copies of the safe conducts I have given to Breadalbane and of the orders of the ships and parties that are going to the Highland coast. I could get no more from him but only a promise of endeavouring. I sent his proposals last post. I know Mackay will not be pleased with this for he is upon another method, and he is but ill appointed for it yet. Let me know your Majesty's pleasure in all; you see there is but to the 20th of May allowed, and the forces cannot be ready sooner, so there is nothing lost as to that, though he prove but tricking, which I am afraid of. As to the order forbearing all acts of hostility by the ships, it is only till further order, so if your Majesty be not satisfied, immediately upon a return, it may be recalled. Mackay and Argyll will both reclaim against this. Breadalbane is a mighty cunning man and professes to be for his interest, I know not what weight to lay on him, but he loves money well and would be sure to have a part advanced, but I think it were enough to put so much as you think fit to be bestowed in some person's hand whom he will trust to be paid at such times and on such conditions as you shall think fit.
You would likewise let me know whether I shall rescind the Act relating to the articles, for that is the thing they strike much on. I do not think it is now to be stood upon, though it be indiscreet in them to desire it; but when it is evident that they design that nothing should be done but the Parliament adjourned or dissolved, it should be the more guarded against and what you desire will be the more easily carried when this ferment is over. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 84.]
April 27. List of the regiments which have been inspected in the various garrisons in the Low Countries during the past week, with remarks concerning them. [Ibid., No. 85.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. James Hamilton. Shows that he raised a troop of Dragoons in Col. Wynn's Enniskillen regiment. That the colonel broke him without any just reason and gave his troop to one who was not in Ireland when the said troop was raised. He prayed to have the whole affair tried by a council of war, which was delayed by Sir John Topham, Judge Advocate. When the court martial was held, the petitioner had no timely notice to bring in his evidence. He applied himself to General Ginckle, praying the matter might be rehearsed, but the injury having been committed before he commanded in chief, he advised him to apply himself to the King. Prays to have the same rehearsed or to have it referred to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Referred accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 283.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Mayor, Bailiffs, and Burgesses of the borough of Plympton Earl, in Devonshire. Shows that they and their predecessors have enjoyed divers liberties and privileges, as well by prescription and by usage as by virtue of divers charters granted them by her Majesty's royal predecessors, particularly by a charter of the late Queen Elizabeth, bearing date the 27th day of April in the 44th year of her reign; and among other things have enjoyed several yearly fairs and weekly markets, and the liberty of their Mayor to be a justice of the peace during his term of office, and for one year after, and for their Recorder to be a justice of the peace during his term of office, with power to the said Mayor and Recorder, in case of sickness or other necessary absence, to execute their office by deputy.
That, notwithstanding some interruption and violence upon them in the last reign, they are legally entitled to, and have ever since enjoyed, their privileges granted, and do so still. Nevertheless, for clearing all doubts and preventing any question which may arise by reason or occasion of the said interruption, and that they and their successors may have perpetual remembrance and be obliged and enabled the more effectually to serve their Majesties, they pray her Majesty, by her royal charter, to grant and confirm to them their ancient and lawful liberties and particularly the privilege of having justices of peace as aforesaid, together with their weekly market and six fairs in the year. Referred to the Solicitor or Attorney-General. [Ibid., p. 286.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Henry Minge to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Alexander Ross and Mr. Hans Larson, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 218]; for John Redouté, ditto; for Mr. John Gaupp, upon the certificate of the Lord Mayor and the Lutheran minister, ditto; for Martha Covitrey, ditto; for Arnant van Westervelt, ditto; for Yeromy Lauginger, ditto; for Lieut. Alexander and William Armstrong, his servant, ditto; for Theodore Colby, ditto [Ibid. p. 219]; for John Villiers, ditto; for John Sluyter, ditto; for Ensign James Dennis, ditto; for Elie des Granges, ditto; for Daniel Coxe, ditto; and for Lord George Hamilton, Capt. John Ruthen and six servants, ditto. [Ibid., p. 220.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Nicholas Hill, messenger in ordinary, to make strict search for Henry Hene, clerk, and having found him to seize him for uttering seditious words, and for treasonable practices, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 317.]
April 28.
London.
—O'Donnel to —. My want of health not permitting me to wait on you at your departure has disappointed me of other expectations which I then had. So that now I have not whereby to maintain myself, relieve my friends, pay my debts, nor (which is worse) whereby to equip myself to serve his Majesty somewhere at a time when neither my zeal or duty permit me to sit idle. I hope to be paid the remainder of the 4,000l., whereby I shall be able to disengage myself of the stress I lie under and put myself in a way to serve where ordered. My desire of giving further testimony of my duty and propension to his Majesty is so ardent that for compassing it now by this supply I shall think myself happy and not disappointed. I could instance several reasons of my education and interest to improve the motion of my duty and propension; but, to avoid tediousness, do only remit myself to the experience you had of me. There is a petition remitted to his Majesty upon this account by the Cabinet Council, which, seconded by your authority, will certainly take effect. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 34.]
April 28.
Maestricht.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Is going to Aix. Details as to placing the regiments. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 86.]
April 28.
Turin.
Victor Amadeus to the King. Thanks his Majesty for the letter in which he assured him of the continuance of his royal protection; in answer the writer desires the King to believe in his entire devotion both to his Majesty and to the well being of the common cause. Seal of Arms. [Ibid., No. 87.]
April 28.
Paris.
Memorandum. Affairs for the descent upon England are more advanced than was believed, for King James sailed to-day; his departure being hastened by news received from that country. [Ibid., No. 88.]
April 28.
Paris.
"Copy of a letter from Paris." The only thing talked of here is the attack on England. Movements of King James who is expected to embark next month at Havre. List of the troops that will go with him. English news. [Ibid., No. 89.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir John Guise. The Lord President has communicated your letter of the 24th instant, with the enclosed copy of depositoins, to the Council, and I have thereupon sent this bearer with a warrant for apprehending Henry Hene, and desire you will give that bearer your advice and assistance, when and how he may best be taken. I. would have sent another warrant for seizing — Littelton if there were any depositions against him. There being orders already sent to the Lords Lieutenant for mustering the militia in the several counties, at such time and place and in such manner as may be most convenient, her Majesty thinks it very fit that you cause a muster of some horse and foot to be made at the time and place you propose in your letter for defeating the designs of any ill-affected men that may take that pretence of resorting thither. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 434.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Nicholas Frans to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 220]; for Peter Dessons ditto; for Abraham du Four, ditto; and for Mr. John Incledon with a horse and guide, to go to Plymouth. [Ibid., p. 221.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to Capt. John Poyntz, of the sole use of his invention for raising wrecks, &c. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 317.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commander of the Dutch Ships. Encloses a letter from the Queen, requesting him to send some ships to join with Sir [Ralph] Delaval. His concurrence herein will be agreeable to her Majesty, and of great public advantage. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 138.]
April 29./May 9.
North Foreland.
Captain Decker to the Earl of Nottingham. According to her Majesty's order of 22 April, I came hither with six ships of war on the 26th, but her Majesty's ships under a Vice-Admiral did not pass till yesterday, and they sailed into the Downs. My ships cannot remain here any longer for want of victuals, anchors, and ropes. I desire you to communicate this to her Majesty, and to consider whether it would not be better for the ships to go to the Downs. [Ibid., p. 146.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Governor of the East India Company. It is a fortnight since I sent you a copy of the charter of the East India Company, approved by the Queen, and having not yet heard that the same has been taken into consideration by the Company, I acquaint you that a speedy answer is expected from them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 434.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Bedford. The Queen commands you to send me with speed a list of all your Deputy Lieutenants for Middlesex and Westminster. [Ibid., p. 435.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The LordsJustices having represented the poverty of the inhabitants in all parts of Ireland, by reason of what they have suffered in the late war, and having therefore proposed the remitting what was due on Lady day last for the Hearth Money and Quit Rents which, if demanded, cannot be paid at all by some, and by others not without great difficulty, her Majesty is pleased for the ease of her subjects to approve of this proposal, and commands you to despatch the necessary orders for accordingly remitting what was due for Hearth Money and Quit Rents. [Ibid., p. 443.]
April 30.
The Hague.
Warrant for a gift of the office of sheriff of Banffshire in favour of Sir James Ogilvie. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 121.]
April 30.
The Hague.
The like for a remission of all crimes of treason, and rebellion, to — Macdonald, captain of Clan Ronald. [Ibid. p. 122.]
April 30.
The Hague.
The like for the same to Sir Donald Macdonald of Slaite. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 123.]
April 30.
The Hague.
The like for the same to — Macdonald of Glengarry. [Ibid.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for James Fache to go to Harwich and Holland; for Elizabeth Meyer to go to Gravesend and Bremen; for Geesbert Van Steenis and John Hagenbach to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 221]; for Thomas Davies, ditto; for Philip de Lisle and Samuel de Vaguieux, ditto; for Willemina and Pieternella Jongh, two sisters, ditto; for Cornelius de Boodt and Francis de Keyser, ditto; for John Barre, John Eldein, and Claude Cartier, ditto; for Peter Bourgett, John Mourett and Peter Tesseire, ditto [Ibid., p. 222]; and for Margueritta Belrieu and Olimpe de Massé, ditto. [Ibid., p. 223.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I formerly wrote to you that the Richmond frigate was ordered to Waterford to convoy the troops, but the Dolphin is now likewise commanded for that service, and I desire you to have the troops ready to embark upon the arrival of this convoy, so that the two ships may spend as little time in port as possible. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book, 1, p. 331.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Upon information that seamen pass over into Ireland, to avoid going on board the fleet, to the great prejudice of their Majesties' service at this time when they are so much in request, the Lords of the Admiralty are sending some press-masters there, to bring thence such as they can find there for the fleet. Her Majesty therefore desires you to give strict orders to the officers of all the places whither they shall go, to be assisting them in the execution of their warrants.
For preventing the inconveniences which might happen by discouraging ships from going into Ireland with corn at a time when it is so much wanted, the Lords of the Admiralty have ordered that the men, belonging to such of those ships as have given bond to return with their men, are not to be pressed, so as to disable them from performing the voyage, but that there be a sufficient number left on board for that purpose. [Ibid.]
April 30.
Southampton.
Thomas, Lord Jermyn to —. I arrived here last Tuesday, and being informed that there was no ship at Portsmouth ordered for me to embark in, or bound for Jersey, I went the next morning over to the Isle of Wight where I heard the Earl of Monmouth was, in hopes to pass in the same vessel; but he had sailed in a small privateer some few hours before I arrived there, so that I am at present without any opportunity of embarking. I expect the Isabella yacht here by the first fair wind, in which I am very willing to go, rather than trouble the Lords of the Admiralty for a new order, and the more because it is probable it will be the quickest way. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 35.]
April 30.
Admiralty Office.
Proposal by the Lords of the Admiralty for means to be used for supplying the fleet with men.
That Mr. Russell send orders to all the tenders belonging to the fleet, which are abroad, pressing them to come to the fleet immediately, and to press all seamen along the coast in their way without regard to any protections, excepting only such vessels as have victuals and ordnance stores actually on board going to the fleet. This is marked: agreed exclusive of the transport ships in the North Seas.
That masters and officers, as well as the men in the small craft, be liable to this press, and care taken that the ships from which any men are taken are left in harbour in safety. This is marked: agreed except out of ships going with recruits, clothes, &c. to Holland; the Commissioners of Transport to give the Admiralty another of those ships.
That Mr. Russell send some officers of the fleet up the Thames and Medway to press all fit seamen, watermen, &c., to serve in the fleet, excepting those on vessels with victuals and ordnance stores.
That a general embargo be immediately laid on all ships and vessels as well coasters as others. We think these measures reasonable in case there be imminent danger of the French King making an invasion. Should the French come with a force, which, upon intelligence shall be thought superior to ours and the Dutch combined, that all fifth and sixth rates attend the fleet to be used as required. This is marked: agreed except such as the Admiralty shall particularly appoint for any special service, notwithstanding this order. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 142.]
April.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Wilshaw, esq., to be colonel of the regiment of foot, raised or to be raised, for the service in the Dockyard at Portsmouth, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 259.]
April
Whitehall.
Warrant for Letters Patent under the great seal of Ireland for the restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Ardagh to Ulysses Burgh, Doctor of Divinity, and for the profits of the bishopric during the vacancy from the time of the deprivation of William Sheridan, late bishop, who was deprived for not taking the oaths prescribed by certain acts of parliament passed in 1691 [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 452.]
[April] — to "Mr. Weston in Aldermanbury, or his brother, the City Marshall." When these come to your hands, I pray present one of each of them to the Lord Mayor, his lady, and to each sheriff and their ladies. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 36.]
Enclosing
"His Majesty's letter to sundry Lords, and others of the Privy Council. James R. Whereas our royal predecessors used to call such of their Privy Council as could conveniently be had, to be witnesses to the birth of their children, and whereas we have followed their example at the birth of our dearest son James, Prince of Wales, though even that precaution was not enough to hinder us from the malicious aspersions of those who were resolved to deprive us of our royal right. It having now pleased Almighty God to give us hopes of further issue, we have thought fit to require such of our Privy Council who can come, to attend us here at St. Germains, to be witnesses of the Queen's accouchement. We therefore signify our pleasure to you, that you come with all possible haste, the birth being expected to take place about the middle of next May. The King of France has given his consent that you shall have leave to come, and to return again with all safety. Though the unquiet of the times, the tyranny of strangers, and a misled party of our own subjects have brought us under the necessity of using this unusual way; yet we hope it will convince the world of the truth and candour of our proceedings, to the confusion of our enemies. Dated 'at our Castle of St. Germains, 2nd April 1692, in the eighth year of our reign."
Following this is a statement headed Advertisement, which is as follows: "If the imposing a suppositious son upon the nation to the prejudice of the Princess of O[range] gave the Prince, her husband, the provocation of invading the dominions of his father, and the wresting his crown from him, the offering to repeat a trick that proved so successful unto him, is the happiest advantage that can be given to W[illiam] of securing him in his throne. But it will concern him to use better methods for the detecting this imposture, than any he has thought fit to advance in proof of the former; for neither his own credit which he has staked in his declaration, nor the topics insisted upon by Burnet and Wildman, to disprove the legitimacy of the last, will pass any longer upon the nation, to 'bubble' them into a belief that they are to be cheated afresh. And therefore, as they at Whitehall would not be thought to trust to the preserving that by power which they acquired by falsehood, they are bound in wisdom, as well as honour and justice, to gratify the desire of the King in the preceding letter. Nor can they take a more compendious way of being driven back to Holland with idelible infamy, than either to conceal the letters addressed to persons of honour and quality upon this occasion, or to refuse them the liberty of going over with as much safety on this, as is generally offered on that side.'"
Besides the letters sent to most of the Privy Councillors as aforesaid, there were also letters addressed to the following persons, viz., to twelve peeresses: the Duchess of Somerset, Duchess of Beaufort, Marchioness of Halifax, Lady Derby, Lady Mulgrave, Lady Rutland, Lady Brooks (sic), Lady Nottingham, Lady Lumley, Lady Danby, Lady Frecheville, and Lady Fitzharding; to six commoners' ladies; Sir John Trevor's, the Speaker's lady, Sir Edward Seymour's lady, Sir Christopher Musgrave's lady, Sir Thomas Pope Blunt's lady, Sir John Guise's lady, Thomas Foley's lady, Lady Stamp, the Lord Mayor's lady, Lady Ashurst, and Lady Levet, the two sheriffs' ladies, and Dr. Hugh Chamberlain. Printed, 3 copies. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 36i.]
April. Memorandum as to arms and ammunition required for the defence of Guernsey. Refers to the lack of boats to carry men from the island of Castle Cornet. Endorsed. Enclosed to Sir Henry Goodrick, April 9, 1692. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 37.]