BHO

William and Mary: July 1694

Pages 207-248

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1694-5. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1906.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

July 1694

July 1.
On board the Brittania.
Admiral Russell to Sir John Trenchard. Since I parted from Lord Berkeley till I came upon my rendezvous no accident has happened except the foundering of two ketches that tended on my own ship, with a great quantity of water, which has a little disappointed me. Hearing nothing of the French being between Lagos and Cadiz, I ordered Nevill to join me, which he did on the 30th ult. with eight English, and Vice-Admiral Calemberg with eight Dutch ships, so that we are now together sixty-three ships of the line. The Spaniards came to sea the same night with nine sail, but as yet I have not seen them. I hear the French are seventy men-of-war, and that they lie in a line from Alsaques to Barcelona. I will not lose a moment's time to get to them. If they design to stay us, and be the number reported, we may soon come to a deciding blow, so that when all are killed that are to be killed, the rest may return home before cold weather and Michaelmas storms come in, which I apprehend for these three deck ships. I do not yet hear anything of the credit you wrote me about. [Ibid., p. 602.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Henry Peck, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Major John Hobbart is captain, in the regiment of foot commanded by Sir Richard Atkins; for James Church to be surgeon to Sir Richard Atkins' regiment of foot; for Nicholas Lepell, esq., to be adjutant to Colonel Thomas Windsor's regiment of horse [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 223]; for Mr. Roles to be ensign to Captain de la Court in Brigadier Earle's regiment of foot; for Mr. Scarborow to be chaplain to the same regiment; for Mr. John Pratt to be lieutenant to Captain Thomas Goaghan in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 225]; and for Mr. John Farmer to be ensign to Major Rose in Colonel Rowe's regiment [Ibid., p. 227].
July 1.
Whitehall.
Pass for John van Cruyl, a Dutchman, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 588.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Captain Charles Richards. Sets forth that he was captain of a company in the late Colonel Foulkes' regiment when it went upon "the expedition," and was at the same time lieutenant of the ship Tiger, the captain whereof sent the petitioner ashore to press men for the service of the ship; the fleet in the meantime sailing, he was left behind and his commission in the regiment filled up by Colonel Foulkes. Prays to be allowed his captain's pay till he be provided for. Referred to the Earl of Ranelagh, paymaster-general, for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 416.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Francis Colt, Mr. Lawley, and Henry Curson and —Williamson, servants, to go to Gravesend or Harwich and into Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 226.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for Cornelia Rosse and her two children to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 588]; for Pieter Johnsen and John van Campen, Dutch seamen, to go to Gravesend and Holland; for Douwe Cornelissen, a Dutch seaman, ditto; for John Nicholas de Weert, his wife and four children, to go to Holland; and for Peter Geay, a Frenchman, ditto [Ibid, p. 589].
July 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger, to apprehend Captain Povey, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 51.]
July 2.
Off Beachy.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. The weather has been so bad since we came out, that there has been no going with safety into Dieppe Bay, so that I came last night to an anchor here, hoping the weather would mend. A great man-of-war of Holland, of eighty guns, has lost her foremast and bowsprit: The meeting with the fleet of Swedes and Danes has helped to disperse our fleet, but I believe we have seized upon them all. They were mostly bound to Havre de Grace with corn, and some had contraband goods on board. "If I find none of the bomb vessels missing, I will over again to the coast of France the first fair weather; but since we have already alarmed them at Dieppe I would attempt some other place first, and let them fall asleep there by leaving them quiet a little longer." [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 606.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Mr. Papillion. It being of great importance that the victualling ships for Cadiz should be dispatched as soon as may be, I desire you to let me know when they will be ready to sail. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 150.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Colonel Gibson. I received your letter of yesterday giving an account of your having secured Captain Johnson alias Tyrwhitt till you were sure of him. I must now tell you he was brought to me by his right name, and by some things understood from him I thought fit to send him to Lord Berkeley, with whom he has been, and that it was agreed between them that he should follow him, taking the first opportunity of any frigate bound to the fleet, so that you need make no difficulty of setting him at liberty. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 38.]
July 2. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. There is a necessity of representing to your Majesty the present state of the funds for the Navy, of which the short abstract which I presume to inclose will inform you with less trouble than I can hope to do by a letter. I shall only observe that the sum mentioned in the first column of the abstract, being 1,156,994l. upon the head of wages, is strictly appropriated by the Act of Parliament to that use; the remainder of the 2,500,000l. is designed by us at the Treasury as your Majesty may please to see in the abstract:
To the wear and tear 571,254l. 656,994l.
The yards and ordinary 85,740l.
Ordnance for sea service 109,499l.
And to the victualling 576,513l.
which last sum for the victualling does much exceed what was calculated by the House of Commons for that head, because their calculations went upon 20s. a man, whereas the expenses this year by reason of the dearness of all sorts of provisions will amount to 30s. a man at the least, and upon this account we have proposed in our scheme to add so much to that head as brings it to the sum mentioned on the other side, whereof the victuallers have already received more than 500,000l.; notwithstanding which, their daily demands to us for more money and the extraordinary services which they tell us are required of them by the Queen's orders, signified by the Secretary of State, made it evident that the charge of the victualling in this year will amount to at least 700,000l., which is a sum so far beyond the highest calculation that it must needs make a great disorder in some part of the service of the Navy; from the wages it cannot be taken, because that sum is strictly appropriated; and from the wear and tear, both the Admiralty and Navy will never suffer it to be taken, because they say too little is already designed for that head, and if we should go to make it yet less, all dealers with the Navy would be quite discouraged, and their whole service must stand still. At the same time the victuallers are in their usual style, and tell us plainly they cannot go on without more money, and the comissioners of the Navy persist still to say they have had more than their share.
This being our case we resolve to have a meeting to-morrow with the Admiralty and Navy Board, to consider how we shall proceed in this matter, and by what we have often seen at meetings upon the same occasion, I am apt to think the result will be that these great inconveniences do chiefly arise from the victuallers not paying in course, which these victuallers have plainly said to your Majesty, yourself, that they never will nor can do; this was the case last year; it is the case this year, and I think it must be so every year, unless the proper time be taken either for changing the hands or putting the victualling to contractors.
This next month is the only season perhaps of the whole year that will admit of such a change, but then your Majesty's absence and the absence of Admiral Russell's whole assistance would be very convenient (sic) in an affair of this nature, and seem to make difficulties almost insuperable; upon the whole matter, it seems to me, that this excessive supplying of the victualling must occasion a great failure in some part of the service. Your Majesty sees plainly the difficulties it brings upon us; you will judge best yourself if any remedy can be applied to it, and of the most proper methods to be taken for applying of it. I could not but think it a duty indispensable in me to lay this state of affairs before you or else I am sure it is very unwillingly that I give you the trouble of so long a letter, in which, for fear of making it yet longer, if I am obscure, and have not expressed the matter so clearly to you as I ought, I humbly beg pardon.
Since writing this letter I have been desired by my old friend Mr. May to join with him in a humble request to you that you would please to bestow the equerry's place, vacant by the death of Tom Butler, upon Mr. Robert Baynton: I cannot refuse to give him this character to you—that he is an honest man, and stout man, and understands hunting horses very well. Enclosure not preserved. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 41.]
July 3.
Rye Bay.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. We anchored here this afternoon. Yesterday we had as bad weather as any I have seen this year; all our bomb-vessels, tenders and well-boats are driven away. I have sent orders to such as are in a condition to come again and join me at once. I have an account of only five men that are drowned. If we have no more ships ordered to join me, or some of the regiments set on shore, we shall be undone by sickness, our men falling down every day. There are four score sick on board Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and the Dutch mightily complain. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 610.] Enclosing:—
Copy of a resolution at a council of war held on board the Queen, 3 July, 1694. It is resolved to collect the small vessels together after the damage wrought by the bad weather. It is most necessary that more frigates be ordered to join us; without them little service can be done. [Ibid., p. 614.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Draft of a letter to Admiral Russell. The two months' dry provisions ordered to be prepared for you are now being put on board, and two men-of-war from Lord Berkeley's squadron will convoy them to Cadiz Bay. I have written to know the King's pleasure, how long you shall keep the great ships in those seas, but have not yet received any answer, there being now three Dutch mails wanting. I presume you will communicate with the King by way of Genoa, and will receive his instructions the same way, if anything is to be done by you in favour of the Duke of Savoy.
Lord Berkeley's squadron has gone to Dieppe, with land forces under the command of the Earl of Macclesfield. By their success at that place they will be able to judge of the sufficiency of their bombvessels and engineers, and whether it may be advisable to engage in some more important enterprize. [Ibid., p. 680.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Earl of Denbigh. In answer to your letter of the 30th of last month I must tell you that application having been made to his Majesty some time before he went into Holland to give Mr. Fielding a pass to return from France, he then refused it, and it would not become me to ask her Majesty to grant the same favour without telling her what the King had formerly resolved in it, and then I believe you would conclude what the success will be. I am sorry there should be any difficulty in obeying your commands. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 37.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Speaker. This morning as soon as I heard that Dr. Littleton was dead and that there was a prebend vacant in Westminster, I put the Queen in mind of the address of the House of Commons for your chaplain, but had the ill-fortune to come too late, her Majesty being already engaged. [Ibid., p. 39.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
The same to the bailiffs of Yarmouth. This is to acquaint you that upon perusing the information you sent me, their Majesties' Council are of opinion that Greenwood ought to be committed to the county gaol for high treason in adhering to their Majesties' enemies, whither you will therefore send him and those of his ship's crew whose depositions have been taken. [Ibid.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of New Romney. I have your letter telling me that Thompson has gone to the assizes, and I have since given directions that he be prosecuted. [Ibid., p. 40.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrant for Major de Moncal to go to Harwich and Holland; for Henry Sperling of Dantzic in Poland, a tradesman, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 226]; for Jannetje Stevens, a Dutchwoman, with her child, to go to Holland; for James Calvert and George Brown, belonging to the Duke of Ormond's troop, ditto; and for Barbara Toussaint and three children, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 589].
July 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Marisco to apprehend Paul Pepper for high treason in compassing and imagining the death of the King and Queen. [Ibid.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Maurice Eustace, esq., brother and heir to Thomas Eustace, setting forth that petitioner's brother, being a lieutenant in King James's army in Ireland, did on the Declaration of 1688, quit the service, and retire to his dwelling in Yeoman's Town in co. Kildare, notwithstanding which he was indicted of high treason and outlawed. Prays a reversal of the outlawry. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland for their report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 414.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to make a grant to Sir Thomas Domville, bart., of the estate mortgaged to him in 1686 by James Talbot, late of Templeoge, co. Dublin, esq., deceased, viz.: the castle and lands of Templeoge and certain houses in Dublin. In 1688, when the papists were very oppressive to the protestants in Ireland, Domville retired to England, and Talbot re-entered into the property; Domville returned, after the "happy rout" at the Boyne, to find many of the houses pulled down and the property seriously injured. Talbot was slain in rebellion at the fight at Aughrim. Domville's claim is further based on his services as clerk of the crown and hanaper in Ireland. Domville's trustees of the mortgage were Sir William Domville, then Attorney-General of Ireland, and Sir Paul Ricaut, knight. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 132.] Annexed is a list of the houses in Dublin mortgaged as abovesaid, giving the names of the tenants. [Ibid., p. 137.]
July 4.
London.
Mons. Leyoncrona to the Duke of Shrewsbury. By treaty between Sweden and England it is stipulated that Swedish ships, met by a man-of-war or privateer, on producing their passes, shall not be stopped, searched or molested; but recently a whole fleet of Swedish and Danish merchantmen were stopped as they were endeavouring to get through the Channel, and were brought into the Downs, although they not only produced their passes, but were provided with a Swedish and Danish convoy. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 58.]
July 4.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to Sir John Trenchard. Hearing that it is not thought convenient to detach two of the third-rates from Lord Berkeley's fleet to join Vice-admiral Hopson, we suggest that one of Lord Berkeley's second-rates should be ordered to Portsmouth, where some of her men may be turned over to the Lancaster (which is only wanting men to be ready to join his said squadron), and that the remainder of the men should be put on board the Monk and Kent, in order to sending them into the Soundings. We are so far from being able to comply with Lord Berkeley's request for small ships, that we have not ships sufficient under our direction to answer the many services expected of it. [Ibid. 5, p. 616.] Enclosing:—
(1) Copy of a letter from Lord Berkeley to the Lords of the Admiralty dated in Rye Bay, 3 July, 1694. All our victuallers and most of our tenders are missing; I hope they are in the Downs. [Ibid., p. 620.] (2) Copy of the resolution at the council of war held on board the Queen, 3 July, 1694. [Ibid.]
July 4. Order on the Exchequer for repayment of a loan of 200l. by Anthony Stephens, esq. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 96.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Rango, a Swedish gentleman, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 227.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Lord Berkeley. It is the Queen's pleasure, in case you are in a condition to execute any attempt upon the enemy which you have under consideration, that you should now proceed to the execution thereof; otherwise you shall sail to St. Helens and there await further orders, putting on shore such of the landmen as are disabled by sickness. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 150.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Rowland White, praying writs of error to reverse outlawries against him in Ireland, because he claims no property of any kind in the kingdom, and since May, 1691, has, for the benefit of his health, been residing successively at Montpellier in France, in Flanders, at "the Spaw waters" in Germany, and in England. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 65.]
July 5. Minutes of the proceedings of Council touching orders to be sent to Lord Berkeley. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 59.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Marisco to apprehend Captain Walton alias Whatton, charged with high treason. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 591.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hopkins to apprehend Thomas Noel charged with high treason. [Ibid., p. 594.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Passes for Agnus Nuttes, a Portuguese woman, to go to Portugal [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 589]; and for Johannes Wolfgang and Christian Wanderling, both Germans, to go to Holland [Ibid., p. 590].
July 6.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Lord Berkeley. Orders have been sent this day to the Admiralty to dispatch the only three frigates which can be spared at present. The Queen would have you call a council of war to consider what service can be performed against the enemy with the forces under your command, and whether any service can be performed in the Bay of Biscay, and upon any of the islands there. Her Majesty leaves you at liberty to take with you such land forces as you shall think fit, and would have you expedite whatever may be resolved on. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 151.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. It being thought necessary by a council of war held on board the Queen on the 3rd inst. that more frigates should be ordered to join Lord Berkeley, the Queen commands that you order the Smyrna Merchant, the Unity and the Sally Rose to repair as soon as may be to St. Helens. [Ibid.]
July 6.
Off Dungeness.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. I am just getting under sail, and intend immediately for Dieppe Bay. Five or six small vessels came yesterday to view our fleet. I sent some of our boats and small vessels, who chased them to the French shore. Ever since break of day we have heard firing both with bombs and great guns. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 628.]
July 6.
Between Dungeness and Dieppe.
The same to the same. We are now making the best of our way to Dieppe, to put into execution the resolution of the council of war held on the 28th ult. So soon as we have done at Dieppe, I will call a council of war and lay their Majesties' pleasure before them. Some of our frigates have taken five fisher boats; they say bread is sevenpence a pound, and that they are all starving. [Ibid., p. 624.]
July 6. Minutes of the proceedings of council, respecting ships to be added to Lord Berkeley's squadron, and order to be sent to him to call a council of war with regard to the expedition in hand. [Ibid. 7, No. 60.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Pass for Monsieur Bronchoven and two servants to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 590.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Mrs. Mary Dyve and Mrs. Anna Maria Dyve, who lately came from France, appeared before the Duke of Shrewsbury in pursuance of a recognizance entered into on their behalf by William Wade, rector of Broadwater, Sussex. [Ibid. 39, p. 51.]
July 7.
Dublin Castle.
The Lords Justices of Ireland to Sir John Trenchard. On the 28th of June arrived here their Majesties' ships the Scarborough, the Pearl, and the Talbot pink. Captain Breholt in the Pearl, so soon as he came on shore, gave in a memorial that he had been six months off the ground, and it was necessary, in case he should be sent to cruise, that he should first be cleaned. We have therefore ordered him to Kinsale for that purpose, and the Talbot pink to sail in company with him as far as Dungarvon in search of some small French privateers we hear are upon that coast, and then to return to this port. Captain Kellingworth in the Scarborough we have ordered northward to cruise for six weeks as far as Tillinghead, whither we formerly sent Captain Stepney in the Dolphin. On June 27th Captain Stepney met with two ships off Carrickfergus, one a privateer of thirty-six guns and eight peteraros, and the other a prize she had taken, called the Mathew of London. He engaged the privateer four hours and, having received much damage in his masts and rigging, was forced to put into the Bay of Carrickfergus. The privateer got away, but the prize he brought along with him into port, and several merchantmen which otherwise would have fallen into the hands of the privateer have by this means escaped. We hear one of those French privateers, that so much infest this northern coast, carries 50 guns and about 300 men, a force much greater than any appointed for the guard of this coast, the biggest of which carries but 32 guns. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 58.]
July 7.
St. Germains.
Roger Strickland to Captain Masterson. The last post brought me your desire of having our royal master's commission, but for the others you mention (giving an account of your proceedings) I never had them. Mr. Stradford (sic) has not yet returned from Boulogne. However, I took care that your letter should be read to his Majesty, and I doubt not that you will have his commission sent you by this post, or the next at the farthest, Mr. Nighall having given me that promise last night. I should be very thankful to know if Captain Ridley or any of his ship's crew be living in gaol in Wales, as is reported here. [Ibid., No. 57.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen leaves it to you to provide concerning the naval stores to be sent to Mr. Russell as the service may require. Orders must be given for the convoy to be ready for the victuallers for the Straits, which are to sail the beginning of next week. If the machine vessels and the little machines have not come into the river, the Queen would have them hastened to the Downs or Margate. States that he encloses an extract of a letter from the Lord President. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 152.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for William Lawrence to go to Holland; for Susanna Lewis, servant to Lady Fingall, ditto; for Mr. de Grandse, ensign in Count Morton's regiment, and his wife, to go to Holland or Flanders. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 590.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for apprehending Carill, Viscount Molyneux, together with his papers and arms, for high treason in levying war against their Majesties and adhering to their enemies. [Ibid. 39, p. 83.]
July 7. A like warrant for apprehending Sir Thomas Clifton, of Letham. [Ibid., p. 84.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for apprehending [Peter] Lee, of Lyme, esq., together with his papers and arms, for high treason in levying war against their Majesties. [Ibid., p. 86.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for apprehending [William] Blundell, of Crosby, esq., together with his papers and arms, for high treason in levying war and adhering to their Majesties' enemies. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 88.]
July 7. Like warrants for apprehending John Wilson of Chipping, and Philip Langton of the Loe, esq. [Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Pass for Cornelius de Groot with his wife and one child to go to Holland. [Ibid. 38, p. 590.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Peter Newlyn to go to the Downs and there receive from the commander of their Majesties' advice-boat, the Postboy, four passengers, which he took out of a vessel off Dunkirk, and to take said persons into custody. [Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Bale, messenger, to search for and apprehend Thomas Irwin, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 69.]
July 9.
Liege.
Baron de Heiden to the King, containing a report of events connected with the war. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 39.]
July 9.
Dieppe Bay.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. We got here yesterday, and hoped to have begun to throw bombs into the town to-day, but it blows so hard that we cannot. When we get more favourable weather I do not see how they can hinder us throwing down a great part of their town, though they have guns mounted all round about. A small frigate was taken by the French on Friday last, and we have taken two more fisher-boats. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 632.]
July 9.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. The orders now sent to Vice-Admiral Hopson are expected to find him either on the coast of Flanders, off Dunkirk, or off the North Foreland. Nine ships, from the third to the sixth-rate, are ordered to proceed with him according to your instructions. [Ibid., p. 636.] Enclosing:—
Copy of an Admiralty order to Thomas Hopson, esq., commanding their Majesties' ships in the Northern seas. In accordance with his Majesty's orders of the 25th June and 9th July, directing you to join with several Dutch ships of war on the Broad Fourteens, and to endeavour to seize or destroy the squadron of French ships under the command of John Du Bart, you are hereby ordered to join with them accordingly, and when you shall have joined with so many of them as shall make up a squadron of ten or more ships of both nations, you shall then diligently put into execution what is directed in the abovesaid two orders. [Ibid., p. 638.]
July 9.
Admiralty Office.
Report by the Lords of the Admiralty on the petition of Ann, wife of John Blythman. The embezzling of stores in the navy being very much practised, and the persons concerned therein being very seldom detected, they cannot advise the pardon of any one convicted thereof. [Ibid., p. 644.]
July 9. J. H. Pauly, Danish Resident, to the Duke of Shrewsbury, respecting the release of Danish merchant-vessels taken by English men-of-war belonging to Lord Berkeley's squadron in July 1694. The Resident hopes there will be no difficulty in releasing them, seeing they were not taken by privateers (which have now become so insolent they respect no passports), but by officers of the fleet, whose reasons appear from the enclosed certificates given by permission of the Marquis of Carmarthen. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 61.] Enclosing:—
(1) List of the abovesaid Danish vessels, July 1694. Also a duplicate list, omitting tonnage and cargoes. [Ibid., Nos. 61 i. and 61 ii.] (2) Copy of a certificate signed by Francis Wyvell on board the Captain in Dover Road, 7 July, 1694, to the master of the Danish vessel Elizabeth, declaring that she was stopped by order of the Marquis of Carmarthen only in order that she might not go upon the coast of France to give intelligence of the English fleet, there being no pretension of making her a prize. [Ibid. No. 61 iii.]
July 9.
London.
Memorial by Mons. Leyoncrona touching the case of the ship St. Eve, Peter Hayelberg, master, brought up to Portsmouth in January last after a long suit, and then cleared by the judge of the Admiralty; the ship then went to France in ballast, but was again stopped last week in the Downs. The unkind usages the Swedes meet with all along the English coast occasion very frequent and reiterated complaints, and quite dishearten them from all trade, the ill consequences whereof have already been felt in Sweden. [Ibid., No. 62.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. Mons. Leyoncrona giving in a memorial [see above abstract] complaining that a Swedish ship the St. Eve is stopped in the Downs by the Commander-in-Chief there, notwithstanding that she was released by order of the High Court of Admiralty, her Majesty commands you to give directions to the Commander in the Downs to permit the said ship to pursue her intended voyage. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 40.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Justice Giles Eyre. Several justices of the peace and other gentlemen of note in and about Reading having applied to her Majesty on behalf of John Parr, whose reprieve was lately revoked, the Queen commands me to send you a copy of the certificate or representation they have made, of which her Majesty would know your opinion before she takes any resolution in this matter. Enclosure not here entered. [Ibid., p. 41.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Helen Saller, a maidservant, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mrs. Sarah Newsham, with Catherine, Elizabeth and Margaret, her three daughters, and Ann, a maidservant, ditto; for Christopher Iselius and John Raab, two Swiss gentlemen, to go to Harwich and Gravesend [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 228]; for Lewis Girard, doctor of physic and oculist, with his goods and necessaries, to go to Harwich or Gravesend, and there to pass over into France by way of Holland or Flanders [Ibid., p. 229]; for Robert Gaide, a French protestant, to go to Holland; for Peter Forne, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 591]; for Jacob Nunez, a Jew, ditto; for Hendrick Weever, Jacob Jansen, David Byvoot, Jan Hanson, Hendrick Wagt, Pieter Croes, and Pieter Arentsen, ditto; and for Anthony Suel, ditto [Ibid., p. 593].
July 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to the mayor, sheriff and bailiffs of the town of Haverfordwest of a market to be held on every Thursday in the said town, for the buying and selling of horses and all other live cattle, and likewise three fairs yearly, the first to be on the first day of June, the second upon the twelfth day of September, and the third upon the seventh day of October and two days after the said days yearly. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 592.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing Francis Lindley, esq., to be recorder of Hedon, in Yorkshire. [Ibid. 39, p. 53.]
July 10. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I have received your letter of the 1st inst, and have acquainted the Treasury with your commands for remitting some contingent money weekly, which we shall endeavour to begin to do to-morrow in the distribution to Lord Ranelagh. I am very glad you approve of our care, and take so much care yourself for the subsistence in the first place, as to ease us at present of the clearings expected by the army; but there is still another burden of the same kind, which we shall have great difficulty to struggle with, and that is to give funds for this year's clothing, for which those who have furnished the clothes are extremely clamorous.
You judge very rightly that we shall not be able to pay any part of the money remaining due for forage till the month of August, and even then we must endeavour to content them with the remotest assignments we have upon the funds of this year, because unless the ready money and nearest assignments are reserved for the subsistence, the troops will come to want it yet before you come on this side of the sea, and in this view we have suffered great clamours for want of the subsistence here in England, rather than leave any of the bills unpaid which are drawn upon Lord Ranelagh from abroad, that so you might have the advantage of the same, if not better credit against next winter when you will have at least as much need of it.
We had a hearing yesterday at the Treasury in the presence of some of the Lords of the Council appointed by the Queen, about the further demands of money from the victuallers, and I think we shall have this fruit of it, viz., to make them keep within the sum designed by the scheme for them, at least till your Majesty comes over, and then it must have a new consideration; in the meantime the possibility of changing the hands, in case you should incline to that, will be past.
Our new brethren at the Treasury are in a very different temper from those we parted with, for these love dispatch in business as well as the others did trifling, so that if we had wherewithal to work upon, I should flatter myself you would be satisfied with our endeavour, but it is hard to make bricks without straw. I remember last year it was expected we should be thinking of funds for the year to come, if you would have anything of the kind done now, you will judge best how, and to whom to give your commands. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 43.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. I have received yours of the 28th June and of the 1st, 5th and 8th of July (N.S.). The three last arrived all together on Saturday by the same packet boat. I did not trouble you upon the first, as it related what is to be done by the Channel fleet and land forces, of which I conclude Mr. Secretary gives a constant account, and the designs we have on foot appear so frivolous that it is not very pleasant writing upon them. The fleet is now gone again to attempt something upon Dieppe, from which they were before diverted by bad weather, and I hope that the same fate may not attend them again, it having blown extremely hard these two or three days. The season is so far advanced, that I believe the seamen will not advise our going into the Bay, and in these seas I know nothing so well worth attempting as St. Malo or Dunkirk, and by all the projects that ever I heard of for destroying those places, it is to be effected with a squadron of light ships and without land men. Du Bart's force at Dunkirk being now increased, nothing can be attempted there without such a strength as may be sufficient to keep him in, which may easily be provided, and then if Meesters' proposals be feasible, the destroying that port is become more considerable by the growing force there, and by the injury we every day receive from it.
Some time since a young gentleman came to me from France, who was bred a papist, served as lieutenant in the fleet till the late King went away, followed his fortunes into Ireland and afterwards went on board the French fleet, where, upon some suspicion, he was seized and thrown into prison for above two years, and being released came straight away and surrendered himself to me, professing to turn Protestant and to be very desirous to revenge himself of the ill-usage he had received in France; he pressed to go on board the fleet as a volunteer, pretending to do good service by his knowledge of the French ports and coast, but before I would recommend him to anyone there I made him give me some account of the designs of the party here [Jacobites], which he undertook unwillingly, thinking it an employment not very becoming a gentleman; but by my persuasions and a promise of his not being produced, he did discover some things in which I found him true, and among others he told me he had learnt from his father, Captain Tyrwhitt, an eminent sea captain in King James' time, and a Papist, that there was no man whatever the Jacobites did more entirely depend upon than Captain Sanderson, the captain of your yacht.
I have troubled you with this long story because I would inform you exactly of the manner in which I came to know this, thinking it on the one hand a very hard thing to ruin a man upon a whisper, and yet on the other side, the employment he is in gives him such opportunities of betraying your person, that I cannot think it safe you should trust yourself with him again. This young man has so convinced me of his sincerity that I have sent him to Lord Berkeley, with whom he had formerly some acquaintance, and by his behaviour as a volunteer, if there be action, he desires we will judge of his zeal.
I have received a letter dated 9th of July which pretends to be written from Versailles. I have not had enough from the same hand to be very confident of the intelligence, only, some posts since, he did give assurance that Gironne was the place they designed to besiege, and so far he has told it right; now this informs me that upon the news of the reduction of Gironne, a courier was immediately dispatched from the court to the Duke of Grammont, commanding in Biscay, to be by him forwarded to Madrid, with invitations to a peace, and arguments that they could never expect assistance there from you nor the States.
Three Lancashire and Cheshire men, who have been engaged enlisting soldiers, and buying arms for the disaffected gentlemen in those parts, have made an ample discovery of the whole matter to the Lord Keeper, Mr. Secretary and myself, whereupon Mr. Secretary and I have sent out warrants for seizing the persons and arms of about twenty considerable gentlemen thereabouts, and if these witnesses make good at their trial what they have deposed before us, they will be every man both lives and fortunes in your power.
As to the question you ask whether it would be an injury to the Treasury to settle the commissions of Excise and Customs without consulting them, I am not well enough acquainted with the privileges that Board pretends to, to give a positive answer to the question; but I do not think Lord Godolphin's action very discreet. I have discoursed the Lord Keeper and Mr. Secretary upon this subject, and as on the one hand they look upon some alteration as necessary to the support of these two branches of your revenue, and the complying with expectations of people who, seeing the under offices of these two Boards filled generally with the most declared Jacobites of the country, think a change absolutely necessary; so, on the other hand, I find they agree with me, and would be very shy in giving their opinions of persons and their affections, at a meeting with five Commissioners of the Treasury, and the addition at least of the Lord President and Privy Seal, who will have reason to complain if they are excluded from such a public consideration.
I have been told that the last Commission of Excise was formed without consulting any person of the Treasury Board, except Lord Godolphin. Perhaps if he had ruled this alteration, as he is reported to have done that, this difficulty would not have been started. By what I have written you will easily discern my opinion; I shall only add, by leave of the Lord Keeper and Mr. Secretary, that this difficulty does exist, not only to the necessity of making a considerable change in these commissions, but to the impracticability of doing it now, by a meeting with all the Commissioners of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 44.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen approves of your report concerning the fitting of the south part of the barracks in the Savoy for receiving the Irish prisoners who are to be tried, and would have you give the necessary orders accordingly. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 152.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Orders are to be given for Lord Cutts to be received on board the Sally Rose, appointed to join Lord Berkeley's fleet. [Ibid., p. 153.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Queen has been informed by a letter from Admiral Allemonde to Mr. Viroot, the Dutch Consul here, that a Dutch ship called The Arms of Enchusyn has come into Portsmouth much disabled in the late storm; orders are to be given for furnishing her with all needful stores, &c. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 95.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Abraham de Crasto to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 228]; for Hendrick Huybregtsen Van der Grave, a Dutch seaman, to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 591]; for Edward Hendriex, ditto [Ibid. p. 593]; for Mr. John Ingoldby and Charles Penketh, his servant, ditto, recommended by Serjeant Ingoldby; for Peter Butler and Garret Mackloed, both soldiers, to go to Ireland; for Matthew Macknamaraw and John Macknamaraw, both soldiers, ditto; and for Mr. Nicholas Verhaugh, a Dutchman, on Colonel Gibson's pass to go to Holland [Ibid., p. 594].
July 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Simon Chapman, messenger, for apprehending Mr. John Byers, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 52.]
July 11.
Dieppe Bay.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. Ever since my last it has continued blowing hard from the west, but we hope it will soon have done. This goes by the Shoreham, which carries the Marquis of Carmarthen for England, he sending me word he is sick and desirous to go. Postscript.—13 July. Lord Carmarthen was better and altered his mind, but now sends word he got cold yesterday and is relapsed. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 652.]
July 11.
London.
A list of Swedish ships lately brought up and detained in the Downs. [Ibid. 7, No. 63.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Victualling Commissioners, enquiring the date when the victualling ships for the Straits will be ready to sail. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 153.]
July 12.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. We have considered the case of Dr. James Welwood, one of the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded Seamen, and find he had a warrant from the said Commissioners to be principal physician at Deptford, Greenwich, Gravesend, &c., with the allowance of ordinary travelling charges only in visiting Deptford once a week, and the other places as occasion should require, without salary. The allowance to physicians constantly residing at other parts is 200l. a year, but they have no other employment in the service as Dr. Welwood has, nor do we think it necessary that a physician should be established at those places. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 656.] Enclosing:—
Warrant to Dr. James Welwood to be principal surgeon at Deptford, &c., with power to appoint Dr. Abercromby and Dr. Greer his deputies, at a salary of 60l. yearly each; 14 May, 1691. [Ibid., p. 658.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Chief Justice Treby, enclosing a petition (not here entered) for his opinion. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 42.]
July 12. The Lords Justices of Ireland to the King, reporting on the petition of Robert Porter. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 97.] Enclosing:—
(1) Report by Sir Richard Levinge, Solicitor-General of Ireland, on the said petition, 6 July, 1694, recommending the granting of the request, in view of the truth of the facts alleged. [Ibid. 5, No. 97 i.] (2) Affidavit by John Naughton, 15 June, 1694, confirming the petitioner's statement. [Ibid. No. 97 ii.] (3) Permit to Robert Porter, esq., to live quietly at his house in Dublin, 5 July, 1690. [Ibid. No. 97 iii.] (4) Testimony to the petitioner's character and conduct, 7 June, 1694, by the following Protestants of Kildare:— George Mallory, John Nelson, Oliver Nelson, Thomas Salt, Thomas Pilsworth, Bar. Athly, David Jones, Edward Bevans, Richard Beane, John Moore and others. [Ibid. 5, No. 97 iv.] (5) Affidavit by James McManus, 15 June, 1694. [Ibid. No. 97 v.] (6) Affidavit by the petitioner, 18 June, 1694. [Ibid. No. 97 vi.] (7) Pass to Robert Porter to go to England, 12 August, 1690. [Ibid. No. 97 vii.] (8) The Lords Justices to Sir Richard Levinge, directing him to report on Porter's petition, 8 May, 1694. [Ibid. No. 97 viii.]. (9) Petition of Robert Porter [? Nov. 1693.] For seventeen years last past petitioner has been agent to the Earl of Kildare in Ireland, and though residing at Dublin all that time, and whilst the late King James was there, he never took up arms, nor raised men, but lived as a peaceable citizen during all the late troubles. By reason of his being the Earl's agent (for he had no lands or leases) he was elected by some of the Earl's tenants a burgess to serve for the corporation of Kildare in the late pretended parliament in Ireland, wherein, however, he only concerned himself to obviate any prejudice that might be offered to his said master. Immediately after the battle of the Boyne he submitted to King William, and came to London in August, 1690, where he lived peaceably till the Kingdom of Ireland was entirely reduced to order. He has nevertheless been outlawed for treason; and now petitions for the reversal of this outlawry, &c. Annexed is a copy of the King's order to the Lords Justices to report on this petition. [Ibid. 97 ix.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Proclamation concerning colours to be worn on board ships. None are to presume to wear in any of their ships or vessels their Majesties' jack, commonly called the Union Jack, nor any pendants, ensigns or colours usually borne by their Majesties' ships, without special warrant. Merchant ships shall hoist only the flag and jack white with St. George's cross passing quite through the same, and the ensign red with St. George's cross in a canton white at the upper corner thereof next the staff, and no pendant whatsoever. Vessels in Government employ shall, besides the colours which may be worn by merchant ships, wear a red jack with the union jack described in a canton at the upper corner thereof next the staff. Vessels in the employ of the different Government offices shall carry on their jack the seal used in the said several offices. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations, Vol. 6, No. 102.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings on the petition of Jane Boteler, relict of Captain Henry Boteler, setting forth that her husband was commander of their Majesties' ship Northumberland, for which service there was due to him 700l., but his mother lays claim to his estate. Prays that the sum may be stopped till the mother agree that a reasonable part thereof be allowed for the petitioner's support. Referred for report to the lords of the Admiralty, with an ad interim order for stopping the money. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 415.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. John Arnold to go to Harwich and Holland; for Lewis Perrot, a French deserter, ditto [S.P. Dom., Warrant Book 37, p. 229]; for Mrs. Ann Lumley, William Malle, Ellenor Madeson, and Petter A. Nelo, a Dutch woman (sic), to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland [Ibid., p. 230]; for Andries Cray, a Dutchman, to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 595]; and for Mr. John Andrew Tourton to return from Holland and land at any port in England [Ibid., p. 596].
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for grant of letters patent to Samuel Clarke of London, merchant, for his invention of making black latten and tinned plates as good or better than those brought from Germany. [Ibid., p. 595.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to permit Mr. Hollis, Mr. Mompesson, counsellors-at-Law, and Mr. Burleigh, attorney, to have free access, from time to time, in the presence of a keeper, to Mr. Walter Philips, alias Crosby, now a prisoner. [Ibid., p. 596.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury to pay to Matthew Prior, esq. (remaining for the public service at the Hague until the arrival of another minister there), the sum of 20s. by the day for his ordinary entertainment and allowance, to commence from 1st November last, and to continue for six weeks after the said minister arrives. [Ibid. 39, p. 54.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. Having troubled your Majesty with so long a letter the last post, I should not now importune you again, but that since then there has been a general report spread as if there were encouragement given from beyond seas to Major-General Trelawny, that in case he would pretend to be lieutenant-general and colonel of the Guards in the place of Mr. Talmash, he would not fail to succeed. This is so commonly believed here, that many people have been with me to declare their apprehensions of it, and finding it a thing that will universally dissatisfy that party "that is distinguished under the name of Whig," I thought it my duty to acquaint you with it. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 45.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the East India Company praying a convoy for the richly laden ships they now expect. Order sent to the Admiralty to furnish the same. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 416.]
July 13.
On board the Neptune in Dieppe Road.
Goodwin Wharton to Sir John Trenchard. One Capt. Thomas Jennings, commander of this vessel under Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and formerly master-attendant at their Majesties' dockyard at Chatham, hath for these three years past been accustomed to be in the summer service at sea, whilst the service at home would admit of his absence. As he can very well do both, we desire you to use your utmost endeavour that his place may not be disposed of; there is not on board this fleet a more able and zealous person for this Government. We must again recommend to you the sending of the light frigates, and such necessaries as were writ about. We hope to make such progress at St. Malo and elsewhere as shall give public satisfaction, which if we should fail of doing for want of these things, it would be an unfortunate matter for us all. I have enclosed a short relation of the business here. [Enclosure not preserved.] I wish you had determined the point about asking contributions, since this place probably might have made one sooner than any other; but I find that those who had at first a very good opinion of the proposition, have since thought they wanted power to try and execute it, and one of them will write to you about it. I wish also the forces now proposed to go for Flanders had been sent from St. Helens at first. If Lord Bolingbroke or Sir Thomas Travell desire to see this relation, please let Mr. Hopkins show them a copy of it. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 98.]
July 13.
On board the Neptune, Dieppe Bay.
Goodwin Wharton to Sir John Trenchard. We lay anchored off Dieppe for five days together till the 11th, in a very strong wind, during all which time we saw great numbers of horse and foot drawn up on the hill. In the evening of the 11th our bomb vessels made towards the shore to find their distances, and one of them throwing a bomb amongst the horse on the hill, they all broke in great confusion and dispersed, a few of them only appearing next morning, till such time as a shell came near them, and then we saw them no more. The next morning our bombadiers began to fire with great quickness and dexterity, few of them missing some part of the town. The enemy fired on us from six or seven places, but, it being random shot, did us no harm but to kill one man and wound another. About five we found we had shattered the town and castle pretty well; about nine a flame broke out in the middle of the town, and continued very fierce all night. About one, we sent in a machine vessel to a pierhead, which makes the mouth of their harbour, our men going in under fire of their great and small shot; after they had fired the fuse and left her, in the boat, they perceived the fuse had gone out, and they went back the second time and gave fire to it, coming off very safe. The bomb vessels continued firing till four in the morning, and in the whole threw 1,149 shells, &c., and began again this morning at eight. I cannot say I was glad to see one thing yesterday, which was a formal procession with the host on the hill behind the castle, with the several orders of the town, amongst which were the nuns out of their nunneries (one of which is said to be English), and if their going abroad doth not some way comfort them in this calamity, I must confess I have good nature enough to pity them. My Lord Carmarthen is just going hence sick; my Lord Cutts arrived here yesterday in the Sally Rose. [Ibid., No. 99.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Lord Berkeley. The Queen being informed that the Marquis of Carmarthen is dangerously ill commands that, upon receipt hereof, you immediately order some man-of-war to bring him to England. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 153.]
July 13.
Dieppe Bay.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. Yesterday and last night we threw about eleven hundred bombs and carcasses into the town, most of which had good effect. About ten last night the town took fire, and has burnt violently ever since; I hope by to-morrow morning to have most of it in ashes. We last night blew up one of our machines, intending it against the pier-head, but it had little effect, unless it killed the men that were near it on shore. We have seen several bodies of their troops (some horse clothed with blue) on the hills on each side of the town; but they do not incommode us at all. Yesterday most of their shot went beyond our bomb vessels, not more than four or five men being wounded. One shell fell into one of the bomb vessels and broke on deck giving the men time to leap overboard. Our people are now taking a little rest, but in an hour or two will begin again, and continue till to-morrow morning.
To-morrow I shall call a council of war, and believe we shall range along the coast to Havre de Grace and la Hogue, and then perhaps to St. Malo. But nothing can be done there without at least half a score of frigates of fifty guns and under, and we have but four now. Even if we have them, we cannot do much unless our machine vessels have good effect on a small island going in called the Quince rock.
It would be of service to remove the ten battalions from the fleet, for the weather is now hot, and sickness (I fear of a dangerous nature) will be unavoidable; four battalions would be enough to man the fleet and attempt anything that is reasonable.
Mr. Goodwin Wharton who is here has a working head, and "contributions runs in it confoundedly." He has persuaded me to write to you to know if her Majesty would give me power to compound for any if it should be offered at some other place, now they see how we have served Dieppe. I think there is no great danger of having any offered. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 664.]
July 13.
Off Carthagens.
Admiral Russell to Sir John Trenchard. Contrary winds pursue us. I lay seven days off Cape Spartel with fogs and "levants" before I could get into the Straits, and ever since have had easterly winds. It is the more unlucky because the year being so far spent, by the time I get as high as Barcelona I must be coming back again, not only in consideration of the approach of winter but also of the state of our provisions. I shall order bread to be baked at Carthagena against my return. I have been this day six weeks without touching anywhere, which makes the Dutch complain they want water.
The French have gone to the "Isle of Aires"; they will certainly disarm their great ships and send squadrons into the Levant, or else go with their whole fleet off Malta, where they know we are not in a condition to follow them. As I wrote you before I left England, I shall return without being able to do any service, which will be a great mortification to me. Had I come out a month sooner, I might have pursued them from place to place. This voyage, and no prospect of doing any service, has almost broken my heart.
Off Cape de Gatt I took a small frigate of sixteen guns, the enemy's westernmost scout. The commander tells me that Mons. Tourville had notice from the court of France by the 20th of June, that I was coming into the Straits with forty sail of English and Dutch; I cannot but observe their intelligence comes very quickly. I am afraid the French will send a squadron for the Turkey fleet, but will do the best I can for their security; they might have gone three months since secure enough. [Ibid., p. 668.] Enclosing:—Account of the time the provisions will hold out on board Admiral Russell's fleet, 13 June, 1694. [Ibid., p. 672.]
July 13. J. H. Pauly, Danish resident, to the Duke of Shrewsbury, requesting a passport from Dover for two members of the company of French comedians belonging to the King of Denmark, viz., Julien Bourdois Dorilly and Jean Baptiste de Lorme Chasteauvert, the latter having with him his wife, three children, a valet and a maid. They were on board the Danish ships lately stopped in the Downs, on their return to their native country. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 64.] Enclosing:—A list of the abovesaid persons. [Ibid., No. 64 i.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Bishop of Killaloe. Shows that by the late Act of Settlement in Ireland there was granted to the see of Killaloe, out of the lands forfeited by the rebellion in 1641, an augmentation of 200l. a year, which the then bishop endeavoured to place on the lands of the late Lord Clare; but an act of Charles II restored Lord Clare to his estate, by which means the see lost the benefit of the said Act for its augmentation of 200l. The same lands being a second time forfeited by the late rebellion, petitioner prays they may be annexed to the see for ever. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 66.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to grant a new custodiam to Lord Coningsby of the estate lately belonging to Richard Fagan, of Feltrim, and of the lands of Portmarnock and Carrichill, co. Dublin, lately belonging to William Plunkett, all forfeited by the attainder of the late owners. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 13, p. 137.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, directing them to remit certain rents reserved to the crown on a grant to Rudolph Kien, esq., of a custodiam of the forfeited estate of Ignatius Burford, in the county Meath. [Ibid., p. 138.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to make a grant to Dr. Narcissus Marsh, Archbishop of Dublin, and his successors, in augmentation of the revenues of the see, of the lands of Seatown, Newtown, Blackhall, Gamwell, Smith's Lands and several others in and about the town of Swords, directed to be granted to Francis, the late Archbishop, by letters of 12 October, 1693; the said letters not being deemed a sufficient conveyance for a permanent endowment of the see. [Ibid., p. 139.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to make satisfaction to John Colquit, out of the forfeited estate of Richard Barnewall, for 100l. advanced by him to the said Richard, for whom Matthew Barnewall was bondsman. [Ibid., p. 141.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Lord Dursley, envoy extraordinary to the States General and plenipotentiary at the Congress at the Hague, returned from the said employment on June the 6th last past. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 55.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of Charles, Lord Dursley, envoy extraordinary to the States General, &c., from 6 March, 1693–4, to the 6th of June following. [Ibid., p. 56.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Beeke and Henry Allen to seize two horses, standing at Thomas Sheldon's at the King's Head tavern, Canterbury, and two horses standing at Captain Roberts' at Harbledown near Canterbury, and two more standing at Thomas Pittern's, innkeeper at Bridge Hill, which are all designed to be sent to France, with a man in groom's clothes to carry over the said horses, and to apprehend Thomas Sheldon and Captain Roberts for being concerned in the transportation of the horses to France. [S.P. Dom., Warrant Book 38, p. 596.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for Joseph Wock, Lieb and Maudell Jeros, to go to Holland [Ibid.]; and for Mary Pietersen and a little child, ditto [Ibid. p. 597.]
July 14. Lady Abergaveny to N. Vernon, asking for a pass for her grandchild to go to Bruges with Mrs. Markham. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 100.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. One of their Majesties' yachts is to carry the Duchess of Leeds to Lord Berkeley's fleet, her Grace having learnt that Lord Carmarthen is dangerously ill of a fever. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 154.]
July 14.
Dieppe Bay.
Copy of a resolution of a council of war held on board the Queen. Having had so good success in Dieppe, it is resolved to sail immediately to Havre de Grace, and to endeavour to do as good service there; but small frigates will be much more necessary there than at Dieppe, for without them we may be liable to some insult from the enemy, they being in no want of galleys and other small craft in that river. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 674.]
July 14.
Corunna.
Captain William Street to Sir John Trenchard. Since my last letter to you relating to this affair, our Irish general, Don O'Bourne (sic) hath treacherously imprisoned myself and two more of my officers, and sent my sails on shore, pretending we were about to run away with the ships. Our Consul tells me he cannot assist Captain Humphrey and myself, being Spanish colours. [Ibid., p. 698.] Enclosing:—
(1) Bond by William Street of Poole, co. Dorset, to Sir James Houblon of London, knight, and other members of the committee for the Spanish expedition, 12 February, 1694. [Ibid., p. 702.] (2) Bond by Richard Strong, mariner, to the said Captain Street, 29 January, 1694. [Ibid., p. 704.]
July 14.
London.
Memorial to Sir John Trenchard by Sir James Houblon, Mr. Germain, Mr. Rigby, and other owners of the squadron of merchant ships now riding in the port of Corunna, for assistance in quelling mutinies on the ships James, Captain Street, the Dove, Captain Humphrey, and the Seventh Son, Captain Thomas, who will not obey the commands of General Don Arturo O'Bruin (Arthur O'Brian ?) who has been intrusted by those interested with the chief command. It is feared they will follow the example of the Charles, the crew of which, in May last, seized upon the said ship, made one Henry Every their commander, and sailed out of Corunna in the night, leaving notice in writing of their intention of pirating on the English as well as on all other nations. Wherefore the owners request that the said ship Charles may be seized wherever it is found. [Ibid. 7, No. 65.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Justice Giles Eyre. Though I wrote to you on Tuesday last concerning Parr, a prisoner in Reading gaol, yet the concern I find in some gentlemen who have appeared for him and wish to have his life saved, obliges me to write you again to send me your opinion as soon as possible. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 43.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Northampton. I have received your letter of the 9th inst., which I have laid before the Queen and made the Council acquainted with it, and I am directed to let you and the gentleman who joined with you in that letter know, that what you have done has been well approved of, and that by the prudence and vigour of the magistracy there, you have been able by your own authority to suppress those tumults and re-settle the peace of that town, which will be continued by the same methods. [Ibid., p. 42.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Don Sigismundo Van Heye and Don Remigio Duret to go to Holland; for Don Joseph Carreras, his two daughters and a child, to go to Holland or Flanders; and for George Bear, with a son and daughter, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, v. 597.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Bartholomew Walmsley, esq., charged with high treason, and to search his house for seditious papers and warlike instruments. [Ibid., p. 599.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. In reply to your report of the 13th, on the defective state of the machine vessels, the Queen commands you to provide twelve small fisher boats or long boats to fix the twelve little machines in, and other small vessels which are to be got ready with all possible expedition, and to rendezvous either in the Downs or at Margate. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 154.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. James Bradshaw and William John Hinton to go to Holland; for Elizabeth Vander Linden, a Dutch woman, and three children, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 597]; and for Mr. William Walker, ditto [Ibid., p. 598.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to take into custody James Hussey for making a riot within the verge of their Majesties' palace, and for rescuing from a messenger one James Marshall, seized upon information given that he had lately come from France. [Ibid. 39, p. 57.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. Such of the machine vessels as are in a condition to sail are forthwith to join Lord Berkeley's fleet, together with any small frigates under 50 guns each which can be spared from other service. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 155.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Berkeley. The Queen directs that you put on shore, at or near Portsmouth, such land forces as shall be thought requisite. As to the proposal from Mr. Wharton of putting towns under contribution to excuse them from being bombarded, her Majesty leaves you at liberty to accept thereof, if any such case shall happen, except in cases where there shall be a probability of destroying the enemy's shipping or naval stores. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 158.]
July 16. J. H. Pauly, Danish resident to Mr. Vernon. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 66.] Enclosing:—
(1) The same to the Duke of Shrewsbury, of same date, requesting that eight Danish vessels now awaiting a decision in the Admiralty court, may be allowed to go up the river and discharge their cargoes of corn, which will otherwise be spoiled. The ship St. Lorent of Drontheim, André Steensen, master, returning from France with a cargo of salt only, has been seized by Captain Thomas Townshend of the Bridget galley, on grounds unknown and apparently unjustifiable [Ibid., No. 66 i.]. (2) List of Danish vessels laden with corn, all belonging to Copenhagen [Ibid., No. 66 ii.].
July 16. Minutes of the proceedings of Council touching naval matters. Orders to be sent for the machine vessels to join Lord Berkeley, and for the disembarking of the land forces. The regiments of Cutts, Collier and Rada are to be among those put on shore. If any considerable part of these forces be disembarked it shall be left to Lord Macclesfield's choice whether he remain on board or come on shore. [Ibid., No. 67.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. John Owerhazi, a Danish gentleman, with John Dobes and John Hull his servants, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Richard Robinson to go by sea to Newcastle-upon-Tyne. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 230.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hopkins for apprehending Captain William Stow and Captain — Charnock, with their papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 72.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. I have to acknowledge the honour of yours of the 5th of July, which came to my hands last night; I can give no answer to what you are pleased to enquire concerning Lord Monmouth's making his peace at St. Germains; it is natural for a man that is very ill of one side, to desire not to be so on the other; but I daresay, although he may have made what advances are possible of that kind, if he could find his account under your government, it is what he would prefer much before any such alteration; and at this time he appears in so much better a temper to act anything for your service than you can believe, that I should not think it at all advisable to turn him out of his lieutenancy, and for his having anything to do in that disturbance at Northampton I dare engage he knew no more of it than I did, it being no more than an accidental tumult of the rabble occasioned by their seeing corn sold in quantities out of town. It is now quiet, without any other interposition but that of the magistrates alone. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 46.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Queen would be informed whether there be not any other of the machine vessels, besides the Sea Horse, in a condition of service; and how they are now employed. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 155.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Draft of a letter to Admiral Russell. I have not yet received the King's commands as to how long he would have you stay in the Mediterranean, or what ships you should leave behind. It may probably reach you direct from Flanders, by way of Genoa. The victuallers for Cadiz Bay will be ready to sail in two or three days, accompanied by two bomb vessels. From Lord Berkeley's success at Dieppe it is some satisfaction to find that our bomb-vessels and mortars are better prepared, and our engineers more expert, than was expected. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 676.]
July 17.
Havre de Grace Road.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. We sailed from Dieppe on the afternoon of the 14th inst., and just as we sailed had the satisfaction to see the Jesuits' steeple tumble. If we had been in the town, and nobody to oppose us, we could not have burnt it better. On the afternoon of the 15th, being off this place and having no pilots well acquainted, I sent Captain Benbow with the masters of the first and second rates to sound all the place, and by their report we went in. We found it much more difficult to do our business here than at Dieppe, for our great ships were forced to anchor a long way off, and our small vessels, that went in, to haul on and off every half tide. But yesterday, about three o'clock, we began to play our bombs, and set the town on fire in several places, so that we judge there may now be about a third of the town consumed, and the fire still burning.
Yesterday, while I was in among the bomb-vessels giving orders, a shell blew up the Granada bomb-vessel; the captain was taken up alive, and we have hopes of him; many of her men were saved. Captain Silver is a very good officer of the ordnance; his two nephews and a lieutenant to Sir Cloudesley Shovel are lost. Except this unlucky accident, in burning these two towns, we have lost but one man killed and three wounded. Had it not been ill weather to-day, we still could not have fired many more bombs, for our vessels are extremely shattered, and most of the mortars run so, that they will be of little use till they be recast. I will keep the fleet out as long as I can, and at least give them the alarm at La Hogue and Cherbourg, and throw some bombs at the latter. There is no thinking of an attempt on St. Malo without new mortars.
I sent the Elizabeth on the 13th inst. with a brigantine and some well-boats, Colonel Venner and two hundred men, to make an attempt upon Treport, but have no news of them.
In the burning of these towns I have found all the officers very forward in their several employments, and also the men who were sent in to sustain and help them. Captain Benbow has been of extraordinary use to me in placing the bomb-vessels.
Postscript. Captain Silver's nephews were both taken up wounded last night. At a council of war this afternoon, the Dutch offering to spare us water, we agreed to stay here a day or two longer, and ply the town with three or four bomb-vessels we shall get repaired, to hinder them from putting out the fire. The reason the Dutch have more water than we is that they had but three battalions on board; we seven. It is not our men-of-war that want water, but the fireships, &c., that have soldiers on board. The Elizabeth is now coming in; they did nothing worth mentioning on the coast about Treport.
I have just received orders from the Admiralty requiring me to dispatch business at Portsmouth. I find they are angry with me, though I have never omitted giving them an account of everything I do, and paying them all the respect they can desire. Lieut.-Colonel Richards of the Ordnance is a very pretty officer, and by his skill has done great service. Mr. Wharton will carry this to you, and give you a more particular account by word of mouth. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 684.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Roope. I have several of your letters to acknowledge; the last of the 15th inst. which concerns the Admiralty I have sent to the Lords Commissioners, who I hope will provide for the security of the coast and furnish the necessary convoys. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 43.]
July 17. Statement of arms, horses and equipment, [taken ?] from Sir Rowland Stanley, now a prisoner in Chester Castle, Sir James Poole, and Mr. Massey of Poddington; the last named has been out of the country for some weeks. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 101.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Rodney Fane, esq., and John William, bail of Anthony Rodney, praying a writ of error in a judgment obtained against the petitioners by Edward Phipps. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 67.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Commission for John Whitehall, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Lieutenant-Colonel William Seymour is captain in the second regiment of foot guards called the Coldstreams, commanded by —. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 223.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for George Alder, a German, to go to Holland; for Lieutenant-Colonel Gaspar Belgarde and his servant, ditto; and for Nicholas Babossia and Joseph Croce, both Jews, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 598.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger, for apprehending Captain Patrick Auchmooty, together with his papers, for treasonable practices. [Ibid. 39, p. 57.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the reprieve, for thirty days, of Joseph Bulmer, gent., in case he is found guilty when tried at the assizes at Kingston-uponHull for the murder of — Allgood, gent. [Ibid., p. 58.]
July 18.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 688.] Enclosing:—
List of convoys and cruizers to the northward, besides the ships with Vice-Admiral Hopson, 18 July, 1694. [Ibid., p. 692.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. James Hais, a French protestant, to go to Holland; for Anthony Vander Myl, a Hamburgher, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 598]; and for John Geelhuysen and Henry Fraterman, both Dutchmen, ditto [Ibid. p. 599].
July 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the reprieve of Christian Cassey, found guilty of burglary and felony, and sentenced to death. [Ibid. p. 598.]
July 19. Extract from letter of Sir John Trenchard to the Lords Justices of Ireland: Mr. Bridgman removing in a few days to be secretary to the Admiralty, I must recommend Mr. Hopkins, who is in my office, to take care of such Irish affairs as are to be despatched here.
Endorsed: "This is only to show that an under-secretary's being employed particularly in the affairs of Ireland is not an innovation. Most probably he was considered for it; otherwise there would have been no recommendation of Mr. Hopkins for an employment by which he would not have profited. But the under secretaries' having 200l. a year from Ireland as a gratuity (which has been equally divided among them for many years past) has been customary as long as I can remember anything of the office." [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 59.]
July 19. The duplicate of the foregoing. [Ibid. No. 60.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Bedford. The Dutch Ambassador having lately presented a second memorial, with a letter from the States-General, complaining of a sentence given in May last by the Lords of Appeal against the ship Jager or Hunter, Robert Foster, master, and demanding that the same be redressed, for the reasons set forth in the said letter, I have sent you a copy thereof, and wish you to collect, and as soon as possible send me, an abstract of the proofs that were produced against this ship before the Lords of Appeal, and what was, at that time, alleged by the other side. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 44.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Bailiffs of Yarmouth. I have received your letter of the 16th inst., and am surprised that one accused of high treason should be so easily suffered to make his escape; such a negligence in the gaoler ought not to pass without being strictly enquired into. In the meantime I have directed an advertisement to be put into the Gazette for recovering the prisoner. As for Quet, Thomson, and Voaks, if they can give good security for their appearance in the Court of King's Bench in Michaelmas term, you may discharge them, taking bail of such of them as can give it; otherwise it will be further considered what may be fit to do with them. [Ibid. p. 45.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke. The inclosed petition of Conrad Griebe, with the articles annexed against Colonel Rechteren, having been laid before the Queen, her Majesty commands me to send the same to you with orders to prepare for a court-martial to be held thereon. Enclosure not here entered. [Ibid.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Duke of Bolton. I have received your letters of the 23rd and 30th past, and could not answer them sooner, having expected till yesterday a letter from Mr. Justice Eyre concerning John Parr. I now find that the judge is still of the same opinion, that he is not a fit object for mercy; he does not look upon his discoveries to be such as may entitle him to any favour, and he adds that some of the gentlemen who joined in a certificate in his behalf have since owned to him that they did it by surprise and misinformation. You will easily imagine how little advantage it would be to the prisoner to have such a report laid before the Queen; I see no remedy therefore, but that the matter must rest there till the judge comes to town, and we can see whether he has altered his opinion upon discoursing with some other of the justices of that county, who know better the nature and usefulness of this man's discoveries. You tell me to procure pardon for Captain Lyon, but I have never yet heard of his crime, where he was tried, or what is to be said in his justification; when I have further instructions I will give the captain what assistance I can. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 45.]
July 19.
Havre de Grace Road.
Copy of the resolution at a council of war held on board the Queen. Having done what was possible at Havre de Grace, and finding that not above two of the bomb-vessels are serviceable, it is resolved to sail for St. Helen's, to refit, &c., giving the enemy the alarm at La Hogue or Cherbourg, if wind and weather permit. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 696.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Roger Pilcher and others. Sets forth that they were chief instruments of seizing Bromfield and Cooper, two disaffected persons who were endeavouring to go to France, and the better to discover them they put some wool on board for no other purpose than to serve their Majesties, and with no intent to transport the same; but the wool was seized by the customs' officers, &c. They pray a nolle prosequi and a reward. Referred to the Attorney-General for report. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 417.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Baptiste de Lorme Chasteauvert, Martine Genevieve his wife, John Baptiste, Julien and Rene their children, Julien Bourdais, John Loubere, a servant, and Anna George, a maid servant, with their goods and necessaries to go to Dover, and there to embark on board any of the ships appointed for the exchange of prisoners and pass into France; for Mr. Thomas Riddle and Francis Harrison, his man, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and embark for Holland or Flanders [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 27, p. 331]; and for Martina Kitelaer and four children to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 599].
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Bale for apprehending Captain David Mackadam. [Ibid. 39, p. 45.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for John Blythman, gunner of the Smyrna Factor, to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate, without any condition of transportation. At a court-martial held on board the Berkeley Castle on 15th June last, he was found guilty of embezzling the stores and was sentenced to death. [Ibid., p. 59.]
July 20.
Croxton, near Brereton Green.
Thomas Lee to Sir John Trenchard. The account Sir John Mann and I gave you of our proceedings was as long as Sir John's haste would permit. My stay in Chester was longer, and therefore I saw more of the justice of our complaint of the shortness of our tether. Since my return home I see yet more; my abode is in the crowd of enemies to the government; it is certain they are in great consternation, and riding about continually, as I now am informed they have done in the night for some time past. The power I have as justice of the peace does not reach the occasion, men being timorous in their evidence concerning their neighbours.
At Chester we sent for the head military officer, and gave him an account of your commands, when prisoners were expected every moment. He flatly said he should take no notice of a secretary's order. He is but an ensign, named Robinson, of I know not what regiment. Indeed, if the gaoler (though no better than he should be) had not been a timorous man, we should not have known how to have disposed of the prisoners, having no positive orders in it. They brought an old trunk of papers from Sir Rowland Stanley's; there were nine saddles, all new, found at Mr. Massey's, hid under feathers and straw. Sir Rowland sent to us next morning for a copy of his commitment. There is nobody with whom the non-swearers herd more than Mr. Shakerley, M.P. One Mr. Weston, of Chrislington, near Chester, I believe is as obnoxious as any man. I moved to have him surprized by a search, but was not harkened to. There is one Mr. Samuel Warburton, that lives at Butler's Wharf, who was born upon Mr. Cholmondeley's land. He is an eminent dissenter of Mr. Vincent's church; but when he was last in this country he gloried much in being a chief instrument in conveying the late king away. He has a brother in this neighbourhood, a plain man, who was at London this week, by whom I am assured he corresponds very much with the Jacobites, and particularly Mr. Cholmondeley, of Vale-Royal. Molyneaux and Standish have escaped. Saddles for a troop of horse were found at Standish's. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 5, No. 102.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, hastening their report on the petition of Mrs. Jane Boteler, for a share of money due to her late husband, commander of the Northumberland. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 96.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. The Queen commands me to signify her pleasure to your lordships that you prepare a warrant for her Majesty's sign-manual to put Colonel Toby Purcell, the governor of Cork, in Ireland, upon the establishment of that kingdom for an allowance to him of nine shillings and sixpence a day to commence from the 20th April last, in lieu of a company of foot which the king promised him upon quitting the regiment now commanded by Colonel Richard Ingoldsby. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 173.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to pay to Dorothy Hubblethorne, widow of Lieut.-Col. John Hubblethorne, who was killed in service at sea, and to Charles Hubblethorne her son, the arrears of a pension of 200l. granted them for their lives, on the 10th September, 1674, and a new pension at the rate of 100l. yearly. The said Charles Hubblethorne went over to Ireland with the late Duke of Schomberg, and in the attack on Limerick received a shot through his face, impeding his speech. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 142.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a grant to Thomas Dent, M.A., of the place and dignity of a prebendary in the collegiate church of St. Peter, Westminster, void by the death of Dr. Adam Littleton. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 143.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Charles, Viscount Townshend, Dr. William Sherrard, John Stewart, his lordship's gentlemen, and Roland Morel, his footman, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 232]; for John Bouquet to go to Holland; for Firmin Lotteoeuvre, a French protestant, ditto; and for Michael Rukinga and John van Campen, ditto [Ibid., p. 600.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the holding of a court-martial to examine into the charges of returning false musters, &c., mutually made by Conrade Griebe, adjutant in the regiment of horse commanded by Colonel Rechteren, and the said colonel, to consist of Luke Lillingston and Edward Dutton Colt, esquires, colonels of two regiments of foot; Colonel Colyer, Lieutenant-Colonel Rosentrouch, Captains Heyder, Wolson, Seyffen, Simon, Mohr, of the regiments of Dutch foot guards; and Major Robert Tempest, Captains John Boyse and Richard Franks, of the regiment of foot commanded by Sir Henry Bellasis, under the presidency of Comte de Steinbock. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 58.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Like warrant for another court-martial, under the presidency of Colonel Walter Philip Collier, including in the matter for examination charges by Major Podewell of the same regiment, and adding the following officers to the court:—Theophilus Rabinière, esq., lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Lillingston; and Captains John Frisbourg, John Ward and Christian Lilly. [Ibid., p. 65.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The twelve small fisher boats ordered to be prepared are. to take in the machines from Tower Wharf A vessel is to be provided for a machine lying at Deptford in the Whitepot. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 159.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Ordering the discharge of the James of Glasgow, lately taken near Dunkirk by Capt. Philips, commander of their Majesties' advice-boat Postboy, the said vessel having been employed by the Council of Scotland to carry over some persons from the Bass to Dunkirk. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 96.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for grant of the office of water bailiff of the Thames, between Staines Bridge and the head of the said river, to John Fergusson, gent., in the place of Roger Killigrew, deceased. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 600.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mary Vanier and Mary Berry, with a child, to go to Holland. [Ibid.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Approbation of the following persons as deputy-lieutenants of the county of Gloucester:—Lord Capell, Lord Scudamore, Lord Tracy, Sir John Guise, Sir Ralph Dutton, Sir Thomas Stephens, Sir Richard Cocks, Sir John Newton, John de la Bere, John Mariott, Thomas Stephens, Henry Creswick, Joshua Ayleworth, Maynard Colchester, Reginald Pyndar, George Smith, Edward Smith, Robert Tracey, William Hodges, John Cocks, Thomas Pyrke, Thomas Stephens of Lysgate, Edward Fust, Thomas Chester, Samuel Codrington, Nathaniel Stephens, Samuel Barker, Samuel Trottman, Richard Dowdswell, Charles Dowdswell, William Try, John How, Francis Creswick, John Stafford, Edward Stephens, and Joseph Browne, esquires. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 60.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Approbation of Sir John Guise, Sir Thomas Earle, Sir William Haman, Sir John Duddlestone, Thomas Day, William Jackson, John Dutton Colt, Robert Yate, Michael Pope, Henry Gibbs, Thomas Edwards, Robert Henly, Richard Codrington, Humphrey Corseley, John Cary, John Hine, and Timothy Parker, esquires, as deputylieutenants of Bristol. [Ibid., p. 65.]
July 23.
Victualling Office.
The Victualling Commissioners to Sir John Trenchard. The ships in the enclosed list were at Gravesend, and would have reached the Nore had not one of them sprung a leak, which entailed her unlading and the distribution of her provisions to the rest of the ships. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 68.] Enclosing:—A list of the ships laden with provisions for the fleet under the command of Admiral Russell in the Straits. [Ibid., No. 68i.]
July 23. Minutes of Council. The opinion of the Lords Justices came too late, that a parliament cannot meet there before the latter end, or at soonest the middle, of October, and then their session will happen at the same time as that of the parliament of England, which is not thought convenient. To signify to the justices that they should take proper opportunity to let the gentlemen know that their Majesties will not part from their right of sending money bills, and to endeavour to undeceive those that are persuaded to the contrary. That the principal reason that the committee is of opinion that the parliament in Ireland should not be immediately called, is that the Lords Justices' opinion came too late, that it is not practicable to have a session there before the meeting of the parliament in England. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 61.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for Hendrick Jansen, Jacob Vershore, Jan Laurenson, Hendrick van Lieuwen, Luke Jansen, and Albert Heindricksen, being six Dutch seamen, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and into Holland; for Nans Coedycke, John Knobbert, and William Jansen, three Dutch seamen, ditto; for Claas Gerritsen, and Dirck de Vlaming, two Dutch seamen, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 232]; for Nicholas Siseer, a German, and four children, to go to Holland [Ibid. 38, p. 600]; and for Catherine Marsallis, a Dutch soldier's wife, and two children, ditto [Ibid., p. 601.]
July 24.
Carthagens.
Admiral Russell to the King. I am sorry this letter does not bring your Majesty the news of my having met the French fleet, but contrary winds have pursued me from the time I first left England, which has made my passage so long that the French, upon the news of my coming, have retired with their fleet from Barcelona to the Isles of Aress, which makes me conclude they resolve not to fight; though I am not a man who takes delight in that recreation, I confess my hopes were that, in these seas, they would have faced me, where the advantage to them must be great, we being so far from England. I hope you are pleased to believe I have done what was in my power; it is a great mortification to me that I should be forced to return home without rendering you some service from this long voyage; the season of the year and the shortness of the provisions in the fleet will compel me to make no stay here. How that will suit with the Spaniards' designs (if they have any) I know not, but I am sure it is for your service to have the great ships in safety before the winter weather comes in. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 45a.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. Yesterday, by the Queen's commands, Mr. Secretary Trenchard communicated to some Lords, called upon that occasion, two letters he had received—one from Lord Capell, and one from the two other Lords Justices of Ireland. When first I saw them I confess I was extremely surprised to observe they were answers to questions relating to a parliament which I remember was (sic) sent them near four months ago by your command, and, I concluded, long since returned; they differ absolutely in opinion, as you will perceive when you read the two letters; but had not Lord Capell's great indisposition, with the backwardness the others have shown to come to a resolution, been a sufficient excuse for his share of the delay, I must have declared that all three had been guilty of a neglect of the highest moment, in deferring to return you an account of those questions, till now, when it is too late; so that were there the best dispositions imaginable in Ireland, there is not time left to pass over the forms, so as to call a parliament, before that of England must necessarily sit.
All the Lords that were present at the reading of these letters agreed that a parliament was necessary for the welfare of Ireland, and almost all were of opinion that, would the time allow it now, it were advisable to call and try one, there being good grounds to hope they would meet and act with good temper; but I must observe to you that these two Lords Justices have not contented themselves with giving a lame opinion, as if the parliament will not act to your service, but, lest they should be tried, have artificially deferred the giving that opinion till it is no more possible to make the experiment before next Spring. To their observations I have one of my own to add: that if these two gentlemen are to conduct this parliament when it does meet (who have given their opinions that it cannot succeed) even they will have address enough to order it so as infallibly to make good their advice.
Sir James Montgomery's lady was with me two days ago, and though she would not directly own that she was ordered by her husband to come to me, yet she gave broad hints, as though she were desirous I should believe and acquaint you that if Sir James might have his pardon and leave to return to his own country, he was entirely disposed to live quietly and privately the rest of his days at home; I gave her not much encouragement to hope any such favour from you, but thought it my duty to acquaint you with it. [Ibid., No. 47.]
July 24.
Dublin Castle.
The Lords Justices of Ireland to Sir John Trenchard. This morning we have received the ill news that their Majesties' ship Scarborough, Captain Killingworth commander, after a stout resistance was on the 18th inst. taken, off Tory island, by two French privateers, one of forty and the other of twenty-six guns. One account says that the captain and thirty others are killed, but another says that the captain is wounded and about one hundred of his men sent on shore. There are said to be seven French men-of-war on that coast, and if we should order the Dolphin and another frigate there, they would certainly be taken.
This day the merchants of this city came in a body to us to the castle from the exchange acquainting us with the damage they continually receive from French privateers, and desiring us to represent their case to their Majesties. They tell us that of thirty-two ships sent the last year from Liverpool to the West Indies, four only are as yet returned, and that the loss of such as are taken by the French is as great to their Majesties as to the merchants, and more to England than to Ireland. Just now we received an express from Waterford that the Dogger packet-boat with three packets on board her was, on the 20th inst., taken by a French privateer of six guns, who landed some of the seamen and passengers near that place, though the Talbot pink was then, and is still, cruising upon that coast. But men that have skill tell us that she is so great "a slug" that she will be able to do little service against privateers, and they swarm so extremely all over this part of the coast that there will be no security without a better guard, or at least another vessel of this size.
We have heard nothing from the Dolphin since his engagement with a French privateer which we acquainted you with in ours of the 7th inst., but we are told he has sailed to Hoylake. The other two ships appointed to serve here (the Pearl and the Dover prize) are not yet in a condition to come from Kinsale. Since writing the above we have received yours of the 19th inst. in which you recommend Mr. Hopkins to us for the Irish affairs in Mr. Bridgeman's stead; we are very well satisfied with the gentleman and will send the usual dispatches to him. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 62.] Enclosing copies of (1) report by the Postmaster of Londonderry, dated 21 July, 1694, of the capture of the Scarborough frigate. [Ibid., No. 62 i.] (2) Similar report, dated Castle Doc, 19 July, 1694, from William Wray. [Ibid., No. 62 ii.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. Philip de Canu, a Frenchman lately taken at sea, and now a prisoner at Harwich, having represented to her Majesty that he was bred a protestant and desires to continue in that profession, prays he may not be exchanged or sent into France, and the minister of the congregation to which he formerly belonged, together with other French protestants, having certified in his behalf, it is her Majesty's wish that you set at liberty the said Philip de Canu upon his finding security that he shall stay here and behave himself peaceably without giving offence to the Government. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 46.]
July 24. J. H. Pauly, Danish resident, to the Duke of Shrewsbury. Knowing your favourable inclination to the interests of the King, my master, and his subjects, I hope you will obtain from the Queen a hint to Sir Charles Hedges to release three or four Norwegian ships and two belonging to Jutland in the same manner as the thirty-eight Danish ships have been released. They all have passports in due form. The trade of England with Norway should be borne in mind, for the English are always well treated in that country. The releases in question would contribute much to the preservation of a good understanding which has existed for centuries between the powers. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 69.]
July 24. Thomas Bedford to the Duke of Shrewsbury, giving an account of the case of the ship Jager, Robert Foster, master, taken by Captain Thomas Graves, commander of the privateer Falmouth, and condemned by the Duke of Shrewsbury, the Earl of Bridgwater, and Sir Henry Goodrick, the only lords of appeal then present. [Ibid., No. 70.] Enclosing:—(1) Arnout Van Citters to the Queen, dated Westminster, 7 May, 1694, begging a prompt termination of the case of the ship Jager now pending. [Ibid., No. 70 i]. (2) Original, copy, and translation in duplicate of the same to the same, dated Westminster, 28 May, 1694, requesting a fresh trial in the same matter. [Ibid., Nos. 70 ii70 v.] (3) Copy and translation of the Duke of Shrewsbury to Van Citters, 1 June, 1694, stating that the Queen cannot consent to grant a reverse in the proceedings. [Ibid., Nos. 70 vi and 70 vii.] (4) Translation, in duplicate, of the States General to the Queen, dated at the Hague, 22 June, 1694, begging a reversal of the judgment against the ship Jager, on the ground that it was obtained by subornation of witnesses, whose evidence can be disproved. [Ibid., Nos. 70 viii and 70 ix.] (5) Original and translation, of Arnout van Citters to the Queen, dated at Westminster, 19 July, 1694, expressing the surprize of the States General (in view of article 12 of the marine treaty concluded between England and Holland, 1 December, 1674) at the Queen's rejection of his memorial for a new trial of the Jager. They knew that this article was very much opposed by some when the treaty was making, and during the first fourteen years opposition was always made in such cases by those who would indicate that the Committee of Appeals and the Privy Council are one and the same thing, being composed for the most part (as it is still) of the members of the Council; yet they could never establish this opinion in any of the preceding reigns; but, on the contrary, their Majesties, upon the remonstrances of the States General, were so much the more inclined to direct the like causes to be reviewed by the Privy Council in their presence, to be satisfied whether justice had been duly administered, and with all the precautions that the treaties require. It follows from the Duke of Shrewsbury's letter of the 1st of June that the Privy Council and Court of Appeals are two different jurisdictions, and that the former is superior to the other, for if they were the same it would then follow that her Majesty, taking from the Council the cognizance of the like matters, would consequently abolish the Committee of Appeals. Their Highnesses can understand that the King, with his Council, being as it were overcharged with great affairs, has thought fit to ease himself and them by committing the affairs of justice, which concern only his own subjects and the subjects of powers not engaged in such treaties and Alliance as their Highnesses are, to the decision of the Committee of Appeals. But to extend this to the subjects of their Highnesses is what they think without foundation, for it abolishes a jurisdiction which is established by reciprocal treaties, and this only upon a pretence not to introduce precedents to make suits endless. [Ibid., Nos. 70 x and 70 xi.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter Caillard, a poor lame French protestant, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and Holland; for Matthew Guillot and Benoite, his daughter, French protestants, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 233]; and for Bartholomew Kuys, John Kievit, Michael Carreyn, Michael Swaansen, John Walderhoef, George Symonsen, Cornelis Willems, Hendrick Soelen, Laurens Brouwer, all Dutch seamen, to go to Gravesend [Ibid., 38, p. 601.]
July 25.
Altea Bay.
Admiral Russell to Sir John Trenchard. In the orders I have given to the Turkey fleet I have made only such alterations in the instructions given to Sir Francis Wheler as were thought advisable by a council of war.
So tedious a passage as we have had, nobody ever remembers. I very much fear my coming into these seas will be of no service. The French fleet retired upon the first notice of our approach; and our appearing before Barcelona will have little effect, for the Spaniards are not able to face the French, so that it is in their power to take Catalonia when they please, notwithstanding any naval force that may be there. At any rate the French know this fleet cannot stay, and the moment our backs are turned they may appear before the place; all the sea ports along the coast will submit at the sight of six ships in their bays. The sloth, ignorance and poverty of these people is not to be expressed.
The season is so far spent that I can do nothing but offer my service to join in any attempt they can propose against the French, and if nothing can be done I must speedily think of returning. It is very plain the French will put nothing to a hazard, for it is hardly possible for them to expect a greater advantage than fighting us in these seas where we can have no relief. I hope you will not send me orders to detach any ships; if I leave any they will run the danger of being destroyed, for if the French be stronger, as certainly they will, there is not a port in these seas can protect them. Cadiz will deliver them up, should an enemy threaten to bomb the town, unless the English and Dutch were sacrificed. The only service to England the fleet has done by appearing there is a reputation, which is very great at this time; but that is not equal to the hazard they run. To Spain we have done the service of keeping the towns on the coast from the French, from Gibraltar to Barcelona, as also Minorca, which by this time had been in their possession. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 714.] Enclosing:— (1) Copy of Admiral Russell's orders to Captain Sincock, commander of the Tiger prize at Cartagena, for his proceedings in convoying the Turkey fleet of merchantmen, 25 July, 1694. [Ibid., p. 722.] (2) Copies of two several sealed orders from the same to the same, of the same date, to be opened successively at sea. [Ibid., p. 726 and 728.] (3) Copy of an order from the same to Captain Wakelin, commander of the Princess Ann, to remain at Smyrna till joined by the Scanderoon convoy, and then to follow Captain Sincock's orders. [Ibid., p. 730.]
July 25.
Near the Isle of Wight.
Lord Berkeley to the same. We appeared on the French coast off La Hogue and Cherbourg, and alarmed the enemy, who fired many guns and made fires on the shore. Having notice there was a French frigate and four or five merchant-ships at La Hogue, I sent some ships with a fire-ship to try and destroy them. Had the weather been good, I intended to have sent to Cherbourg and demanded contributions, having received yours of the 16th inst.; but as the weather was unfavourable, and we should not have been able to have thrown in above one hundred and fifty shells in case of their refusal, I would not "opiniastre" it any longer. I am now sending Captain Benbow with three or four ships to the Quince Rock by St. Malo, to see whether it be fortified. The Reserve brought me a machine-vessel yesterday, and another vessel with three mortars on board, but all of ten inch, which are mere baubles and will do no service. It is shells of weight and number that must do our business, else bombarding will be but an insult upon the enemy, which I suppose is not the only thing desired. I hope to get into St. Helen's this afternoon, and desire you would think of the order I wrote about, for victualling the soldiers, before I sailed from that place. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 718.]
July 25.
Westminster.
J. H. Pauly, Danish Resident, to the Queen, begging that the impositions laid on the released Danish ships may be remitted, and the charges and dues moderated, in view of their losses and damages by the delay in England pending the decision. [Ibid. 7, No. 71.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Harmansen and Jacob Anthonissen to go to Holland; and for Stephen Barnes, a bit-maker, and William Fastnidge, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 88, p. 601.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to Mr. Justice Powell and Mr. Justice Rokeby. The enclosed petition of Raney Rabaud having been represented to the Queen, her Majesty commands me to tell you that if the petitioner be found guilty of manslaughter or otherwise, you do not proceed to the execution of the sentence until a report shall be made to her Majesty of the circumstances of the fact as they shall appear to you upon his trial, whereupon her Majesty will declare her further pleasure. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 173.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. I have sent Captain Tyrwhitt to the fleet in expectation that he may do their Majesties some service there, and I desire you will send directions that he be received on board the Stirling Castle, and that he be admitted as a midshipman on board the said ship. [Ibid. 5, p. 47.]
July 26.
St. Helens.
Lord Berkeley to Sir John Trenchard. I called no council of war about putting the soldiers on shore, because it related only to the English; but Lord Cutts, Sir Cloudesley Shovel and I agreed to put six regiments on shore, viz., Cutts', Collier's, Rada's, Venner's, Coote's and Roe's, and to keep the rest on board till further orders. We are in great want of seamen, our numbers daily ebbing and none coming in; for the Admiralty have sent me an order to take no men from the frigates that are not of the line of battle, yet they take from us. The Swiftsure has come back from La Hogue, but the ships had made their escape from there the night before she arrived. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 732.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Lord Berkeley. In reply to your letter enclosing the result of the council of war of the 19th inst., the Queen commands that you repair hither with all convenient speed, leaving orders that the fleet be put in readiness to go to sea again as soon as you return to St. Helen's. Captain Benbow is to come to London immediately on his arrival at St. Helen's. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 159.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Baden, of London, junior, praying a patent for an engine for raising, forcing and discharging water, &c. Referred for report to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 67.]
July 26. Minutes of the proceedings of Council touching Admiralty matters. Orders to be sent to Lord Berkeley to come to town immediately, &c. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 72.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Henry Brooks to go to Harwich, or down the river for Holland or Flanders [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 233]; for Herman Kuyper, a Dutch soldier, and his wife to go to Holland; for Martin Orle, a Dutch soldier, ditto; for Messrs. Posadowsky, Landresky, Ghug, Alexander, Titius, Hartmut, Schneider, all Germans, ditto; for Albert Valentin and Jacob van Hensden, ditto; for John Fergusson, ditto; and for Christian Meekeren, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 602].
July 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to permit Lady Slane to speak with Walter Crosby alias Philips, now a prisoner for high treason. [Ibid., p. 603.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of Transports to provide three vessels, to send several sorts of stores for the service into Flanders under the care of William Meesters, esq. [Ibid. 39, p. 60.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Knight, messenger, for apprehending Peter Hayes, together with his papers, for treasonable practises. [Ibid.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to satisfy Sir William Ashurst, knight, lord mayor of London, and other creditors of Richard and Andrew Dalton, late of Dublin, merchants, now outlawed of high treason, for sums due to them out of the forfeited estate of the said Daltons. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 144.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to grant 2,000l. to Alice, Countess-Dowager of Drogheda, who has represented that for three years past she has lost the benefit of her jointure in Ireland, and has petitioned for a grant of such debts as were due to her grandson, Lord Slane, when she was guardian to him, out of the estates of the Marquis of Antrim and Sir John Fleming. Lord Slane's real estate has been granted to the Earl of Athlone, but the personalty remains vested in the Crown. (The debts alleged to be due are specified.) [Ibid., p. 148.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same to pay to James Hamilton, of Tallimore, esq., such sums as he became responsible for on behalf of the public association of the nobility and gentry of Ulster, to defend the protestant interest and assert their Majesties' government, about the months of December, January and February, 1688–9. [Ibid., p. 149.] Annexed is an account of these debts. [Ibid. p. 150.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Passes for Cornelia Heymans, Mary Flaswa and two children, to go to Holland; for Mr. Benjamin Hawskins Styles and Mr. Thomas Carbonnel, ditto; for Volgent Jansz, Bertram van Haren, and Jacob Arie Jansz, all Dutch seamen, ditto; for Martin Brouwer, a German, ditto; for Mr. Jacobus de Hondt, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 601]; for Frederick Wensky, a German, ditto; for Peter le Court, a French refugee, ditto; for James du Bue, ditto [Ibid., p. 602]; for Peter Johnson and John Pietersen, Dutch seamen, ditto; for Nathaniel Patience, and Anne Partridge, ditto; and for Richard Clark, ditto [Ibid., p. 603].
July 27.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of Sir Paul Ricaut, their Majesties' resident in the Hanse Towns of Lower Saxony, from 1 January, 1693[–4] until 1 July, following. [Ibid.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of George Stepney, esq., his Majesty's commissary at the court of Saxony from 14 Dec., 1693, to 14 June, 1694. Among the items are: "for three journeys to Mauritzburg, and to the officers who gave me quarters there." [Ibid., p. 74.]
July 28.
Frankfort.
Charles [Landgrave of Hesse Cassel] to the King. Your Majesty has already been informed that the Margrave and I have been obliged to recross the Rhine owing to the nearer approach of the enemy. As we are not in a position to form the two armies of the Upper and Middle Rhine, which your Majesty considered necessary (for I have with me only the troops of Münster, Paderborn, Zell and Wolfenbüttel), and therefore could effect nothing useful on the other side of the Rhine. The Margrave Ludwig of Baden conceived the idea of putting the devastated town of Mannheim into a condition of defence against the French and Swabian territories; I agreed to contribute a proportion of troops, to be sent to reinforce him in case of necessity. [King William's Chest 15, No. 46 a.] Enclosing:—Return of troops, perhaps under the command of the Landgrave. [Ibid., No. 46 a. i.]
July 28. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. I have the honour of your Majesty's letter, and am not at all surprised to find you so much displeased at the disappointment of the supplies you have so long expected for the army. It is a great mortification to me to receive any expressions like displeasure from your Majesty, but I have the satisfaction of knowing that, if you were here, you are too just to impute it to me; in one word it was impossible, with the Council and Treasury that you left here, to have the Land Bank settled in your absence, or without some very particular signification of your own pleasure.
I believe my Lord Portland, in the little time he has been here, must be sensible of this, and I hope his being here will, in very few days have an effect that will at least enable us in some measure to relieve the army; but I will not trouble you with the measures he has taken in order to that, since you will receive the account of them better and more particularly from himself; the gentlemen we have been so long in treaty with about bullion have given us bills for 10,000l. only, which goes over by this post. For your Majesty's permission to export so much bullion and our assurances to repay them in a fortnight's time, they promise by the next post to furnish us with a greater sum upon the same footing, and in the whole will supply us by degrees with the 200,000l. which your Majesty has power to export, but that will depend upon the condition in which they see us of being punctual in our repayments.
There is no money to be had here but what must come from the gentlemen of the Land Bank, and they have hitherto refused to lend it on any terms to those who have mortified them and discouraged them as if they had been persons who had designed nothing else all along than to distress the Government. But I hope Lord Portland will get that matter right here, and give you a just account of it when he returns. In the meantime I can only say there is all the reason imaginable to hope for a very good effect of his coming.
I beg leave to acquaint you I have had a letter from Lord Lonsdale, by which I find it would be a great mortification to him if you should long defer to declare your pleasure in favour of his kinsman Sir John Lowther. [King William's Chest 15, No. 48.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Henry Pilbrow, setting forth that he was disabled in their Majesties' service at sea, and praying an almsman's place in St. Peter's, Westminster. Order to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a grant accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 417.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Daniel Mitzherst and Mr. Rodolph Passavant, two Swiss gentlemen, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 233]; for Henry Appleback, a Dutchman, to go to Holland; for Justinus Kuper, a Dutch soldier, with his wife and child, ditto; and for Peter Berger, a Swiss, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 603].
July 28.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of William Churchill, stationer, for stationery ware furnished to the Duke of Shrewsbury's office from 5 March, 1693–4, to 24 June, 1694, amounting to 310l. 19s. [Ibid. 39, p. 58.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty. The twelve little and the three great machine-vessels are to be manned, and provisioned for a month or six weeks. Carpenters and smiths are to be in readiness for the said ships at Deptford. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 158.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Justice Nevill or Mr. Baron Eyre. The enclosed petition having been presented to the Queen with very favourable circumstances on behalf of petitioner, her Majesty commands me to transmit the same to you, for your opinion. Enclosure not here entered. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 47.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Pass for Nicolle Boulard and her daughter to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 603.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Lord Godolphin, summoning him and the other Lords Commissioners of the Treasury to attend the Queen on Friday next. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 7.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
The like letter to Sir Stephen Fox Mr. Montague, Sir William Trumbull and Mr. Smith. [Ibid.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to the Lords of the Admiralty, giving orders for the manning, &c., of certain vessels, and instructions for the convoy to Cadiz; and requiring an account of the seamen supplied out of the Alicante fleet lately returned for the service of their Majesties' men-of-war. [H.O. Admiralty Entry Book 1, p. 159.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Minutes of the proceedings of Council touching naval matters, e.g. statement of ships at present with the fleet, and to be added, orders to be issued as to convoys, &c. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 73.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Logeois and Judith le Sire to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 233]; for John Tobias Lotz and John Willemsz, to go to Holland; for John van Laren, ditto; for David Lingebbach and Cornelis Erwyneu, ditto; for Mr. Alexander Gervan, to go to Ireland, for Hendrick Thomasz van Eck, Jacob Andreesz and John Noppe, to go to Holland; and for Cornelis Timmerman, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 604]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Maris to apprehend — Williams, alias Williamson, gent., for high treason. [Ibid., p. 605.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Worcester for the reprieve of Claudius West, alias Wilt, till 17 September next. He was found guilty of highway robbery at the Lent Assizes in Worcester, 1692, and sentenced to death, and in August last was reprieved, which reprieve has since been revoked. [Ibid. 39, p. 62.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the King. I attended the Queen with the list you were pleased to enclose of the Commissioners of Customs and Excise; as to what relates to the last, I am so ignorant of the merits of the three doubtful persons, that I did not dare to give any opinion, more than that, of late, I had learnt Sir John Foch did attend the board very diligently, which before was the objection to him. But in relation to the difference whether Sir John Werden or Sir Robert Clayton should be dismissed, I thought it my duty freely to declare my opinion now, as I had done before to you, for every day's experience convinces anybody that will examine, that besides those imputations of corruption and partiality to his old fellow servants, however unfit and disaffected they are, he does continually insist so stiffly and unreasonably against reforming any errors or abuses that are practised in the office, that it is sufficient to say a thing is an ancient custom, to engage him blindly to espouse it; so that whilst he remains no reformation can be hoped for in that office, which stands in as much need of it as any other in the kingdom.
The Lords of the Committee have this morning had under consideration Mr. Blathwayt's letter to the Secretary concerning Mr. Russell's stay in the Mediterranean. If it cannot be so ordered that a strength may stay there all the winter superior to the fleet the French will leave, it is certain those ships that are designed to return must come away so early as will give the French fleet an opportunity of assisting at the siege of Barcelona, which an inferior force of your Majesty will not be able to hinder, and the reputation your arms have gained by being master of that sea will vanish with the loss of that town in the autumn.
It were therefore, in my opinion, much to be wished that it might be so contrived that your fleet might be laid up and fitted at Cadiz, if it could be done with safety to the ships. There they would be ready to act as you should command next year, and be in such a place as they would certainly watch the motion of the French; "so that in case they should send a squadron into the ocean to be stronger here, a squadron of the like strength might be immediately despatched from Cadiz to reinforce us also."
It is likely I talk very sanguinely and chimerically of this matter, not yet knowing enough the minds of the Lords of the Committee you advise with upon this point, nor the opinions of the Admiralty, seamen and others, whose judgments must guide their Lordships, to know what return you will have to it; but am in hopes by the next post an answer will be returned to you what they advise, and what they think feasible in this matter, and in case they should venture to give their opinions, that the fleet might be kept abroad so long, it will be absolutely necessary the Dutch be so much of the same mind as to take care for providing to refit their squadron, as we shall ours.
I desire you will take notice of nothing I write upon this subject, because it is very likely nothing I here mention will prove to be the opinion of the Committee, but in case it should, I thought it might be of use to you, to give you this hint a post before.
I will use my utmost care to discover the truth of what is suspected concerning Captain Sanderson and give you an account. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 49.]
July 31. Lord Godolphin to the King. In my last of the 28th, I humbly informed your Majesty that we had remitted 10,000l. by that post, and hoped by this to send a greater sum; accordingly we have this evening, at the Treasury, agreed for 20,000l. more with some of the Jews, but the bills will not go over till the next post because their Sabbath was come before the agreement could be perfected, but the assurances of them will come so certain to Mr. Hill by this post that he may be able to value himself upon that sum. This 20,000l. is lent us upon better terms than the former 10,000l., and for the advantage of the remittal only, whereas the others besides that are to have the advantage of exporting to the value of 10,000l. in bullion.
I was in hopes to have been able by this post to have given you a good account of Lord Portland's negotiation for a sum of money for the army, for he was very strongly promised that 200,000l. should be subscribed this day upon the credit of the Exchequer in general, but I do not find they have yet subscribed above 40,000l. He seems a good deal discouraged at this disappointment, and talks as if he would immediately be gone, but I have begged him to see this loan perfected before he goes, or else I am confident it will miscarry, and I hope that argument will prevail with him. [Ibid., No. 50.]
July 31. Sir J. Somers to the same. The Duke of Shrewsbury, upon Friday last, signified to the Lord Chief Baron, by the Queen's order, that she would accept of the resignation of his place, which he had offered to make in his petition. He has not hitherto returned any answer to the Duke's letter, and there may be reason enough to doubt whether he will be constant to his offer. But since the thing is become a matter of public discourse, and consequently may be the occasion that you will be solicited in behalf of such as may pretend to succeed him, I thought it my duty to inform you that there will be no necessity of filling the place before you return, and that I believe it will be for your service that nothing should be done in it till then.
The Duke of Shrewsbury and Lord Sunderland join with me in recommending one Mr. John Hawles to you, to be made one of your counsel-at-law. I must own to you that there are too many who have that title; and yet it is most visible that there is a want of lawyers to carry on your service, both in the House of Commons and in Westminster Hall. This is but a titular thing, there being no profit going along with it, and the reason why you are troubled with it at present is, that there being some prospect that this gentleman may be chosen into the House of Commons (where he was much hearkened to formerly) it would be a good way to engage him into your service, by making him this compliment beforehand, and for this reason, if you should be disposed to it, there should be no time lost in signifying your pleasure.
I think myself obliged to mention you a thing which relates to the East India Company, and because it does relate to that company I have not taken notice of it to anybody else, nor shall do, till I know your pleasure.
By their new charter they are obliged to accept of such regulations and qualifications as you shall be pleased to impose upon them before Michaelmas next.
If nothing be done till after that time, they are out of your power and stand again upon their old charter.
How far that will be for your service you are the best judge, and I will not so much as pretend to give any thoughts about it, but only presume to put you in mind how near, the time approaches, that so, if you like, the thing may pass over silently (for I believe those who think most of it will not mention it) or else, that you may not lose the opportunity of giving orders in it, at least for keeping your power on foot for some time longer, which may be done by giving them farther regulations. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 51.]
July 31.
Admiralty Office.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Duke of Shrewsbury. In connection with Vice-Admiral Hopson's letter, we cannot but observe that the service would be much more effectually done if the Dutch would send clean ships to join ours. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 736.] Enclosing:—
Copy of a letter from Vice-Admiral Hopson to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated off the Banks of Flanders, 29 July, 1694. On the 25th inst. I sent into Newport for news, and learn that Du Bart lies ready to sail with the first fair wind. We have posted ourselves as near as we can in their way, so that the pilots tell us they cannot pass without being seen. One ship from Holland of forty-two guns joined us yesterday, which makes ten sail of them and six of us. We very much want three or four light clean frigates to send up and down amongst the sands after the privateers, and to send in for intelligence. If Du Bart should get by us, we have no ships fit to follow them, and the Dutch much worse, for they all sail like hay-lighters. I have just received orders from the Admiralty: I wish their lordships would consider that this station is very dangerous for these great ships to lie in. It were better that Du Bart were out at sea, and that we had a good squadron of clean fourth and fifth rates to follow him, so that we might look after him and the fishery too. As it is I am sure we can do but little service. Appended is: A list of what ships the enemy has at Dunkirk. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 740.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Priestman. If you receive this in time I desire you will let me speak with you some time to-morrow or as soon as you can. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 48.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Sir John Trenchard to Mr. Justice Gregory and Mr. Baron Powell, containing a reprieve for Christopher Pickering during the Queen's pleasure. [Ibid. 3, p. 172.]
July 31. Minutes of the proceedings of Council. The Lords of the Treasury to be directed not to adjourn during eight or ten days. A summons to be sent to the Lords of the Admiralty to meet the Committee of Council to-morrow, to discuss the practicability of keeping Mr. Russell's fleet in the Mediterranean the whole winter. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 74.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Henry Netz and John Schroder to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 234]; for Peter Vermeulen to go to Holland; and for Weltye Sluyters and three children, and Lysbet Smits with three children, ditto [Ibid. 38, p. 604].
July 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to take into custody Colonel James Fountain for high treason in levying war against their Majesties. [Ibid. 39, p. 62.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Robert, Lord Lucas, governor-in-chief of the Tower of London, to permit the Earl of Clancarty, now a prisoner in the Tower for high treason, to go to Egham, Berks, for the recovery of his health, and to remain there or within five miles thereof until 1 October next, under charge of the warder, provided the said Earl of Clancarty enter into a recognisance in the sum of 8,000l. for himself with four sureties, viz., Sir John Fenwick, bart., Sir John Friend, kt., Joshua Sabyn of Spittlefields, weaver, and Benjamin Stone of Bridgwater Square, Barbican, merchant, to be bound in the sum of 2,000l. each upon condition the said Earl shall not escape. [Ibid., p. 64.]
July.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the reversal of the outlawry of Nicholas and Patrick FitzGerald, gentlemen, reciting the report of Sir Richard Levinge upon their petition, 10 November, 1693, from which it appears that they were in France at the capitulation of Limerick, the one being a lawyer, the other a merchant, with no freehold estate in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office Letter Book 13, p. 146, and S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 30.]
[July ?]
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Whitehall, gent., to be ensign to that company whereof Lieutenant.-Colonel William Seymour is captain in the second regiment of foot-guards called the Coldstreamers [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 223]; and for Mr. Andrew Nisbett to be cornet to Captain Stewart in Colonel Henry Coningham's regiment of dragoons [Ibid., p. 224].