BHO

William and Mary: June 1694

Pages 160-207

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1694-5. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1906.

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June 1694

June 1.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. I shall ever acknowledge the favour your Majesty has been pleased to do me, in allowing that Lord Carbery might be Lord Lieutenant of North Wales, much above what the thing seems to bear, because I esteem it a trust you were pleased to repose upon my passing my word, in which I assure you I am never capable of deceiving you willingly, but having accidentally mentioned my intention of begging this favour of you, before I had received your letter but after I sent mine to ask it, to a friend of Lord Macclesfield's, I understood my Lord had so set his heart upon the hopes sometime or other of coming into this employment, that though he is not ill-satisfied that I had it, who he was sure would surrender whenever you should find it for your service, yet if it should fall into Lord Carbery's hands, who would be likely to desire the continuance of it, it would very much put him out of humour. I having never mentioned this matter to Lord Carbery, any otherwise than to find whether he would accept it if offered, have not taken notice to him of your favourable intentions towards him, because I thought it was not for your service to disoblige Lord Macclesfield and that perhaps a little time might make this matter more easy either the one side or the other, so for the present I continue as you were pleased at first to command.
I suppose Lord Normanby has acquainted you in a letter from himself that he is not satisfied with being left out, because the meeting is not to have the name of a Cabinet Council, it seems as if he would be contented if he might be called sometimes with the Lords with the white staves.
Compassion will not permit me to resist seconding what Lord Sunderland says he has written to you in behalf of Lord Bellomont, that he may have some forfeited lands in Ireland. His condition, I really believe, is necessitous to a great degree. He seems to the world to have been unfairly displaced. I will not answer for him, but dare engage that no man living is more faithful and zealous to you and your Government, even under these hardships, than he. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 21.]
June 1.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury, enclosing informations concerning the squadron fitting out at Dunkirk not here preserved. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 474.]
June 1.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. We have had some further account of the enemy's ships expected out of Dunkirk, and therefore think it will be best for the service to have a squadron of men-of-war together to protect the coast, but have not sufficient ships available unless those cruizing on the Broad Fourteens be recalled. [Ibid., p. 482.] Enclosing:—
(1) Account given by Captain Stevens, late commander of a Dutch packet-boat, 1st of June, 1694. Whilst he was in prison in Dunkirk, he was informed that fourteen to sixteen sail of men-of-war, besides privateers, were getting ready at Dunkirk, under the command of Chevalier Du Bart and Jasper Debart, from thirty to sixty guns, and that when he came thence there were six of the said men-of-war ready to go out in the road, and it was supposed they intended to destroy as much of the fishery on the English coast as they could meet with, and from thence to go to Fleckery (sic) and convoy the corn-ships north about to the western parts of France. Copy. [Ibid., p. 486.] (2) Extract from a letter of Mr. Peter Joy, dated 1 June, 1694. I find the account from Dunkirk is no more than the news that there were seven men-ofwar in Dunkirk road, and that the rest were fitting out to make up the number of twenty-two, to go to sea. [Ibid.]
June 1.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. If the Queen order the ships cruizing on the Broad Fourteens to return, we desire the Dutch ships under orders for that station may join them. [Ibid., p. 478.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to make a lease or custodiam for three years to Thomas Keightley, esq., of the lands of Carrickneshannagh, Begsrue and Lisnabeg, Kennetstown, Rogerstown, Ballynapoge, Keppoge, Plattine, Calestowne, Bollybeg, Fussaroe, Gigginstown, Richardstown, Drinedully and part of Rathdown, in counties Louth, Meath, Kildare, Wicklow and West Meath. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 118.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. John Baggott of Crosslogh, co. Catherlogh [sic], setting forth that he was in Limerick during the last siege, and, being sick, for his health retired into a place in the Irish quarters, having first obtained a certificate from General Guide to entitle him to the Articles of Limerick; but, notwithstanding, he has, by some mistake, been indicted and outlawed for high treason. He is only tenant for life of his estate, which has been settled in marriage on his son. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland for their report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 402.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Hussey, gent., setting forth that in pursuance of a former petition all outlawries against the petitioner are reversed, and praying a pardon of high treason. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland for their report. [Ibid., p. 403.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
List of officers of three companies of invalids whose commissions are dated 1 June, 1694:—Captain Edward Pickin, Lieutenant John Davies, Ensign Robert Wells, Captain John Twiddall, Lieutenant John Moore, Ensign Thomas Sheppard, Captain Henry Brochett, Lieutenant Michel Hudson, Ensign Samuel Gibson. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 218.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Commission for James Griffith, gent., to be lieutenant of the company commanded by Captain Arthur Davies, in the regiment of foot commanded by the Earl of Donegal. [Ibid. 4, p. 57.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to naturalize the ship Gaffle Slott for the carrying out of a contract made by the officers of the Navy with Francis Riggs, of London, merchant, for bringing two ships laden with masts, deals, fir, timber, and other Norway stores, from Norway, for the service of the Navy, and of greater length than can be brought on English built ships. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 607.]
June 2.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. We hear you have made enquiries about a month's provisions to be supplied to the fleet in August; we have had no orders in that behalf, and beg they may be sent if the supplies are needed. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 762.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Lucas. The Queen commands me to order you to permit Colonel John Parker, a prisoner in the Tower, to walk, from time to time, an hour in the day upon the platform over his lodgings in the presence of his warders and the gentleman gaoler. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 25.]
[June 2.] Memorandum by Mr. Bridges. Col. Russell had an order to the Victuallers of the Navy to furnish him with two months' short allowance for three hundred men [going to Barbados]; they have lain so long on board that he begs an order for another month's supplies. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 766.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. Richard Butler, setting forth that in 36 Charles II. a judgment was obtained against him for publishing and presenting an address in writing to some "parliament men" for the stopping the further growth of popery; and he was condemned to pay 500 marks, which he did. Prays that the recognizances for his good behaviour, entered into by Robert Clarke and others, may be discharged. Referred to the Attorney-General for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 404.]
June 2. Warrant to Richard Hopkins for apprehending — Bromfeild and Mary Bromfeild alias Smith, his wife, for treasonable practices. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 572.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant of naturalization for the ship the Hanse and Jacob. [Ibid., p. 608.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Commission for Mr. Samuel Hunter to be chaplain of Brigadier Hastings' regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 221.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Romney to supply the necessary ammunition, &c., to the Bartabella packet-boat, carrying 16 guns, commanded by John Paschal, employed in transporting the mails to and from Holland. [Ibid. 4, p. 53.]
June 3.
On board the Prince of Friesland, off Gravesend.
De Vries' order to the ships to cruize on the Broad Fourteens, and appointing a rendezvous in case of separation. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 490.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen directs that orders shall be forthwith given for providing one month's dry provision for the fleet. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 136.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Directing that two bomb-vessels of one mortar each (of those which were last in the Downs) do join a Dutch man-of-war left at Spithead or St. Helens, to convoy some Dutch victuallers to the fleet. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 136.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Meester, esq., to provide, with all speed, the necessaries for the execution of his design for annoying the enemy, of which the Queen very well approves. [Ibid., p. 149.]
June 4.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 494.] Enclosing:—
Copy of an order to Captain Kiggins, commander of their Majesties' ship Mountagu, cruizing upon the Broad Fourteens, of the same date. On receipt hereof, if there shall be three Dutch men-of-war with you upon the Broad Fourteens, you are to continue to cruize on that station for intercepting the corn-ships bound to France; otherwise you shall immediately come off the said station and repair to the buoy of the Gun-fleet. [Ibid., p. 496.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the Commissioners for Victualling the Navy. The Queen is informed that the two months' short allowance, which was provided for the three hundred men going to Barbados, will not be sufficient to serve them, because they have been longer on board than was expected. Her Majesty commands me to signify her pleasure that you give order for another month's provision at short allowance to be put on board. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 169.]
June 4.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 770.] Enclosing:—
Admiralty order, dated 4 June, 1694, to Captains Edward Owen and John Sole, commanding the bomb-vessels Society and Angel, to join a Dutch man-of-war left at Spithead to convoy the Dutch victuallers to the fleet under Admiral Russell. Copy. [Ibid., p. 774.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. John Ferguson, setting forth that the office of water-bailiff of the Thames, between Staines Bridge and the head of the river, having been void several years, the river in those parts is neglected and the breed of fish destroyed. Prays for a grant of that office. Referred for report to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 403.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Report of the Attorney-General of Ireland on the petition of Sir Richard Pyne. The lands of Ballinglass, Glanagurteene and Balledergan were, before the rebellion that broke out in 1641, held by a long lease and mortgaged by the petitioner's ancestors, and that the reversion and redemption thereof were adjudged to the petitioner's brother in 1667, and the petitioner has been in possession of the lands for above twenty years. It appears that the other lands, viz., of Ballylaken and Kilembagh, were, about 1663, decreed to Sir Robert Walsh, a protestant, by the commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement; Sir Robert Walsh enjoyed the lands till in January, 1693 [–4] he conveyed them to William Dobbin, in trust for the petitioner. It would be no prejudice to the crown to grant him letters patent confirming the said lands to him, and creating such of the said lands as lie in co. Cork into a manor, with liberty for holding a court baron, provided rents be reserved as heretofore. Referred, with the annexed report, to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 405.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Frances Sheldon, Mrs. Catherine Sheldon, and Mrs. Anne and Dorothy Sheldon, with two women servants, Mary L'Estrainge and Anne Smyth, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland or Flanders; for Peter Escar and Jacob Mons, Dutchmen and silk weavers by trade, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Jacob de Riet and Thomas Bruyn, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 216]; for Andrew de Court, a Dutch mariner, ditto; for Thomas Swinburn, esq., and John Foster, his servant, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland or Flanders [Ibid., p. 217]; for Adriana Leenaarts to go to Holland; for Benjamin Storrim, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 572]; and for Jeanne Fosse, a French woman, ditto [Ibid. p. 573].
June 4.
Whitehall.
Certificate showing that the Right Honorable Charles, Earl of Carlisle, was commissioned governor of Carlisle, 1 March, 1692/3. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 218.]
June 5.
Aix-la-Chapelle.
Baron de Heiden to the King. I have received the letter your Majesty did me the honour to write me from Breda on the 22nd/1st inst., ordering me to bring up from Liege the troops of his Electoral Highness, my master, and I hasten to carry out your Majesty's instructions, and have given orders that all the troops, as well those on the other side of the Rhine, as those of Wesel, those about Cologne, and our artillery, shall be on the 8th of this month on this side of the river Rour; and, if it meets with your approval, I will encamp near Visée, where I shall be within reach of all. This point once reached, the enemy cannot forestall me. Besides this, we shall have the convenience of the river and of forage for our cavalry. I reckon to be in this camp on the 9th, and have given orders that our cavalry, which is in and near Boxmar on the Meuse, shall join us there the same day. The difficulties we found in the Juliers district with the camp at Eschweiler, and the dispatches to and fro, somewhat retarded our march. However, I hope that it shall still be punctual at the said camp of Visee to execute your Majesty's command. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 20.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Commissioners of Sick and Wounded. Directing that Mr. Rider be allowed to send six couple of hounds and three brace of greyhounds to Calais, by the next transport for the exchange of prisoners. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 171.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Robert Seywell, ensign in Colonel Tidcombe's regiment, to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 573]; for Donna Mariana de Villatobos, a Spanish lady, and Antoine Ressé and Ann Henwick, her servants, to go to Holland or Flanders; for Mary Browning and Francis Hawkins (renewed), to go to Holland; for John La Noue, a French soldier, to go to Flanders; for James Tyvidale to go to Holland or Flanders; for Cornelius van Damme and his wife to go to Holland; and for William Murray, with one horse, to go from Hoylake, or any other port, to Ireland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 574].
June 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Mariscoe to apprehend Henry Cooke for treason. [Ibid., p. 573.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. By the letters that came yesterday from Flanders, I am directed to tell you that his Majesty and the States-General have nearly concluded a treaty with the Dukes of Wolfenbüttel for two regiments of foot and one of horse, of the troops of the said Dukes, to be entertained for the service and in the pay of their Majesties and the States during this war. In consideration whereof it is also agreed that the said Dukes shall receive the sum of 100,000 rix-dollars yearly till such time as the peace is made and ratified. One moiety of which sum is to be paid as soon as the said troops arrive on the frontiers of the territories belonging to the States, and the other moiety is to be paid monthly by equal proportions within that year, and at the end of this year one hundred thousand rix dollars are to be continued yearly, by paying the twelfth part of the same each month till the conclusion and ratification of the peace; the charge of which payment, together with the ordinary entertainment of the said three regiments, according to an estimate thereof (here enclosed) is to be borne, two-thirds by the King and one-third by the States. And whereas those troops were already come within a few days' march of the camp, his Majesty commands me to order you to accordingly provide his part as well of the subsidies as of the pay for these troops, and that the same be remitted to Mr. Hill, deputy-paymaster of the forces in Flanders, to be paid by him as the treaty requires. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 27.] Appending:—
An estimate of the charge of the 2,000 men of the troops of Wolfenbüttel which by the late treaty are to serve in the Low Countries and to be paid by the King and the States-General. [Ibid., p. 28.]
June 6.
Off the Lizard.
Admiral Russell to Sir John Trenchard. This day I parted from Lord Berkeley with a wind N.W.; a good wind for us both. I am afraid we shall not have much to brag of, for the year is so far advanced and the enemy prepared for both our designs. I am not a very desponding man, yet I am a little out of hope. In duplicate. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 506 and 510.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Passes for Melior Margham, Catherine More, and Henrietta Maria More to go to Harwich, or down the river, and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 217]; for George Watz and Peter Baissner, Dutchmen, to go to Holland; for Joseph van Neffelen, a Dutchman, ditto; and for John Baptist Willemz, a Dutchman, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 575].
June 6.
Whitehall.
Naturalization of the ship Hope. Whereas the principal officers and Commissioners of the Navy have contracted with William Wallis, John Shorter and other merchants for bringing masts from New England, the Baltic Sea and Norway, for the service of the Navy and of greater lengths than can be brought by any English-built ships, the said merchants accordingly ought to employ two foreign built ships fit for that purpose. The foreign ship, the Hope, is therefore to be naturalized and made free use of for the purpose of bringing masts or other naval stores or stowage goods from New England, &c. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 573.] Like naturalization of same date for the Bear. [Ibid., p. 574.]
June. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Doctor Edward Baynard, praying letters patent for his invention of a new carriage for coaches, calashes, &c., making the draught easier. Referred for report to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 406.]
June 6.
Ordnance Office.
The Ordnance Board to Sir John Trenchard. Mr. Bushnell, the inventor of an engine to break chains and bombs, is now at work in fixing the same for service; it will be finished about a week hence, and he could then go on board with it at Portsmouth, to follow the fleet; but, as the fleet sailed so long since, Lord Romney doubts whether it will turn to account to employ him now, and we therefore desire her Majesty's pleasure therein. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 778.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Commission for Major John Folliot to be captain of the troop of which Captain Robert Stevenson was late captain in the regiment of dragoons commanded by Colonel James Wynne. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 56.]
June 7.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 782.] Enclosing:—
(1) The Victualling Commissioners to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated 4 June, 1694. We have received your order of yesterday to provide one month's dry provisions for the whole fleet, which we suppose to be the main fleet, calculated to bear 26,000 to 27,000 men. It is no season to kill flesh, and pork cannot be procured; but we think, on the arrival of the last victualling ships that went from the Downs, there will be a greater quantity of flesh in hand than to make up their four months. Copy. [Ibid., p. 786.] (2) Extract of a letter from the Navy Board, dated 5, June, 1694, enquiring at what port the provisions should be lodged. [Ibid.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. The ship Hopewell that came lately from Calais with exchanged prisoners has brought over a horse from there for the Duke of Richmond or Mr. Rider, which is now detained at Dover by the commander of the said ship. I desire you will write to him to give no obstruction in this matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 25.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Lexington. This is to tell you that the Commissioners of the Admiralty have given me notice that the men-ofwar they had appointed for your convoy to Holland are in such a bad condition as to be unfit to proceed on that service, and they desire you would make use of that convoy now ordered to go with the transport ships that are carrying forces to Willemstadt, which begin to embark on Monday next, and may be ready to sail next day. [Ibid., p. 28.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the Commissioners of Sick and Wounded, &c. Having received the enclosed petition and papers concerning one William Bidot, a Frenchman, now prisoner at Portsmouth, I desire you will examine into the matter and give me an account of it, that I may, thereupon, receive her Majesty's pleasure. Enclosure not appended. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 170.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Bretone, collector of customs at Dover. Mr. Rider has obtained her Majesty's leave to have a horse brought from Calais to Dover, and the horse having already come thither, has been stopped by you for want of such leave. I am commanded by her Majesty to order you upon receipt thereof to deliver the said horse to such person as Mr. Rider shall appoint. [Ibid.]
June 7.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. The man-of-war appointed to convoy the Fubbs yacht to Holland, with Lord Lexington, being found in too bad a condition to sail, we hope his lordship will avail himself of the convoy of the Centurion, which is returning to Holland with the ships carrying troops to Willemstadt. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 514.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Judith de Louis Die and Joseph Monte Sine, two French Protestants, to go to Gravesend and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 217]; for Mr. William Siliardt, Mr. George Legg, and one servant, to go to Holland; and for Leonard Coning, a Dutch seaman, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 575].
June 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Adams, esq., of the kingdom of Ireland. Sets forth a former petition: that his estate lying near Mullingar, a frontier garrison, it supplied the garrison with great quantities of corn, &c., and that most of his houses on the whole estate were pulled down for "firing" for the said garrison, and that his damages amounted to 7,000l. Prays a grant of some lands for a recompense. Referred to the Treasury for their report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 407.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Edgworth, esq. Sets forth a former petition and report of Lord Sydney and others, whereby it appeared that the petitioner and several of his brothers had been great sufferers, and had done considerable service to the Crown, and that petitioner is kept out of an estate in right of his wife, the daughter of Sir Edward Terrill, on account of an outlawry two months after Sir Edward's death. Prays a reversal of the outlawry, &c. Referred to the Treasury for their report. [Ibid., p. 408.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Arthur Galway of Ballyphean, co. Cork, gent. Sets forth that he had many protestant relations in Ireland at whose importunity he accepted a captain's commission in 1688; but so soon as he discovered the Earl of Tyrconnel's design of carrying on a war against the King, he would have quitted the same, but could not without great hazard of losing his life; but, however, did protect and preserve many of the protestants at the time, and took the first opportunity to lay down his command. Notwithstanding, he has been outlawed of high treason, and his estate of 250l. seized. Prays for pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland for report. [Ibid., p. 410.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Marisco to search for and apprehend Alexander Gawne, of Brentford, Middlesex, esq., for treason. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 576.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hayward, messenger, to apprehend Walter Chambers and James Sommerville, together with their papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 43.]
June 8. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I have received your letter of the 7th from Bethlem, and return you my most humble thanks for the expressions in it of your kind intentions for me. After abundance of difficulty and obstructions, the Queen at last has signed this morning, in the Council Chamber, the warrant for the commission for taking subscriptions to the bank, which is not, however, like to bring in any money till the 1st of August, and then how fast it will bring in the whole sum, I am not able to guess; but I am pretty sure it will not come so fast as the bare subsistence for the troops will want it, if there were no other occasion of the army that required it. But you must needs be sensible, besides, that we have very pressing demands at the Treasury every day both upon the money wanted for the clothing and the clearing of the army; there was but one sum left in the scheme that could be applicable to either or both of these uses, and at your going away, you left it undetermined, but seemed to intend that we should guide ourselves as to any payments upon the latter of those two heads, by such directions as we should receive from you after you came to the army and had spoken with the officers. I must humbly remind you that we want your further pleasure in that matter, and whatsoever can be done in case of the funds for the subsistence will be the more necessary because of the orders we received from you by the last post concerning a new additional charge for the Wolfenbüttel troops, which you know must make the funds for the subsistence fall so much shorter as that amounts to, and our scheme at first carries it no further than the month of October, supposing too the whole 1,200,000l. from the Bank were all ready money, which it is plain it can not be near so soon as that time, so that one may easily foresee the greatest difficulties imaginable towards the latter end of the snmmer; and how to get out of them I am afraid will not be easy. I have communicated to our Board your pleasure to have Mons. Schuylemburgh's fund changed to a nearer, but the straits we shall find ourselves in every week for the subsistence will I doubt make it next to impossible to be complied with. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 25.]
June 8.
Camaret Bay.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. On the 6th inst. we made Ushant, and as soon as the enemy saw us they alarmed the country by firing many guns and making great fires all night. On the 7th we had fair weather and got into Camaret Bay. As we were coming in, and after we had anchored, the enemy "bombed" us from five batteries round the bay, most of the guns firing short, and they did no harm. If they had not discovered their bombs before we anchored, we should have gone nearer in, and they might have extremely incommoded us. About seven o'clock yesterday, according to a resolution of the council of war, I made signal for the soldiers to embark in the boats and small vessels.
Between eleven and twelve Lord Carmarthen (whom I had ordered in to the bottom of Camaret Bay, with the Monk, Charles galley, Shoreham and four Dutch frigates, to cover the landing of the soldiers) got in, and presently after twelve, Lieutenant-General Talmash went towards the shore with the soldiers, and between one and two landed with three or four hundred men, but was beaten off again before the rest could land to his relief, and himself shot through the thigh, but I hope will do well. The enemy are intrenched in every little bay hereabouts, and have batteries wherever they can be placed, and by what I can find are in no want of men, neither horse nor foot. Of the former, of which we see several squadrons, I counted ten clothed with white.
I shall now make the best of my way to Portsmouth to await your commands. I send this by the Dreadnought, which has Mr. Talmash on board. Lord Carmarthen behaved himself very well and gallantly, and so did all the rest of the officers that were with him. Our three English frigates, as well as the Dutch, lay three hours against the enemy's batteries. The Dutch frigate Wesel was sunk, and her captain and most of her men killed. The fleet with me was extremely thinly manned before, and now is in worse condition. Admiral Russell made large drafts from us, and yet wants many men to complete his numbers. We were last year supplied with soldiers, and three or four battalions are the fewest that can now be left; and they will hardly do either (if any service is designed for the fleet), for several ships really want seamen to trim their sails.
People in London will perhaps blame us for not still attempting to go into Brest, but if they were here and saw how far the enemy throw their bombs, I am confident they would be of another opinion, especially when they consider what little effect five mortars, ill-fitted and attended, would have upon Brest, when in all probability they have at least six times that number. I shall sail this morning, but shall leave ships off Ushant to give notice to any ship that might be coming to join us. We have lost five or six well-boats and a Dutch long-boat, one was lost by a bomb, the rest grounded and were fired in the night by the French. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 522.] Enclosing:—
(1) Account of soldiers and seamen wounded and missing since the late action in Camaret Bay. [Ibid., p. 518.] (2) Account of the number of men actually on board the respective ships in the admiral of the blue's squadron, 9 June, 1694. [Ibid., p. 526.] (3) Copy of the resolution of a council of war held on board the Queen, 10 June, 1694. The bomb-vessels having come to us after we were some eleven leagues from Brest, it was proposed to make an attempt upon some other place, but decided to return to Portsmouth to put our wounded men and dragoon horses on shore, and to receive further orders from her Majesty. It was also proposed that the Queen and council might be moved to leave the council of war at liberty to attempt or bombard what part of France they, when at sea, should think most feasible and most for the service. [Ibid., p. 530.] (4) Copies of resolutions of councils of war held as follows: (a) On board the Queen, off Ushant, 6 June, 1694. Agreed to send the Monk and a Dutch frigate to batter the redoubt at Camaret Bay while the forces are landing: to endeavour to make the land, and to join as far as we can, in the night; to send a lieutenant in each of the ship's boats that carry the men on shore, to command them; proposed to go in without flags, but was resolved in the negative. (b) On board the Queen, 8 June, 1694. Resolved that Lieut.-General Talmash and the land forces go on shore as soon as can be. to make themselves masters of the fort at Camaret; four or five frigates to be sent in to facilitate the landing; an English and a Dutch sea-officer to be sent on shore, to get upon the hill and view the bay within. (c) On board the Dreadnought the same day. Our ill-success on shore this day being considered, and that the enemy were entrenched almost in every bay, it was considered what was now best to be done with the fleet and land forces on board. General Talmash, being asked if he had any power to make any attempt upon any other place than Brest, said he had not, but proposed, if it might be for the service, to send into Brest a squadron of small frigates with the bomb-vessels, to bomb the town; but it ivas thought by the council by no means advisable, because they could not go in without a westerly wind (it is now easterly), neither could they come out again without an easterly wind. Besides not knowing certainly what force the enemy might have in Brest, it was resolved that Spithead was the fittest place to go to from thence, to land the soldiers and to refit our maimed ships. Another reason for not sending the small frigates in to Brest was that one was sunk in battering the fort, and most of the rest for the present made unserviceable. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 536.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Mayor of Dover. I have received yours of yesterday with two enclosed letters from Calais; but the proposals therein contained being only fit to be considered at Council, I can say nothing to them at present, and when any resolution is taken in that matter, you shall have an account thereof. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 30.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to grant to Lord Coningsby a custodiam or lease of the estate late belonging to Richard Fagan, of Feltrim, and the lands of Portmarnock and Carrickhill, lately belonging to William Plunkett, all in co. Dublin. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 119.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for the appointment of Francis Babe to be one of the Surveyors-General of the Revenue of Ireland, with a salary of 250l. and an additional annuity of 100l., in consideration of services done by him in Dublin immediately after the battle of the Boyne, as well as the great improvement made by him in the Irish excise. [Ibid., p. 120.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to pay upon sight the 2,423l. 6s. 8d., authorized to be paid by letters of 9 June, 5 William and Mary, to the officers and widows of officers who were of the garrison of Londonderry during the siege, named in a list not here appended. [Ibid., p. 130.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Hugh Powell, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain Irby Montague was captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Sir John Hanmer; for Mr. Henry Fielding to be lieutenant to Captain Keymey's company in the same regiment; for Mr. Daniel Drolenvaux to be ensign to Captain Irwin's company in the same regiment; for Mr. William Hanmer to be lieutenant of the company of grenadiers commanded by Captain Low in the same regiment; for Mr. Francis Korning to be ensign to Captain Carpenter's company in the same regiment; for Mr. Patrick Murray to be lieutenant to Captain Gregory's company in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel John Michelbourne; for Mr. Samuel Wright to be ensign to Lieutenant-Colonel John Hamilton's company in the same regiment; for Mr. John Clements to be ensign to Major Shamberg's company in the same regiment; for Richard, Lord Lambert, to be ensign of the company of which Colonel Michelbourne himself is captain; for William Cornwall to be ensign to Captain Burleigh's company in the same regiment; and for James Dingley, clerk, to be chaplain to Brigadier William Stewart's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 219.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Alida Mater and her daughter, and Antonia Mater, to go to Gravesend and Holland; for Johana Alain, Elizabeth Chaillet, and Mary Fabry, three French protestants, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 218]; for Vincent Jacobs and a little girl, his daughter, to go to Holland; and for Mary la Vatee and two children, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 575].
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to allow John Hawles and Roger Mompesson of Lincoln's Inn, and Anthony Weldon of the Middle Temple, esqrs., and Robert Webber of Clifford's Inn, gent., to have free access from time to time, at convenient times and in the presence of a keeper, to Walter Crosby, a prisoner for high treason. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a bill to pass the Great Seal for making the following persons (aliens born) free denizens of England: Abraham Gilbert, clerk; Henry Mettayer, clerk; James Huet, clerk; Peter de Tacher, clerk; Peter Persode, clerk; William Binaud, Paul Rondelet, Catharina Guenaut, Thomas Gaugain, John Francis Gignillat, James Joyeux, Mary his wife, James, Samuel, Eliaz and John their children; Julius Cragg, John de Lage, John Albert, Peter le Noir, Paul Droilhet, Thomas le Heup, Robert Oursel, Lambert Annes, Henry Feray, John Melchior Maystetter, John de Belle, John Vartla, Philip Rollos, Peter du Buisson, Paul de Lage, Peter Willecke, Francis Rich, Lewis Bonnet, Michelle his wife and Anna their daughter; Stephen Boigoun, John Toutham, John de Lage, John Heisenbuttell, Francis Carré, Derick Hasserterborgh, Andrew Raven, Josias Iback, Daniel de Bondt, John Croll, Peter Lucadou, Paul Margueritt, Isaias Geilinck, Moses Lavet, Guy Babaud, Martha Negrier des Landes, James Chabot, Richard Monck, Andrew Lamoureux, Susanna his wife, Elizabeth and Judith their children; Peter Bondecou, Peter Sneew, Timothy Archambeau, Francis Meschinet, Peter Morin, Peter Jouneau, Philip Jouneau, Peter Valeau, Stephen Valeau, Francis Richard, George Herauld, Isaac Eymé, James Mazel, Peter Rouvière, Peter Cazalet, John Cazalet, Noah Cazalet, Peter Valette, Francis Vaurigaud, Andrew Dubois, John Benoist, James Roger, James Benoist, Abraham Mourtheis, Elizabeth Belin, Peter, Elizabeth, Mary and Mary Anna her children; Jeremiah Many, Anthony Nouguier, Isaac Dargent, Mary his wife, Nicholas, John and Mary Anna their children; Isaac Bonouvrier, John Houssaye, James Faget, Isaac Guitton, Peter Guitton, Daniel Guitton, Gabriel Guitton, John Bosanquet, John Asselin, Elias Pineau, Ann his wife and Anna their daughter; Francis Roy, John, Francis and Prudence his children; John Roy, Peter Roy, John Morin, Elizabeth his wife, Peter, John, Henry, Samuel and Matthew their children; Derick Batnevelt, Peter Gervais, Peter Canton, Stephen Jamin, Abraham Melier, Hierome Lamberti, Stephen Jourdan, Pannues Calender, Noah Pasquereau, Nicholas Gautreau, John Voulac, and Elizabeth his wife; Anthony Ayrauld, John Bertrand, Elizabeth his wife and Elizabeth their daughter; James Bargeau, James, John, Peter, and Abraham his sons; Peter Cabibel, Peter Belle, Lewis de la Cosse, Marguaritta his wife, Lewis, John, Mary and Susanna their children; Jacob Mouchard, Moses la Croix, David de Caux, John Chardellou, Peter Garon, Isaac Block, Leonard Knyft, Matthew Collineau, Peter Martin, John de Farcy, Mary de Ravenel, Isaac Bleiberg, John Guichardiere, Lewis de Launay, John Briot, Samuel Briot, Lewis Supply and John his son; Anna Massy, John Lucas, Samuel Vergnon and Samuel his son; Léon de Bourdeaux, John Malaigue, Jacob Beaune, Peter Orange and Thomas Thomas. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 41.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lady Mary Boyle. Sets forth her husband's great services in the county Cork during the late rebellion, when he was taken prisoner, but making his escape into England, was made major and afterwards lieutenant-colonel, and so continued till his death. But for his firm adherence to the Protestant interest, his estate was plundered and ruined to the value of 8,000l. Prays a grant, for seven years, of an estate of one Edmund Roch of Trabulgan, outlawed. Referred for the consideration of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 411.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Coningsby. Since my last to you I have received yours of the 22nd and 27th May. I will not fail to make the enquiry you mention, before I give out the commissions, but hope you do not intend to stay very long in the country. I should be glad to talk to you before that matter is settled. [H.O. Secretary's Letter Book 4, p. 2.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Roope. I have received your letter of the 3rd inst. giving me an account of the fleets having been seen that day off the Start, and I desire as anything occurs in your parts for the future, you will let me know it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 29.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Romney. I have received your letter of the 7th inst. with the information against John Thompson. Appearances seem to point to his being concerned in managing a correspondence with France, which it is fit he should be answerable for, though in the meantime I think that bail may be taken for his appearance at the next county assizes. [Ibid., p. 30.]
June 9.
Westminster.
Arniaut van Citters, Dutch Ambassador, to the Queen, with regard to the case of the ship Robert, taken by a Zealand privateer, and condemned to be publicly sold by an order of the Zealand Admiralty, but seized on its arrival at Dublin by Louis Signo, a merchant of that place, under a pretence that it had formerly belonged to him. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 49.]
June 9.
Westminster.
An English translation of the above. [Ibid., No. 50.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Mary Pawlet, Ann Clifton, her servants, and Mr. Robert Manfield, to go to Harwich or Gravesend, and embark for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 218]; for Captain Isaac Foxley and two servants to go to Holland; for Cornelius Van Vliet, a Dutchman, ditto; for Catharina Lamtien and her son, ditto; and for Mr. Edward Browne, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 576].
June 10.
Dartmouth.
Joseph Bully to Sir John Trenchard. Enclosing letters received from Admiral Russell to be forwarded. As Dartmouth agent and clerk of the cheque to the Admiralty, he will always be ready to communicate intelligence received as to the fleet, &c. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 51.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Pass for Elizabeth Hermans and two children to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 516.]
June 11.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 790.] Enclosing:—
Extract of a letter from a French Protestant condemned to the galleys, written to his wife at Rye, dated at Rouen, 15 May, 1694. We are here at present to fit out six galleys. We have seen the greatest miseries that ever was heard of, finding the people all along the road from Marseilles dead for hunger; towards Lyons they eat bread made from roots of fern, which costs 2d. a lb., and at Paris bread is sold at 6d. a lb., and there is such misery that they find every morning 500 or 600 people dead on dunghills, &c. They throw themselves into the water to swim aboard of our galleys, to buy some of our bread. The first minister of state hath been near to have been assassinated by the people, who took him from his coach; yet for all that they did not dare make any attempt against those people. King James had four of his guards killed by his side; he made his escape himself, or else they had served him the same sauce. It is inexpressible how the people cry against him, openly cursing him, that his being there is the cause of their miseries. They do not yet perceive that God will abate their pride, the great ones as well as others, that did rejoice in our distress at first, not foreseeing their own ruin at hand, are at present as much afflicted, for if ever any nation was in sorrow it is this people. [Ibid., p. 794.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. Robert Philippe, praying a writ of error in a judgment obtained against him by Arthur Bury. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 407.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Blakeston, under sentence of death for robbery, praying to be inserted in the next general Newgate pardon, he being grandson of Sir William Blakeston, who served King Charles I. and Charles II., and having himself been in their Majesties' service in Ireland and Flanders, and the robbery being under 20l. value. Referred to Chief Justice Ireby for report. [Ibid., p. 408.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Savery, gent., praying for letters patent for a new invention for grinding and polishing glass, &c. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 409.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the vicar and churchwardens of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, praying a grant (for the poor of the said parish) of the estate of one Anne Burlace, deceased, who in the time of her last sickness was prevailed on to make one Mary Portington, at that time keeping a nunnery, her executrix. There have been several proceedings at law respecting the said estate. The Queen is pleased to gratify the petitioners, and the Treasury is instructed to issue orders accordingly. [Ibid., p. 412.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Conrad Westarpf and Francis Philip, his servant, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 218]; and for Mr. William Van Schie, a Dutch minister, his wife and two children and a servant, to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 576].
June 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Romney. Directs that out of the ordnance stores there be issued "six demy culverings and four sakers, mounted on travelling carriages, and five barrels of powder and shot," for the defence of the town of Brighthelmston, in Sussex. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 57.]
June 12.
Monastery of Mount St. Robert, near Liege.
Baron de Heiden to the King. I have received yours from Roosbruch touching measures to be taken for the safety of Maestricht. I not only sent thither from Viset four battalions of the troops of his Electoral Highness, but on arriving here I asked Mons. de Coehorn to send two others "de ceux de l'état," under the command of a colonel with orders to throw himself into Maestricht. I have also sent a regiment of cavalry there, at the request of the commandant. According to what I can hear Mons. de Harcourt is at St. Vient; I am assured he has no large force with him. Still, if all our cavalry crossed the Meuse, he would be able to penetrate into Cleve, for we have no troops either in the Juliers or Cologne districts to oppose him; and as the said districts are under contribution, they would do nothing to prevent him. I have given order to LieutenantGeneral de Dewitz, in case he is advised that de Harcourt is preparing to execute this move, whilst your Majesty leaves the cavalry on that side of the Meuse, to send a detachment of his cavalry up towards Guelders, to cover the Cleves district. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 22.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Justices of Ireland, directing an inquiry into the case of the ship Robert, which is stated to have been unjustly seized by Lewis Signio, merchant of Dublin. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 4.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for John King, esq., with Patrick Wall and John Clark, his two servants, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland or Flanders; for Thomas Blundell, Bridget Clifton and Catherine Blackwell, ditto; for Philip Taillard to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 219]; for George Hammer, servant to Baron Riedissell, colonel of horse, to go to Holland; and for James Fabian, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 577].
June 13.
Viset.
Baron de Heiden to the King. I have received your Majesty's instructions as to what I should do in case the enemy attack Liege. There is a regiment of cavalry, viz. Flemming's, which is quartered in the county of Ravensberg in the Duchy of Minden, which has not yet come in, but is under orders to come as quickly as may be. I hope that, in case of crossing the Meuse, the necessary bread for the subsistence of the troops will be granted. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 23.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Lord Berkeley. By her order to Lieutenant-General Talmash the Queen did not intend to restrain him to the attempting any one particular place on the coast of France, as you will see by the enclosed copy of the order, and of my letter to Talmash of the 29th ult.; and his Majesty having signified by Mr. Blathwayte that he leaves the forces which were designed for Flanders to be employed here as shall be thought most advisable, while they may be useful in anything that was or may be intended against the French, her Majesty thinks fit you should call a council of war to consider what further attempt may be made upon any part of the French coasts. Enclosures not here appended. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 138.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty, sending a copy of Admiral Russell's orders to Lord Berkeley, dated 29 May, and of a list of the Mediterranean squadron. Enclosures not entered. The short allowance money of the squadron gone to the Straits under Admiral Russell, and 20,000l. for beverage and contingent uses for the said squadron, are to be sent to Mr. Russell, the credits to be divided, part at Cadiz, part at Alicant, and part at Genoa. Two months' dry provision at whole allowance is to be forthwith dispatched to the said squadron. [Ibid., p. 137.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen, hearing you intend to order the Rupert to sail westward, directs that the said ship continue in the Downs till further orders from her Majesty. [Ibid.]
June 13.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 798.] Enclosing:—
Copy of a letter from Admiral Russell to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated 6 June, 1694, off the Lizard. I sent you from St. Helen's lists of the English and Dutch ships accompanying me to the Mediterranean, and of those left under the command of Lord Berkeley and Admiral Almonde; also the orders given to these last. We parted this day with the wind at N.W. As there is not three months' provisions in the squadron, I am taking with me the two provision-ships, whose masters are willing to be discharged in any port in Spain. I trust you will send some provisions after us. Mr. Steventon tells me the supplies in these two ships will make out three weeks for the squadron. It would have been very happy if this detachment had been made a month since, we might then have done some service, but now I have little expectation of it; had I foreseen this I should not have taken this long voyage. [Ibid., p. 802.]
June 13.
On board the Neptune.
Lord Macclesfield to —. I have sent Captain Salisbury to give you an account of all that has passed, and what is proposed for their Majesties' service; I shall await her Majesty's commands by him. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 532.]
June 13.
Sailing to Portsmouth.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. The victuallers and bombvessels have lost a fly-boat of 500 tons laden with powder, taken by a privateer off Dungeness, which is no wonder, considering that they had only one frigate for their convoy. It is lucky they did not meet with four half-galleys that some of our ships saw come through the Race and go into Brest the morning we came away. When these bomb-vessels joined us on the 10th instant I called another council of war, and according to the opinion thereof, desire you will propose to her Majesty that she will be pleased to send orders for our going to sea with the bomb-vessels, and all or what part of the soldiers shall be thought requisite, and give a latitude to the council of war to attempt what place they shall think most proper when at sea.
We do not question but to revenge the affront we have received, and make the enemy most uneasy all the remaining part of the summer. If this be approved I desire you will send me an order to send to Jersey and Guernsey for pilots, and will also order me contingent money to reward those that are bold and forward, for the machinevessels are not to be made use of but by great boldness of men that carry them on, and boldness is most commonly begot by the hopes of reward; besides contingent money has always been thought so necessary, no officer in the post I am now in ever was without it. Our ships that battered the castles in Camaret Bay had as warm service as has lately been known, and those men that stood upon the decks, if her Majesty thinks well of it, through her bounty really deserve a reward. I write those that stood upon the decks, for I am sorry to acquaint you that many ran into the hold. The proposal I here make to you was first proposed to me by Mr. Wharton. If it should not be approved of, and the troops be sent to Flanders, three hospital ships we have with us would be of little use, and would serve to transport many men, thus saving some expense.
On the 11th inst. a Dutch rear-admiral named Muise joined me with two ships more. I have not one clean ship with me for a scout, without which there is hardly any intelligence to be had, or any advantage to be taken of the enemy. In Camaret Bay we had but twenty-nine line of battle ships and four frigates, all which frigates are for the present unserviceable, so that when I come in I have not one ship to send to cruize on the back of the Isle of Wight, but what is crowded with soldiers and is a heavy sailer; therefore I hope the Admiralty will be ordered to supply me with some others. A Swede, eight days out from Dieppe, informs me they are much alarmed there upon the news of an invasion, and that they had put twelve hundred old soldiers into the town and eight hundred pensioners from Paris, and that, six weeks before, they had placed mortars and batteries in all places they thought needful. I enclose an account of soldiers and seamen missing; that of the seamen you may depend on, but I question whether there be so many soldiers missing; numbers were taken prisoners, and I believe it may be worthy of the council's consideration whether a stop be now put to the exchange of prisoners, till it is known whether the French make any difficulty of sending back the soldiers. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 540.]
June 13.
London.
Mons. Leyoncrona to the Duke of Shrewsbury. [Ibid. 7, No. 52.] Enclosing:—
A list (made by order of the King of Sweden) of demands by Swedish subjects for ships brought up in England and for losses and damages by them sustained, according to their owners' accounts. [Ibid., No. 52 i.] Appended are:— Sir Charles Hedges' remarks upon the above list. [Ibid., No. 52ii.]
June 13. Minutes of the proceedings of council with respect to orders to Lord Berkeley as to the land forces, commanded by LieutenantGeneral Talmash, embarked on the fleet, &c. [Ibid., No. 53.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to grant to John Baker, eldest son of Colonel Henry Baker, deceased, in consideration of the said colonel's acceptable services in the defence of Londonderry, the lands of Milltown, Newton, Derver Grange, Christianstown, Upper Allordstown, Corbolis and Dromiskin, in co. Louth, formerly held by Nicholas Gernon, in tail male to his two sons, with remainder to George Gernon, a person indicted and outlawed for rebellion, and now in France; the last of the sons of Nicholas Gernon died about the beginning of December last. Claims upon the estate are preferred by Brent Moore and Ann his wife, formerly wife of the said Nicholas Gernon, and by one Fortescue, who had married the daughter of Nicholas by a former wife. Clauses are to be inserted in the grant charging the said John Baker with the payment of the annuity formerly paid by the Crown to Ann Baker, his mother, and of certain sums to his younger brother and sisters, Henry, Eleanor and Elizabeth Baker, at their several ages of eighteen years. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 122.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to grant to James Roch, the estate of James Everard, a forfeiting person in the county of Waterford, and of the following ferries near his habitation in Ireland, viz., the ferries of Kinsale, Donegal alias Passage and Ra Coursee in co. Cork; the ferries of Waterford, Passage and Dungarvan, co. Waterford; of Wexford, Carrick-upon-Slaine, Rosse and Ballyhack, co. Wexford; the ferries or passages of Strangford, and Porto Ferry, and of Narrow water, co. Down; the ferry of Lifford in Donegal, of Annabog and Longhill in Limerick, of Killaloo in Clare, of Lanesborough in Longford to Ballyhegue in Roscommon; the ferry of the abbey of Grange in Mayo, of Ballynard in Wexford on the river of Ross, leading into Bridge Island, and the ferry of Liffey at Hawken's Wall near Dublin; the said Roch having shewn by his petition, that notwithstanding the grant to him of all the ferries in Ireland, for which a privy seal was signed 5 March, 5 William and Mary, he is still kept out of possession thereof by persons pretending ancient rights thereto. [Ibid., p. 125.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing the presentation of John Jones, clerk, B.A., to the rectory of Aberfraw, co. Anglesey, void by the death of Richard Rowland. [H.O. Church Book 2, p. 14.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrant for John Neering to go to Gravesend and Newcastle [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 219]; for John Chape, Esther his wife and three small children, ditto [Ibid., p. 220]; for Catharina Van Romsen, with four children, to go to Holland; for Peter Mariscoe, a messenger, to go to Portsmouth; for James Raymond, a French refugee, to go to Holland; and for Louis du Plat, his wife and four children, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 578].
June 13.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Robert, Lord Lexington, his Majesty's envoy extraordinary to the Emperor, entered into the said employment on May the 1st last past. [Ibid, 39, p. 43.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. "I do not perceive by the letter you enclosed that any complaint is made that the soldiers would not assist, or indeed that they demanded they should. I doubt therefore one may be too quick in giving them such directions which if they should not execute with prudence, might do more harm than good. It is my opinion therefore one had better stay till the letter Mr. Hutchinson expects arrives, which will probably be to-day. If anything more is asked by them care may be taken by to-morrow's post." [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 30.]
June 14.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 806.] Enclosing:—
Extract of a letter from Capt. Launce, of their Majesties' ship Sheerness, dated at Lowestoft, 10 June, 1694, reporting the seizure of a pink laden with corn, ostensibly from Taymouth to Ostend, but suspected to be bound to Dunkirk. The master offered to bribe two of the men belonging to the Sheerness by 5l. apiece and the payment of all their wages due in their Majesties' service, "which is above a year." [Ibid., p. 810.]
June 14.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. Orders have been given for two months dry provisions for the Straits squadron; some of Lord Berkeley's ships will be required as a convoy to Cadiz. [Ibid., p. 814.]
June 14.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. We have received the Queen's pleasure for stopping the Rupert in the Downs; as she was one of the third rates assembled for cruising by an Act of Parliament, we cannot "answer" her lying in port, or being diverted from that service Moreover, we have no other third-rate to supply her place, and beg one of Lord Berkeley's squadron may be detached for that purpose [Ibid., p. 818.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Treasury Commissioners. Directing short allowance money, &c., to be provided in accordance with the order sent to the Admiralty on the 13th instant. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 138.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Clark, merchant, praying a patent for making black latten and in plates, as good as any brought from Germany. Referred for report to the Attorney of Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 411.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. Dr. Jame Wellwood has been appointed by the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded Seamen to be principal physician at the forts of Deptford Greenwich, Gravesend, and other places upon the Thames, and he has acted by virtue of their Commission ever since 14 May, 1691, without any allowance for the same either by way of travelling charges or otherwise. Her Majesty thinking it fit he should be considered for his attendance in that service, commands you to take the same into consideration and report to her Majesty your opinion as to what is fit to be allowed yearly to a chief physician for his care of the sick and wounded seamen in the said places, as also what allowances are made to physicians in other ports of the kingdom. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 31.]
[June 14.]
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded, &c., directing them to discharge William Bidot, a French protestant prisoner at Portsmouth. [H.O. (Secretary's) Letter Book 3, p. 171.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Romney. I have received a letter from the Board of Ordnance of the 6th inst. concerning Mr. Bushwell [Brushwell ?], the inventor of an engine to break chains and booms, which I have laid before the Queen, who thereupon commands me to acquaint you that as soon as the said engine is fixed Mr. Bushwell is to be discharged from any further attendance upon this service till further order. [Ibid., p. 171.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Leopold Starck, a German, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Paul Martin and Jacob Hanes, two French protestants, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland; for William Lasman, a dyer by trade, his wife, and two children, to go to Gravesend, and embark for Holland or Hamburg [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 220]; for Robert Peake, a dyer, and his wife, ditto; for Mary Paisible, with her wearing apparel and necessaries, to return out of France in any of the ships appointed for the exchange of prisoners and land in any port of England [Ibid., p. 221].
June 15. Sir John Somers to the King. "Last night the Duke of Shrewsbury, Lord Godolphin, Secretary Trenchard, and myself did meet, in obedience to your commands, to consider of the commissions of the Customs and Excise. I could have wished it had been sooner, that some good effects of the alterations might have appeared before your return.
"I have presumed to send a list of the commissions that you may see how they now stand, and what changes are proposed.
"In the commission of the Customs everybody agreed to leave out Sir Richard Temple and Mr. Booth. It was also agreed, that Sir Robert Clayton was very little use in the commission, but how far his interest in London, where he is the eldest Alderman, may make it proper to consider him must be submitted to your judgment.
"As to Sir John Werden, Lord Godolphin differed from the rest, he being of opinion that he had experience and was uncorrupt; whereas according to the informations we could get, he does show great partiality in preferring officers who are disaffected to the Government, and is not free from corruption, and his experience is a disservice to you, for rather then vary from the old course, he will defend all the frauds and abuses which are occasioned thereby.
"The persons which we agreed to propose to your consideration, as proper to serve in that commission, were Mr. Samuel Clerk of the Custom House, Sir Walter Young, and Mr. Chadwick.
"In the commission of Excise it was agreed that Mr. Hornby and Mr. Aram were such avowed Jacobites that there was nothing to be said for them.
"The three first in the commission may be left out without prejudice to the duty of Excise. But Sir Samuel Dashwood is an alderman and Sir Stephen Evans and Sir John Foche are very considerable men in the city and very useful to you upon all occasions of loans.
"As to Mr. Wilcocks, there was nothing determined last night, but upon discourse with "Lord Shrewsbury" and the Secretary this evening, we agreed to represent to you that he is said to be privately a partner in two brew-houses, which is directly against his oath, and tends greatly to the defrauding of the duty. I am apt to think Lord Godolphin has no opinion of him, by what he said last night, but we could not speak with him to know his opinion more particularly; but Wilcocks being a Dissenter we thought we might presume that he would not take this representation altogether amiss.
"We presume to offer the following names to you as persons fit to supply any vacancies in this commission, if they be acceptable to you. Mr. Edward Clark, of the House of Commons, Mr. Danvers, Mr. Foot Onslow, Mr. Tipping, Mr. Molesworth and Mr. Overton.
"I beg pardon for adding one observation, that you may see the necessity of making a speedy and a very effectual alteration in the commission of Excise. Those commissioners have yearly the disposition of 100,000l. in salaries to inferior officers, and these officers they appoint without any control, and if this great sum be distributed to the worst men which can be picked out, and it be considered how great an influence these inferior officers have upon great numbers of your subjects, and how they are spread in every part of the kingdom, it will be plain that nothing can tend more to the poisoning of the people.
"There is one thing necessary for carrying on your service, which was extremely wanting in these two commissions; that there should be somebody of them, who might upon all occasions give a satisfactory account in the House of Commons of what related to their proper business, which I hope Sir Walter Young and Mr. Clark will be very well qualified to do, if upon other accounts they be acceptable to you.
"I would not have given you the trouble of reading what is better told you by the rest of the Lords, who were present, but that they would persuade me it was necessary." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 28.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. Last night those persons met, which your Majesty was pleased to direct should consider of the commissions of Customs and Excise, and came to a resolution pursuant to the list here enclosed. I could not observe much difference of opinion concerning the persons to be turned out, unless in relation to Sir John Werden. My Lord Keeper, Mr. Secretary Trenchard and myself, had received several informations, though not such as we could prove, as if Sir John were guilty of the two faults this commission is by everybody charged with, corruption and a bias towards employing under-officers disaffected to your government. Upon these accusations we three were inclined to think it proper he should be removed; but Lord Godolphin, who pretends to a perfect knowledge of him, did so entirely answer for him as to the first, and differing in opinion as to the second, we thought it proper to leave the matter thus before you, to direct in it as you please.
As to Sir Robert Clayton, who is marked doubtful in the list of the Customs, Sir Robert Dashwood, Sir Stephen Evans, and Sir John Foche, who are likewise marked doubtful in the list of the Excise, we all agreed that these four fall under the same consideration as persons who neglect their attendance in their employment, and are at best so useless in them, that the commissions would certainly be improved by leaving them out, and putting diligent men in their room. But then it remains a question how far your Majesty in prudence will consider them as eminent citizens, and persons who all do or should promote loans, and other services you may expect from the city. For these reasons they are left for you to determine as you please.
The reasons for removing Sir Richard Temple are corruption, disaffection, neglect, and in short being good for nothing.
Mr. Booth is by all agreed to be a well-wisher to your government, but so highly charged with corruption as it is said he understands nor minds no other part of the place.
Mr. Aram, of the Excise, is a person I do not know, but by the accounts given of him, suspected to be ill-inclined to the government.
Mr. Hornby, by everybody known, and I believe hardly denied by himself, an avowed Jacobite, that keeps clubs openly declaring their principles.
Having said thus much in relation to the persons proposed to be turned out, I shall trouble you with very little concerning those offered in their room. You know most or all of them, only I doubt it will be necessary I should say a few words concerning one which I myself offered, though he was readily consented to by the rest, who agreed he had talents extremely proper to make an industrious, faithful and zealous officer, and that is Mr. Molesworth.
I apprehend you have received a disadvantageous character of him; but perhaps that same active busy spirit that rendered him an uneasy correspondent to a Secretary of State may be no ill recommendation towards putting him into these commissions, which want warmth and zeal, and I must do him the justice to say that in my idle time, having looked over many of his dispatches, and the answers to them, he was often full of his own projects and perhaps too tedious for one that had multiplicity of business to answer; but in the concerns with Denmark, it were to be wished that his opinion had been followed in many particulars. Upon the whole I think the man nicely honest, zealous for your Government, a lover of business, painful and assiduous in any employment, and with very good parts to set all these at work. He has a relation in the West, by whose interest he is almost secure to come into Sir Peter Colledon's place in Parliament, where I am sure he has talents to be made very useful for you, and if he be desperate of your favour, I foresee he will be a very troublesome popular speaker, having suffered as much in this revolution as any man of his estate, and got reputation by his book which was written with great ingenuity.
But having troubled you, I doubt, too long upon this subject, I will only add, that in case you should think fit to remove him out of the commission of Customs, Mr. Clark, of the House of Commons, who is proposed for the Excise, would, I believe, be the most acceptable and proper person to add to the three in this list mentioned, and if you should resolve to continue Sir John Werden, in regard of his long experience, I should think this would be the best occasion for advancing that other, Mr. Clark, who has now some place which he fills very well in the Customs.
Some time after I had returned your answer to Lord Montagu, upon Lord Falkland's death, he came to me to offer himself if he could be useful to you in Holland. I found he meant it as a compliment, and proof that he was ready in any capacity to serve you. I promised him to accquaint you with it, and I suppose whatever answer you will return, he will be no further troublesome to you in it.
Since writing this I perceive the Lord Keeper and the Secretary are of opinion that Mr. Wilcox, who is likewise one of the Excise, should be removed; he was formerly a brewer, and is suspected still to continue that trade; we think ourselves more at liberty to speak of this man without Lord Godolphin, because he is a Whig and a Dissenter, though for my own part I can say nothing for or against him.
I have detained you with an unreasonably long letter, and yet cannot help adding a few words to lament the loss of poor Mr. Talmash; Captain Green who has indited this enclosed relation, brought me the sad news this morning, saying he had a message to deliver to the Queen, at which he desired none should be present but myself. I immediately took him to her Majesty where he spoke much to the effect he has here signed.
The account pretending to be very exact and more particulars than I could charge my memory with, I desired him to set it down in writing, which accordingly is done, and at the same time, by the Queen's command, I recommended him not to divulge several of the circumstances which you will observe may be construed to the prejudice of some of the living, and truly I hope rather happened by mistake and accident, than any other way; for by a gentleman I have spoken with to-night, who was also in the action, I am informed several of the boats ran foul one of another, and others drew too much water to allow them to land at an ebbing tide, as it was when the Lieut.-General went ashore. The Secretary will give you an account that we every hour expect what proposals will come from the fleet. I confess I have very little hope in any, and yet I perceive, since the men are on board, the town expect we should not leave their [the enemy's] coast at rest. I always concluded it would have been agreed between the sea and the land officers, who promoted this design, what to attempt in case this of Brest did not succeed, which I ever feared probable, but it seems no such thing has been considered. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 29.]
June 15. The Relation of Captain Nathaniel Green, volunteer with Lieutenant General Talmash in the expedition to Brest.
On the 7th inst. Lord Berkeley, with the squadron under his command, anchored about noon between the two lands near Camaret Bay, the water being about five miles over. In the afternoon General Talmash went in a yacht (taking Colonel La Motte, an engineer, with him) to view the landing place, and there being no batteries raised nor trenches dug, the general was encouraged to land the next day. The 8th in the morning there appear on a high land near the shore, about five squadrons of horse, with some few foot, and treated us all the day long with cannon shot and bombs, but did us little or no hurt. A council of war was held that morning on board Lord Berkeley's ship, where it was resolved that the Marquis of Carmarthen with three English and four Dutch men-of-war should divert and batter Camaret Fort in order to cover the general and the land forces in their landing. Immediately after Lord Carmarthen was engaged with the fort, the general commanded the land forces to go into the boats.
Lord Cutts, brigadier, was commanded to land first with nine companies of grenadiers; Colonel Venner, in case of opposition, was to sustain him with his regiment; Colonel Hussey was to sustain Colonel Venner, and so every colonel had his regular orders to sustain each other. But when we came to the shore the army saw three batteries, one on the right hand shore and two on the left hand, besides three trenches within the land on our front. The first trench was lined with men, the second empty, and the third full with a battery over it to cover all, and for further strength one hundred and fifty musketeers were covered behind a sand rock about ten yards distant from the land rock. This sudden and prodigious appearance of strength made our men not very forward to land.
The general, being near the shore in a small boat with Colonel La Motte, Lieutenant-Colonel Montargis and Captain Green, gave orders for landing by word of mouth, but none landed at that time except nine grenadiers with one ensign. Notwithstanding the great danger, the general would, and did land, Captain Green going up to the middle in water first, the general next in the same depth of water, then Colonel La Motte and his brother Lieutenant-Colonel Montargis, and so marched up to the land rock for cover, it being about thirty yards from the water.
When one hundred and fifty more grenadiers and soldiers were landed the general came from the rock and put himself at the head of them, but immediately received, from the batteries, the sand rock and the land rock, a great number of small shot which cut off most of these men, killed Colonel La Motte, shot his brother through the left leg, and the general about the middle of the right thigh with a poisoned shot.
After this the general sheltered himself under the rock again, but presently, after the landing of two hundred soldiers more, and two or three captains and some few subalterns, he headed these men a second time to take the sand rock, but was repulsed by the said rock and the batteries with the loss of most of these men, and then retreated again to the rock, calling out for more men to land, but a body of horse being seen to march towards the shore, the general, by great entreaty, was persuaded to go off and to get into a boat, being led by Lieutenant-Colonel Montargis and followed close by Captain Green (to save him from shot) who upon entering the water received a slug in his back, but having a buff waistbelt on and the hanger making it double, it did him no more harm than to go through his bell coat, waistcoat and shirt, breaking the skin a little, and there lodged. When the general came to the well boat side, Montargis and Green lifted him in, but being deserted by most of the seamen and aground, the boat could not get off. A boat of Lord Berkeley's being near, Captain Green promised the men 5l. to take in the general, which they did and by the time they were six or eight boats' lengths from the shore the horse came down and cut off all that were left or that had landed afterward.
So that on shore and in the boats he judges we have lost about five or six hundred soldiers. In going, Captain Green sitting behind the general, received a pistol shot in his hat, breaking only the upper part of his head. When the general was gone quite off, the Earl of Macclesfield, major-general, very prudently beat a retreat and so drew off without any further loss. The general rowed to Lord Berkeley's ship, asking the attendance of Mr. Worth, a surgeon, and a ship to carry him to England. For this the Dreadnought was allotted, and once aboard this ship he was attended by Mr. Worth. About half an hour after, Lord Berkeley and the general officers came on board the general's ship and there held a council of war, which concluded with a resolution to weigh anchor next morning and to sail for Spithead. The general, however, made the best of his way to Plymouth, arriving in the Sound on Monday, the 11th inst., about seven in the morning, and landed at nine; he was dressed with the assistance of the physicians and surgeons that were in that town, whose judgments were that he would do well; but on Tuesday about four in the afternoon, he fell into a slumber till five, and then waking sent for Captain Green, and showed him his thigh, which was swelled to a prodigious bigness. Before he died the general asserted it was impossible to have served their Majesties better, unless he had been better obeyed, because none of the general officers landed with him; but that, apprehending it would have been to little purpose to have landed more men, Lord Macclesfield acted as prudently in beating a retreat as my Lord Cutts did undutifully in not going on. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 30.] Appended is a list of General Talmash's dying requests to their Majesties, respecting preferments for Colonel Montargis, Mr. Allen, Mr. Hyde, Mr. Sterne and Captain Green. [Ibid. 30 i.]
June 15. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. In pursuance of your Majesty's command I have attended my Lord Keeper, the Duke of Shrewsbury and Mr. Secretary Trenchard about some changes which they tell me you have directed to be made in the commissions of Excise and Customs. I have long thought it necessary for the revenue of the Customs that there should be a change made in that commission, but I never found that argument strong enough to prevail for the doing of it until now that, for the sake of removing some men that are of one party and gratifying some that are of another in the commission of Excise, your Majesty is inclined to make a change in both. I knew so little of your mind, as to the persons intended to be put in or put out, that I thought all that belonged to me to say in that meeting would be to give an account impartially of those in either commission who understand their business, and of those who did not, nor never could be made to understand it; but I cannot say that that consideration was much minded, either with relation to those proposed to be left out, or put in. I shall not therefore trouble you with the names of either the one or the other, knowing they will be sent by those Lords, but content myself to say in general, with great submission, that I cannot think it for your service to make changes in the management of your revenue, to gratify party and animosity, or to procure advantage to particular persons by putting them into the employment of others, who, if they have not done their duty, ought to be charged with it and to be heard in their own defence, either by your Majesty or at least by the Treasury, and a report made to you from them, who must either be the best judges of this matter, or else they are not fit to sit there; and in that case you would be in the right to make one change more, and judge that commission too, as well as the others. I believe this is the first time that ever such entire changes were made in commissions immediately under the Treasury without the advice and communication of that board, and I am apt to think this Council will not succeed the better for that method being not followed now. I may be partial in this case, but I confess I think a commissioner of the Treasury has an employment uneasy enough in this kingdom, without adding any mortifications to it which are seldom offered to people in their station, though when I have said all this as to the manner and the motives of these changes, I must own that the commission of the Customs cannot be made worse than it is at present, and I think that of Excise requires some alterations, and might easily be mended if the proper considerations for that matter might be admitted to prevail in it; I ask your pardon for having said so much on this subject, and for not having rather said more to you of the difficulties we struggle with in the Treasury, but the truth is I am tired myself, and am afraid of tiring your Majesty with troubling you perpetually upon such unpleasing subjects. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 31.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the King. In obedience to your commands I have met with the Lord Keeper, the Duke of Shrewsbury and Lord Godolphin to consider the commissions for managing the Customs and Excise, and to report our opinions thereupon to you. Upon consideration of the commission of the Customs we were all of opinion that if you shall be pleased to make any alteration therein, it will be for your service to leave out Sir Richard Temple and Mr. Booth. We did likewise agree that Sir Robert Clayton was not of any use in that station, though in regard to his interest in the city, he may perhaps deserve your consideration.
But we were not so unanimous in respect of Sir John Werden, Lord Godolphin thinking him a very knowing officer, the rest apprehending that he has too much protected some of the inferior officers who are not very well affected to the present Government. We have thought fit to lay before you the names of three persons, whom we believed to be very capable of serving in that employment, which are—Sir Walter Young, Mr. Samuel Clarke, of the Custom House, and Mr. Chadwick.
As to the Commission of Excise, we resolved to represent to you our opinion:—that Sir Samuel Dashwood, Sir Stephen Evans, and Sir John Foche are very little serviceable in that employment; that Mr. Hornby and Mr. Aram are generally reputed persons disaffected; and that Mr. Wilcox is reported to have an interest in two brewhouses, which is contrary to the Act of Parliament and to the duty of his place, for which reasons we judge that they may deserve to be removed, unless you, for other considerations, shall think fit to continue any of them.
Those names we agreed to lay before you for supplying their places are:—Mr. Edward Clarke of the House of Commons, Mr. Danvers, Mr. Tipping, Mr. Onslow, Mr. Molesworth, and Mr. Overton.
That which we had chiefly regard to in this representation is that those branches of the revenue may be advanced, or at least kept from sinking; that your affairs in Parliament relating to the revenue may be always well explained, and the debate concerning it well supported, as often as there shall be occasion; and that particular care may be taken that no officers may be employed under them, but such as are well affected to your government.
I have laid before you in my letter to Mr. Blathwayt what occurs here relating to sea affairs. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 32.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Sir Charles Hedges. The Swedish Secretary has lately delivered in a memorial with the list of ships for which satisfaction is demanded by the King, and the same having been laid before the Queen, she commands me to transmit it to you, and directs that you report to her (as soon as possible) the motives and consideration that drew on the condemnation of these ships, and what your opinion is of their demands. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 32.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Commissioners of the Post Office communicating an advice to me they have this day received concerning Debarts having come out of Dunkirk with eleven men-of-war, and not knowing whether you have received the same, I thought fit to send you a copy thereof. Enclosure not here appended. [Ibid.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Moses Berent and his son to go to Holland; for John Swan, a Dutchman, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 578.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Kenge and Charles Marris to apprehend Sir George Maxwell and Mr. James Tucker, together with their papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 46.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Credits for the Straits' squadron shall be ordered at Cadiz, Alicante and Genoa in such proportions as you think best. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 139.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the mustering and receiving into pay of the four regiments of foot to be raised under the several commands of Colonel John Courthope, Viscounts Charlemont and Mountjoy, and Sir Richard Atkins, in the room of four regiments of foot lately ordered from Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 127.]
June 15.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard, desiring instructions on the ordering of provisions requisitioned for the Straits' squadron. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 822.]
June 15.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard, acquainting him with the arrival of the fleet. [Ibid. 5, p. 544.]
June 15.
St. Helens.
The same to the same. We are using all imaginable dispatch in refitting the ships, &c. I have ordered hammocks for all the soldiers, which will contribute mightily to their health. I do not know whether the Admiralty will approve, but, if I have not power sent me to do this and several like things, the service will suffer extremely. If the soldiers could be permitted to go on shore on the Isle of Wight but for two nights it would be a great benefit to their healths. [Ibid., p. 548.] Enclosing:—
Copy of the resolution at a council of war held on board the Queen at St. Helens, 15 June, 1694. An express having arrived from Secretary Trenchard, a council of war was immediately called; they were in favour of sailing to the coast of France and there giving the enemy as much trouble as possible. Some small frigates are extremely necessary to sustain the bomb-vessels in places where the great ships cannot go. [Ibid., p. 552.]
June 16. M. Coehoorn to the King. The works here are now complete; but they are still working on the escarpment of the mountains, to make them yet more secure, and they are also preparing palisades, &c. Our plan of defence is drawn up provisionally. I hear from Baron de Heiden that, in case of an attack by the enemy, he has your orders to throw ten more battalions and four regiments of dragoons into the place. Your Majesty will pardon my saying that, if we have so many additional troops, in case of an attack we shall be robbed of all the glory of being attacked; therefore I would respectfully submit that six hundred cavalry or dragoons would be sufficient to prevent disorders in the town, and four infantry battalions to further secure the post of St. Walburgh, which will be the principal point of attack, for the enemy have thrown a line of boats across at Huy, and Boufflers is still occupying his three small camps near Chenay, with (report says) between nine and ten thousand men. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 24.]
June 16.
Dublin.
Sir J. Porter to the King. This very day the gentleman your Majesty commanded me to discourse with (concerning what related to your service and the quiet and security of this kingdom) was with me, and I had a full discourse with him; and upon the whole I found him ready to serve you in the way and particulars you desire.
I have thereupon made him acquainted with the bounty you do intend him and the method of conveying it to him, which is such as, because of privacy, he likes better than any other. It will pass through my hands only if you allow the manner, which is this, that you give directions that the Lords of the Treasury do signify your pleasure to the Lord Justices; that they cause a custodiam to be granted me of some part of the forfeited estates under a reasonable rent, to be paid and disposed of in such manner as you by your sign manual shall direct.
By this means I can without observation of any person, perform this service and be able to give you a satisfactory account that the profits are disposed of according to your directions. Whenever you shall require a more particular account of what passed between us, and what he has promised, I will send it, but considering the hazard of intercepting letters I have this time only given the "general" of it.
If what I have propounded be agreeable to your sentiments, I think it may be convenient to mention some particular estate to be granted to me, and for a few years only.
I shall take the liberty to mention that of Sir Valentine Brown, being remote from hence, and I think no man has applied for it, the rents thereof being at present in a great measure applied towards building barracks at Limerick. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 33.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen leaves it to you to dispose of the Rupert as you think fit, notwithstanding any former order to the contrary. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 139.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Mr. Bridgeman was this morning directed to send to Mr. Sotherne copies of letters from the collectors of Liverpool and St. Ives; I enclose a letter since received from the Treasury, with the Queen's directions that necessary care may be taken to prevent the danger which the trading ships on the coasts now seem to lie under. Enclosure not here appended. [Ibid., p. 140.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Berkeley. I have laid the result of yesterday's council of war before the Queen, who thinks it requisite to be informed whether you have under your consideration any particular designs upon the enemy's coasts, and whether all, or what part, of the land forces are necessary for the execution thereof. In the mean time you are to give directions for putting on shore all the land forces in the Isle of Wight, to remain there until further order. [Ibid.]
June 16.
Royal Oak in Cadiz Bay.
Rear-Admiral John Nevill to Sir John Trenchard. I have kept our ships all along in a condition of sailing, whenever orders should reach me. The ships have been supplied with bread, pease and oatmeal, and such as needed it have been careened and caulked. All our ships are together, in good condition, and tolerably manned. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 826.]
June 16. Minutes of proceedings of council with regard to certain admiralty matters, e.g. the service to be performed by Lord Berkeley's squadron, &c. [Ibid. 7, No. 54.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Captain Thomas Pearce, in Lord Cutts' regiment, to go to Holland; for Abigail Fransen, Johanna Goeritsen and three children, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 578]; and for Anne Gefray, Mary Browning and Jane Barnaby with three children, ditto [Ibid. p. 579].
June 17. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I am to acknowledge the honour of your Majesty's letter of the 8/18th, and if I had not by the same packet received one from Mr. Blathwayt of the 11th/21th. I should have been extremely uneasy to see your Majesty so justly displeased at our refusing to lay aside the land bank, while your army was in so great extremity, and we without any other certain prospect of relieving it; yet even to this moment that is our case. It is true the Bank of England have given us credit for a second 100,000l. but I am confident it is the last we are to expect from them, and they would not have given it when they did, but to furnish an argument for not concluding with the other; at present that is quite "out of dores," and our only resource now is to give out bills from the Exchequer. I am confident we shall all of us labour with our hearts and souls to make those bills effectual; some of us that their obstruction of the others may be the better justified, and some of us because it is plain there is nothing else to keep us alive. We have not yet concluded for our bullion, and when we do I doubt the quantity will not be so great as I thought at first, which is an ill effect of a good cause, the reason of it being that they bring no great quantity into the mint to be coined; they coin now above 70,000l. a week, and we hope to carry it on yet faster for the future; with all this, the new money does not circulate. We live in hopes it will come out more after Midsummer Day when no clipped money is to pass in loans. God send we may find it so. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 34.]
June 17.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. There are many supernumerary tenders in the fleet, left by Admiral Russell for disembarking the soldiers; they are a great charge, and I believe we shall have no occasion for them. The reason the last council of war named no particular place in France to attempt, was that the French might have their force more divided to guard every place, it being observed that when anything is resolved upon in England it is not long before it reaches the other shore; whereas if the forces were on board, and no one knew which way we bent, it would keep at least double the forces we have on board from reinforcing the French army in Flanders, which would be a service, allowing we could do nothing else. The number of men drawn from my ships by Admiral Russell, together with the sickness on board some ships, has wholly disabled them. I have but eighteen English ships with me, and those so poorly manned, that we are but a very weak fleet. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 556.] Enclosing:—
Account of men taken out of certain ships by Admiral Russell's order. 17 June, 1694. [Ibid., p. 560.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen commands that you send orders for four men-of-war of Lord Berkeley's squadron to join the ships which are cruising upon the Broad Fourteens; also for some small frigates to be sent immediately to join the said squadron, in accordance with the desire of the council of war of the 15th instant. Lord Berkeley having represented to her Majesty how necessary it is that the land men should have the conveniency of hammocks to lie in whilst they are on board the fleet, and that it would contribute mightily to their health, such hammocks are to be forthwith provided. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 141.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the Admiral. The Queen desires to know whether the short allowance money, &c. ordered for the Straits' squadron is provided; also whether the Society and Angel, bombvessels, sailed with the Dutch man-of-war that convoyed the Dutch victualling ships to Mr. Russell's squadron, and, if not, the reason for their not doing so. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Victualling Commissioners. The Queen desires to know whether you intend to send the credits ordered for the Straits' squadron to-morrow by the Groyne packet. [Ibid., p. 142.]
June 18.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. In accordance with the Queen's commands we have sent orders to Lord Berkeley to despatch four ships of his squadron to the Broad Fourteens; and directed the Navy Board to supply hammocks for the soldiers on that squadron. But, as regards her Majesty's orders to send some small ships to join Lord Berkeley (the coast being at present very much infested with the enemy's privateers, for the guarding whereof a great number of these small ships are by Act of Parliament particularly appointed for cruisers, besides convoys for remote parts), we cannot answer the diverting them from those services. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 830.]
June 18.
St. Helens.
Copy of resolutions at a council of war held on board the Queen. The council have no particular place under their consideration for bombarding, but judge some place on the coast of Normandy, according as opportunity offers. Four regiments will be sufficient to man the fleet and secure the bomb-vessels against small embarkations filled with soldiers. Resolved to put the soldiers on shore on the Isle of Wight to-morrow, with seven days' provisions. [Ibid. 5, p. 564.]
June 18.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. After four hours' discoursing I send you the result of the council of war. We believe Calais, Dieppe, Havre de Grace and some other places of less consideration may be without much difficulty bombarded, and are willing our second attempt, though of small consideration, may succeed. When this is over we would propose to sail to the Bay of Biscay, and try what may be done there, but if the admiralty will not be persuaded to send us some frigates we shall be at a mighty loss, and shall not be able at any time to send you an account of our proceedings. [Ibid., p. 566.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lady Jane Dowdall, praying the reversal of an outlawry obtained against her son. Referred to the Treasury for their report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 413.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the annulling of an excommunication pronounced on 24th March last against William Armar, precentor of the cathedral church of Connor, for contumacy in not appearing before the late visitors at a royal visitation held at Lisburne in Ireland, the said Armar being then afflicted with a great sickness in London. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Book 13, p. 127.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a cessat processus against Richard Edgecomb, who states in his petition that in Michaelmas term last there was an information exhibited in the Crown Office against him for speaking and publishing divers dangerous and seditious words against the Government in October last, saying he would fight for King James and endeavour to restore him, and that 30,000 men were ready; for which words he is bound to appear at the next assizes in Cornwall. But he has produced a certificate attesting his loyalty, and alleging that he was greatly distempered by drink at the time; he prays for a stay of proceedings against him. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 579.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Henry Timmerman, Jacobus Keran and Ferdinand Vogtt to go to Holland; and for Peter and Giles Mingot, ditto. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to pay to the gentlemen of the Chapel Royal the sum of 20l. as a free gift, and instead of three deer which of custom have been granted to them yearly. [Ibid., p. 581.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Simon Chapman to apprehend Alexander Gawne of Brentford, Middlesex, esq. He is accused of treason and has for some time absented himself from his own house, and is supposed to frequent the house of Sir Richard Dunton at Isleworth. [Ibid., p. 583.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
A like warrant to search the house of Sir Richard Dunton for arms and treasonable papers. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant addressed to Peregrine, Marquis of Carmarthen, directing that, by beat of drum or otherwise, volunteers are to be raised for recruiting and completing his marine regiment according to the establishment, and the officers are to see that the soldiers behave themselves civilly and duly pay their landlords; all magistrates, justices of the peace, constables, and other officers are to assist in providing quarters, impressing carriages, etc. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 220.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
A like warrant of the same date directed to Lord Berkeley, colonel of the second marine regiment, and in his absence to the commanderin-chief of the said regiment. [Ibid.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Westwood, gent., to be ensign of that company in the regiment of foot commanded by Charles, Duke of Bolton, of which he himself is captain. [Ibid. 4, p. 61.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder of London to cause John Gould, John Sanettor, John Ryan, Richard Cheevers, and Constantin Doarty, to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate, upon condition of transportation. They were found guilty of high treason and piracy and were sentenced to death on 26 February last, at a general sessions for the Admiralty of England held at the Marshalsea. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 44.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Berks to revoke and determine the reprieve granted to John Parr, convicted at the Reading assizes of highway robbery, and sentenced to death for the same. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 44.]
June 19.
London.
Lord Normanby to the King. "I beg your Majesty's pardon once more for troubling you upon so trifling a subject as myself, though I must own a sacred promise from a king is of no small importance; but the occasion of my approaching your Majesty again this way, after I held myself obliged to take my leave humbly for ever, is a discourse I had the honour to have with the Queen yesterday, by which I find all my just grievance capable of being redressed in one word from your Majesty to the effect that I should meet with the Keeper, President, Privy Seal and Secretaries when they are assembled.
"Now, Sire, this very way of their meeting with myself was my own proposal to your Majesty when you were pleased to advise me about those methods, and when you were so partial as to think me so much more assiduous than the White Staff as to leave them out at the same time, which I neither did or do desire, but only that I should not suffer on their account by an exclusion plainly contrary to your promise as well as to reason and the nature of business; for how is it possible to advise the Queen without being acquainted with all things and letters communicated to that meeting? I did take upon me to propose that some more probable attempt should be made immediately on the French, and not let 40 ships and 6,000 men lie idle; but when the Queen asked me what, how could I answer without being so well informed of all as others are? For though I believe very good proposals may be made, such as it were a shame to let slip, yet till I am let in to the same knowledge with others, that which may seem now reasonable may, for ought I know, be ridiculous and impracticable.
"Thus, Sire, you see the inconvenience of your present method, which yet I submit to, if not excluded out of it; since it is a real cabinet without the name, nay, called so generally now, and there was no other in all the late King's times, out of which, too, the Privy Seal Lord Anglesey was ever excluded; so that it does not go now according to places since he is in it, without having a right, while I am out, to whom your Majesty assured it most solemnly and frequently; once, I remember, with this expression: that we were composed better than formerly and persons who could at least draw together in your business. Whereas now, instead of that, I cannot be thought one who draws, but one who is dragged behind everybody else. Your Majesty is and ought to be the master, to use me as you please; but I beg leave to say with all due submission, that this usage, if continued, is not only below so great a king to impose after all assurances to the contrary by which I was brought to the council, because I depended upon them, but 'tis even below me, the meanest, of your subjects, to acquiesce in farther than patience and my duty oblige me." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 35.]
June 19.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 834.] Enclosing:—Extract of a letter from Lord Berkeley, dated at St. Helens, 17 Jane, [16]94. Four of the ships here greatly need repairs. If you are assured the French will not yet fit out their great ships at Brest and Rochfort, it would be well to lay these ships up, and turn over their men; otherwise, I believe it would be better to have a month's patience. We are still in great want of men, but have many supernumerary tenders for which we shall have no great occasion. Besides the Lancaster and Monk, which are not in condition, I have but eighteen English line of battleships. [Ibid., p. 838.]
June 19.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. We suppose the Society and Angel bombvessels sailed with the Dutch men-of-war, pursuant to orders sent to them. We have heard nothing of the former, but yesterday received a letter from the commander of the Angel, telling us he had put into Plymouth Sound, having lost company with the fleet. [Ibid., p. 842.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Orders are to be given for repairing the three machine-vessels which did not sail with the main fleet, viz. the Crowned Herring and the Trumpet, now at Portsmouth, and the Whitepot, at Deptford. The twelve little machines, now in the store-house at Portsmouth, under the charge of Mr. Felton, are to be brought into the Thames, and shipped on board a vessel of about sixty tons. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 142.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen would have you come to my office at five this afternoon, with an account of the ships you proposed to the House of Commons for the main fleet for this summer's service. [Ibid., p. 143.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Draft of a letter to Admiral Russell. "I send this under cover to the consul at Alicante to inform you that the Commissioners of the Victualling Office have sent you, by the Groyne packet, credits for 50,000l., payable at Cadiz, Alicante and Genoa. They are also ordered to prepare two months' dry provision for the squadron with you at whole allowance. The victualling ships to the Dutch squadron with you sailed on the 8th inst. The Angel and Society bombvessels were sent to you but have put back; two others shall be sent with the victualling ships for Cadiz. It is probable that upon notice of your approach Mons. Tourville will retreat to Toulon. Report says the basin there will not receive their fleet without lying very close together, which will make them liable to be bombed.
I suppose you will have heard of our repulse at Brest, with about five or six hundred soldiers and two hundred seamen killed and missing; but what afflicts us most is the loss of Mr. Talmash, who died on the 12th inst. at night.
If a man-of-war should be sent before Algiers, during your stay in the Mediterranean, it is the Queen's pleasure that Mr. Baker, consul of Algiers, and his family, should be taken on board to be brought home. I have not yet any directions from the King concerning your stay in the Mediterranean." [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 570.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Couchman to apprehend Robert Webber of Clifford's Inn, junior, gent., for treason. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 580.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hayward to search for and apprehend Thomas Bertram, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 45.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ann, wife of John Blythman, shewing that he was gunner of their Majesties' ship the Smyrna Factor, and was in the late expedition against the French, where he was blown up and his body sorely burnt in the burning of the Rising Sun, and he now lies condemned for embezzling a barrel of powder, &c. Petitioner, having three small children, prays for her husband's life. Referred for report to the Lords of the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 60.]
June 20.
Turin.
Victor Amadeus [Duke of Savoy] to the King, congratulating him on the services of the Earl of Galway. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 26.]
June 20.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. We will dispatch orders to Lord Berkeley to send the London about to the buoy at the Nore; but we cannot give orders for the three ships to join the squadron under his command, unless we receive the Queen's orders for employing the Monk, Charles galley, and Shoreham, when they are fitted, in their stead, to answer the services of the ships appointed by Act of Parliament for cruisers. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 846.]
June 20.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. Upon consideration of what we discussed with you yesterday, we have to inform you that if the London be ordered about to Chatham, the men may be disposed of to help man the ships in the river; and we can send three ships to take the place of the disabled Monk, Charles galley, and Shoreham, if they are left at our orders as soon as they are refitted. [Ibid. 5, p. 574.]
June 20.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to the same. The soldiers are now all on shore; prior to their re-embarkation, without which we cannot go to sea, an order must be sent to Lord Cutts. The machine-vessels now with us are very crazy, and a trouble to us to take them to sea. I can foresee no use for them, except against Dunkirk where our great ships cannot go. I believe it would be for the service to leave them here till a squadron might be fitted to play them against the said place. Pursuant to an order from the Admiralty I have ordered four ships to join Rear-Admiral Hobson; the Dutch refuse to send any without an immediate order from the King or Queen. [Ibid., p. 578.] Enclosing:—
An account of what men are wanting to complete the complements of the ships of Lord Berkeley's squadron, 20 June, 1694. [Ibid., p. 582.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. In answer to your letter of to-day, the Queen commands you order the London to be brought into the Thames, and the men on board her discharged into the three ships you name, to join Lord Berkeley's squadron. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 143.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Lucas. It is her Majesty's wish that Mr. Burroughs be twice more admitted to see Colonel Parker, now a prisoner in the Tower. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 33.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Briggs, esq., praying a writ of error in a judgment obtained against him by the Earl of Kingston. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 413.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Auriol, gent., and others, setting forth that, having fled from France into this kingdom on account of their religion, they were obliged to bring some of their goods by stealth, whereupon they are threatened to be prosecuted in the Court of Exchequer. [Ibid.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Alexander Watton, a young man of about 18 years of age, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland; for Mary Giloyn, Magdalena Kerkman and three small children, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 222]; and for Henry Broome recommended by Major Churchill to go to Flanders [Ibid. 38, p. 581].
June 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for grant of licence and privilege to Edward Baynard, M.D., for his invention of a new sort of carriage useful for coaches, carts, etc., running with four or more wheels on one axe or axle tree turning with the wheels, with other contrivances, being easier, of less draught and safer for the highways and streets than has hitherto been used. [Ibid., p. 610.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hayward, to search for and apprehend Captain David MacAdams and Innes Ostowic, together with their papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 45.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Brevet to John Gibson, esq., to be a colonel of foot with full power to command and take his rank as if commissioned a colonel of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 221]; and commission for John Every, gent., to be second lieutenant of the company of which Captain William Bockenham is captain in the second marine regiment of foot commanded by Lord Berkeley [Ibid., p. 223].
June 21.
Viset.
Baron de Heiden to the King. Advices from Prince Izerclaes inform me the enemy is at Horion; in response to his urgent call for help, I have sent six battalions of his Electoral Highness's troops and the dragoons in Liege. I have reinforced the garrison of Maestricht with four battalions, and I will order the cavalry to encamp near that place. I hope that as the said troops are on the other side of the Meuse you will give orders that bread may be furnished them. I am now starting for Liege. Had we not feared that any disputes relative to the command at Maestricht would have caused disorder, we should have sent one of our generals; to avoid which I gave the command of these battalions to Colonel Baron de Heiden, who having been there a long while in garrison knows the place well. It is desirable to further increase the garrison there. Our cavalry is commanded by Lieut.-General Dewitz. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 27.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Orders are to be given to provide the Drakenstein, a Dutch man-of-war, with the stores mentioned in the enclosed list. The list is not entered. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 143.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen commands me to repeat her pleasure that you order the three ships mentioned in your letter of yesterday, which are to receive men from on board the London, to join Lord Berkeley's squadron with all possible expedition. Her Majesty leaves it to you to dispose of the Monk, Charles galley and Shoreham as you shall think fit. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 144.]
June 21.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. When Admiral Russell went away, he left a power with me to appoint officers in the fleet in case of vacancies; and now the Admiralty write to desire me not to appoint any officers in port without first acquainting them, a desire I shall not comply with, for otherwise I can keep the fleet in no order. Since this war the Admiralty have never in the summer time appointed officers in the line of battle ships, and I should be sorry to be the first officer not thought a judge of officers. I hope her Majesty will do me right in this matter, or leave the command of the fleet to some officer of an inferior post to mine, for this sort of usage I cannot bear. The Lisbon fleet is now in sight, sailing to the eastward.
We now victual the soldiers put on shore in the Isle of Wight, they having no subsistence. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 584.]
June 21.
Isle of Wight.
Lord Cutts to [Sir John Trenchard], from the camp on St. George's Down. The land forces under my command are now on shore, though the last were not disembarked till late last night. I shall tomorrow review them, and send an account of the state they are in. In the meantime I have written to the Duke of Shrewsbury to hasten us some subsistence, the sea-provisions occasioning sickness and being in many ways inconvenient. [Ibid., p. 588.]
June 21. Minutes of the proceeding of Council respecting orders to be given for Lord Berkeley's squadron. Notice to be taken of Lord Berkeley's letter mentioning their going into the Bay of Biscay after the service on the coast of Normandy, and thereupon to recommend them to consider whether it be not most advisable to sail into the Bay in the first place, in case they think it practicable to attempt anything beyond Brest. [Ibid. 7, No. 56.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Roope. I have received your letter of the 17th to which I have only to answer, at present, that what you write concerning the Justices of the Peace, I will speak to the Lord Keeper about when I know the names of the persons you wish to have added to the Commission of the peace to assist you in their Majesties' service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 33.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Post warrant and passes for Captain Joseph Turner with one horse and a guide to go to Harwich and Holland; for Magdalen le Vent to go to Gravesend and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 222]; for Susanna le Grand, a French protestant, to go to Gravesend and Holland; for Charlotte Papin and Sara Dativot, two French protestants, ditto [Ibid., p. 223]; for Catherine Moore and two small children to go to Flanders, on the recommendation of Mr. Edward Nelson, mayor of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and Mr. Samuel Brown, overseer of St. Martin's parish [Ibid. 38, p. 580]; and for Mr. Rambout Philipps to go to Holland [Ibid., p. 581].
June 22. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. "Yesterday being appointed for the opening of the books and taking the subscriptions to the Bank, the Commissioners of the Treasury waited upon the Queen for leave to go into the city and subscribe ten thousand pounds for your Majesty, being told the example of it would be a great encouragement to others; this was accordingly done, and it had such good success that the subscription yesterday amounted to near 350,000l. I have not heard what has been subscribed to-day, but so good a beginning seems to leave little doubt but the Bank will now take place notwithstanding the difficulty and obstructions it has met with almost in all places, and from all persons. I don't know what the consequence of it may be hereafter, and whether it will be a prejudice to the public and deserve to be repeated next sessions of Parliament, as some already threaten it shall be, but this I know, that without the 1,200,000l. which we hope for from this Bank and which cannot now be had without it, there will be no possibility of paying the subsistence farther than this next month of July; and therefore whatever opinion any others may have of it as to your service or the good of the public, yet I hope the Commissioners of the Treasury cannot reasonably be blamed hereafter for having promoted it, since 'tis plain that without it at this time there would be no carrying on of any payments either to the army or navy, for at present there is almost a total stop at credit, one set of people keeping up their money to subscribe to the Bank, and all the goldsmiths giving any rates to get the money into their hands to disappoint the subscriptions. But I hope the struggle will be over now in a little time, as soon as the Bank is full, and the credit resumes its course again. We find the ill consequence of it already so much that for these two last weeks we have not been able to pay Sir Joseph Herne; but with some difficulty we have prevailed with him to send the bills, by giving him tallies upon the Paper Act, and we can expect no more ready money till the credit of the Bank takes place, which will not be till either the whole sum of 1,200,000l. be subscribed, or till the 1st of August in case 600,000l. shall be subscribed by that time. You will have the goodness to forgive this hasty account of this matter which is the whole concern here at present." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 36.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Licence for Thomas Ashurst, esq., high sheriff of Lancashire, to live out of that county during his term of office. [H.O. King's Letters 2, p. 58.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for revoking and determining certain letters patent constituting and appointing Sir John Lowther, bart., lieutenant of the counties of Westmoreland and Cumberland, and appointing Charles, Earl of Carlisle, in his stead. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 582.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to raise a loan of 5,200l. on the credit of the hearth money, to provide payments due for the clothing of Colonel Cunningham's and Lord Donegal's regiments and for the levy money of the four new regiments of foot to be raised in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 128.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for Elizabeth Turraine to go to Holland; for Philip Nichols, a Dutchman, ditto; for Catherine Pietersen and her three children, ditto; for Anthony Ulric de Burchdorf, Thomas Hudolph de Campen, Alexander Kal Kreiter and John Schimmel Penning, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 581]; and for Philip Schurens and Valentine Rudolft, ditto [Ibid., p. 582].
June 23./July 3.
Turin.
Lord Galway to the King. The blockade of Casal has been resolved upon under General Shwing, an imperial officer. The rest of the letter is occupied with details of current strategy. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 37.]
June 23.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. We have sent orders to Lord Berkeley to hold his fleet in readiness to sail. As to his lordship's complaint of being restrained in appointing officers whilst in port, we do not find it has been used in the navy to give power for appointing officers in the channel to any other than the admiral of the whole fleet; his lordship being only commander-in-chief of a squadron of the said fleet, we do not think it proper that he should have power otherwise than when the squadron is at sea.
The ships appointed for the service of Ireland lay wind-bound at Plymouth several days, but have now sailed. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 850.]
June 23.
Admiralty Office.
The same to the same. We have ordered their Majesties' ships Sapphire, Garland and Joseph to join Lord Berkeley's squadron. [Ibid., p. 854.] Enclosing:—
(1) A letter from Captain Sole of their Majesties' bomb-vessel Angel, dated at Spithead, 21 June, [1694]. I sailed from Spithead on the 8th with a Dutch man-of-war bound for the fleet, which we joined on the 11th; on the night of the12th I lost sight of them in a gale, and made for Plymouth, from which I sailed on the 19th with the Lisbon and Port convoy, and have now returned to Spithead to refit. [Ibid., p. 856.] (2) A letter from Captain Edward Owen of the bomb-vessel Society, dated at Portsmouth, 21 June, 1694. I am now in harbour by Lord Berkeley's orders to remedy the defaults of my vessel, and intend to sail this evening. [Ibid., p. 860.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen directs that you send orders to Lord Berkeley to put to sea with all possible expedition with all his ships and bomb-vessels, except two of the bomb-vessels carrying one mortar apiece-such as are best fitted to endure the sea, to be left behind at Portsmouth, being designed for the Straits—and except two men-of-war to convoy such victualling ships as shall be sent to Admiral Russell. He is to take with him such of the machine-vessels and tenders as he shall think fit. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 145.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Berkeley. The Queen takes notice of your intention to go into the Bay of Biscay after the service on the coast of Normandy is over, and recommends it to you to consider whether it be not most advisable to sail into the said bay in the first place, in case it shall be thought practicable to attempt anything upon the coast in those seas. The Lords of the Admiralty have ordered 500l. to be paid to you for contingencies, and the Sapphire, Joseph, and Garland have orders forthwith to join you, but the Queen's pleasure is you do not stay for these ships. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 146.] Enclosing:—
Warrant to the same 23 June, 1694, to receive on board his squadron Major-General the Earl of Macclesfield and ten battalions of foot, and to set sail for the coasts of France, to make such attempts, or to otherwise distress and annoy the enemy, as shall be thought most advisable from time to time at a council of war of flag and general officers. [Ibid., p. 145.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Macclesfield to embark ten battalions of foot on Lord Berkeley's squadron, and to assist in all measures to be taken against the enemy. [Ibid., p. 146.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Capel. Mons. Bordieux, a French minister, who was chaplain to the late Duke of Schomberg when in Piedmont, is one that on many accounts deserves to be considered, and I wish it may be easier effected for him in Ireland than it is here, as his great abilities and services plead for him as much as does his numerous family. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 5.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sarah, Countess of Thomond, as executrix of the late Earl, the chief part of whose estate lay near Limerick; there are about 400l. arrears of rent due from Lord Brittas, but, during the troubles in Ireland, the said Lord Brittas having a regiment under his command, Lord Thomond's agents did not dare to take forth an execution upon a verdict obtained for the said arrears. Lord Brittas is now outlawed. Prays for an order to the Lords Justices. Referred to the Treasury for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 63.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for Michael Miller, a dragoon in Sir Thomas Levingstone's regiment, to go to Harwich and Holland or Flanders; for John Van Ysselvur, Elizabeth his wife, and their two small children, to go to Gravesend and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 223]; for Godfrey Keller, a German, to go to Holland; for Anthonetta Stange and two children and Maria Yoostens and a child, Dutch soldiers' wives, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 582]; for Abigail Hibbins, a Dutch soldier's widow, and two children, ditto [Ibid., p. 583].
June 24.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Orders are to be sent to Lord Berkeley to have the fleet in readiness to sail as soon as he shall receive orders for it. Lord Berkeley having informed me that you have written to him not to appoint any officers whilst in port without first acquainting you, and her Majesty, thinking it reasonable he should have the same powers as commanders of the Channel fleet have, desires an account of those powers, and of your reasons for restraining him. The Government of Ireland have represented the great losses the merchants daily sustain for want of the cruisers which were intended and directed to guard those coasts; you are therefore to take care that those ships are dispatched without further delay. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 144.]
June 25.
Victualling Office.
The Victualling Commissioners to Sir John Trenchard. From the enclosures you will perceive there hath been no want of provisions in the fleet, and that they have been provided with an overplus. The flesh, &c., in the two victualling ships that accompanied Admiral Russell will serve his whole fleet (consisting of 16,515 men) for upwards of five weeks at whole allowance; therefore we submit whether so great a quantity need be sent as has been ordered. Her Majesty's order that the seamen should be on short allowance of beer, as well as dry provisions, would have been greatly advantageous to the service if the whole fleet had remained in these seas; but, now so great a part has gone for the Straits, we offer it for consideration whether it would not be convenient for the seamen to be on short allowance for dry provisions only, which may prevent the spoiling of some quantity of the beer now in the victualling ships, and likewise lessen the charge of keeping the victualling ships longer in pay. We have further to ask her Majesty's pleasure respecting the victualling of the land-forces in our fleet; our agent mentions 5,000 men on board the English ships, besides a number on the Dutch. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 870.] Enclosing:—
(1) Extract of a letter received from John Stevenson, agent victualler in the Fleet, dated at St. Helen's, 23 June 1694, reporting on the victualling of Admiral Russell's fleet, and of Lord Berkeley's squadron. The admiral has promised to write to the Admiralty about putting the men on whole allowance of beer. This would abate one-fourth of the short allowance money, which latter commodity, I believe, you find very scarce, and I have too much of the other. [Ibid., p. 866.] (2) Abstract of provisions sent to the Straits with Admiral Russell in the ships Yarmouth and Providence. [Ibid., p. 868.]
June 25.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. I received yesterday the Queen's orders for going to sea. I thank you for your letter relative to my appointing officers. I have written to Lord Cutts about the re-embarking of the soldiers. I have but thirteen English ships now left with me, and the Admiralty have written to me to leave two behind, to go to the Straits, which, if I do, will make it impossible to take in all the soldiers without crowding them so that it will certainly breed diseases in the fleet. All the third rates that were fit to accompany us Admiral Russell took with him. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 592.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
J. H. Pauly, the Danish resident, to the Queen, representing the sufferings and losses entailed on his nation by proceedings consequent upon the taking of Danish and Norwegian vessels by English privateers, instancing the case of the Christians Haven, Rodolf Menck, master, captured by Thomas Greves of the Falmouth. [Ibid. 7, No. 55.] Enclosing:—
(1) Deposition by Rodolf Menck of Copenhagen, and Magnus Claesen as to damages sustained by the Christians Haven after her capture, 14 June, 1694. Copy, and deposition by Peter Olfers on the same subject, 21 June, 1694. Copy. [Ibid., No. 55 i.]
June 25.
London.
Mons. Leyoncrona to the Duke of Shrewsbury, representing the case of the Swedish ship the Red Winefat, lately condemned to confiscation by the Lords of Appeal. [Ibid., No. 57.]
[June 25.] Sir Charles Hedges to Lord Nottingham, reporting on the case of the Danish ship Christians Haven, and referring to an enclosed memorial (not here preserved) from the Danish Resident. [P.S. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 91.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Sir Charles Hedges. I send you a copy of the Danish Resident's complaint against the captain of the Falmouth privateer for the violence and injustice offered to a Danish ship, the Christians Haven, and you are to report to her Majesty the state of the case, and whether there is anything to be done to remedy the injury complained of. Enclosure not appended. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 34.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrant for George Leopold to go to Gravesend and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 223]; for Captain Johnson, with one able post horse, &c., to go to Portsmouth; for Edmund Trafford and Humphrey Trafford to go to Gravesend and Holland; for Peter le Grand, a weaver, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Sara Datwot, a French protestant, to go to Gravesend and Holland [Ibid., p. 224]; for Mary de Villepontona, Susanne Geraud and her two daughters, to go to Holland; for Moyse Martineau, a French protesant, ditto; for Maria Van Cooten with her children, ditto; for Catherina Barents, ditto; for George Smid, John Forster, Thomas Burgiane, Frederick Cibe, all Germans, ditto; for Christian Barts and Francis Ammelinge, both Germans, ditto; for John Mars, a Dutchman, ditto; for Samuel Bernardeau, Marguerite Crespin and Jane Moyne, French protestants, ditto; for Anthony Schiurman, David Polferton, John de Hesse, and John Pot, Dutchmen, ditto; and for Mr. Francis de la Croix, a Frenchman, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 584].
June 26.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the Lords Commissioners of the treasury. The Queen commands me to signify her pleasure to your lordships that you forthwith give order for discharging Simon Harcourt, esq., from any employment he has under their Majesties, from which he may be removed by you. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 172.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Mayor of Rye. A French protestant of note has told me that he expects, by a Swedish ship returning from Bordeaux or Rochelle, several French protestants, viz., Elie Grenolieau, Isabeau Lafargue, Elie Lafargue, Anna Lafargue, Antoine Laujeols, François Laujeol, Jeanne Cante, and a maidservant to the Laujeols, and he having assured me that they only came away from France on account of their religion, and having undertaken that they shall immediately appear before me and give a further account of themselves, I have thought fit to give you this notice thereof, that if they land at Rye (as intended) they may be forthwith committed to the care of the person who shall deliver you this letter. [Ibid. 5, p. 35.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Capel, recommending his relation, Mr. Philip Savage, for any reasonable favour that can be shown him in a pretension depending before the Lords Justices. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 6.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, regarding a payment to Captain Benbow from Lord Berkeley's contingent money. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 147.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing them to order Captain Benbow to go on board Lord Berkeley's ship and to remain with the fleet during the present expedition. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 147.]
June 26.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 874.] Enclosing:—
(1) Letter of the Navy Board to the Admiralty, dated 25 June, 1694. We had sent orders for the four machine-vessels to be refitted for sea, but are now informed that the Crowned Herring, Maesterland and Trumpet are so rotten that they cannot be repaired. We humbly pray, if it be thought worth it, and the service allow, that we may receive directions for rebuilding them. [Ibid., p. 878.] (2) Report by William Stigant and Jos. Allen on the defects of the Maesterland, dated at Portsmouth, 23 June, 1694. [Ibid.] (3) Extract of a letter from Commissioner. Tymewell to the Navy Board, of the same date, relating to the defects of the machine-vessels. [Ibid., p. 879.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Commissions for William Smith, gent., to be lieutenant to Captain Rutter in Colonel Lillingston's regiment; for Samuel Wells, gent., to be lieutenant to Captain Lillingston in the same regiment; and for George Foulkes, gent., to be lieutenant to Captain John Foulkes in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 221.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Lewis Dumoulin to go to Gravesend and Holland; for Johanna Du Val, a French protestant, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 224]; for Mrs. Catherine La Serre and Esther Chapes, with three children, being French protestants, ditto; for John Turner, esq., and Mrs. Cary to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; for Christian Ferdinand Aleman and John Frederick Aleman to go to Gravesend and Holland [Ibid., p. 225]; for Anna Margarita Palluarte, Ignes Palluarte, and Anna Meys to go to Holland or Flanders; for Magdalena Edion and her four children, ditto; for Matthew Manevelt and Jacob Jansen, both Germans, ditto; for Francis Bertault, his wife and child, French protestants, ditto; for James Crop, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 585]; and for John Cock, a Dutch tailor, ditto [Ibid., p. 586].
June 26.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of Philibert d'Hervart, esq., Baron D'Heuningnen, envoy extraordinary to the Swiss Cantons, from 25 September, 1693, till 25 March following. [Ibid., p. 585.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Maris to take into custody Sir George Maxwell, for high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [Ibid. 39, p. 46.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Greshy of Guernsey, mariner, showing that he was lieutenant of a privateer commanded by Captain Bonamy, lately lying in Weymouth harbour in company with Captain Rowland, privateer; on 20 May last two French privateers came into the road and cut away a ketch laden with Purbeck stone. The captains of the said privateers and most of their men being on shore, petitioner induced the remaining men to go with him to rescue the ketch, which they did, driving one of the privateers on shore and taking the other. About four months ago, he burnt a French privateer on the coast of Normandy, and some time before took a vessel from the Fort of Monville on that coast; he has been in their Majesties' service in Ireland, and was the next man to the Duke of Grafton when he was killed. Prays for the said French prize of about ten tons. Referred to Sir Charles Hedges for his opinion. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 61.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Victualling Commissioners. The land forces are to receive the same allowance of provisions as the seamen during the time of their being on board. You are to carry out orders already issued with regard to the quantity of dry provisions to be sent to Admiral Russell. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 147.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen being informed by a letter from the commander of the hired ship Unity to you that a fleet of Swedes and Danes, laden with corn, &c., for France, is now off the coasts of Sussex, and understanding from you that you have no ships to send after them, directs that you order Lord Berkeley to detach ships from his squadron to bring the said fleet into the next safe port. [Ibid., p. 148.]
June 27. Sir Charles Hedges to [the Duke of Shrewsbury], reporting on the cases of the Swedish ships mentioned in the enclosed list delivered to his Grace by the Swedish secretary. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 92.] Enclosing copies of:— (1) Lists of the Swedish ships. [Ibid., No. 92 i.] (2) Account of demands made by the King of Sweden's subjects for ships brought up in England, and for losses and damages by them sustained. [Ibid., No. 92 ii.] (3) Letter of Count Oxenstiern to —, dated 13 January, 1692, complaining of the paralysis of Swedish trade owing to the lawless and violent proceedings of English privateers; he hears the English courts pay no respect to Swedish passports; the cases of the ships St. John and Whale are especially flagrant; he awaits an answer to his former letter respecting the merchant ships and convoy arrested at Portsmouth. Copy. [Ibid., No. 92 iii.] (4) Sir Charles Hedges' report on the cases of the Swedish ships, 13 September, 1692. [Ibid., No. 92iv.] (5) List of the Swedish ships in the order they were given in by Mons. Leyoncrona. [Ibid., No. 92 v.] (6) Correspondence relating to the Swedish ships of various dates, 1691–4. [Ibid., 92 vi.]
June 27. The same to the same. Copy of the above letter and of enclosure No. 1. All in duplicate. [Ibid., 93, 93 i., and 94, 94 i.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Passes for Charles Price to go to Gravesend or Harwich and embark for Holland or Flanders; for Christopher Muller, a Dane, and a cabinet maker by trade, to go to Gravesend and Denmark [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 225]; for Herman Crammers, to go to Holland; for Mary van Ampel, Mary Wite, Margaret Pieters, and Jacomyn Hindrix, with three children, ditto; for John Doncher and John Bontem, two Dutchmen, ditto; and for Martha Vanderberg and one child, ditto [Ibid., 38, p. 586].
June 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder of London to cause Thomas Herbert, convicted for stealing deer and condemned to twelve months' imprisonment, to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate. [Ibid. 39, p. 47.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
A like warrant to cause Eleanor Wilkinson to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate without condition of transportation. She was convicted of high treason for clipping the current coin of England at the sessions at the Old Bailey in September last, and sentenced to death for the same. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 48.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for appointing the following members of the Privy Council Commissioners of Appeal for prizes during the present war: Prince George of Denmark; John, Archbishop of Canterbury; Sir John Somers, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal; Thomas, Duke of Leeds, Lord President of the Council; Thomas, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Privy Seal; Henry, Duke of Norfolk; William, Duke of Devonshire, Lord Steward of the Household; Charles, Duke of Bolton; Charles, Duke of Shrewsbury, principal secretary of state; William, Duke of Bedford; John, Marquis of Normanby; Charles, Marquis of Winchester; Robert, Earl of Lindsey, Lord Great Chamberlain of England; Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex, Lord Chamberlain of the Household; Aubrey, Earl of Oxford; John, Earl of Bridgwater; Thomas, Earl of Stamford; John, Earl of Bath; Daniel, Earl of Nottingham; Laurence, Earl of Rochester; William, Earl of Portland, Groom of the Stole; Thomas, Earl of Fauconberg; Charles, Earl of Monmouth; Ralph, Earl of Montagu; Richard, Earl of Scarborough; Francis, Earl of Bradford; Henry, Earl of Romney; Richard, Earl of Ranelagh; Charles, Viscount Dursley; Henry, Bishop of London; Robert, Lord Lexington; Charles, Lord Cornwallis; Sydney, Lord Godolphin; Henry, Lord Capel; Thomas, Lord Coningsby; Sir John Trevor, kt., Speaker of the House of Commons; Sir Robert Howard, kt., Thomas Warton, esq., controllers of the Household; Sir John Trenchard, kt., principal secretary of state; Charles Montagu, esq., chancellor of the exchequer; Sir John Holt, kt., lord chief justice of the King's Bench; Sir Edward Seymour, bart.; Sir John Lowther, of Lowther, bart.; Sir Henry Goodrich, bart.; Edward Russell, esq.; Richard Hampden, esq.; and Hugh Boscawen, esq. [Ibid., p. 49.]
June 28.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. I intend to sail to-morrow morning, if we can get off some stores for the bomb-vessels, without which they will be of little use to us; for in trying some yesterday and firing none above twice, they were extremely shattered. The soldiers were all got on board yesterday. The Admiralty have again ordered me to leave two ships here, and I am taking out their soldiers accordingly. I have no order to victual the soldiers on board, but have directed it to be done, and desire you will procure me the Queen's order for my justification. I proposed first going into the Bay of Biscay, but found none much inclined that way; the westerly wind for the present put that discourse off; indeed our fleet is very unfit both in number and quality to go into those parts. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 596.] Enclosing:—
Copy of the resolution at a Council of War held on board the Queen at St. Helens, 28 June, 1694. The Queen's order being read to sail to the coast of France and annoy the enemy, it was decided to sail to Dieppe and bombard it. [Ibid., p 600.]
June 28. Statement of moneys paid to the navy or the ordnance for the seaservice, in part of 2,500,000l., out of the funds for this year. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 38.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, requiring copies of the orders issued to the commanders of the bomb-vessels appointed for the Channel service this summer. Mr. Peter Fountaine is to be ordered to go on board such ship as Lord Berkeley shall think fit. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 148.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the same, requiring their opinion as to the allowance of beer to the seamen of Lord Berkeley's fleet. [Ibid., p. 149.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Elizabeth Bodt and two servants to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 586]; and for John Pietersen, a Dutch seaman, to go to Gravesend and Holland [Ibid., p. 588].
June 28.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of Nicholas Herne, consul at Alicante, from 24 June, 1693, till 18 May, 1694, consisting chiefly of money laid out for poor seamen and soldiers taken by the French. [Ibid., p. 587.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the bailiffs of Yarmouth. I received your letter of the 25th with the information against Greenwood, whom you did right to secure. I have sent informations to their Majesties' Council for their opinion how he ought to be proceeded against, of which I will send you an account in a post or two. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 36.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth Martin, widow, praying an allowance. Referred for report to the Earl of Romney, master general of the Ordnance. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 414.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Harrison, praying a writ of error in a judgment obtained against him. Granted. [Ibid.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Abis, John Fellows, William Snow and Richard Bavett, gent., and others, shewing that a great part of the late dissolved priory of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, in Surrey, is wrongfully detained from the crown; they, being willing to make out their Majesties' title at their own costs with one moiety of what shall be recovered, pray for a lease of the premises for 99 years. Referred to the Treasury for report. [Ibid. 3, p. 64.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Mr. Steuart to be captain in Brigadier Steuart's regiment; and for Mr. William Steuart to be captain lieutenant in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 227.]
June 29.
Pipe Office.
Certificate that Samuel Swift, esq., late sheriff of Worcester, paid 80l. (pursuant to the Act for encouraging the apprehending of highwaymen) to John Appletree of Edgeacke, esq., and Posthumus Sheldon, of Abberton, gent., for taking Gabriel Dubourgh and James Alexander. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 95.] Annexed is the certificate of Mr. Justice G. Eyre, of the apprehension of the said highwaymen, after a robbery committed on John Daunce. [Ibid., No. 95 i.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Christopher Matson to come over from Holland and land in any port of England. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 226.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hayward to apprehend James Fontaine, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 50.]
June 29. A like warrant for apprehending Major — Macdonald. [Ibid.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, requiring to be informed when the machine-vessels ordered to the Nore, and the vessel with the twelve little machines, shall come into the river. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 149.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The seamen on Lord Berkeley's fleet are to be put to whole allowance of beer. [Ibid., p. 150.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth Hills, widow, on behalf of herself and two children, showing that, being born beyond sea and bred a papist, she came over young and was married to Henry Hills, deceased, who made her his executrix; but before she could execute his will, she was convicted of recusancy, and being thereby reduced to great necessity she prays a pardon of the said recusancy. Referred to the Attorney-General for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 62.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to Mr. Fox. Monsieur Jurieu (who is a gentleman for whom his Majesty has a particular consideration) has desired me to recommend to you the case of Captain Verdelles, a reformed captain who has a pension in Ireland. I send you enclosed a memorial of the state of his case and desire you will give order for paying such part of his pension as may enable him to pay some of his debts here and go to Ireland. Enclosure not here entered. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 172.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Lucy Pinshbank, gent., to be lieutenant to Captain John Steuart in brigadier General William Steuart's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 221]; for Mr. Alexander Cuningham to be lieutenant to Captain Steuart in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 227]; for Mr. Charles Steuart to be lieutenant to Lieutenant-Colonel William Tatton in the same regiment; for Mr. Burghes to be first lieutenant of grenadiers to Captain Perkins Vaughan, in the same regiment; for Mr. Theodore Delves to be second lieutenant to the same company; for Mr. William Taylor to be ensign to Major William Steuart in the same regiment; and for Mr. Fitzmorris to be ensign to Captain William Steuart in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 228].
June 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Tymewell. This will be brought you by Captain Johnson, whom I recommended to Lord Berkeley, and he had taken him to sea with him, but that the captain could not be ready so soon. I therefore desire that if Lord Berkeley has not already left directions about it, you would speak to the commander of any of the frigates that are to follow his lordship that they take Captain Johnson with them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's 5, p. 36.]
Proposals relative to raising levies in Switzerland for the service of the allies.
If there is any idea of raising levies in Switzerland, Colonel Béroldinghen is strongly in favour of raising, in the Catholic cantons, not only two regiments of sixteen hundred men under the name of "Suisses," for service in Flanders, to reconquer the places occupied by the French since the Peace of Nimeguen, but also a third under the name of "Allemans," to act on the offensive wherever they may be wanted, even in the heart of France. But we must begin recruiting next October at latest, and so ought to set about the arrangements. These are the Colonel's proposals in his letter of 17th May. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 40.]
[June.] Petition of Ann, wife of John Blythman, shewing that her husband was a gunner of their Majesties' hired ship Smyrna Factor, and in the late expedition against the French was sorely burnt in the burning of the Rising Sun. He lies condemned by court-martial for embezzling naval stores. Having three small children, and her life being "wrapped up" in his, petitioner craves his pardon. Referred to the Admiralty for report, see 19 June, 1694. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 646.]