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William and Mary: December 1692

Pages 516-557

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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December 1692

Dec. 1.
Kensington.
Commissions for Henry Hunt, gent., to be cornet to Capt. James Crow's troop in Brigadier Leveson's regiment of dragoons [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 313]; for John Liard, gent., to be lieutenant to Lieut.-Col. John Williams' troop in the same regiment; and for Thomas Lane, gent., to be cornet to Capt. Thomas Pownall's troop in the same. [Ibid., p. 317.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Master of the Packet Boat at Harwich. Being informed that a French captain, whose description is in the enclosed paper, and two other captains in his company, came by the last packet boat out of Holland, without any pass, and that they are dangerous men, I desire you will inquire after them; and in case they are at Harwich, or thereabouts, that you will take care to have them seized and kept in custody, until I shall let you know, upon your sending me an account what you have done, his Majesty's further pleasure concerning them. The French captain's name is Laussan, "a great thick man, a black countenance marked with small-pox, he speaks through his nose, left handed, and about 45 years of age." The two captains with him are young men. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 595.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter du Tuile, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; for Francis Thede, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 437]; for John Vanden Hoeve, ditto; for John Hulper, ditto; and for John Jacobsen Wall and Hartigh Cloppenburgh, ditto. [Ibid., p. 438.]
Dec. 1. Warrant to John Thompson, messenger in ordinary, to search among the passengers coming from Harwich to London, and in all suspected places, for a French captain, and two other captains, lately come by the packet boat to Harwich without a pass, and to seize them and their papers, and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 448.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a pardon to John Howe, late of the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster, for wounding Francis Fyrchild and others within the palace at Westminster. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 450.]
Dec. 1. The disposition of their Majesties' Land Forces. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 147.]
Dec. 1/11.
Sarbruck.
The Prince of Nassau to ——. Mentions a difference of opinion between Field-Marshal Schoening and General Caprara. The Elector of Mayence wishes to know if he shall provide regiments under the same conditions as those already provided by the German Princes Copy, extract. [Ibid., No. 148.]
Dec. 2. Copy of a letter from Baron von Heyden marked by the Prince of Waldeck as having been received by him. Refers to General Fleming's departure from Berlin. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 149.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for John Toelaer to go to Harwich and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 437]; for Samuel Bonel, ditto; for the Prince de Chimay and eight domestic servants, recommended by the Spanish Ambassador, to go to Falmouth and the Groyne [Ibid., p. 438]; and for Thomas Morris to go to Holyhead. [Ibid., p. 440.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Gregory King, esq., Lancaster Herald, who is appointed to carry the Order of the Garter to the Elector of Saxony, left for that employment on Sunday November 27. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 451.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Metazer, to go to Harwich, and embark for Holland; for Dadila la Jeunesse, ditto; for Anthony Lawrence, ditto; for Cornelis Hendricksen, ditto; and for John Theodor Heinson, recommended by Mr. Edzard, Lutheran minister, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 440.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lieutenant-Governor of Plymouth. The Portuguese Envoy has complained that two Portuguese ships being brought into Plymouth by some English privateers, the masters are confined and detained there in custody, and their passports and all their papers taken from them. I desire you will give me an account of this matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 594.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate, or his deputy, to carry— Holland to the Lord President, at his lodgings as often as his lordship shall require it, in order that he may be examined, "touching criminal matters." [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 451.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Stephen Gythens, messenger in ordinary, to seize Henry South, on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid.]
Dec. 6.
Kensington.
Commission for Nathaniel Blackiston, esq., to be captain of the company in which Major John Hedger was late captain in the Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Henry Holt. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 309.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lords of the Treasury concerning the petitions of the proprietors of the Zante frigate, &c. The report is as follows:—We referred the said petitions, for our better information therein, to the Commissioners of your Majesty's Customs, whose report thereupon we have hereunto annexed [not entered], whereby it appears that the petitioners Wood and Coltman were the original proprietors of the said ship and her cargo before capture, and not the petitioners Nelson and the others, who were only "insurers" thereon for the voyage. Upon the whole matter, we are of opinion, that if your Majesty permits the said ship and cargo to be redeemed (as has been done for others in like cases) the original proprietors may have licence so to do, and not the "insurers" Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 422.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Talbot Clerk, Thomas Addison, esq., George Moor, and Henry Corbett, of London, merchants. Shows that they have found out the way to melt and smelt down all sorts of iron by the use of pit-coals which could not hitherto be made or recast, whereby vast sums of money have annually been remitted; and whereas such undertaking requires many thousand pounds stock, which cannot be raised but by a joint-stock, they pray to be incorporated by the name of the Governors and Company for making Iron with Pit-Coal. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. See post, Dec. 14. [Ibid., p. 423.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King desires you to give order for removing Mr. Jonathan Wharton, from the office of Surveyor-General of the Customs at Plymouth and the adjacent ports. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 595.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. The King desires you to send orders for stopping the ships with prisoners at Portsmouth from proceeding to France, until Sir Francis Wheler has sailed thence with the squadron under his command. [Ibid.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Passes for Deederick Van Lynne, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Baptiste, Jacomyntje Martens, a small child, ditto; for Jacob Symons, ditto; for Mrs. Falconer, ditto; for Cornelis Young and her three children, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 441]; for John Bannier, ditto; for John Fredericks, and Abraham Abrahams, ditto; for Susanna Reyniers, and hertwo small children, ditto; for Juda Coen, and Jacob Abendana, ditto; for Antoinette Alion, ditto [Ibid., p. 442]; for John Boulan, ditto, for Paul Celery, ditto; for James Baudouin, and Ann, his sister, ditto; for James Godefroy, Mary, his wife, and Magdalen their daughter, ditto; for Jacomyntje Den Hoop, ditto [Ibid., p. 443]; for Barbe Harivant, Mary her daughter, and two children, ditto; for Christian Ernst Carross, ditto; for Anthony Young, and Elizabeth Verriou, recommended by Mr. Bedford, Lord Bath's chaplain, ditto; and for John Thompson, a messenger, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 444.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King being inclined to gratify Sir Henry Bellasis in what he desires in the enclosed paper, directs you to consider it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 596.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Francis Brantom, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 444]; for John Willemsz, and Arien Copsen, ditto; for Mrs. Jane Russell, and Mrs. Dorothy Russell, to go to Lisburn [Lisbon ?]; and for Lieutenant John Hill, to go to Harwich and Holland; this pass was granted on a letter from Lord Cutts, who, in the same letter, desired a commission for the said Hill to be lieutenant in his regiment. [Ibid., p. 445.]
Dec. 7.
Kensington.
Warrant to insert in the military list of the present and all future establishments of the expense of Ireland, the sum of 60l. per annum payable to James Clarke, esq., constable of the Castle of Dublin, for providing fire and candles for the guards at Dublin. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 545.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Commission for Francis Sanderson, gent., to be ensign to Lieut.Col. Lillingston's company, in Col. John Foulke's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 310.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Daniel Routier, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for James Roger, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 445]; and for the Zante frigate, Nathaniel Wood, and John Coltman proprietors, and Nathaniel Darby, commander, taken coming from Zante to London, laden with currants, and carried to Morlaix, to pass from Morlaix with her lading, to any port in England. [Ibid., p. 446.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord-Lieutenant. You are to put a stop to the reversing Mr. Fagan's outlawry which was directed by a letter signed by the Queen, the King intending further enquiry. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 442.]
Dec. 8.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and the Recorder of London, to forbear putting into execution any sentence which may be passed upon John Remington, who is to be tried at the Old Bailey, for murder. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 452.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill constituting Thomas Rymer, esq., Historiographer Royal, in the place of Thomas Shadwell, deceased, with the salary of 200l. per annum payable quarterly, out of the Exchequer, to commence from Michaelmas last past. [Ibid.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to prepare a bill, constituting Naham Tate, esq., poet laureate, in the place of Thomas Shadwell, deceased, with the yearly fee of 100l. payable quarterly at the Exchequer "together with a butt or pipe of Canary wine every Christmas." [Ibid., p. 453.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Like warrant to prepare a bill making Robert Oursel, being an alien born, a free denizen of England. [Ibid.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Davies, messenger in ordinary to apprehend Capt. Bingham and John Griffith, his servant, on suspicion of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 454.]
Dec. 8. Sir Charles Hedges to Richard Warre. The case of the ship Charity came to a hearing to-day, and a pass bearing date the 7th of October showed that she belonged to the Danes. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 537].
Dec. 9.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland granting to Thomas, Lord Coningsby, the office of Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, void by the death of William Harbord, esq. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 543.]
Dec. 10.
Kensington.
Commission for Darby Slamon, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of grenadiers of which Capt. Fox is captain, in Col. Zachary Tiffin's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 309.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Nation, John De Wee, and Thomas Puckle, of London, merchants: Shows that they have, after great expense and industry, invented an engine consisting of screw wheels, long tumblers, etc., proper to lift up or down the greatest weight, fit for weighing ships, guns, anchors, etc., and much to the advantage to the public. George Nation being the first and sole inventor, they pray for letters patent for the sole exercise thereof. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 424, and S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, 113, and 113i; the last document being the Attorney General's report in favour of granting the patent.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Claasz, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 445]; for John Crochell, John Hoyer, and Hans Jorgensen, ditto; for Reinard Kessler, ditto; for John Lebbé, ditto; for Lucas Bovissavi, recommended by Mons. Du Bourdieu, ditto [Ibid., p. 446]; and for Charles Marris, a messenger, to go to Portsmouth. [Ibid., p. 447.]
Dec. 10.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a grant to Christopher Robinson, esq., of the place of Secretary of the colony of Virginia, in the room of Col. William Cole, late Secretary there. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 454.]
Dec. 10.
Kensington.
Warrant to Dr. William Oldyss, King's Advocate in the Court of Admiralty, and Samuel Franklin, esq., Procurator-General, to stop all proceedings against the ship Francis of Dieppe, Francis L'Hermit master, and to allow John Tupper, commander of the Swallow privateer, the benefit of the said ship. He had seized a poor French fishing boat, and judging that the same was not worth the charge of bringing in, dismissed her without any order, and for that his commission was revoked; but before he had notice of such revocation, he had seized the Francis from under the guns of a French port in the haven of Demonvile, by cutting four cables to unmoor her, notwithstanding the continual firing of great and small shot from the said fort, and brought her to Guernsey as prize. The said vessel was, however, claimed by the Admiralty, she having been taken after Tupper's commission had been revoked as aforesaid. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 455.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Robert Molesworth, esq., Envoy Extraordinary to the King of Denmark, from 27th May to 27th November last. [Ibid., p. 456.]
Dec. 11.
Kensington.
Commission for John Hill, to be lieutenant to Capt. Francis Conigrave in John, Lord Cutts' regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 329.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Reepe, gent., showing that after great pains and charges he has invented a certain engine for making or twisting whips which is more regular and better work than can be made or used any other way: and being the inventor of it, prays for a patent for the sole use thereof during the term of 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book, 1, p. 423.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceeding upon the petition of Cornelius Denys, of London, merchant. Shows that in June last, he bought a ship called the Sea Horse, which had been condemned in the Court of Admiralty, and sending the said ship to Ostend, she was taken by a Flushing privateer, and carried to Middleburg, where the said ship and goods are sold and disposed by Jan Hout Kooper, commander of the privateer. The petitioner having claimed the said ship and goods, he is advised that he cannot obtain restitution of it without their Majesties' Envoy at the Hague demands the same on the petitioner's behalf. Prays for such order. Referred to Sir Charles Hedges, knt., Judge of the High Court of Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 424.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Exeter. His Majesty is well pleased with the dutiful and loyal behaviour of his city of Exeter, and in particular of the zeal of the magistrates in his service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 596.]
Dec. 12. Caveat that nothing pass concerning Mr. Thomas Tilson and Mr. Edward Corker, of Dublin, Registrars of the High Court of Chancery in Ireland, till notice be first given to Mr. Philip Atkinson in Great Queen Street. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 73, p. 14.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for Lieut. James Wemyss, with twenty recruits for Col. Earle's regiment, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for James Enkettey, ditto; for Evert Van Eyckholt, ditto; for John William Johnsen, ditto; for Symon Abrahamsz, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 447]; for Mr. David Polhill and John Heiss, his servant, ditto; for Peter Petit, his wife, and one child, ditto; for Meyer Moses, Mark Moses, and Hertog Abrahams, ditto; and for Claas Tyssen and John Moll, ditto. [Ibid. p. 448.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to George Fry, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend John O'Neale, Charles Sweeney, Elizabeth Sweeney, Frances Barry, Richard Magrath, and William O'Brian, for high crimes and misdemeanours. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 456.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend Catherine Harris, Frances Benefield, Elizabeth Fitzgerald and — Blake, for high crimes and misdemeanours. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 465.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Jackson, and Edmund Hemmings. Shows that, with great labour and expense, they have attained and brought to perfection a new art or invention for light, differing and far exceeding all lights new extant, fit to be used in all churches, halls, and such other large places as well as streets, performed to the satisfaction of all persons who have seen the same. As they are the first inventors of the said light and lamp, they pray for letters patent for the sole use of the same during 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 425.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Pass for Jacob Jansen, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 448.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Young, or any other messenger in ordinary, to apprehend — Prevancell, with his papers, for coming from France into England without a pass. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 462.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hopkins, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend John Grey, for coming from France to England without a pass. [Ibid., p. 465.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Like warrant to apprehend Capt. Brodie, ditto. [Ibid.]
Dec. 13.
The Victualling Office; Tower Hill.
The Victuallers of the Navy to the Earl of Nottingham. We have received your order, that in case the Hope, Cornelius Johnson, master (which was to carry 40 soldiers and their provisions to the Barbadoes, and was by storm driven on shore in Stokes Bay), could not be got ready to sail with the fleet, that we should hire the ship Martin's Delight, John Atkinson, master, to supply her place. Our agent from Portsmouth writes that he had sent to Cornelius Johnson, master of the Hope, to offer him assistance if he wanted any, to which the master returned that he wanted none, and had taken care for hoys to take out his goods, and doubted not but to save his vessel. The order you send us from his Majesty is conditional, so that we do not know what to resolve in the case, for if the Hope should be ready before the fleet sails, this order will not warrant us in freighting the other ship. The Hope was contracted with to carry only 40 soldiers and their provisions in their passage, for which the master was to have 40l. The Martin's Delight is of greater burden, and will expect more considerable freight, having no merchants' goods to carry. We have sent to discover the owners, and they have consented to let the whole ship to their Majesties, to carry such numbers of soldiers, provisions, etc., as shall be thought fit to be put on board her, and as she can reasonably stow, to deliver the same at Barbadoes, and to be discharged there, for 200l. provided she have protection for her seamen and promises to be ready on a week's notice. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 541.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Warburton of Winnington, in the county of Chester, esq. Shows that he has lately discovered and found lying deep within his own lands, a rock or mine of salt, and has at his great charge and expense raised several tons thereof and opened a free and easy access to the workmen for gaining the vast remaining quantities thereof; and that he has, by himself or his agents, found out several methods of ordering thereof in such manner as may be most serviceable to your Majesty's kingdom by sea and land. Nevertheless he is well advised that certain persons, falsely pretending to have found out salt rocks in this kingdom and a new and extraordinary way of improving them, have petitioned for letters patent for the sole benefit thereof, designing, under colour of the said grant, and contrary to his Majesty's intentions, to debar the petitioner. Wherefore, for as much as this salt rock of the petitioner's was not found out by the said projectors, as is pretended, and forasmuch as the sole property thereof is legally vested in the petitioner and as there is no other salt rock in their Majesties' dominions as yet discovered, and capable of any improvement whatsoever, and forasmuch as the invention mentioned in the said petition, which relates to the improvement of salt rocks cannot be of any universal benefit to the nation, but is directly levelled against the petitioner's inheritance, he prays that he may have the liberty to make the best use and improvement of his own inheritance, and that the other patent may not pass. Referred to the Attorney-General. (See ante, under date Nov. 29.) [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 426.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Attorney-General concerning Clark and Addison's petition. (See ante, under date Dec. 6.) The report is as follows:—In obedience to your Majesty's commands, I have considered the annexed petition, whereby the petitioners desire that they, and divers others persons concerned with them, may be incorporated, in order to the carrying on an undertaking to smelt down all sorts of iron ore, iron stone, "slaggs," cinders, and broken, cast, or hammered iron, with pit-coal, and to make the same into good "merchantable bar-iron" and other iron, and also into guns, bullets, and all other utensils. The petitioners allege that, by reason iron could not hitherto be made or cast by pit-coal, a great many good mines in your dominions have lain unwrought, and great sums of money have been remitted to foreign parts to procure the same for your use and for the use of your subjects; for these reasons they desire to be incorporated, firstly because (as they allege) so great a stock as is requisite for the effectual carrying on an undertaking of this kind cannot otherwise be raised, persons being unwilling to advance great sums in a way of partnership because in case of the bankruptcy of any of the partners the stock in partnership will be liable to be seized; and, secondly, because such an undertaking is not to be carried on but under rules and orders which cannot be established unless by your authority. The petitioners allege that this undertaking will be of use and advantage to the kingdom in saving the consumption of great quantities of wood which are daily spent in melting and smelting iron, and that it will promote the vending of English iron; because the same being smelted at lower rates by their method, may be sold cheaper. In case you shall be disposed to gratify the petitioners by granting them such a charter of incorporation as is desired, you may prevent their making any ill use of your favour by directing such clauses to be inserted therein as may determine the same if the undertaking should be found hurtful to the public in the practice thereof, or if the petitioners should not carry on the same effectually. Referred back to the AttorneyGeneral to prepare such heads for a charter, with the names of the persons to be the first members, as he shall think fit. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 427.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Robert Jansen, Elias Jansen, and William Cornelis, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jacob Comyn, ditto; and for Peter Duran, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 449.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
George Clarke to the Earl of Nottingham. I suppose Mr. Warre has acquainted you that I was with him, as you directed, about Col. Codrington's share of the booty. I am ready to attend you when you wish to settle this matter, which I believe may be done very equally by giving the colonel a double colonel's share, when he assists with a body of men as big as two regiments. If the Commanderin-Chief sticks to his third part of the whole you will please to consider if it will not be reasonable that one of these two colonel's shares be taken out of his third, or if he accepts of a fourth, whether he should not have it entirely himself, and Codrington's double share be taken out of the other three-fourths. The shares for the officers, sent by the artillery are in the letter I sent you. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 114.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for estimates to be made of what the charges for the necessary fortifications of Cork and Kinsale, and also of Ross Castle, will amount to, and for the payment of the money necessary for the same, not exceeding 6,000l. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 546.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Warrant to cause the sum of 1,000l. per annum to be added to the present allowance of 2,000l. per annum for payment of extraordinaries by Concordatum in Ireland. [Ibid.]
Dec. 14.
Kensingtor.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland appointing William Trench, Esq., to the office of Agent and Solicitor to the Commissioners of the Revenues in Ireland, in the place of John Thompson, with the salary of 300l. per annum. [Ibid., p. 547.]
Dec. 14.
On board the Resolution at Spithead at 12 o'clock at night.
Sir Francis Wheler to the Earl of Nottingham. I received your packet to-night by Mr. Marisco, messenger, dated the 13th instant, with his Majesty's further instructions dated the same day, which I shall put in execution to the utmost of my power. I have also received your letter to Col. Kendall which I will deliver safely. For certain the Hope is lost, the winds have come in so hard, that nothing could save her; she was to carry only 40 soldiers, and had provisions but for the complement, without any ordnance stores. The way of hiring the Martin's Delight is, as you say, by the month certainly best, but if the owners do not like that way, please let it be the other, and to be done out of hand, for time is precious. Notwithstanding our going to the place you mention, certainly it is best to send us provisions to come away in April or May, for the other place is only on an exigency to keep us from starving. But the great quantities that we shall want will call for it from home; a small quantity we may get credit for, but never for so great a sum. At the best it is dearer than in England, and they have so good a vend to our plantations that to depend on it will put us to great straits, for we must feed a great many mouths. I hope I may have distribution of booty before we sail, for the wind is in the S.W. quarter, "with dirty weather."
The Rupert has brought in a pretty French privateer of 16 guns, who sails very well. I have written to the Admiralty desiring that she may be sent with us, she needs no cleaning, and if orders come to the yard to the Victuallers, and the Ordnance, with the help of all our boats, I will engage to get her ready in four days. If she is not ready when we sail, I will leave her behind, and rather than not carry her, we will man her by detachment out of the squadron. She will be of excellent use, can be cleaned very easily, ply to windward, and carry intelligence from one island to another, and on occasion bring a packet home, and in her cruising correct the enemy's sloops, and snows that infest those coasts and take the New England men, and so distress our plantations in taking their provisions. I wish Captain Kirke now in the Cygnet fireship, bound with us, had the command; he is a brisk man and good seaman. If it should be thought inconvenient to increase the squadron, let the Cygnet be left behind, turn all her men and things into her, and we will carry the fireworks in cask, and so we can make her a fireship in 24 hours if occasion happens, The Cygnet is the most improper ship for that service, "being the dumbest worst sailor in the world." If the Admiralty do not do this, will you move the King to order it? The mail was robbed again last night, and I hear all the public letters are taken out, if they looked for mine to you they have been mightily disappointed. The Admiralty ordered the Woolwich as a convoy to the William and Mary, but she came away with our storeship and the two fireships, so I think it would not be amiss to remind them again. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 545.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Green, gent., showing that by his industry and great expense, he has invented and found out a way for converting stone and chalk into lime, and that by the heat thereof, water and other liquors may be boiled and made fit for several uses, which will be to the advantage of the public, and were never before practised. He prays for letters patent for the sole use of his invention. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 428.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for David Asselin, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Abraham Le Fevre ditto; for Andrew Boyer, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 449]; for Christian Loopmans, and her son, ditto; for Gerard Marchard, and Victor Anen, ditto; and for Michael Hermon to go to Southampton and embark for Jersey. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 36, p. 450.]
Dec. 15. Allowance of the expenses of Charles, Lord Dursley, Envoy Extraordinary to the States-General of the United Provinces and Plenipotentiary at the Congress, from 6 September to 6 December last. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 457.]
Dec. 15. Warrant to pay 820l. 14s. 6d. to Sir Leonard Robinson out of the Customs. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 115.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Chapter of the Collegiate Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Southwell in the county of Nottingham. Shows that the said chapter has lately set up a lecture or afternoon sermon on the Lord's Day for the benefit of the large parish of Southwell, who have no other church but the said collegiate church, and the revenues thereof being poor and mean, it will be impossible for them to support the charge of it for any length of time, without some assistance from abroad. They have applied themselves to their Majesties, not only in consideration of their known readiness to encourage all good work, but more especially because they conceive there is a great arrear due to them from the Crown upon that account; for King Edward VI., having taken into his hand several lands and possessions belonging to the said church, did, in lieu thereof, grant a perpetual pension of 10l. per annum upon a divinity lecturer, which was all the consideration they had for their lands. This pension was paid for many years, and for many years likewise it has been withheld; and there is now at this time an arrear of above 500l. which if paid, would make such a fund as that out of it a constant provision for the future might be made for an afternoon preacher. Nevertheless they, knowing their Majesties' great occasion, do not petition for the said arrears in specie, but only for some trees in the Forest of Sherwood not serviceable for naval stores as shall amount to the value of 500l to be bestowed upon them, and the money raised from them to be lodged in the Archbishop of York, their visitor, or any other person appointed by their Majesties. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 429.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Charles Hedges. I enclose you a paper containing the case of Mr. William Robinson and others, owners of the ship, the St. Michael. She was condemned as a prize in Ireland, and bought there upon the presumption of a good title, and employed in their Majesties' service; but now lately she has been adjudged to their Majesties in the Court of Admiralty here, upon the allegation, that the Court in Ireland had no power or jurisdiction in these causes. I desire you will send me the state of the case and your opinion for the petitioner's relief. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 596.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. The King would have you send John de Lettre over to France in the first transport ship which shall go there with prisoners of war. He will be delivered into your hands by Charles Maris, messenger, and you must keep him safely until he goes to France. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 597.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Gerrit Dirckse Cam, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mrs. Elizabeth Studholm, her child, and a maidservant, ditto; for Andrew Virgile, and his son, recommended by Mons. Du Bourdieu, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 450]; and for Nicholas Jansen, ditto. [Ibid., p., 451.]
Dec. 17.
Kensington.
Commissions for Bernard Piercie, gent., to be ensign to Capt. James Deyeus' company in Col. Robert Goodwyn's regiment of foot; for Richard Brewer, junior, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Carey's company, in Col. Richard Brewer's regiment of foot; for Henry Barkley, gent., to be ensign to Major Arthur Ormsby's company in Edward, Earl of Meath's, regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 310]; and for Unton Dering, esq., to be captain of the company in which Captain John Tyrrell was late captain in the first marine regiment of foot, commanded by Peregrine, Earl of Danby. [Ibid., p. 311.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Isaac, and Herd Simons, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Joris Jansen, John Gerritsen, John Josephs, Jacob Jansen, Joseph Claassen, John Huyberts, John Geritsen, Frederick Pietersen, Cornelis Cornelissen, Claas Jansen, Bouwe Cornelissen, Teunis Pietersen, Cornelis Pietersen, Wouter Jansen, and Claas Jacobsen, fifteen Dutch seamen, ditto; and for Mr. Samuel Thomson, Mr. George Hershaw, and William Merrick, a servant, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 451.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Davies, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend William Cotton, for coming from France without a pass, and on suspicion of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 463.]
Dec. 18.
The Hague.
The States-General to the King on behalf of the ship the Fortune, Isaac Cossart, master, condemned as prize. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 549.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Commissions for Sir John Jacob, bart., to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Ferdinando Hastings, and likewise to be captain of a company in the said regiment; for Arthur Taylor, esq., to be major of the same regiment, and likewise to be captain of a company in the said regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 311]; for Edward Tynt, gent., to be ensign to Major Sir Thomas Wyndham's company in John, Earl of Bath's regiment of foot; for Thomas Stanwick, esq., to be captain of Col. John Tidcombe's company in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 315]; for Frederick Hamilton, esq., to be colonel of the regiment of foot of which Edward, Earl of Meath was late colonel, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 316.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a grant to Thomas Manningham, D.D., one of the chaplains in ordinary, of the place and dignity of prebendary of the free chapel of Windsor, void by the death of Dr. Richard Meggott. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 133.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a grant to John Wickart, one of the chaplains in ordinary, of the deanery of the cathedral church of Winchester, void by the death of Dr. Richard Meggott. [Ibid.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill containing a grant to George Nation, John Dewee, and Thomas Puckle of the sole benefit of their new invention of an engine for raising or letting down great weights, useful for ships, guns, anchors, raising heavy stones to the top of high buildings, boring timber, and pounding and grinding metals. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 458.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to Sir Robert Cotton, knt., and Thomas Franklin, esq., to give necessary directions to the masters of the packet boats, so that if any of the recruits of the several regiments of foot in the Low Countries, are brought to them, they shall be given free passage in their boats to Holland or Flanders, taking a certificate, under the hand of such commissioned officer who has charge of them, of their names and the regiment to which they belong. [Ibid., p. 459.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Robert Wolseley, esq., Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector of Bavaria, for two quarters ending Dec. 3rd 1692. [Ibid., p. 460.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Marris, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend Mons. John Francis Tillier, with his papers, on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid., p. 462.]
Dec. 20.
Kensington.
Commission for Edward Rigby, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Unton Dering's company in the first marine regiment, commanded by Peregrine, Earl of Danby. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 315.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you, by the King's Command, the enclosed paper, relating to the ship, Queen Esther, which I received from the Dutch Ambassador's secretary, that you may consider it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 597.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Michael Compigny, and Magdalen, his sister, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Daniel Monro, ditto; for Thomas Thomassen, ditto, for Flower Fowls, ditto; and for Cornelis Bishop, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 452.]
Dec. 21.
Kensington.
Commission for Roger Elliot, esq., to be major of the Earl of Bath's regiment of foot and likewise to be captain of a company in the same. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 316.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dr. Joshua Edisbury. Shows that, about two years since, a writ of ad quod damnum issued out of the Court of Exchequer in Wales, on behalf of Lady Broughton in order to alter a way in the county of Denbigh, which will be very prejudicial not only to the petitioner, but to others in the neighbourhood, which writ, by reason of the unfair practice in the execution of it, and for other reasons, was lately quashed by Sir John Trenchard, Chief Justice of Chester, at the Sessions for that county. Since which, the petitioner is lately informed that she has petitioned the King for a grant of the same thing (vide ante, under date Nov. 30) and without the least notice to the petitioner or any others therein concerned, which, if it pass the Great Seal, the petitioner and others will receive no small prejudice. Prays his Majesty to take the case into consideration, and to do therein, as to him shall seem just. Referred to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 430.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Passes or post-warrants for Mr. Herman Quaet, and John Adams, his servant, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 452]; and for Mr. George Fry, a messenger, to go to Harwich. [Ibid., p. 453.]
Dec. 22.
Kensington.
Commission for Arthur Ormsby, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Frederick Hamilton, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment; for Robert Sterne, esq., to be major of the same regiment, and captain of a company thereof; and for Joseph Stroud, esq., to be captain of the company of which Edward, Earl of Meath was late captain in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 316.]
Dec. 22.
London.
News Letter. From Florence, we have certain advice that the Regency of Tripoli is resolved to continue the war against France. The Italian officers who are in the service of France raise recruits at Leghorn with good success. Two Zealand privateers have taken two French merchant ships, and carried them to Messina. From Venice we hear that the Senate has resolved to raise 3,000 Morlaques and 2,000 Greeks in the Isles of Corfu, Cephalonia and Zante. They are building a most magnificent galley to carry the Doge into the Levant and have launched two men-of-war, and are impressing men to man them to be employed there. It is also said they will make another attempt upon Canea.
From Vienna we have advice from Peterwardein, that Lord Paget had left there for Belgrade where all things are prepared for his reception, and all our letters from the frontier of Turkey continue to assure us of a speedy peace. Prince Eugene will carry with him from hence to Piedmont 40 bombardiers, and as many firemasters.
From Paris we learn that Mons. Tourville is preparing to go hence to Toulon to visit "the Grand Lovois" who is to be Admiral of the ocean fleet next spring. Last Wednesday Count D'Estre arrived from Provence, and has had audience of his Majesty, who seemed displeased at his conduct last year, for losing two of the French men-of-war as he passed the straits, and for not joining Mons. Tourville before the sea fight, which is wholly laid to his charge. A treaty was on foot between his Majesty and the Duke of Parma, but the same was discovered by the Allies who soon frustrated the French intentions.
From Cologne we hear that the troops of the Allies designed for the relief of Rheinfelden [Rheinfels ?] are to rendezvous between Zintzic[Sinzig] and Remagen. The troops designed for the expedition will consist of 12,000 Brandenburgers besides 7,000 of the forces of Neuberg and Cologne, and six regiments from the country of Liege which will make, in all, an army of 24,000 men. In the meantime 6,000 French horse and dragoons are marching to prevent, if possible, a junction of the Allies. Notwithstanding the precaution of the French, a ship laden with ammunition and provisions from Coblenz got into the place. The French carry on their approaches day and night, and have advanced so near that they can throw hand grenades into the place; yet the besieged defend themselves with great gallantry, and have signified to the Landgrave of Hesse that they will hold out nine days longer, by which time we doubt not but to succour the place.
We have advice from Prune (?) Moravia, that a most dangerous conspiracy is discovered there, but the conspirators are seized and since executed; they were a lieutenant-colonel and his lieutenant, who designed to fire the city, and during the confusion he set at liberty the Field Marshal Schoning who is a prisoner in the castle.
From Plymouth we hear that 300 prisoners, who arrived yesterday from St. Malo, say that a squadron of 13 French men-of-war has sailed from Brest, six of the ships are to lie in the chops of the Channel, and the other seven near Cape Clear to wait for our Straits and Canary fleets. Fifty privateers of St. Malo are now at sea, besides many from other ports, and not a day passes but they bring in prizes, the sea being so full of them that it is almost impossible for a ship to escape them.
The Dutch convoy to the St. Tubal fleet fought till she sank, and not a man on board her was saved. Eight of the merchant ships were taken and carried into Brest. The French are very apprehensive of a descent from England, but at the same time, they talk very confidently of an earlier descent upon us in two several places, viz.: one to the eastward, and the other in Cornwall. The Sheerness galley which has come in here says that off the Rock of Lisbon she met with three French men-of-war who took three merchant ships which were in her company; the other two have arrived safely in port.
From Portsmouth we hear that yesterday, Colonel John Gibson, the lieutenant-governor, accompanied by Sir Francis Wheler, and other officers of note, went to Cowes to ship the forces designed for the West Indies, and in the eveningtide most of the ships at Spithead weighed anchor and fell down to Cowes Road, and if the wind continues fair, will sail to-morrow or Thursday. It is reported that the French have 30-men-of-war to intercept our outward-bound fleet. Last night an express arrived there from London, which contradicted some former order sent to Sir Francis Wheler. We have advice from Ireland that Lord Sydney designs to visit, in person, all the fortified towns along the sea coast, there being some apprehensions of a descent in that kingdom from France next spring. In the meantime our fleet is ordered to be ready to put to sea by the end of February at the latest.
By a particular letter from Cologne, we are advised that the Landgrave of Hesse had relieved Rheinfelden [Rheinfels ?] and fell upon the rear of the French as they were drawing off, of whom he killed 3,000, and took 16 pieces of cannon; but this letter coming from a private hand, we do not give just credit to it, but hope to have it confirmed by our next.
On Tuesday, Lieutenant-General Talmash arrived from Flanders, and gave his Majesty a particular account of the present posture of affairs in that country. He left the command of the English army during his absence to Sir Henry Bellasis, and he says the French are laying vast magazines at Namur and Dinan and that they have sent vast quantities of ammunition from Charleville to Philippeville, which, in all probability, are designed against Charleroy.
Yesterday the eleven malefactors condemned last sessions, were executed at Tyburn; the same day his Majesty was pleased to say at dinner, that he would not pardon Holland, or any other highwaymen whatsoever. On Tuesday one Groves, alias Brown, alias Parker, a noted highwayman, was taken in St. James Park, and is committed to Newgate. Before he was taken he endeavoured to fire two pistols by snapping the pan but they did not go off, and it is said that there were five more in his company who made their escape yesterday.
The Rupert frigate brought a French caper of 12 guns, and another French ship in ballast, to Spithead yesterday. This day the House of Commons passed the bill for impartial proceedings in Parliament, and made some progress in the bill of four shillings per pound upon land, and then put off the consideration of the East India bill, till next Thursday. [Greenwich Hospital News Letters 4, No. 17.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for Daniel Longuet, and John Smith, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Capt. Van Brecht, Roger Van Brecht, his son, John Rogier, and Herman Van Loon and John Vervoort, John Vanden Heuvel, Lawrence De Vries, and Arent Van Someren, four troopers, ditto; for Wessell van Weereas, and Gÿsbert Vischer, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 453]; for William Winckebeck, ditto; for Hubert Arius, ditto; for Casten Hillebrand, ditto; for Mrs. Mary Jane Lorio, and her little son, ditto; for Catherine Maurice, ditto; and for Joseph Gally, ditto. [Ibid., p. 454.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger in ordinary, to search for Adam Hampton, and having found him, to seize him and bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 460.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
The like warrant, to go to Harwich, and receive into custody from the Mayor there, John Du Jardin, Henry Hamles, and John De Vest alien spies, and bring them to be examined. [Ibid., p. 461.]
Dec. 22.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sotherne to Richard Warre. I send you the copy of a letter from Mr. Dickinson at Plymouth, agent from the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded and Exchange of Prisoners, so that you may lay it before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 368.] Enclosing:—
George Dickinson to ——. Mr. Tudor arrived with 228 prisoners yesterday, a list whereof is here enclosed and to the number of 179 I have granted tickets to the men; they were very pleased to be protected. Several of those numbered from 180 to 228 have entered themselves on board the men-of-war here, and there are several of this town who have not yet called for their tickets. The seamen would scarce believe the captain, but with much ado he persuaded them to this port, where a great many complained to me of their hard usage at Nantes, Rochfort, Brest, Toulon, and St. Malo, but those from Dinan were treated very well. The French news is that they are fitting their fleet, which will be ready very early in the spring; there are twenty new frigates building, the latter of which may be launched in March or April, and that there is great discourse of a descent. There are 13 men of-war cruising under command of Count Esmond. No privateers are to go to sea, after the 10th of January, and none to remain at sea after the last of the same month. If the Irish or English under King James' command have not returned then, those English taken under that commission shall be sent to the Isle of Bass in Scotland. About eight weeks since a pretty Scotch vessel arrived at Brest with two gentlemen who immediately went post to King James and some believe the descent is designed in that country, others in the West of England. I should be heartily glad to be rid of the Irish here, for the prison is so weak, that I am daily in fear of their escaping. Ninety-five English prisoners from St. Malo have arrived in the Elizabeth, John Foreman, commander, at Portsmouth. Dated, at the Custom House, Plymouth, 18 December 1692. [H.O. Admiralty, 4, p. 372.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King having received an account from Ireland, that there is a great scarcity of wheat in and about Cork, desires you to direct 1,000 barrels of wheat to be sent from Bristol to Cork on the first opportunity. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 597.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Say and Seale. I have your letter of the 20th concerning Mr. Weely Cale's dispensation, and have spoken to the Archbishop of Canterbury about it; and if any application is made at my office I will take care that nothing shall pass till you have notice. [Ibid., p. 598.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Galway. The King having directed that all officers of the army now in Ireland, who are here in England, should have notice to repair immediately to their respective charges, I desire you will inform yourself, if you can, what officers of the troops in Ireland are now in England, and what licences any of them have to be absent from their commands, and that you will give me an account of the names and licences of such officers, as far as you can learn them. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23. Caveat that nothing pass concerning the office of Clerk of the Crown and Clerk of the Peace in Ireland, Sir John and Sir Maurice Eustace, knights, having a patent of these offices for their lives, till notice be given to Sir John Eustace, knight, to be left at Mr. Price at the Star Tavern, near the Inner Temple Gate. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 73, p. 14.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. There has been a petition offered by Lady Margaret Hope, on behalf of her son, Charles Hope, of Hopetown, representing that they and their predecessors had long enjoyed a freedom of exemption of paying custom for the lead ore exported by them, until lately their possessions were "ranversed; " and that upon application to the Treasury there was a warrant given for superseding the exacting of any custom till our pleasure was known. We now refer the consideration of the whole matter to you, either to ordain the custom to be paid, or to discharge the petitioners, as you shall find just. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 151.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant to Colonel John Hill to "intromit" and dispose of the French ship lying at Comentry [Colonsay ?] on the south side of the Isle of Mull, with her loading. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, desiring them to assist Col. John Hill, governor of the fort at Inverlochy to dispose of the disabled French ship driven on shore in the Isle of Mull. [Ibid., p. 152.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant for a letter of remission of treason to Charles Maitland, late lieutenant of the Bass. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Blank warrants for remission of treason. [Ibid., p. 153—155.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of principal sheriff of Banff and "bounds thereof" to Sir James Ogilvie. [Ibid., p. 156.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Commission for Mr. Alexander Pitcairn, provost of the old college of St. Andrews, to be principal of the new college of St. Andrews, the place being vacant by the death of Mr. William Violent. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of one of the Macers of Council, to Francis Nasmith, the place being vacant by the decease of John Henderson. [Ibid., p. 157.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for John de Later, to go to Harwich and Holland, for Rutger Verreest, ditto; and for Catharina Vriendt, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 455.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant confirming the appointment of Moses Slade, gent., as Town Clerk of Wallingford, in the place of Peter Sayer, gent., deceased. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 462.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Thomas Morton, to go to Harwich, and Holland; for Gerrit Jansen, William Jansen, and Arien Verhorst, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 455]; for Thomas Morris and Henrietta, his wife, ditto; and for Gideon Boyer, ditto. [Ibid., p. 456.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Maris, messenger in ordinary, to deliver to Capt. Cornelius Vander Hoeve, commander of the ship the Signe, of Rotterdam, now in the river, John Francis Tillier, a Swiss prisoner in the said messenger's custody. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 464.]
Dec. 24. Mons. Scheel to the Earl of Nottingham. I send you a memorial for the King concerning the privateer of Flensburg which, as was alleged, carried King James's pass. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 557]. Enclosing: The Memorial referred to. [Ibid., p. 561.]
Dec. 24.
Admiralty Office.
J. Sothern to Richard Warre. I send you the enclosed extract of a letter from Commander Greenhill at Plymouth, giving an account. of some Scotch ships bound from Leith to France; so that you may lay it before the Earl of Nottingham. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 376.] Enclosing:—
Extract of a letter from Commander Greenhill. I am informed by Philip Harwood, late master of the ship Industry of this town, who came from St. Malo in the last Exchange vessel, that whilst he was prisoner on board the privateer which took him, about the middle of November last, thirty leagues to the westward. of Ushant, they met a vessel called the John, of Leith, John Brown, master, laden with coals and lead, bound from Leith to Rochelle having on board twenty passengers, mostly Scotch, said to be the late King James' officers, and the master declared there were two other ships coming after them. He further adds that they met with six French men-of-war near the said station, and understood that three others were cruising in the Bay of Biscay. Dated: Plymouth, 20 December, 1692. [Ibid, p. 380.]
Dec. 25. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. Concerning the ship Golden Mountain, which Sir Paul Ricaut says is supposed to be designed for a French privateer. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 553.]
Dec. 26.
Kensington.
Commission for Major William Dobbins to be captain of the company of which Capt. John Davies was late captain in Sir James Leslie's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 316.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Stephen Duport of the Island of St. Christopher, planter. Shows that, about eleven years since, he settled upon a plantation which he had in right of his wife, on that part of the island possessed by the English; that immediately after their Majesties' accession to the throne, he, being then sickly, embarked for England with two children in the ship called the Nord Sound, Arthur Smith, commander, which, in her way home, was taken, after a sharp fight, in which he was wounded, and his only son of 7 years of age had his leg shot off, and they were all carried to St. Malo; he was forced to appear a new convert, to save his family from ruin, and had afterwards several preferments offered him in the French service. But being a free denizen of England, he resolved to do nothing inconsistent with his duty and loyalty to their Majesties, and refusing all sorts of preferments he came privately into England. And whereas the island was happily retaken from the French, he conceived to have as good a title to his estate there, as any of their Majesties' subjects have to theirs, being a free denizen of England, and his wife and family all English born. Nevertheless, during the time of his affliction in France, all his estates, negroes, "coppers," etc. were seized and disposed of as plunder, to his and his family's utter ruin. He prays for an order to Col. Coddrington to cause whosoever under his command who shall be found possessed of his estate, negroes, "stock-coppers," etc. to restitute the same, or permit him to lay hold of any of the same wheresoever he meets them. Referred to the Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 431.]
Dec. 26.
Bridge Town House, by Stratford-upon-Avon.
W. Biscope to ———. These lines are to convey my devoirs to you, and then to acquaint you that the right and title of Serjeant-at-Arms to the House of Commons is again returned to me by the late death of Serjeant Topham, who was only my deputy for his life, upon terms betwixt us. You may do me great service by discoursing Mr. Speaker, and other of your members, concerning me, minding him and them how much to satisfaction I executed that office for many years, which perhaps he has forgotten, though he was then a member. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 116.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Darell, knt., on behalf of his kinsman John Darell, now in custody at Dover. Shows that the said John Darell having been bred up a protestant till the age of 13, was then enticed by Sir Edward Scott, who had married the said John's mother, about the latter end of King James's reign, and placed the said youth at St. Omer in order to "pervert" him in his principles of religion; but the youth growing sensible of his misfortune made his escape from thence to Dover by way of Calais, and is now in prison for presuming to come without a pass. Prays for his enlargement. Referred to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 432.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King desires you not to stop the subsistence money to the soldiers going to the West Indies, although they are embarked, but direct the payment thereof to be continued to them until their sailing; so that they may provide themselves with fresh victuals, and not consume the provisions on board the ships. Sir Francis Wheeler writes to me, on December 24th, that the bills for the sick and wounded men have not come to him. I desire, therefore, you will despatch them if they have not already gone, and if they are that you will send away duplicates of them for greater security. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 599.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Governor of Sheerness. The Hamburg man-ofwar and foreign merchant ships, lately stopped, being brought into Queensborough Swale and delivered into custody of the Commissioners of Prizes, in order to their trial, the King desires you not to permit the said ships to go out of that harbour until they are legally discharged. [Ibid.]
Dec. 28.
Kensington.
Commissions for William Thomson, esq., to be captain of the company in which Capt. Fitz-Maurice Gifford was late captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Godfrey Lloyd; for the same Fitz-Maurice Gifford, to be captain of the company of grenadiers of which Capt. William Thomson was late captain in Charles, Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 312]; for Charles Cutts, gent., to be cornet of the troop of which Capt. John Fetherstonhaugh is captain, in the regiment of horse, commanded by Col. Charles Godfrey [Ibid., p. 313]; and for Sigismond Stiddolph, gent., to be lieutenant of the same troop. [Ibid., p. 314].
Dec. 28.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of the "chamberlaincy" of Fife, &c. to Sir John Dempster of Pitlover. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 158.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Helena Smits, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Jacob Heym, his wife and five small children, Margaretha Hop, and Maria Smith, ditto; for Nicholas Saumer and Catherine his wife, ditto, [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 456]; and for Boundewyn Samuels, ditto. [Ibid., p. 457.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Young, messenger in ordinary, to search for Mrs. Jones and to seize her, she being charged with treasonable and seditious practices. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 466.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Commissions for Christian William Lichtenberg, esq., to be captain of the company in which Capt. Gordon was late captain in Sir Charles Graham's regiment of foot; for John Simmonds, esq., to be captain of the company in which Capt. Richard Hill, was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Thomas Earle; for Harry Trelawny, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Lawrence Clayton was late captain in the Queen's regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Henry Trelawny; for William Gore, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Charles Armstrong, in Col. Zachary Tiffin's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 313]; and for Thomas Worchester, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Parsons' company in Col. Edward Lloyd's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 314.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to Col. Godfrey Lloyd stating that Capt. Pilkington, formerly a captain in his regiment, having resigned his commission, Capt. Thomas Garth was appointed in his place by Col. Christopher Codrington captain-general and governor-in-chief of the Leeward Caribee Islands; and that on 29th October last, the King appointed Capt. James Norton as captain of that company. His Majesty now directs that the said Capt. Garth shall have the first company void in that regiment. [Ibid.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Col. Godfrey Lloyd. The Duke of Bolton having signified his consent to the exchange which Capt. Thompson and Capt. Gifford, two captains in his and your regiments, have desired to make, the King has been pleased to sign their commissions upon this assurance, that you have been made acquainted with this exchange, and likewise consent to it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 600.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate there, to confer the degree of Doctor of Divinity upon John Wickart, M.A., one of the chaplains in ordinary. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 134.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The like to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a grant of restitution of temporalities, to Edward, Bishop of St. Asaph, to commence from the date of the translation of William, the late Bishop, now Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. [Ibid., p. 135.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for Thomas Berk, Lord Dursley's coachman, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Capt. Thomson and Capt. Gifford, to go to Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 457.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. The King has appointed Mr. Donnclan and Mr. Pakenham to be his serjeants. I have not the original letter of Alderman Bull, but I have sent to the Admiralty for it, and will send it as soon as I receive it. The King has not given any directions touching the Lord Chancellor and the Solicitor-General, but I will remind him again of their just pretensions. I shall speak to Lord Galway touching the terms the Irish may expect in the Venetian service and you shall be informed thereof and of what further the King will do in that affair. The King would not have you proceed in the matter of abjuration but thinks it better to take the same measures in Ireland as will be speedily endeavoured, as I believe, here. He approves your proceedings in carrying suspected persons to be secured and would have strict inquiry made of any of the late King's officers who are, or shall be seized, be they such as went to France before, or upon, the surrender of Limerick; for the King would have them prosecuted, and they should be distinguished from those who remained in Ireland and submitted.
I am infinitely obliged to your Excellency for the concern you express for me. I confess it is very uneasy to me, after all the labour I have, with no little zeal, undergone, to be charged with faults, especially of infidelity, and it is yet more uneasy to have the faults of others, and not my own, imputed to me, and this by one who has owned me for his friend, and, I thought had been mine too. I will not trouble you with many aggravating circumstances of his proceedings towards me; but it will be sufficient to justify mine to assure you that he began. And if I have endeavoured to expose his actions, by truly stating them, I hope I am not to be blamed. The provocation I received, and my own defence, will excuse me, and I believe it is now pretty evident that the miscarriages are not to be charged on me, and that I have acted, in my post, as a true servant of their Majesties. And as I have been very happy in having you a witness of many of my actions, so I am very proud that you so generously wish for opportunity to be my advocate too. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 443.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Leave granted to Thomas Crispe, high sheriff of Oxfordshire, to reside out of the said county; for William Johnson, esq. high sheriff of Rutlandshire, ditto; for James Cheetham, esq., high sheriff of Derbyshire, ditto; for Thomas Ravenscroft, esq., high sheriff of Flintshire, ditto; for Sir Richard Cox, bart., high sheriff of Gloucestershire, ditto; for Samuel Swift, esq., high sheriff of Worcestershire, ditto, for William Joliffe, esq., high sheriff of Stafford, ditto; for Ambrose Pudsay, esq., high sheriff of York, ditto; and for Thomas Jones, esq., high sheriff of Monmouth, ditto. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 44.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Young, messenger in ordinary, to apprehend Mrs. Cook, for treasonable and seditious practices. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 466.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The like warrant, to apprehend Mrs. Mary Wood. [Ibid.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to Sir John Trevor, Speaker of the House of Commons, of the office of Master or Keeper of the Rolls and Records in Chancery, and the custody of the Hospital or House of Converts, situate in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the West, in Chancery Lane, anciently annexed to that office as a dwelling for the Master of the Rolls. [Ibid., p. 467.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant of the office of Clerk of the Faculties, and Dispensations in Chancery, to George Jenkins, gent., in succession to John Spencer, esq. [Ibid.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to John Reepe, junior, of the benefit of his new invention of an engine for making or twisting whips. [Ibid., p. 468.]
Dec. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to John Green, of the sole use of his invention for converting stone and chalk into lime. [Ibid., p. 469.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant approving the appointment of Ralph Banks, gent., as Town Clerk of the borough of Wigan, in Lancashire. [Ibid p. 474.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir Charles Hedges. I send herewith the names of certain Swedish ships, which the Swedish Envoy tells me are going, in ballast, to France, there to lade goods and return with them directly to Sweden. He has therefore desired a pass to secure them from our privateers. I desire you will let me know whether anything is depending before you relating to any of these ships, or whether you know anything concerning them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 600.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Passes for Herman Maartins and Gouert Matthys, to go to Harwich and Holland, and for Martha Gambis, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 457.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Commissions for —— Robert, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Henry Gilman in George, Prince of Hesse's regiment of foot; for Thomas Beverley, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Aspin's company in Charles, Duke of Bolton's regiment of foot; for Lancelot Allgood to be ensign in the Duke of Bolton's company in his regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 315]; for Obadiah Moore, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. William Harmer, in Charles, Earl of Monmouth's regiment of foot; for Roland De La Boulaye, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Thomas Brent in the same regiment; for Charles William, esq., to be brigadier, and eldest lieutenant of the three troops of horse guards, commanded by Richard, Viscount Colchester; for John Wood, gent., to be sub-brigadier and eldest cornet of the same troops [Ibid., p. 319]; for Daniel De Belcastel, esq., to be captain of the company in which Captain James De Blanzac was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Peter De Belcastel; for Jacob Braems, esq., to be captain of the company of grenadiers, of which Major Roger Elliot was late captain in John, Earl of Bath's regiment of foot; for James Granville, esq., to be captain-lieutenant of the said Earl's company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 320]; for James Allen, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Isaac Guoyquet St. Eloy in the said regiment; for Robert Ayres, gent., to be adjutant in the same; and for William Thorold, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Matthew De Vaux in Col. John Tidcombe's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 321.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, ordering the adjournment of Parliament from the 17th of January to the 10th of February next following. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 159.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Same to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, ordering payment to Capt. William Mackay of the money laid out by direction of the late Captain William Mackay, for fortifying the castle of Ruthven in Badenoch, and requiring them to deliver Col. Æneas Mackay and Col. Macdougal the receipts given by them for meal and provisions supplied to Lieut.-Gen. Mackay's regiment when working upon the fortifications at Fort William. [Ibid., p. 160.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to Colonel John Hill, governor of Fort William to place a garrison in Castle Tirrim, the house sometime belonging to the captain of Clan Ronold. [Ibid.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
The like for a ratification and a gift of the office of commissary of Caithness in favour of Mr. John Campbell vacant by the death of Mr. William Sinclair. [Ibid., p. 161.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Commissions for John Heigham to be ensign of Lieut-Col. Lumisden's independent company of foot in Scotland, whereof he is captain; for John Murray to be adjutant of the regiment of dragoons, whereof William, Lord Jedburgh is colonel [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 162]; for Duncan Buchannan to be adjutant of Col. John Hill's regiment of foot, in garrison at Fort William; for — Fergusson to be lieutenant of a company in the regiment of foot, whereof Col. John Buchan is colonel [Ibid., p. 163]; for Patrick Robertson to be cornet of Capt. Bennet's troop in the royal regiment of dragoons, whereof Sir Thomas Levingston is colonel; for Francis Forbes to be ensign of the company, whereof Col. John Buchan is colonel [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 164]; for James Mortoun to be surgeon of the regiment of foot in garrison at Fort William; and for George Calddeugh to be one of the master-gunners of the train of artillery, whereof John Slezer is captain. [Ibid., p. 166.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Corneliss, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. William Sasseghem, ditto; and for Anne Malart, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 458.]
December. Abstract of the muster taken of their Majesties' forces in England. Giving the number of the Dutch forces in the country, and also those forces which had been shipped to the West Indies. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 150.]
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Begs the King to consent to that which Brigadier Hubert [Herbert ?] asked the writer to recommend. [Ibid., No. 151.]
Extracts from the letters of Lord Melville:—The claims of the Earl of Breadalbane are larger than they were last year. The Earl believes it will be as difficult to come to terms with the rebels, as to obtain an interview with their various chiefs; also Colonel Hill desires to serve the King. Count Menard [Meinhard de Schomberg] would be the right person to serve in Scotland, Mackay being despised by his enemies and little esteemed by his friends.—April 3.
Mackay is to be blamed for allowing so many abuses to arise. The troops are in great necessity. The country runs the risk of being lost if the King does not hazard something. Begs that money may be sent. The King's great forbearance makes his friends lose courage, and makes them believe, that he does not dare to punish even the most insolent. Suggestions as to filling military vacancies. The Presbyterians must be treated with consideration, granting to them that which will conduce to their safety, and refusing that which would increase their ills. Has prolonged the time to Breadalbane. Has not great confidence in him. His interests are different to those of Argyll and Atholl. Suggests the fleet cruising between Scotland and Ireland.—April 11.
Mackay finds himself in a state worthy of pity, and complains he has received no reply either from the King or Lord Portland. Speaks of the great confusion of the kingdom and of the extremities which the malcontents have already come to, begging the King to pass through Scotland, making it a road to Ireland.—April 14.
Has adjourned Parliament until the 22nd of this month, before which time he expects the reply of the King to the two last packets he has sent him. Asks the King to order Mackay to take counsel with him (Melville) as to the affairs of the kingdom. Breadalbane has returned; he makes the most of the affairs of the Highlanders; blames Mackay's conduct. The friends of the King are troubled at the King's voyage to Ireland, and his enemies fear that he will not be able to go there. Believes the King ought to order Mackay immediately to seize the horses which belong to suspected persons, but this question could not very well be discussed in Council for fear that a rumour of it should escape before the time.—April 15. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 152.]
Pass for Matthew De la Bussiere, Peter Bailly, Joseph Drags Anthony Carriere, Peter Rosee, Austin Terose, Yambish Carmaind, Peter Petit, Isaac Voluck, and Nicholas Favour, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 358.]
Appointment of John Wickart, S.T.P., one of the royal chaplains, as Dean of Winchester. Copy. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4. No. 117.]
El. Churchill to Sir John Trenchard, asking, in consideration of 500l. in the Exchequer, and nearly 200l. due upon Navy Bills, for a pension for her life, which cannot last much longer, as she is now 70 odd years of age, and "a miserable poor widow without anything to subsist on." [Ibid., No. 118.]
"The case of the troopers of Lord Galway's regiment of horse, all refugees, against Mr. Moreau, the agent, and their respective captains, humbly presented to the knights, citizens, and burgesses of the House of Commons assembled in Parliament." Printed. [Ibid., No. 119.]
"Reasons humbly offered against the continuation of a general liberty for exporting the woollen manufactures of England by foreigners, with the privileges of the Merchants Adventurers of England." Printed. [Ibid., No. 120.]
"A true account of the horrid conspiracy against the life of William III." Printed. [Ibid., No. 121.]
The case of John Powell and other free burgesses and inhabitants of the town of Lancaster who desired incorporation for the different trades of the town; a bill of incorporation as desired had been obtained, but Mr. John Foster, mayor under the new charter, had obtained a caveat in respect of it. [Ibid., No. 122.]
Pencil memoranda, illegible. [Ibid., No. 123.]
Rough memoranda endorsed " the Supply, 1693, as demanded as granted." [Ibid., No. 124.]
Petition to Parliament by Robert Maynwaring, Robert Levingston, Daniel Donn, Edward Errington, and Gilbert Wye, five of the poor, or alms, knights of Windsor. Shows that they, at the instance of Sir Peter Le Maire, and Sir Francis Craine, were, by a chapter held the 14th of January, 1660, annexed to the foundation of the poor knights of Windsor. The said Sir Peter Le Maire and Sir Francis Craine, by deed enrolled, dated the 28th of March, 1661, and since confirmed, by their assigns, granted 230l. per annum, without deductions, out of the manor of Carbrooke in the county of Norfolk to be paid, by half yearly payments, to the hands of the Chancellor of the noble Order of the Garter, to be distributed by him to the petitioners' predecessors and their successors, five of the said poor knights, for ever. They duly received the said 230l. until the beginning of the year 1692, since which time Sir Robert Clayton, who is in possession of the said manor, has detained from them 58l. 15s., and being a member "of this honourable house" insists upon his privilege against any remedy being taken by the petitioners for the same. They therefore pray that the House will be pleased to take the premises into consideration and make such order therein as shall seem best. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 125.]
[The King] to the Archbishops of Canterbury and York. We doubt not you wish well for the spread of Christianity in Virginia by erecting churches and schools within the colony; wherefore we authorise you to write to the bishops of the several dioceses within your provinces, directing them to give order to the ministers and other zealous men of their dioceses, by their examples in contribution, and by exhortation to others, to move our people within their several charges to contribute to so good a work in as liberal a manner as they may. These collections are to be made in each parish on four several occasions within the next two years. [Ibid., No. 126.]
Memorandum on naval matters. [Ibid., No. 127.]
Memoranda, probably for a speech upon the Estimates in the House of Commons. [Ibid., No. 128.]
Thomas Bedford to the Earl of Nottingham. I herewith return you the two papers which you sent me, and am well assured that no appeal has been prosecuted about the ship St. Michael therein mentioned. Having spoken with the proctor, for the claimers, I understand she is released and gone upon her voyage. Seal of Arms. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 417.]
Names of Dutch Ships of War lying before Portsmouth, with the names of their captains, and the numbers of their guns and men. [Ibid. 5, p. 98.]
The Princess Sophia to the King. Thanks him for the kindness expressed in his last letter which has greatly moved her. Though attached to him and the good cause she yet sympathises with the unfortunate, and owes civility to King James. But her conscience is so tender on this point that she has always shown her correspondence [with King James ?] to the "Chevalier Colt." She sees with pleasure her eldest son at the head of 8,000 men on King William's side, and she sends another son as a token of her attachment. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 1.]
The same to the same. Takes the opportunity of assuring him of her attachment by the "Chevalier Colt"; testifies to Colt's high character. [Ibid., No. 2.]
Memorandum in the handwriting of Viscount Sydney. "This was the list of persons I first proposed to be secured; to-day I desired upon good reasons, that the Earl of Salisbury, the Earl of Yarmouth, and Middleton, might be added to the number:— Lord Peterborough, Lord Ailesbury, Lord Huntingdon, Lord Lichfield, Lord Scarsdale, Sir Theo. Oglethorpe, Sir John Fenwick, Col. Sackville, Col. Oorpe (sic), Major Knevitt Hastings, Col. Slingsby, Col. David Lloyd, Col. James Graham, Mr. Adderley, Lord Brudenell, Lord Dunmore, Sir Andrew Foster, Sir John Talbot, my Lord Griffin and his son, Bernard Howard, Lord Forbes, Lord Newburgh, my Lord Fanshaw, Mr. St. George, Mr. Fergusson." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 3.]
Memorandum signed by Mons. Schuylenburg, of bills of exchange signed at a meeting of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. [Ibid., No. 4]
Memorandum. As the King intends to pay the expenses of those refugees from Switzerland who are going to Ireland, it would be well if he asked the States General to appoint a general collector, who would take in hand the accounts, and otherwise regulate them. It is hoped that a great number of the refugees may be sent to Ireland. It is, therefore, very necessary that as little as possible of the money set aside by the King to establish these families in Ireland, be used for the purpose of travelling; otherwise the number of families to be established there will be greatly reduced, and the condition of those left behind will be worthy of pity. [Ibid., No. 5.]
" A list of divers offices and salaries, granted during life or good behaviour." [Ibid., No. 6.]
Memorandum for the King from the Earl of Mulgrave. 1. That the King may be pleased to appoint a select number of Lords and Commons, as he did for several years during his absence, only with this difference, that instead of being called a Cabinet Council, they must have a commission, to be lieutenants or regents with such limited powers as the King thinks fit.
2. The King may be pleased also to order a certain number of Privy Councillors to be a standing committee for the plantations, and of such as are likely to attend to it, and that it should meet two evenings in a week, on fixed days, and not according to the leisure or humour of a President of the Council.
3. The King may also settle a committee for Ireland, to sit once a fortnight, but neither of these committees will signify anything, unless you tell them solemnly at your going to Flanders, that you expect exact attendance at those committees, and that you have ordered the clerks to write in a book the names of those who shall fail, any day, to come.
4. You will please to observe I do not propose your commanding any strict attendance at council; because, indeed, it is so numerous as that makes it unnecessary to exact it, especially considering how many of it are as well absent as present, that being, ever since Charles I's. time, made rather a place of honour than of use; besides that many there will think it a hardship to be kept out of the country in summer, and some will be unwilling to be debarred their pleasures here.
5. If Mr. Povy (?) give a constant weekly account to Mr. Blathwayt of all that passes at the Committee of Plantations in your absence, it may be seen by you. But, however, it will be some kind of obligation on that Committee, to look after their business.
6. If you will oblige the Admiralty to sit every day both morning and afternoon, though but two at a time by turns, I hope it may turn to some account, though the number and method there makes such a difficulty as to secrecy, that I despair of a remedy unless, on great occasions of secrecy, they might draw lots to be a Quorum of three, as is at Venice sometimes.
7. If fixed days are necessary for the Committees, they are much more so for the Regents; only I propose all meetings of Council, when you are absent, to be in the morning, for a reason I need not give you, and I propose also to have them as early as men can be persuaded to rise; else I have ever seen dinner time above all considerations with infirm persons, who are apt to be faint and weary, and with the healthy also, who are extremely sharp set upon those occasions.
8. You will be pleased to observe that I propose a select number for all Committees instead of all the Council, as it is now; because now everybody's business is nobody's, whereas the other way, such will be charged with it, who are most capable of attending and understanding it.
9. It should be also better taken care of, what should be read at Council, and what is improper, and the matters brought thither should first be a little examined by the Lord President, or else it will be in the power, not only of any Councillor, but the Clerks, to call for petitions not fit to be read, as I have often observed last summer, as well as the indecent disorder there, inconsistent with the doing of business in so solemn a place.
10 Many indecencies also, and irregularities relating to clerks, doorkeepers, etc., are below your care but not the Lord President's. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 7.]
Abstract of the four establishments (the Dutch forces in England, the English forces remaining in England, the English forces sent into Holland, and the forces designed for Ireland) delivered to the House of Commons. [Ibid., No. 8.]
Estimate of the yearly expenses of the Royal Household. Among the items are the household as in the reign of Charles II., 107,000l.; works and buildings, 25,000l.; Secret service, 40,000l.; the Queen Consort, 50,000l.; the Queen Dowager, 18,000l.; the Prince and Princess of Denmark, 50,000l. The whole charge amounts to 555,217l. 16s. 0d. [Ibid., No. 9.]
Memorandum on the petition of Lord Montgomery to be tenant of the manor of Hendon in the county of Middlesex, at a rent of 700l. per annum. Reasons against: 1. The manor is betwixt 1,000l. and 1,100l. per annum, over and above the 100l. per annum granted to the vicar. 2. The rents are constantly and duly paid. 3. The leases of most of the tenants of the demesnes expired at Michaelmas last, and when the leases are renewed from the Crown, at 21 years, the fines will amount to a considerable sum, reserving the same rents now answered to the Crown.
The following reasons are given against Lord Montgomery being admitted a tenant to Hendon at any rent or under any terms whatsoever. 1. The tenants were the only witnesses upon which the recovery was had for His Majesty, and have shown great zeal for his interest, and consequently thereby highly provoked Lord Montgomery and all that party, and they will be utterly ruined if ever they should come under his power. 2. His Majesty's title to the late Marquis of Powis's estate in Wales, of nearly 5,000l. per annum, and to the manors of Oundle and Biggin in Northamptonshire, of about 1,000l. per annum more, is now to be tried, and the witnesses for His Majesty are only the tenants; and in case the Hendon tenants be delivered up to Lord Montgomery, these Welsh, Oundle, and Biggin tenants will never give evidence for His Majesty. It would be an act of the greatest severity to make use of the tenants as witnesses against their own landlords, and then deliver them into their hands " to be tyrannised over and destroyed." 3. The Crown will, in consequence, hereby lose nearly 6,000l. per annum in Wales and Northamptonshire of the late Marquis of Powis's estate. 4. Should the Manor of Hendon be given to Lord Montgomery, the tenants, when their leases expire, would be turned out and they and their families ruined, as a reward for their loyalty to the King. 5. Hendon being within seven miles of London and the tenants being many hundreds, it will be well to keep them, as they are now, dependent on the Crown. The case would be altered if Lord Montgomery came into possession; this point also affects the tenants in Wales and Northamptonshire who are several thousands, and are at present zealous in the King's service. 6. One Mr. Hubert [Herbert ?], a late steward and principal agent of the late Marquis of Powis, a violent opposer of His Majesty's title and interest to the Manor of Hendon, lately informed the tenants at Hendon, whose leases had just expired, that they shall have no further terms. 7. Nor can the Crown ever expect to prevail in any suit upon any forfeitures if Lord Montgomery obtain this lease; and there are several estates of other persons found by inquisition to be forfeited, on trial, of which the tenants are the most material witnesses for His Majesty. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 10.]
A particular of what money the Earl of Marlborough desires may be forthwith paid to seven regiments, upon account, to enable them to raise recruits for their Majesties' service in Flanders. The total sum:—1,858l. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Disposition of all their Majesties' land forces, in Flanders, England, Scotland, Ireland, and the West Indies. [Ibid., No. 12.]
List of regiments now in English pay, making, in all, a total of 64,774 men. [Ibid., No. 13.]
A computation of the monthly and yearly charges of 4,000 Swiss in their Majesties' service—Monthly, 31,306 crowns; and yearly, 375, 683 crowns; these sums include a pension of 2,000 crowns a month allowed to the Protestant Cantons. [Ibid., No. 14.]
Note of the numbers and charge of his Majesty's land forces, consisting of horse, foot, and dragoon regiments, according to the four establishments:—
Total Number, exclusive of General Officers. Total Charges, including pay of General Officers and Contingencies.
£ s. d.
The English Forces in England 11,388 369, 268 15 0
The Dutch Forces in England 14,788 446,109 3 0
The English Forces in Holland 9,970 252,510 3 4
The Forces in Ireland 36,520 1,258,251 1 0
[S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 15.]
List of regiments of Colchester, Leinster, Godfrey, and FitzHarding. [Ibid. 13, No. 16.]
Memorandum in the Earl of Portland's handwriting as to the number of British battalions in England, Scotland, Ireland, and Flanders. [Ibid., No. 17.]
A proposal for additional pay for the King's first regiment of English foot guards, which pay will amount altogether to 5,986l. a year. [Ibid., No. 18.]
Wrapper marked as containing list of troops, &c. [Ibid., No. 19.]
Estimated cost of 6 first rate ships; 10 second rates; 41 third rates; 40 fourth rates; and 32 fifth rates. The number of men required for them is given, as are particulars of hospital ships, yachts, &c. [Ibid., No. 20.]
A list of the ships, and the number of men and guns belonging to each, in his Majesty's fleet, both at home and abroad. The numbers are:—
1st rates 9
2nd " 11
3rd " 39
4th " 40
5th " 9
Fireships 19
6th rates 6
Bomb vessels 3
Ketches 3
Hoys 6
Smacks 4
Yachts 14
Hulks 10
173
On a sheet of paper enclosed, the names of vessels in the Irish Seas are given. [Ibid., No. 21.]
A list of their Majesties' ships designed for the Groyne and the Straits. Some to join Vice-Admiral Killigrew's squadron at Cadiz, and to keep in a body with the other ships; some to go to the Groyne with Admiral Russell. Three, with 7 Dutch men-of-war and 1 Dutch fireship, to attend the motions of the French; 6 Straits' convoys to go to and from various specified places. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 22.]
A project for the winter guard of English and Dutch ships in the following places:—
English Ships. Dutch Ships.
Mediterranean 15 15
Channel or Home Squadron 25 9
West Indies 10
Irish Squadron 6
North Convoys 4
Total 60 24
[Ibid., No. 23.]
Memorandum of the ships in the Irish Seas and going thither; one of the headings is "ships under Lord Torrington "; and a list of convoys when and where last heard of. [Ibid., No. 24.]
Names of the ships of the Admiralty in Zealand. [Ibid., No. 25.]
List of the ships of war composing the fleet under the command of Admiral Almonde, which is united with that of the King of Great Britain. [Ibid., No. 26.]
Particulars as to ships to be furnished by the Admiralties of Holland, Zealand, and West Friesland to the combined fleet in the year 1692. [Ibid., No. 27.]
List of ships forming the three lines of battle of the combined fleet, viz., the Netherlands' squadron, the squadron of the Red Flag, and the squadron of the Blue Flag. The names of the British ships forming the two last lines, with the numbers of their guns, are given. [Ibid., No. 28.]
Fragment of a proclamation from the King concerning the submission of the rebels in Scotland.
We do by these command and authorize George, Viscount of Tarbat, to treat with the Highlanders who are in rebellion against us in Scotland, viz., with Sir Donald Macdonald, Maclean, the Captain of Glankaanell, Glengary, Lochiel, Mr. Colin Mackenzie, uncle to the Earl of Seaforth, and other their associates and dependents and followers, for bringing them in to submit to our Royal authority and laws, and secure their obedience to us, and for that end to treat and commune with them, either by word or writ by himself or such others as he shall judge fit to employ, and we not only authorize and empower the said Viscount so to do, but we by these secure him and those employed by him, from all danger, hurt, and inconvenience whatsoever, that he may incur by treating or communing with those rebels or any of them, whether they be forfaulters, outlawed, or declared fugitives. And for encouraging those Highlanders to return to their duty we do hereby empower the said Viscount to offer in our name, such honor, under that of Earl, and such sums of money, not exceeding 2,000l. sterling to any one chief and tribe of those above mentioned, and also to secure them in all that they possess by law, or were secured in by gifts from our royal uncle King Charles under his Great Seal of Scotland, and so indemnify them and every one of them, who shall come in and submit to us and our laws in manner aforesaid, against all accusations, punishments, and dangers for all crimes and deeds committed by them, preceding their submission. And we promise to perform what the said Viscount shall undertake in our name in these matters, according to what is above said. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 29.]
Memorandum for the King, as to the strength of the army in Scotland; giving the names of officers, cost of maintenance, location, &c. [Ibid., No. 30.]
List of the King's forces in Scotland paid out of England. [Ibid., No. 31.]
Proposal of Mr. Elnathan Lumm: " I will advance to your Lordships, on the quit rents of Ireland, the sum of 30,000l., to be paid in Ireland, as soon as this agreement is signed, and to be secured on the quit rents of Ireland, and to be repaid in twelve or eighteen months as your Lordships please, with Irish interest to be paid quarterly at ten per cent."
Lumm desires to be sub-treasurer to Lord Coningsby, and to receive and pay " all the monies as his Lordship doth," and not to be removed till the above said money be repaid with interest. His salary to be 600l. per annum; the clerks and tellers to be paid by his Majesty as now.
He stipulates that he be made one of his Majesty's Commissioners of his Revenue in Ireland during his pleasure.
Remarks on his proposal.—" The advantage his Majesty will receive by this proposal, is as follows:—Mr. Elnathan Lumm, having these places, will have the receiving and paying his Majesty's revenue in Ireland, which will give a credit to the bank he and others have set up there, which cannot be done without having these places and by which his Majesty will save 1,500l. per annum, which must be paid with gratuity, unless the proposer have the places above mentioned, or that the money had only been paid on the quit rents; besides this, his Majesty has an advantage by this proposal, for the party that lends this money is concerned with the bankers in England, and he having those places to give credit to the bank set up in Dublin, they will be able, at all times, to lend further sums of money for the use of that kingdom; and as for the advantage of a bank being set up in that kingdom, it may be plainly seen by the advantage his Majesty hath had by the bankers in England, and particularly by the parties concerned in this proposal, to whom his Majesty oweth a great sum of money at this time. And, with submission, although the Parliament gives money, yet without the bankers lending money on the funds, his Majesty's affairs will meet with great disappointments; besides, his Majesty will save, by the advancing the 30,000l. proposed, above 1,500l. per annum in interest, for his Majesty having it at Irish interest, it is but in proportion to English interest, at 6 per cent., and the proposers being able to make 15 per cent. and more in England, is more than 20 per cent. in Ireland, which the proposers can make in the exchange of money betwixt England and Ireland."
" Besides, there is none in England that will lend money on land in Ireland at 10 per cent., if they can have it on land in England at 6 per cent; so that the proposers will be no gainers by the advancing of this great sum of money, because his Majesty hath it at the same rate it goes at in England on land security, unless, according to this proposal, they have the hopes of a future advantage, by receiving and paying the revenue of that kingdom.
" Besides, the parties who advance this money trust their correspondence in Ireland, and likewise take the quit rents, instead of a fund, by Act of Parliament; by the last, they can receive their money on the tallies when they please, by discounting them with others; and by the other security they are obliged to wait until the time be expired for which it is lent, let their occasions be ever so urgent; and it is a great advantage to those persons that are dealers in money to be able to command their money when they please. " [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 32.]
Remarks, apparently in the handwriting of Count de Solms, on military matters. Suggests methods for recruiting the foreign regiments to be employed in Ireland. The English regiments are in a poor condition. Suggestions for recruiting these and the Scotch regiments; the latter are strong men and better able to stand fatigue than the English. Remarks on English officers and their men; Trelawny's regiment is without order or discipline; Beaumont is a bad colonel; his regiment was good last year, but in this campaign one of the worst; Stuart is worth more than Trelawny, but his regiment is good for nothing; Gustavus Hamilton is not a good officer and his regiment is " mediocre"; Lisburn takes little care of his regiment; Cutts is a good officer, and his regiment, though also "mediocre," is better than any of the others. Remarks follow on Dering's, St. George's, and other regiments. Suggestions are offered for improvement. This, like several of the following papers, seem to belong to the outset of the campaign in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 33.]
Report by Count de Solms on the artillery in Ireland. The defectiveness of the equipment was very observable during the last campaign in Ireland. Those skilled in the management of horses should be provided. For certain duties Germans are preferable, as the English soon get fatigued.
Oxen are far better than horses for use in Ireland; they are much more useful, and cheaper, not requiring so much, or so good, food or harness; and yet are as strong, if not stronger, for drawing the artillery. Men to attend them can easily be found in Ireland, as they do not require such careful grooming. A few horses will be required for certain kinds of work, which can be procured in the country. Touches on other matters connected with the artillery, ammunition, &c. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 34.]
An account of shoes and stockings lately sent to Ireland: 28,740 pairs of shoes, and 31,586 pairs of stockings; also an account of oats lately sent to, and provided in, Ireland. [Ibid., No. 35.]
Memorandum giving details of the winter quarters of the army in Ireland. [Ibid., No. 36.]
List and numbers of the forces in Ireland, according to the establishment, on the horse, dragoon and foot regiments; there are in all 2,556 commissioned officers, 4,408 non-commissioned officers, 3,311 "servants," and 31,880 effective soldiers; total, 42,155. [Ibid., No. 37.]
Winter quarters of the troops now in Ireland. The artillery to be at Belfast, where four of Hamilton's companies will guard it. The general quarter is to be at Lisburn, where there will be, for guard, the regiment of Meath, which is still the strongest and best ordered of all the English. [Ibid., No. 38.]
Memorandum as to winter quarters of the troops in Ireland. Directions as to manner of quartering, &c. [Ibid., No. 39.]
Regiments in Ireland. Under Kirke and Lanier, in the counties of Longford, West Meath, East Meath, King's County, Queen's County, and Louth, there are 10 infantry and 14 cavalry regiments. Under Douglas and Wolseley, in the counties of Donegal, Fermanagh, Monaghan and Cavan, there are 10 infantry and 12 cavalry regiments. Under Ginckel, Scravenmoer and Nassau, in the counties of Tipperary, Kilkenny, Kildare, Carlow (?), and Wicklow, there are 9 infantry and 13 cavalry regiments. Under the Duke of Wurtemberg, Tettau, and La Forest, there are 8 infantry and 11 cavalry regiments in the counties of Tipperary, Waterford, Wexford, and Cork. There are two companies of body guard in Ulster, Lurgan, Portadown, and Rossmore. [Ibid., No. 40.]
The Earl of Galway to the King. When I took leave of you, you assured me of your goodwill, and you have told me several times, even before I entered your service, that you wished to do me a kindness, and would recompense me for what I lost in France by giving me something to the value of 25,000l. sterling. I asked you for the estate [le bien] of Lord Tyrconnel, which amounted to nearly that sum, but I have learnt here that a person whose services merit recompense has already asked, or has the design to ask you, to give it to him. If you have already resolved to give it to another, I beg you to give me that of Sir Patrick Trant. I have taken the liberty of sending details to you in the enclosed memorandum. It shows you what it was worth in the better times, and what, perhaps, it will again be worth; but it would be better to take it at its present value. If you have absolutely resolved not to give any more lands in Ireland, I pray you grant that I may be keeper of it. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 41.]
Annual value of the lands purchased by Sir Patrick Trent [Trant ?]. From Lord Arlington and Lord Digby, in King's County and Queen's County; from Sir John Eustace, in Kildare; and from Lord Herbert of Cherbury, Captain Fitzmorris, &c., in Kerry. [Ibid., No. 42.]
Count de Solms to the King. Plans made by the engineer Vlengels. The Prince of Waldeck has informed me of the number of Spaniards in Ostend and Nieuport, and of the number yet to come, so that measures may be taken for sending the necessary troops from England. Remarks on the probable condition of the Spanish troops; some have remained in Ostend for fifteen days without finding lodgment. There are many sick and wounded at Ath, Oudenarde, and Charleroi, and there are many desertions. Describes the wretched sleeping accommodation for the troops. The towns are over-billeted, and complaints are general. The behaviour of the Marquis of Castanaga contributes much to this state of affairs; he behaves as though he wished to see the country lost, and owing to the passports he gives to the officers and French merchants, there are many spies. Mons. de Dickvelt has remonstrated with him, but he will not desist. The soldiers lack firing, and some have been sent out to cut wood, or they would have perished from the cold. The enemy is very quiet, but puts various small towns in a condition of defence. Refers to the lack of money for waggons and other necessaries for various regiments. [Ibid., No. 43.]
Memorandum of the Prince of Vaudemont, with the remarks thereon by the Prince of Waldeck, as to the defence of Brussels. The Prince has heard rumours as to the movements of the enemy towards Brussels, and that the French King is leaving Paris in order to advance towards that town. He therefore makes various suggestions as to the line of conduct to be pursued by the allied army. [Ibid., No. 44.]
Names of those in command at the Castle of Namur, and the towns of Namur and Dinant. [Ibid., No. 45.]
Report from the general officers to the King as to the siege of Dunkirk. [Ibid., No. 46.]
Conditions under which the King of Denmark will support the Allies. The King of Denmark wishes to make a closer alliance, and has done so for the last two years. He has frequently spoken on the subject to the late Mons. d'Amerongen and to Mr. Molesworth, who always assured him that they had no orders on the subject from their masters. The King of Denmark has now, however, received a demand from Mr. Molesworth to provide 5,000 men. The transport of the 7,000 men to Ireland cost him a great deal, and if any more be sent he must have an equivalent. States what he is willing to provide, and under what conditions. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 47.]
The Marquis of Castelmoneayo to the King. As it is uncertain when the King will be going to the Hague, the writer requests orders on some important matters. [Ibid., No. 48.]
The Duke of Leinster to the King. Works undertaken at Bruges. Rumours with regard to the movements of the army of the enemy; hopes soon to ascertain whether these are correct. [Ibid., No. 49.]
List of the officers and soldiers killed and wounded during the siege of Namur. [Ibid., No. 50.]
Memorandum of what is required for the magazine of Charleroi. [Ibid., No. 51.]
Memorandum of what is required for the magazine of Ath. [Ibid., No. 52.]
Memorandum of what is required to resist a siege at Oudenarde. [Ibid., No. 53.]
Memorandum of what is required for Namur. [Ibid., No. 54.]
Memoranda as to the strength of the army of the King of France under the Duke of Luxemburg. [Ibid., No. 55.]
Additional memoranda on the same subject. [Ibid., No. 56.]
Memoranda concerning the articles of the treaties made between the King of Spain and the Elector of Brandenburg. [Ibid., No. 57.]
Report on the arrangements necessary for the troops at Brussels and other places; and the defence, &c., of Brussels. [Ibid., No. 58.]
Details of arrangements to be made for besieging D. [Dunkirk]; it should be attacked by both a land and sea force. [Ibid., No. 59.]
Project for entering France by way of Dauphiné 8,000 men should do this in three divisions. [Ibid., No. 60.]
Letter, unsigned, as to the attitude of Sweden towards the peace. Copy. [Ibid., No. 61.]
Affairs in Switzerland; the partisans of France increase. Remarks on the peace with the Duke of Savoy. [Ibid., No. 62.]
Memorandum as to points to be considered in prosecuting the war in Italy. [Ibid., No. 63.]
Memoranda, apparently drawn up by some one in the French service, on the state of affairs on the continent. In Holland people grumble at King William for continuing the war. The Bishop of Munster is still undecided. The Duke of Luxemburg's plans, &c. [Ibid., No. 64.]
Memoranda on military matters, chiefly relating to the forces of Brandenburg. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 65.]
List of the troops of the King of Denmark and Norway, destined for England. The chief commander of these troops is the Duke of Wurtemburg; other commanders are the Marquis de la Forest and Mons. de Tettau. In all 6,706 men. Though placed with papers for 1692, it seems that this list belongs to the outset of William III.'s reign, when the Danish troops were sent to Ireland. [Ibid., No. 66.]
[The Duke of Savoy ?] to the King. Discusses his plan of marching into France by way of Dauphiné with a large army, of which 3,000 or 4,000 will be refugees. [Ibid., No. 67.]
Pamphlet entitled, "Vertoog gedaen aen haer Ed. Groot Mog. de Heeren Staten Van Hollant en Westvrieslant." Printed. [Ibid., No. 68.]
List of the vessels at Toulon, with the number of men and guns on board each. [Ibid., No. 69.]
[The Elector of Bavaria] to the King. Has come into possession of a plan given to the French King for conducting the last campaign. It is worth perusal. The enemy is quiet. Reasons for the Marquis de Boufflers' journey to Mons. Fragment. [Ibid., No. 70.]
Portion of a vindication, in much detail, of the conduct of the allied forces in not attacking the enemy after the siege of Namur. [Ibid., No. 71.]
Project in the handwriting of William III. for the distribution of the allied forces on the Upper and Lower Rhine, and in Brabant, Hainault, &c. [Ibid., No. 72.]
List of the enemy's garrisons at Tournay, Courtray, Menin, Lille, St. Sauveur, Yprès, and Dunkirk. The number of infantry, cavalry, and dragoons in each. [Ibid., No. 73.]
List of the killed and wounded before Namur, among the English regiments, from the beginning to the end of the siege. The numbers of these are, wounded, 2,205; killed, 1,556. [Ibid., No. 74.]
Proposals from the Imperial Court to the King. The Emperor, seeing the dangers which arise against the common cause, suggests that these dangers may be lessened by disarming the Bishop of Munster. He therefore has a plan, how, by the aid of the King, the States General and the Elector of Brandenburg, this may be done. The plan is disclosed, and the King's opinion on it asked; when this is known, should it be favourable, the Count of Windisgratz will put it in train at the Hague. The Catholic princes may take umbrage, and the Emperor therefore wishes for assurances from the King and the two other powers that they will do nothing against the Catholic religion, and that troops will not stay in the diocese of Munster longer than the Emperor desires; that they may be commanded by a general, whom he will send there; and that two or three Spanish regiments may be joined to them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 75.]
List of the general and commanding officers of the [Danish ?] troops in the service of the King of Great Britain. [Ibid., No. 76.]
Memoranda from Maestricht as to how the troops under the command of Lieut.-General Baron de Heyden and Major General Count Tilly shall pass the Meuse. [Ibid., No. 77.]
Project of an order of battle and estimated cost of 6,000 men destined for the help of Brandenburg, at Maestricht and its environs. [Ibid., No. 78.]
List of the infantry which ought to march and compose the army, and those which should remain in Flanders; Churchill's battalion is marked as destined for Malines. [Ibid., No. 79.]
List of officers named to serve in the French army during the winter. The list is headed with the name of General Boufflers, who is to serve in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 80.]
List of the regiments of Scravenmoer and Zulestein. [Ibid., No. 81.]
Memorandum in the handwriting of Count de Solms as to the number of horses necessary to provide for the use of the various battalions during the winter. Endorsed by the King. [Ibid., No. 82.]
List of artillery horses which are to remain in service for the bread-waggons and for the winter. [Ibid., No. 83.]
Memorial concerning the great artillery prepared in Holland for Flanders. [Ibid., No. 84.]
List of troops available for the campaign of the year 1692. [Ibid., No. 85.]
List of the numbers of horse and foot in certain regiments of German militia. [Ibid., No. 86.]
Estimate of the cost of 28,015 English and Dutch cavalry, dragoons, and infantry for one year; with a memorandum relating thereto. [Ibid., No. 87.]
Extracts from various letters out of Germany and Flanders, relating to military operations, with remarks thereon by the Prince of Waldeck. (?) [Ibid., No. 88.]
List of the numbers of men wanting in the regiments lying in certain garrisons in the Spanish Netherlands. The names of several British officers are given. [Ibid., No. 89.]
Summary of the regiments in Flanders and Germany, showing the names of all the British, Dutch, Flemish, and German officers, and the numbers of men under each of them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 90.]
List of the companies of the Grenadier Guards, giving the names of the officers. [Ibid., No. 91.]
List of Brandenburg troops, cavalry and infantry. [Ibid., No. 92.]
Statement of the numbers of pioneers and waggons which can be obtained from certain provinces and districts in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 93.]
Statement of the numbers of Imperial, Savoyard, and Spanish troops which entered into Dauphiné, or remained before Pignerol. [Ibid., No. 94.]
List of the Dutch regiments which the King has ordered to serve in his army, with memoranda as to payments, officers, &c. [Ibid., No. 95.]
List of places in Flanders, and of the companies to be placed as garrisons therein. The names of some British officers are given. [Ibid., No. 96.]
List of the numbers of British, Dutch, German, and Danish officers and soldiers killed, wounded, or missing. It gives the names of some of the British officers in command. [Ibid., No. 97.]
Two lists of French regiments, forming the "first Army of Flanders" and the "second Army of Flanders." [Ibid., No. 98.]
The order of battle of the army of the Allies, under the command of the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel. [Ibid., No. 99.]
List of British, Dutch, German, and Danish brigades, in order of battle. [Ibid., No. 100.]
List of British, Dutch, and German troops employed in the campaign, and of those which can be taken from the garrisons. [Ibid., No. 101.]
List of regiments of infantry which shall serve in "the two armies," and of those which shall remain in the garrisons, with the names of British officers. [Ibid., No. 102.]
Report on the condition of the battalions in certain garrisons in Flanders and Germany. [Ibid., No. 103.]
A table showing the British, Dutch, Flemish, and German battalions, in order of battle. [Ibid., No. 104.]
Memorial as to preparations for a siege to be undertaken by the troops of the Elector of Brandenburg. [Ibid., No. 105.]
Copy of the letter of Mons. de Bernstorff, relating to a proposed alliance between Germany, Spain, England, and Hanover against France. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 106.]
Plan of a portion of the Danube, showing the course followed by boats from Orsowa, &c. [Ibid., No. 107.]
Proposal for an assault on the town of Ypres, by Jacques Frederick de Clermont. [Ibid., No. 108.]
Arrangements for the march of the [allied] army from Lembec toward Steenkirk and Hove, for the purpose of attacking the right wing of the enemy. [Ibid., No. 109.]
Proposals for removing the King's army from the camp of Bethlehem, and advancing from Namur against the enemy, who were encamped at Gemblours. [Ibid., No. 110.]
Plan of Carmagnole. [Ibid., No. 111.]
Representations to the King touching the preparations necessary for operations on the Upper Rhine. [Ibid., No. 112.]
Memorial of causes which have contributed to the decadence of the Dutch troops; apparently in the handwriting of Count de Solms. [Ibid., No. 113.]
List of posts to be occupied by the general of infantry and brigadiers during the coming winter; in the same writing. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Numbers of English, Dutch, German, and Spanish troops, and division of the same into several armies for the campaign of 1692. [Ibid., No. 115.]
Table of winter quarters for the King's army in Flanders, including some battalions under British officers. In the handwriting of Count de Solms. [Ibid., No. 116.]
List of all the British, Flemish, Spanish, Dutch, and German regiments of infantry available for siege and military operations, and for garrisons, the names of the officers being given. In the handwriting of Count de Solms. [Ibid., No. 117.]
Memorandum by the [Dutch] Council of State as to the disposal of English and German regiments and other matters. [Ibid., No. 118.]
Table showing position of regiments. [Ibid., No. 119.]
List of officers, and the number of able, sick, and dead men in the various regiments serving in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 120.]
A similar list. [Ibid. No. 121.]
A similar list. [Ibid., No. 122.]
List of the officers in the foot and horse regiments, with the number of able, sick and dead men belonging to each regiment, and the number of horses, carbines, and pistols which are now required [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 13, No. 123.]
An account of the horse, dragoon, and foot regiments, serving in Flanders, and a list of the expenses connected with them. [Ibid., No. 124.]
List of the English battalions serving in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 125.]
An estimate of the charge and numbers of 20 squadrons of horse, 11 squadrons of dragoons, and 35 battalions of foot, including all the guards, the grenadiers, the Earl of Portland's regiment, and Eppinger's dragoons. [Ibid., No. 126.]
Estimate of the number of men in certain horse, dragoon, and foot regiments. [Ibid., No. 127.]
List of the dead and wounded officers in some of the regiments serving in Flanders. [Ibid., No. 128.]
Abstract of the foot and horse regiments. [Ibid., No. 129.]
List of the Dutch foot guards. [Ibid., No. 130.]
List of the regiments which will form the two armies in Flanders their respective strength, and the names of those which are to remain in garrison, in Count de Solms' handwriting. [Ibid., No. 131.]
List of regiments from Flanders, for England, Scotland, &c., in the handwriting of William III. [Ibid., No. 132.]
List of the garrisons to which it will be best to send those regiments which have suffered the most, in Holland, Flanders, and Brabant, in the handwriting of Count de Solms. [Ibid., No. 133.]
Project for military operations by the Brandenburg, Gotha, and other regiments between the Maas [Meuse] and the Rhine. [Ibid., No. 134.]
An essay on the history and constitution of Scotland, and suggestions for remedying the grievances under which the country labours, especially in the matter of Church government. [Ibid., No. 135.]