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William III: May 1699

Pages 152-211

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1699-1700. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1937.

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May 1699

May 1.
Chapelizod.
The duke of Bolton to Secretary Vernon. I ordered my secretary to write constantly to Mr. Hopkins, to give you an account of the states of my health. I have had a very sad time of it, but everything that has been applied has been with great success; and, I thank God, I am now at perfect ease, but very low and weak.
The doctors assure me that by the end of next week I may undertake my journey for England. There being but one yacht here and the duchess of Ormond going for England I have ordered that to attend her, which sails to-morrow, and hope she may return by the time I propose, which is Monday sennight, May 15. If she should not I shall make use of a little frigate that lies here.
I desire you will acquaint his Majesty that I took care that the fiant was ready to sign, that his Majesty's service might receive no detriment in case it should have pleased Almighty God to put a period to my life.
By four packets which came yesterday I find a most extraordinary clause added to the money Bill, for appointing commissioners here in Ireland to examine into the forfeitures; and I must own that they have pitched upon an extraordinary set.
I am really very faint with only dictating this. Signed Bolton.
[P.S.] I desire you will impart my letter to you to the lord chancellor, not being able to dictate another. By the packets that came yesterday you seem to be winding up your bottoms, so I have no doubt but that before I set out your parliament will be up.
May 2. I am to-day much better, so I hope to pursue my journey at the time I have set. I have this day writt a letter to my lord chancellor about the matter of my privilege, and desire you will send it to him. Signed Bolton. 3½ pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 90–91.]
May 1.
Whitehall.
The king approves of Tho. Bliss of Maidstone, esq., to be deputy lieutenant of Kent. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 389.]
May 1.
Kensington.
Royal warrant: considering that the commission of parliament for plantation of Kirks had by Act and recommendation passed at Edinburgh, June 16, 1697, upon a petition presented by Mr. Thomas Forrester, first minister of the gospel at St. Andrews:
shewing that where in the year 1641, in time of presbiterie, the deceased Mr. Robert Blair, then minister at St. Andrews, by presentation from King Charles I, had right to the haill emoluments and casualties of the archdeaconry of St. Andrews: and accordingly Mr. James Rhymer, presbyterian minister there, and the said Mr. Thomas Forrester, after his decease, possessed the same by Acts of the privy council and decreets of exchequer: nevertheless some of the heretors and others liable controverted the payment of the same, which was a great discouragement to Mr. Forrester:
and therefore praying the commissioners to recommend to his Majesty to grant a gift to Mr. Forrester and his successors first ministers in St. Andrews, of the said emoluments and casualties:
[that the commissioners] recommended the gift accordingly: that Mr. Alexander Shields, now minister of the gospel at St. Andrews in place of Mr. Forrester, is content that the gift be granted not to himself alone, but to himself and his colleague who is to serve with him in the said church, according to the constant use that it has always been served by two ministers, albeit one of them be at present vaiking: and that this consent and division may tend to the greater furtherance of the gospel, and better provision and greater equality and union of the two ministers serving at the kirk:
therefore his Majesty, with the consent of the lords of the Treasury of Scotland, grants to Mr. Shields and to the other minister, who shall be appointed, and their successors in office equally, all the said emoluments [etc.], as possessed by Mr. Rhymer and Mr. Forrester, or by any archdeacons of St. Andrews during the time of prelacy, and that of the cropt and year 1699. [S.P. 57. 17. pp. 190–1.]
May 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for a pension of £300 to Archibald, earl of Forfar revoking the pension payable to him out of the rents of the bishoprics of Scotland, "which is not well paid by reason of the burden with which that fund is charged." [Ibid. pp. 191–2.]
Establishment of the pay of the standing forces and garrisons in Scotland, at 336 days in the year, commencing May 1st, 1699. [The sums mentioned are per annum.]
Our troop of guards: captain, 2 lieutenants, cornet, gidon, quartermaster, 4 brigadiers, 4 sub-brigadiers, 4 trumpets, sollicitor, kettledrum, 106 gentlemen: £6804 10s.
Our royal regiment of dragoons: colonel, lieut. colonel, major, quartermaster: £487 4s.
One troop: captain, lieutenant, cornet, 2 serjeants, 2 corporals, drummer, 30 dragoons: £1237 12s.
Seven troops more at the same rates and numbers, £8663 4s. Total of this regiment: £10,388.
Another regiment of dragoons: consisting of 6 troops, £7912 16s.
Our regiment of foot guards: colonel, lieutenant-colonel, major, 2 adjutants, drum major: £562 16s.
One company: captain, lieutenant, ensign, 2 serjeants, 3 corporals, 2 drummers, 40 sentinells: £778 8s.
Thirteen more companies: £10,119 4s.
One company of granadiers: captain, 2 lieutenants, 2 serjeants, 3 corporals, 2 drummers, 40 granadiers: £795 4s.
One company more of granadiers: £795 4s.
A second lieutenant added to the colonel's company: £67 4s.
Total of this regiment: £13,118.
A regiment of foot: colonel, lieutenant-colonel, major, aid major: £470 8s.
One company: captain, lieutenant, ensign, 2 serjeants, 2 corporals, drummer, 30 sentinells: £604 16s.
Eight companies more, £4838 8s.
Company of granadiers: captain, 2 lieutenants, 2 serjeants, 2 corporals, drummer, 30 granadiers: £621 12s.
Total of this regiment: £6535 4s.
Three regiments more: £19,605 12s.
One regiment more: consisting of 7 companies, and one of granadiers: £5325 12s.
The regiment at Fort William: consisting of 11 companies and one of granadiers: £7744 16s.
Added to this regiment: a second lieutenant-colonel, chaplain, surgeon and mate, martiall, store-keeper, smith and servant, wright and servant, coals and candle, frigate and boats, drugs and medicines, bed-clothes, coverings and blankets: £994.
Total of this regiment: £8738 16s.
General officers: major general of the forces, £672: master of H.M. ordnance, £300: muster master, £252: adjutant general, £134: intendant of invalids, £168: clerk to the court martial and secretary, £168: chief ingenier, £117 12s.: physician of the army, £92 8s.: total, £1904.
Artillery officers: captain, lieutenant and bombardier, gentlemen of the cannon, corporal, 10 gunners, 6 practitioners, 4 miners, commissary of artillery, £776 12s.
Edinburgh Castle: captain, deputy governor, 2 lieutenants, 2 ensigns, 3 serjeants, 4 corporals, 2 drummers, 100 souldiers, chaplain, master gunner, 5 gunners more, surgeon [at 2s. a day], porter, gun smith, coal and candle, £1901 4s.
Stirline Castle: captain, 2 lieutenants, ensign, 3 serjeants, 4 corporals, 2 drummers, 100 sentinells, 3 gunners, coal and candle, £1426 4s.
Dumbarton Castle: captain, lieutenant, ensign, 2 serjeants, 2 corporals, 1 gunner, one drummer, 50 souldiers, coal and candle, £804 12s.
Blackness garrison: deputy governor, porter, gunner, coal and candle, £115 16s.
Total of this establishment: —. [Ibid. pp. 193–7.]
May 1.
Kensington.
Docquet of the warrant for a gift to Robert Carstairs, writer to the signet, of the single escheat of the deceased William [in the margin John] Lamb, merchant in Edinburgh, denounced rebel. [Ibid. p. 198.]
Docquet of the warrant for a charter to Alexander Murray, fiar, of Blackbarony of the 4th part of the lands of Courhope in the parochin of Athelstoun and sheriffdom of Peebles, reserving to Sir Archibald Murray of Blackbarony, elder, baronet, father to the said Alexander Murray, his life rent: with a novo damus and change of holding from simple to taxt ward. [Ibid.]
Docquet of the warrant for a charter to Sir John Hamilton of Halcraig, one of the senators of the college of justice, of the lands and barony of Shawfield with the kirklands, teinds great and small, advocation and patronage of the kirk of Retherglen, all in the sheriffdom of Lanerk, proceeding upon the resignation of Mr. John Eleis and several apprisings of the lands, with a novo damus, new union in a free barony to be called the barony of Shawfield, and change of holding from simple to taxt ward. [S.P. 57. 17. p. 199.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of the 5th and 8th inst.; the latter arrived this morning. I have had opportunities to lay them both before his Majesty, but he does not think fit to give me any directions upon them, till he sees what are the turns Monsr. Lilierode intends to give to the cases proposed in which this alliance is to exert itself, from whence only it can be concluded how far they are to be depended on. His Majesty likewise expects to hear whether the inserting the guarantys in our particular treaty be still like to be insisted on. The fourth point you wanted an answer to seems to have a connexion with it. The Swedes press the garantys and the exclusion of the king of Denmark with the same intention, that we may be thoroughly engaged to support the duke of Holstein in his pretentions without any regard to the king of Denmark, which is a step his Majesty is not inclined to make in a separate manner.
I suppose the parliament will rise on Thursday. The Lords have made an amendment to the Paper Bill by excepting against the clause that gives the Irish commissioners a power to fine and imprison. It was so sent down to our House to-day, but the consideration of it is put off till to-morrow. The Bill to be sure is lost, and there will not be time for venting all the heats it might occasion.
I long to see some of the East India Company, to let them know how much they are obliged to the Pensioner for his favour in the accommodation they have made about their silver. As I am glad to see an end put to it, so it very much increases the satisfaction that the government there have interposed with so much kindness. I hope it will always be answered with suitable returns from hence.
I have seen our W. India Clifford, who would fain argue still against himself, but I think he has resolved to go over to find out a court to try his cause in.
As soon as the session is ended his Majesty intends to go to Windsor for a few days. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 347.]
The same to Mr. Hill. I have your letters of the 4th and 7th inst., which have been laid before his Majesty: the first of them, giving a full account of the rise and progress of the prohibition in Flanders, is sent by his Majesty's directions to the Commissioners of Trade, with the two memorials and the prints; who are to consider whether anything more is to be done on this side towards stopping the execution of these placarts. In the meantime his Majesty approves very well of your interposing so early in this matter, and would have you continue to watch all opportunities for rendering the prohibition ineffectual.
As you are satisfied that Mr. Abbot's services have been taken notice of, (fn. 1) I hope ere long that you and your friends will have the same satisfaction that you are not neglected.
Mrs. Lynch and her daughter were brought to Kensington on Sunday by some officers, where she presented to his Majesty a letter from the Elector of Bavaria drawn up in her own terms; setting forth that the queen was prevailed on to continue her the consulage for her relief, and at the desire of the merchants. The king gave me the letter and has yet no account of it.
The Spanish ambassador's secretary gave me the same day another letter from the Elector of Bavaria, concerning an Irish priest who has lately been taken up; and the Spanish ambassador reclaims him as his chaplain, notwithstanding the notice I gave them, since I came into the office, that they were not to entertain any of his Majesty's subjects as their chaplains. However, when his liberty was first demanded, I sent the ambassador word that I would be so easy as to set this man at liberty, provided he would quit the kingdom and retire to his convent, which was the fittest place for him; as I had lately done to one belonging to the Portugal envoy. But he was not satisfied, and insists to have him released and restored; or otherwise he said he should be obliged to complain. I answered that the reason for a complaint would lie on our side, when they rejected the fair offers made, and more perhaps than in strictness we could justify.
The way it seems they have taken is to engage the Elector in this controversy; but I don't doubt he is so reasonable, and will have that consideration of our constitution, as to be very well satisfied that this man be ordered to retire. And therefore you will lose no time in speaking to him about it; and the rather since the Spanish ambassador's secretary has been just now with me, to tell me his master will renew his complaints both at Brussels and Madrid; as if it were refused to do right to the privilege of his character, which I am sure can't be extended to these cases.
Count D'Aversberg, whom I have spoke to of this matter, thinks the ambassador bears too hard upon us, and said he would tell him so, but I more depend upon your setting the Elector right. For, if the ambassador thinks to carry this point upon us, he may as well go about to abolish all our laws against Roman priests. Copy. [S.P. 32. 11. pp. 234–5.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to Sir J. Williamson]. Yesterday the Lords passed the Bill against house breakers, with this amendment, viz.: that offenders be burnt on the left cheek within an inch of the nose, that it may be seen, and that the judge shall see it done. Then they went into committee upon the Paper Bill, and passed it without the last clause tacked to it, for allowing £3000 to the commissioners that are to go to Ireland to enquire into the forfeited estates, and sent it back to the Commons.
The last letters from Ireland say that the duke of Bolton continues very much indisposed. Endorsed, R. May 15. 99. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 232–3.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. Newsletter. Endorsed, R. 15th, 1699. [Ibid. ff. 236–237.]
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. The lords justices of Ireland have laid before his Majesty a proposal for carrying on the linen manufacture in Ireland; and the author of it, Monsr. Cromelin, has added a memorial of what he desires as a further encouragement to the undertaking. I am to transmit them for your consideration. If the proposal be approved, care is to be taken to put it in execution. You will advise with the Commissioners of Trade.
I am also to send you the petition of the countess of Cavan on behalf of her youngest son, upon whom his Majesty is pleased to bestow £40 p. ann. for his education.
Memdum.: in this letter were enclosed [the documents above mentioned.] [S.P. 44. 101. p. 20.]
The same to the Council of Trade. His Majesty having considered the condition of the four companies at New. York, that they are reduced to about half their established number, and that there is no provision made for recruiting them to their full complement of 100 men each, has established them at 200 men, viz.: the four companies to consist of 50 men each.
I am also to send you Mr. Hill's account of the rise and progress of the late prohibition in Flanders, with the printed papers and written memorials transmitted at the same time, for your consideration. If there be anything further to be done on his Majesty's part for putting a stop to the execution of these edicts, you will represent the same.
I am also to send you copies of letters and papers from Sir Lambert Blackwell, as to the prejudice like to befall our fish trade in the Mediterranean, if the fish be not better salted and cured.
I also send the answer of the Admiralty to your representation about adding another frigate to attend the island of Barbados.
In the foregoing letter were enclosed:
extract of Mr. Hill's letter to Mr. Secretary dated at Brussels, 4th May, N.S.:
copy of Mr. Hill's memorial to the Elector of Bavaria, 2 May, [16]99, and of the States' General memorial to the Elector, 27 April:
placart forbidding the carrying out of Flanders all sorts of wool unwrought:
placart laying a tax upon such wool as should be so carried out:
octroy for establishing an E. India Company in Flanders:
copy of Sir Lambert Blackwell's letter to Mr. Secretary dated 13 April, 1699, about salt fish:
translation of the governor of Leghorn's letter to Sir Lambert Blackwell about prohibiting salt fish, dated 13 April, 1699:
extract of a letter from the Admiralty to Mr. Secretary, dated 27 April, 1699, about a fifth rate frigate at Barbados. (Cal. S.P., America and W. Indies, 1699, Nos. 328–330.) [S.P. 44. 101. pp. 21–2.]
May 2.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I received two days ago your two letters of the 20th and 22nd ult. We are writing to-day to capt. Waller, who commands at Kinsale. He is the most suitable and the only man capable of executing the king's orders well. But the business is such that it could not be done properly without trusting the person employed on it; so we cannot avoid letting capt. Waller know what it is about, but with every precaution that the secrecy ordered by his Majesty may be preserved.
I am very glad that you are satisfied with the letter which lord Trembleston wrote to you; I hope you will have no more troubles of that kind. I think that Gearin may give us a deal of trouble in the future.
I could not avoid giving Lloid a recommendation to you; forgive me for doing so; he is the best of those people that I have come across.
The duke of Bolton is getting better quickly; he thinks that he will be able to leave on the 15th inst., but he is unable to do business yet without danger to his health. If he goes, as I don't doubt he will, the lord chancellor will stay here.
We have no further particulars as to the commission to enquire into the Irish forfeitures, except what the Votes tell us. I hope that the clause concerning that matter will be sent to us.
[P.S.] I forgot to answer the paragraph in your letter about Sir James Jeffreys. In my opinion his presence at Cork is not in the least necessary for the king's service, and I don't think there is a man in Ireland who wants him there. I think his Majesty can grant him all the time he desires for quietly winding up his affairs in Sweden. I trust however that he will not object to our paying out of his salary a sum of about £7, charged upon the lands of Duncannon Fort. I will write to him about it, so as not to trouble you with a small matter of that kind. French. 4 pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 92–3.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Tho. Huites; setting forth that he is aged 63, and served Charles I and Charles II. He asks for the next almsman's place at Oxford. Recommended by Mr. Lowndes. Granted. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 319.]
May 2.
Kensington.
Warrants: for a grant of the office of attorney-general of Barbados to Edward Chilton of the Middle Temple, barrister-atlaw, with a proviso for residence in the island [S.P. 44. 347. p. 436: S.O. 3. 20. f. 171v.]:
for a grant to Thomas Bennet, junior, of Salthorpe, co. Wilts, esq., of the office of chyrographer of the court of Common Pleas, after the determination of the interest of Robert Bird; and, after the decease of Bennet, to Richard Campion of the Inner Temple, gent. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 520–2: S.O. 3. 20. f. 171 v.]
May 3. Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, to allow in the accounts of the paymaster general, Ireland, the sum of £1000 as paid to the marquis of Winchester, for his equipage, as one of the lords justices of Ireland. (Treas. Cal. XIV, 332.) [S.O. 1. 14. p. 171.]
The same, for a grant to Francis D'La Rue, esq., of forfeited estates in Ireland, with schedule annexed. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 332–335.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 156–159.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Jeremiah Chaplain, gentleman usher to his Majesty; setting forth that in the late war there were several small plantations at St. Christopher's forfeited by the Irish papists, "great part whereof is here annexed in a list," all of small value, and some other fines and forfeitures from the Leeward Islands, lately under the command of col. Codrington; but, for want of an escheater to look after them, no advantage is thereby made to his Majesty. He prays for a grant of all the fines and forfeitures upon the said islands, and the place of escheater and receiver of his Majesty's casual revenues. Referred to the Treasury. "The list above mentioned amounted to 610 acres in St. Christopher's." [S.P. 44. 238. p. 321.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord Hatton, at Kirby in Northamptonshire. I have your letters of 17th, 22nd and 29th ult. to acknowledge, and deferred doing it, as to the former, till I found you were fixed in the person you would recommend to the office of comptroller of Guernsey, which some who solicited on behalf of Mr. Priaula made doubtful: but now I will lay your letters before his Majesty and shall endeavour to get Mr. Rolland's orders despatched.
I will speak with Mr. Blathwayt about the chaplain to the garrison, if he be paid out of the military establishment. I am afraid he is not comprehended within the 7000 men, and, if so, he can have no commission. Otherwise I hope the person will be unexceptionable.
The business of the store-keeper has been despatched at Council. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 23.]
May 4.
Kensington.
Appointment by the King of Courtenay Croker, esq., to be governor of "our castles and blockhouses" in Dartmouth, with authority to draw in such men or soldiers of the company of the trained bands of the town as he should see cause. [S.P. 44. 167. pp. 390–1.]
The king's letter recommending Mr. Edwd. Coke to a child's place in the Charterhouse upon the next vacancy. [S.P. 44. 163. p. 125.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Allowance by the Secretary of State of the bill of extraordinaries of Richard Hill, envoy extraordinary to his electoral highness the duke of Bavaria at Brussels, from Sept. 1, 1698, to March 1, 1698–9. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 445.]
May 4.
Kensington.
Pass for Robert Stamper, senior, Robert Stamper, junior, John Fisher, senior, and John Fisher, junior, and Charles Blunt, merchants, of London, with two servants, to travel to Holland, Germany, France, etc. Latin. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 159.]
Pass for the lady Penelope Tyrwhitt,—Goddard, her woman, and John Southcott, esq., to travel to France, etc. [Ibid. p. 160.]
May 4.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I received three letters from you yesterday; two of the 25th, and one of the 27th ult. I thank you for your sympathy in my financial difficulties, and for what you have already done and will do on my behalf.
I fear that lord Jersey is not quite so friendly to me as he always used to be, in consequence of the difficulties we made about his having a third of the emoluments. I hope he will not think that I am asking for the change, which the king, it seems, has decided to make. At the same time I admit it would be a great relief to me, and I think his Majesty would be doing justice to us. However, another order from the king will be necessary; otherwise the order we have received will remain in force.
The archbishop has not mentioned his fourth, but I don't think we should wait till he claims it. He is in the commission, and he is clearly entitled to it.
I very much wish that the duke of Bolton was not obliged to go to England. I hope he will come back, but that cannot be before the end of August or beginning of September. I am much touched to hear that the king has told you that he is so well disposed towards me, but it is scarcely the time to profit by his favour. I am well aware that it is not the moment for thinking of anything forfeited or liable to be forfeited. You know of course that I should not ask any gift from the revenue for myself alone. I can only do so jointly with the duke of Bolton, who has been put to the same expense, and we have joined in writing to you on that subject.
If the king is willing to give us something, and would make it £3000 divisible between us, it would help considerably towards paying my debts, and with that idea we ask to be allowed to send you a letter, which we are writing to the lords of the Treasury, to be delivered to them if the king approves, and to be put on one side if he disapproves.
Following the usual practice the king has given £1000 to the lord chancellor, and the same sum to the Speaker of the House of Commons, for the two parliaments which we have held. I do not think that the same government has ever borne the cost of two sessions, or obtained such large sums in so short a time; and whilst our expenses have risen our emoluments have fallen.
I am very pleased the king has approved the lord chancellor's decision to stay here. Let me know when the king's service makes it necessary for him to leave.
We have informed capt. Waller of what you tell us of the ship which is to carry provisions to the Scottish colony in the West Indies, and have told him to keep it secret.
When the duke of Bolton is more able to attend to business, we will see what can be done for col. Maurice Hussey: it will not be altogether an easy matter.
If the king approves the suggestion we are making through Mr. Cromelin I hope that we shall establish the linen manufacture more firmly, and with less difficulty, than by means of the Act which did not pass in the last session.
It will be a great pleasure to me to render any service to capt. Harrison. French. 4 pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 94–95.]
May 4.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, for a grant, to such persons as John Burke, commonly called lord Bophin, shall nominate [etc.], of all the estate of the said John Burke, forfeited to the Crown. (Treas. Cal., XIV., 336–7.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 178– 181.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. The Dutch mail not being arrived, I have no directions to send you from his Majesty. We are now at an end of our sessions: his Majesty goes to-morrow to Windsor, and will stay there five or six days. I hear lord Portland is resolved upon resigning his key, if he has not done it already: but that will not hinder his meddling in business as his Majesty shall have occasion to employ him.
We have been alarmed these two or three days with a report of the king of Spain's death. They writ from Dover on the 2d. that an express was arrived that morning, in a French boat from Calais, and had brought the news; but nobody owns they have seen any such courier: however, I wish we could hear the contrary confirmed. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 348.]
The same to Mr. Hill. The person to whom the enclosed is directed has a mind to try his fortune in Milan, and is promised some recommendations to the Prince of Vaudemont, but he thinks none would be more effectual than yours. I desire therefore you will gratify him, and let him have twenty crowns towards enabling him to make the journey, and I will take care it shall be immediately repaid.
We have now ended our sessions. You will see by the enclosed how the king parted with us, there being more occasion to tell us what we have left undone than to commend or thank us for what we have done. The next inquiry will be how our vacancies shall be disposed of. I hope those who have a hand in it will as well consider such as are abroad as those at home.
The Spanish ambassador has now made a complaint of some moment, viz.: about the settlement of the Scots in the province of Darien. He calls it an invasion, and a violation of our treaties. We shall see what the Scotch ministry will say to it, who are lately come hither on purpose.
We have had an alarm that the King of Spain was dead. Macky wrote three days ago from Dover that a French courier was arrived there with the news, but we have not heard of him since. We should be glad to hear something to the contrary, for the 50,000 men, that lie ready in Flanders, look to us as if they smelt a carcase, and were ready to enter upon the inheritance. Copy. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 243–244.]
[R. Yard] to lord ambassador Williamson. His Majesty dined yesterday at the duke of Somerset's at Northumberland house.
The letters from Ireland say the duke of Bolton is now very much recovered, and, so soon as he is well enough, will come to England. Endorsed, R. May 17th, 99. [Ibid. ff. 241–242.]
May 5.
Mellifont.
Lord Drogheda to [Secretary Vernon]. By this day's post receiving a letter from one Mr. Trenshard, Mr. Anslow, and Sir Francis Bruster, giving me on account that I was one of the seven persons named by the Act of parliament to be commissioners to inspect into the forfeitures of this kingdom, you may believe it, was a mighty surprise to me, when I assure you I never did so much as hear any such matter was in agitation. If I had, I would have used all means to have prevented myself from being one.
But since it has thus unfortunately happened to me, I must beg your assistance. For I am at a loss, and do not know how to move in this matter: for to deny to act when I am named by the House of Commons of England I dread the consequence. And to act in any affair wherein I may any ways disoblige the king, I will never do it. For as yet I never acted any way that I did not really believe was the best for his service: and though Mr. Methuen and some others was of a contrary opinion to me as to some affairs transacted in the parliament here, yet I am of the same opinion still; and, if I had an opportunity to discourse you or the king in those matters, I am fully persuaded I should convince you that what Mr. Methuen would have had done in the parliament here would not have been for his Majesty's service.
Now I must earnestly beg of you to move his Majesty in this affair I am named in without my knowledge, as I may know his Majesty's pleasure, and I desire you will favour me with an answer.
And, if you desire it, I assure you it shall not be revealed to any, and I request that this may meet with the same treatment. 1½ pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 96–7.]
May 5.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the lords of the Admiralty for disbanding the four marine regiments commanded by colonels William Seymour, Edward Dutton Colt, Henry Mordaunt and Thomas Brudenall,
Annexed. Instructions for disbanding the four marine regiments. [S.P. 44. 204. pp. 217–21.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the attorney-general. I am to send you copy of a letter from the Admiralty, concerning a noli prosequi for some persons named, who are accused by such as they are to give evidence against, for your opinion. In the meantime there are to be no proceedings to the prejudice of the said persons. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 23.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Wm. Pheasant; setting forth that he had the misfortune to be convicted of felony, at the quarter sessions at the Old Bailey in January last for a pretended rape: that he was pardoned for the offence and the penalties; that it is no small discomfort to him that any record should yet rest upon him; and inasmuch as he is advised there is sufficient error in the record of the said conviction and attainder to reverse the same, he prays for a writ of error. Referred to the attorneygeneral. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 322]:
Proceedings upon the petition of John Bradshaw, formerly captain in col. Foulke's regiment; setting forth that several sums are due to him for making up cloth (which was presented to the regiment) into clothes, also for buying shoes, stockings, and other necessaries for the petitioner's company, and for raising and subsisting 40 men, in the year 1690, towards recruiting the army in Ireland, amounting to £200 odd, as will appear by the agent's accounts: that in the lifetime of the said colonel the petitioner obtained several orders from his Majesty, one of which directed Mr. Fox to stop the off reckonings of the regiment and to inspect the petitioner's accounts; which orders were sent to Ireland to col. Foulke, for himself or agent to come to England and make up accounts with the petitioner and the other late captain of that regiment; but the colonel could never be brought to any account: that the petitioner has been arrested and imprisoned for the said debts, and his Majesty promised Sir Jn. Guise, his former colonel, that he should have right done him, but nothing has been done and the petitioner has been forced to borrow to pay his debts to several tradesmen, for which he has for several years paid interest, and is still liable to be sued for the principal.
He prays the money due to col. Foulke may be stopped in the earl of Ranelagh's office for the satisfaction of the said debt; and that the petitioner's accounts may be examined, and the petitioner heard or otherwise relieved. Referred to the earl of Ranelagh, paymaster general of the forces. [Ibid. p. 323.]
Proceedings upon the petition of lieut. John Fenwick; setting forth that he served 18 years in Selvin's regiment; resigned his commission in Aug. '97, on account of wounds received in Ireland and Flanders: he had no provision made for him. His father bequeathed his estate of £200 p. ann. to a remote kinsman upon a false alarm that the petitioner died of his wounds in Flanders: he is reduced to the last extremity. He prays that a sum of £149, which he has expended in the recovery of his health, may be given to him in order to recover his paternal estate. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 328.]
May 5.
Kensington.
Warrant for Henry Pearce to be inserted in the next general pardon for the western circuit upon condition of transportation. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 438.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners of Trade. I am to send you enclosed copy of a letter from the consul at Algiers to the commissioners of the Admiralty, who desire to know whether merchant ships belonging to the islands or plantations, or that trade thither, should not have the Admiralty passes, to secure them from the Algerines. His Majesty would have your opinion. (Cal. S.P., America and W. Indies, 1699, No. 351.) [S.P. 44. 101. p. 24.]
The same to the Admiralty. (1) The king has commanded me to send the letter of the consul of Algiers to the Commissioners of Trade. (2) He sees nothing to object to in the account given by capt. Windsor of his meeting with a pink from Scotland, laden with coals and some Scotch wool, which he permitted to proceed. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 222.]
May 6. In obedience to his Majesty's request made known by the Secretary of State to Mr. John Haynes, one of the commissioners appointed by Act of parliament for preventing the exportation of wool, and capt. John Edwards, that, whereas divers packs and parcels of wool were seized in French ships, they should be delivered to the owners thereof:
Mr. Haynes consents to deliver a parcel of wool seized in a French ship at Yarmouth, and ordered the officer that seized the French shallop at Dover to deliver her to capt. Matthews, giving security to the king that for the future she should not carry any English or Irish wool to foreign parts:
Capt. John Edwards consented to deliver the wool seized at Dover in the French ship St. James of Caen: and the wool seized at Ramsgate in the French ship Mercury of St. Valery: [signed] John Haynes. J. Edwards. [Endorsed in Secretary Vernon's handwriting] Mr. Haynes' and Mr. Edwards' account of the release of the wool seized at Yarmouth and Dover, 6 May 99. R. 7. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 245–246.]
May 6.
Kensington.
Warrant for a licence, to Henry Browne, esq., to return from France [S.P. 44. 351. p. 58]: the like for Gilbert Gaudiat, merchant [ibid.]: Thomas Kavanaugh, gent. (who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland) [ibid.]: Charles Walton, gent. [ibid. p. 59]: Robert Clayton, gent. [ibid.]: Francis Buttler, gent. (who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland) [ibid.]: Catherine Brent, widow, and Margaret, Mary and Francis, her three daughters [ibid. p. 60]: Charles Eden, gent. [ibid. p. 61: S.O. 8.27. Nos. 18–25: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174v.]
The king to the governor, bailiff and jurats of Guernsey: reciting that Elisha Rolland, gent., had by petition represented that the office of comptroller in the royal court of Guernsey had lately become void by the death of Nicholas de Quetteville: granting the office to him: and requiring the governor [etc.] to admit him. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 438–9.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Allowance by the Secretary of State, of the bill of extraordinaries of Matthew Prior, secretary to the embassy in France, from Nov. 10, 1698, to Feb. 10, 1699. [Ibid. p. 449]: and of the bill of Philibert d'Hervart, esq., baron d'Huninguen, envoy extraordinary to the Swiss cantons, for extraordinaries from March 25, 1698, to March 25, 1699 [ibid. p. 435]: and of the bill of Sir Lambert Blackwell, envoy extraordinary to the Great Duke of Tuscany and republic of Genoa, for extraordinaries from Oct. 4, 1698, to April 4, 1699. [Ibid. p. 459.]
May 6.
Kensington.
Warrant to remit the forfeiture of the goods [etc.] of John Brown, and to release him. He had pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey, in May, 1698, to counterfeiting Spanish money. [Ibid. p. 461.]
May 6.
The Hague.
Pass to Robt. Laxton, soldier, late of the garrison of Bois-leduc under the command of Prince Nassau Saarbruch. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 22.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Chaplain of London, merchant; setting forth that a decree lately passed at Barbados in favour of Capt. Alex. Cunningham for £1,200 odd, for breach of covenants in a lease of a plantation there called Staplegrowth, although Cunningham is indebted to the petitioner for several thousand pounds for arrears of rent; from which decree the petitioner has duly entered his appeal to his Majesty in Council, and given security to prosecute the same: but, notwithstanding, execution upon the decree has been granted to Cunningham, without taking security for his answering the appeal, as has been usual. The petitioner prays that the £1,200 may remain in the court of Barbados till the cause be heard and determined, or that Cunningham give security. Referred to the Council of Trade. (Cal. S.P., America and West Indies, 1699, No. 364. i.) [S.P. 44. 238. p. 324.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Richd. Rooth; setting forth that he was governor of the old fort of Kinsale, by letters patent, and commander of a foot company in the standing army of Ireland, and [was] dispossessed of both by the late lord Treconnel in 1688, and suffered greatly by frequent imprisonments and other severe usage from the Irish. He has suffered great damage by the blowing up his house in Ireland, called Old Castletoun, after the surrender of Limerick, which was demolished by order of the government. Being entitled to a pension of half-pay, as commander-in-chief of a squadron of men-of-war, granted by King Charles II., he is left out of the late establishment of pensions, although there is a considerable arrear due to him in the reign of Charles II. He prays for payment of his arrears, and to be continued on the establishment of pensions. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 326.]
May 7.
The Hague.
Passes, to Machon Lich, a Scotch man of the garrison of Breda under the command of col. Ziston in the States' service [S.P. 44. 386. p. 22]: to Magnus Brook of capt. Sutherland's company in col. Murray's regiment in the States' service: to Peter Cumin of capt. Mackay's company in col. Murray's regiment [ibid.].
May 8.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Potter. Some of the members of the Hudson's Bay Company told me I might send to you the names of four persons skilled in beaver skins, and that you would desire them to meet and confer on two points, viz.: (1) what was the real value of beaver skins in 1696 and 1697, or what rate they would have gone off at in either of those years, if so great a quantity as nineteen or twenty thousand had been then exposed to sale ? (2) as to the weight of beaver skins, what they are generally reputed to weigh ?
The lords commissioners appointed to treat with the French ambassador desire to be informed in these particulars by Friday in the morning, when the commissioners are to meet at the Cockpit in St. James's Park.
You will therefore give notice hereof to the gentlemen named in the enclosed paper, two of which are proposed by the Hudson's Bay Company, and the other two by Monsr. Fleury, who solicits the restitution of the skins taken at Fort Bourbon, in pursuance of an article of the Peace.
Mr. John Blake and Mr. John Hawley on behalf of the Hudson's Bay Company.
Tho. Jordan, merchant in Goodman's Fields, and Roger Arkinstall, skinner at The Bear in Canon St. near Dowgate, on behalf of the French.
[In the margin] the commissioners afterwards appointed Tho. Glover instead of Jn. Hawley. [S.P. 44. 101. pp. 24–25.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Ja Vernon to the mayor of Dover. The French ambassador has handed to me a complaint about a French fisherman, who has been ill used on that coast. If you have any account of this, let me know it.
The ambassador has also complained of the seizing and detaining of Matthew Gill, who lately brought over a packet of letters for the ambassador. But, as capt. Edwards assured me that both Gill and his vessel shall be immediately released, I hope I need not mention that any further.
[Extract of a letter from Monsr. Colemberg, commander at Boulogne, to count Tallard, dated 2 May, 1699.] One of the fishermen of this town, having been upon the coast of England to fish, as it has been always practised, has been boarded by an English guardship, the Dover Galley, the captain whereof bid him retire to the French coast or he would sink him. There is some likelihood that the captain did it to get money, for the English have never opposed this fishery, even during the war. [Ibid. pp. 25–6.]
May 11.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. You will receive by this packet our report on the case of lord Tremelston. You will find it strongly contested. It is the view of the duke of Bolton; and I admit that it is not entirely mine, but I did not like to differ from him for the first time.
I shall be sorry if poor lord Tremelston loses his property through my acquiescence. Supposing that he was an ensign in King James's guards, as Geari declares, I don't think that his guilt is so great that he should lose his property on that account; for he was a mere child, for whom his relations had procured this commission to give him the wherewithal to live at the college. His estate is not large, is charged with debts, and I am told that it is entailed. I beg you not to mention my opinion to the duke of Bolton. Lord chancellor Methuen takes my view. I do not want the duke of Bolton to know that I have written to you.
Lord Tremelston will be in London in a few days, and he knows nobody there. He will present himself to you, and you will judge for yourself whether you can grant him your prosection. He does not know that I am writing to you on his behalf, and I beg you to say nothing to him about it. Before the duke leaves I shall try to make him change his mind about lord Tremelston. He has decided to leave on Monday the 15th inst.
Tomorrow I will answer the two letters you wrote to me on the 2nd and 4th inst., which I received on the 9th. [Endorsed] R. 17. 99: French. 2 pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 98–9.]
May 11.
Windsor Castle.
Proceedings upon the petition of lieut.-col. And. Wheler; setting forth that he, being seized of the inheritance of the ferry or passage boat of Datchet leading to Windsor Castle, and having let the same for several years past for £86 p. ann., is now upon the point of being deprived of the benefit of the ferry, by reason of a wall that his Majesty has given orders to be built. About seven years since he mortgaged the ferry for £1,000. The advantage of the passage will be taken away by the wall, and the person who lent the money threatens to fall upon the petitioner, which will be his ruin. He prays to be relieved as to the damage, either by purchasing his interest in the ferry, or otherwise. Referred to the Treasury. (Treas. Cal. XIV, 359, 418.) [S.P. 44. 238. p. 327.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I omitted writing last post, being obliged to go to Windsor on Monday, and did not return till last night.
I had there an opportunity of laying before his Majesty your letters of the 12th and 15th, which his Majesty having considered, and finding that the Swedes intend to leave themselves a great latitude in the treaty depending, while they would tie up others and embark them against Denmark in asserting the duke of Holstein's rights farther than they will be engaged against France for securing the peace of Europe, his Majesty does not think it fit for him to lay himself under any separate obligations as to the Holstein affairs, but, as he and the States are equally garants of the treaty of Altena, he is ready to concur in whatever the Pensioner shall judge the States will come up to, and sees no reason for making further advances alone, which his Majesty thinks he ought to be so much the more cautious in as this case may soon like to happen.
The Danish envoy has said nothing to me since what I mentioned, and I don't understand that he gave any more than a single and general hint to his Majesty that his master was desirous to enter into nearer measures with him. I suppose therefore they have opened themselves more to the French.
The earl of Jersey came to Windsor yesterday morning, and was at his Majesty's levée. I believe he will have the seals given him to-morrow, when the king returns to Kensington. After that he will take possession of the duke of Shrewsbury's office, which I think much fitter for him than myself, whatever my pretentions may be to it.
I saw lord Portland at Windsor without his key, but that does not hinder him from waiting on his Majesty and his being received with all former marks of kindness. There was a great expectation to hear how the vacant employments should be disposed of. but there is nothing yet declared.
[P.S.] I have received this evening your letter of the 19th, and have sent it to Windsor. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 349.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have been at Windsor, where I laid your letter of the 5–15 before his Majesty. Since my coming to town I have your letter of the 7th and have sent it to Windsor, and shall use my endeavours that you may carry the compliment to Turin.
I thank you for your expedient of getting the priest out of my hands. I hope the Elector will put it in practice, or otherwise I will deliver my seals to the Spanish ambassador sooner than I will deliver him an English priest.
We hear from Jamaica that the Spaniards use us very cavalierly on the Scotch account, that they take all our ships they meet with and treat us all like pirates. And yet I am sure we have done nothing to oblige the Scots: so that we are like to have a pretty treatment between them.
I have seen the duke of Shrewsbury at Windsor, who spoke very kindly of you where it may do you most good.
Lord Portland came thither likewise from his lodge. He keeps his green shash though he has quitted his key, and I believe he still concerns himself in foreign affairs.
Lord Jersey came to Windsor yesterday morning, and was at the king's levée. I believe the seals will be given him to-morrow when the king returns to Kensington. That is the only vacant employment that I know is yet disposed of. There were great expectations of hearing of the rest, and I suppose it will not be long deferred.
I have the king's leave to make lord Jersey the compliment of the Southern Province. Perhaps some will censure it who yet wish to see me lower. You will judge more candidly of it, who know it is not good clambering up a precipice. Copy. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 253–254.]
[R. Yard] to lord ambassador Williamson. The earl of Jersey, late ambassador extraordinary in France, arrived here on Wednesday night, and next morning early went to Windsor to wait upon the king.
His Majesty continues still at Windsor, but intends to be back at Kensington to-morrow night.
William Bridgeman, esq., one of the clerks of the council, died this week here in town, and is succeeded by Mr. Southwell, son to Sir Robert Southwell. [Endorsed] R. June 5th 99. [Ibid. ff. 255–256.]
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general: enclosing a list of some more poor French protestants, lately disbanded in Ireland, who are to have a free passage from Harwich to Holland.
List of French soldiers. Daniel Ruynat. Anthoine Ruynat. Elie Ravy. Cephas Dileuse. Paul Bertin de la Valée. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 26.]
Warrant to apprehend—Ellers, for ill practices to the prejudice of the government. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 103.]
May 13.
Dublin.
— to Secretary Vernon. I have, without being known, exposed my life to do my country service, and, because I could not be known, chose to make use of a person to whom I was a mere stranger, but, by something I had seen of his, believed him much of the same interest with myself. I have reason to suspect he has not been just, and to know the truth, without looking any further back, I send him a letter dated the 2nd by the same hand with this, but the bearer could not get off before. I have ordered it to be delivered before this, and pray inform yourself privately whether it be laid before the king. If not, call for it from one Dr. Fingliss, who may be heard of at Young Man's Coffee by Charing Cross, it may be of great use, and if he either denies or stifles it, he ought to be called to an account for it. Let it not be known how you come by this intimation, and pray burn this for the sake of your faithful servant —. [Endorsed] copy of a letter from Dublin. 1p. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 100–101.] (fn. 2)
Lord Drogheda [to Secretary Vernon], asking for an answer to his letter of the 5th inst., "the time of the commencement of the commission now drawing near." [Ibid. ff. 102–3.]
[May 13.] The petition to the king of Samuel Shepheard, Gilbert Heathcote and Henry Tate, on behalf of themselves and others, owners of the ship Adventure, shewing that on March 16, 1697/8, they sent the Adventure on a voyage to Borneo, which with her cargo cost above £13,000: that on the 17th September last when the captain (Gullock) with 14 of the men were ashore on the island of Nayas, on the coast of Sumatra, to take in fresh water, the major part of the seamen on board seized the chief mate and some others, whom they sent ashore, and then cut the cable and ran away. The petitioners, having some hopes to find the ship in the West Indies, intend immediately to despatch Gullock to his Majesty's plantations there, and, being informed that the king had already ordered a sixth-rate frigate to sail for New England, pray that Gullock may have the king's orders to all to assist him in recovering the ship and cargo and apprehending the men.
Annexed. (i) The deposition of Thomas Gullock of London, master of the Adventure, shewing that he sent the second mate with several seamen in the longboat on shore upon the island to supply the ship with water; but the deponent, believing the natives to be savage, for the security of his men went afterwards on shore in his yawl with more help. The water being filled he ordered the longboat to go on board with the same; "which they did and also took the yawl with them;" and left the deponent on shore with 14 of the ship's company, without provisions or necessaries of life, and immediately after loosed the ship's sails and stood off to sea. A small time after they sent the yawl on shore with 5 persons, who told the deponent that when they came on board they immediately with arms in their hands seized the chief mate, saying he was their prisoner and the ship and all that was in her was their own. [Sworn] 13 May, 1699, coram me J. Holt.
(ii) The deposition of Drew Hacker, gentleman, and William Whiteside, boatswain, corroborating the affidavit of capt. Gullock; they remained on board the ship whilst capt. Gullock went on shore, and as soon as Joseph Bradish the boatswain's mate and the rest of his crew returned on board they immediately seized the ship. Hacker says he was immediately turned on shore in the yawl with four others, and Whiteside says he was on board four days longer, and then suffered to go away with the chief mate and armourer in the longboat, and after 23 days met with a Dutch ship, which carried them to Batavia. Sworn as above.
(iii) The names and description of the men who ran away with the ship Adventure on the 17th September, 1698, from the island of Nayas in East India: and a description of the ship, a hagboat, Ipswich built, about 350 tons, 22 guns. The cargo consisted of iron and lead; coloured cloth; perpetuanoes (fn. 3); opium; fuzees with brasswork upon the stocks; small iron guns and anchors; Spanish dollars 33,500. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 257–260.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Blathwayt. His Majesty has granted a commission to Mr. Luke Davis, late adjutant to col. Creighton's regiment of foot, and upon half pay, to be lieut. in col. Echlin's regiment of dragoons in the room of lieut. Clerk: and has ordered Mr. Clerk's name to be inserted in the list of half pay upon the establishment of Ireland, in the room of the said Davis. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 27.]
May 13.
The Hague.
Pass to Robt. Newart, soldier, late of lieut.-col. Davison's company in col. Lauder's regiment in the States' service. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Admiralty, ordering The Fubbs, yacht, to be ready to carry the Sieur de Cleverskerke, ambassador from the States General of the United Provinces, and his family, from the Thames to Rotterdam. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 222.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Pass for Gray Nevill, with Peter Fabre, his tutor, and a servant, to travel to France, Germany, etc. Latin. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 160.]
Commission: to Nicholas de Mesurier, dean of Guernsey, to be chaplain of the garrison in the said isle [S.P. 44. 167. p. 389.]: to Gerard Fenn, M.A., to be chaplain to Sir Mathew Bridges' regiment of foot [Ibid. p. 395]: to John Young, to be chyrurgeon to brigadier Richd. Ingoldsby's regiment of foot [ibid.]: to John Pratt, esq., to be captain lieutenant of that company in major-general Erle's regiment of foot whereof he himself is captain: to Leonard Thickpenny, to be adjutant to col. Zachary Tiffin's regiment of foot [ibid. p. 396.]
May 14.
The Hague.
Pass to John Reid, Andrew Carre, Duncan Mackgregor, and John McRobe, Scotch men, late of capt. Murray's company in col. Ferguson's regiment in the States' service, being disbanded. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of the office of one of the principal Secretaries of State to Edward, earl of Jersey. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 441: S.O. 3. 20. f. 172.]
Warrant for a grant of the office of one of the clerks of the privy council to Edwd. Southwell, esq., in the place of William Bridgeman, deceased. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 442: S.O. 3. 20. f. 172.]
Warrant to the attorney-general, to consent to a writ of error for reversing the conviction of William Pheasant. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 442.]
The same; reciting that the king had been informed by the petition of Richard Bellew, esq., commonly called lord Bellew, and by the attorney-general's report, that the petitioner's father Sir John Bellew, knt., late lord Bellew, baron Duleek in Ireland, deceased, was, in the year 1 Wm. and M., outlawed in England for high treason for being in arms in the late rebellion in Ireland: the record whereof being transmittable into Ireland the petitioner would be liable to be obstructed in the controversies depending between him and private persons, notwithstanding the king had already ordered the reversal of all outlawries and attainders against his father in Ireland: and ordering the attorney-general to consent to a writ of error for reversing the outlawry. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 443–4.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Allowance by the Secretary of State, of the bill of extraordinaries of Hugh Greg, residing at the court of Denmark, from July 1, 1698, to Oct. 1st following [ibid. p. 448]: and of the similar bill of James Cressett, envoy extraordinary to the elector and dukes of Brunswick Lunenburg, "now assisting at the treaty of Pinnenberg," from March 12, 1697–8, to June 12, 1698; including £154 for putting my family and equipage in deep mourning to make the compliments of condolence at Hanover upon the death of the Elector; "I was forced to clothe 14 persons upon this occasion, besides covering a coach, etc." [Ibid. pp. 450–1.]:
and of the similar bills of James Cressett, from June 12 to Sept. 12, 1698 [ibid. p. 452]: Sept. 12 to Dec. 12, 1698 [ibid. p. 453]: and Dec. 12, 1698, to March 12, 1698–9, including £20 "subscription for establishing the French protestant church at Zell" [Ibid. p. 454.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. I am to send you the treaty, concluded by Mr. Hill, for reestablishing the packet boats between Dover and Newport. If you have no objection his Majesty will direct the ratification.
I am also to send you a petition of the French protestants for the continuance of his Majesty's bounty and charity.
[There was enclosed] a letter from the postmaster general to Mr. Secretary, dated 14 May, 1699, with the treaty about the packet boats: Mr. Hill's letter of 1/11 May, 1699, to the postmaster: an additional article to the said treaty: a petition of the poor French protestant refugees. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 27.]
The same to the archbishop of Canterbury. The enclosed is the petition of the French ministers, mentioned yesterday at the cabinet council, and referred by his Majesty to your grace. [Ibid. p. 28.]
The same to the Council of Trade. His Majesty has sent your letter of the 9th inst. (fn. 4) to the Admiralty, with directions that passes be allowed accordingly to the ships of his subjects trading to the plantations, or elsewhere to the southward. You will consider how notice thereof is to be given to merchants or others concerned. [Ibid. p. 28.]
The same to Mr. Potter. I find what I desired of you last week, about the four referees meeting to deliver their opinion upon the two points proposed, was misunderstood. The lords commissioners have since satisfied themselves as to the price of the skins, but still desire to know those gentlemen's opinion as to their weight. You will therefore give them notice, that they may confer and let the lords know on Wednesday. The question is upon beaver skins from Hudson's Bay, what they may be computed to weigh. [Ibid. p. 30.]
May 15.
Dover.
J. Edwards to Secretary Vernon. In obedience to your commands I have been at Dover, where I have made enquiry about capt. Matthews, to deliver him his sholop. I cannot find any one here to take possession. I have been with Mr. Mackey, who acquainted me of your letter to him.
An inventory of Mathewes' slope, seized by us and ready to be delivered, but no man will appear to receive the same. Witness our hands, May 15, 1699, Nicho. Boykett, John Knight, John Allen. [Addressed] to the commissioners for hindering the exportation of wool. [Endorsed] R. 17 May, 1699. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 261–264.]
May 15.
Kensington.
Appointment by the king of Toby Purcell, esq., to be fortmajor of the fort of Duncannon in Ireland. [S.P. 44, 168. p. 239.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Allowance by the Secretary of State of the bill of extraordinaries of George Stepney, envoy extraordinary to the elector of Brandenburg, from Dec. 30 to March 30, 1699. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 446.]
May 15. Grant of an almsman's place in Oxford cathedral to Thomas Huites. [S.O. 5. 31. f. 59.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I acquainted you in my last that I had sent your letter of the 19th to Windsor: since then I have yours of the 22nd, both which have been laid before his Majesty; but, as to these extraordinary articles of the general and particular warranty, he does not think fit to say anything to them, till he hears again from you and the Pensioner, after you shall have considered them between yourselves, and have had the conference you mention with Monsr. Lilierode. I perceive whatever alliance we have with Sweden it must be dearly bought, and I am afraid you don't yet know the bottom of their demands.
Monsr. Leyoncrona was with me last night, after he had received his letters by the Holland mail of Friday last. He told me Monsr. Lilierode apprehended he should not be able to come to any conclusion, since we made a difficulty of binding the agreements that were already made in relation to the affairs of Holstein; that they asked no more than we had obliged ourselves to, by the guaranty of the treaty of Altena.
I told him I thought they now urged an explanation of that treaty beyond what some would allow the genuine sense of it to bear; and if the consequence of it were like to be that, we might soon be engaged in quarrels on that account. It was but natural to consider whether other people would be as forward to espouse our interests, when we shall happen to have differences with our neighbours upon other accounts.
He said they had large offers from France, which they had hitherto withstood; that France would undertake the rights of the duke of Holstein should be asserted in what manner they would themselves; and they might be sure of a great sum of money besides, and their alliance with France should bring them no manner of charge; and therefore we ought to look upon them as disinterested in their proposals, and to consider only the public good; but if we expected from them any new guarantys for Flanders, or for any parts of the treaties of Ryswick, they must likewise consider what they should ask from us as an equivalent; which makes me imagine that under this head they comprehend money, and I know not what besides.
Lord Jersey received the seals from his Majesty on Saturday last, and took the oath as Secretary of State on Sunday at the cabinet council.
Lord Orford resigned his employment in the Admiralty on Sunday morning. I believe he may have had it in his thoughts ever since the parliament begun to make him uneasy with their enquiries. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 350.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to the same]. The earl of Jersey has taken possession of the Secretary's office in the Cock Pit, and appointed Mr. Prior and Mr. Yard to be his secretaries.
On Sunday last the earl of Orford resigned all his employments. Mr. Southwell is to be sworn on Thursday as clerk of the council. Endorsed, R. June 5, 99. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 265–266.]
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have received your letter of the 11th, and have laid it before his Majesty you may be sure. If I had the power of transporting the priest I would not ask the ambassador's leave for it; I shall rather be allowed to execute him; but his going away must be by consent on both sides, and therefore I wish it were despatched. We know very well there is no pretence for this privilege, the long connivance of a concealed popish king is not to be urged, and yet in his reign there are repeated instances of messages sent to foreign ministers not to keep English or Irish chaplains; which are entered in the council books.
You will hear now, from the office you belong to, that lord Jersey has the seals; therefore you will discard me as a correspondent, but I hope I am still entitled to your friendship. Copy. [Ibid. f. 267.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Edward, earl of Jersey, to the lords justices of Ireland, notifying them that he had succeeded the duke of Shrewsbury as Secretary of State. [S.P. 67. 2. p. 195.]
The same to the Admiralty; (1) transmitting the petition of Mr. Sheppard, Mr. Heathcot and other owners of the ship Adventure [see above].
(2) Upon Mr. Burchet's letter to Mr. Ellis of the 12 inst. concerning rear-adml. Benbow, his Majesty would be informed how long he was ordered to stay abroad, and to what time his ships are victualled.
(3) I am to send you enclosed copy [not entered] of a letter from the Commissioners of Trade, delivering their opinion upon consul Coles' advices from Algiers that all ships of his Majesty's subjects trading to the plantations, or anywhere to the southward, should be furnished with your passes, which his Majesty would have you give orders for accordingly, and that the passes be granted in the usual manner, and with such conditions and limitations as have been settled. (Cal. S.P., America and West Indies, 1699, Nos. 351, 361.) [S.P. 44. 204, pp. 223–4.]
May 16.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland for making more effectual the grant [of Feb. 15 ult.] to John Ellis of the forfeited estate of his brother William. (Treas. Cal. XIV, 349.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 192–6.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. His Majesty commands that £100 be paid to Mr. John Haines and Mr. John Edwards, in consideration of the charges they have been at in the prosecution of wool exported out of the kingdom. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 29.]
The same to lord Romney. I endeavoured to wait on your lordship this afternoon with colonel Brudenall, having received his Majesty's directions to acquaint you that two companies of col. Brudenall's regiment were fallen into a mutiny at Canterbury, and refused to be disbanded, or resign up their arms, till they were satisfied as to some arrears of pay and of reckonings; which the colonel has assured his Majesty are not in his hands, but depend upon clearing of former accounts at the Navy Board.
He is directed to go down and appease this disorder; but, in case the soldiers should still persist, his Majesty would have you write to some of your deputy lieutenants to assist in quelling this tumult. [Ibid. pp. 30–1.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the mayor of Canterbury. His Majesty has been informed that two companies of col. Brudenall's regiment of marines have refused to lay down their arms, in order to be disbanded pursuant to a late Act of Parliament, but insist upon arrears of pay and of reckonings, which the colonel has assured his Majesty are not remaining in his hands, but must arise upon stating the accounts of the two former marine regiments which are depending at the Navy Board. It is signified from the Admiralty that the twopences, deducted from these soldiers on account of their clothes, will be allowed, to such as have not been clothed, upon the making up the general clearing of the regiment; his Majesty would have you acquaint them with [this], and use your utmost endeavours to quiet this tumult and preserve the public peace. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 31.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Gabriel Delsey, Nicholas Barrett, Wm. Downer, Stephen Alexander, Charles Walker, Wm. Clapcott, John Capell, Richd. Iles, Joseph Deberon, John Wilson, Richd. Rothwell, and Edwd. Patridge, sailmakers, on behalf of themselves and the rest of the sailmakers in and about London; setting forth the usefulness of the trade of sail-making; and, if the sail-makers were brought under some regulation, the trade would become much more serviceable: that, by reason there is no corporation, several whole suits of sails are frequently brought into this kingdom; whereby his Majesty is not only defrauded of his customs, but many hundred poor people, who have served their apprenticeships and depend on the trade, are impoverished. They pray to be incorporated within the city of London and — miles of the same. Referred to the attorney and solicitor-general. [S.P. 44. 238, p. 329.]
Proceedings upon the petition of the mayor and burgesses of Wilton, and of several inhabitants of the borough and places adjacent, using and exercising the art or mistery of clothing and weaving; setting forth that inconveniences have for this long time occurred, by persons who have crept into the trade without apprenticeship; by reason whereof several hundreds of the trade cannot maintain their great families: that they have anciently used several by-laws for the trade, which, though confirmed by the mayor and burgesses, prove ineffectual. They pray for a charter to impower them to make by-laws "according to the heads annexed." Referred to the attorney or solicitor-general. [Ibid. p. 331.]
May 17.
Kensington.
Warrants, for a pardon of all treasons [etc.] to Henry, earl of Stafford [S.P. 44. 347. p. 456: S.O. 3. 20. f. 172.]:
for the denization of Abraham Franco and Phineas Abarbanell (aliens born) [S.P. 44. 347. p. 460: S.O. 3. 20. f. 173v.]: and of Isaac de la Penha, merchant in Barbados, an alien born [S.P. 44. 347. p. 460: S.O. 3. 20. f. 173].
May 17.
Whitehall.
Allowance by the Secretary of State of the bill of extraordinaries of Sir Lambert Blackwell, envoy extraordinary to the Great Duke of Tuscany and republic of Genoa, from Oct. 4, 1698, to April 4, 1699. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 46.]
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate, to receive into custody William Butler for seditious words. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 104.]
May 17.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, to find the title of the Crown to the jointure estate of lady Hellen Colville, settled upon her by Hill Colville, her first husband. The Secretary of State had laid before the king a letter from the lords justices dated Dec. 23, 1698, wherein they represented that count Dona Ferassiers, who was married to lady Hellen Colville (by whom he had a valuable estate, which was her jointure by her first husband), had been informed by counsel that he, being an alien born at the time of his marriage, the jointure during their joint lives was in construction of law forfeited to the Crown. The lords justices recommended count Dona for a grant of the jointure to avoid the prejudice that might occur, and in regard (as he alleged) that he had lost a considerable estate in France for being in the service of King William during the late war [etc.] (Treas. Cal. XIV, 350–1.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 160–2.]
The same, to order the payment to Rebecca Lascells, widow of Richard Lascells, late of London, goldsmith, of the loss she had sustained on the repayment of £33,050; she having received a great part in guineas at 26s., whereas the same was lent to the king at the rate of 23s. each guinea. (Treas. Cal. XIV, 355.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 162–3.]
The same, for a grant to — Gravemore, widow of the late lieut.-gen. Gravemore, of forfeited lands "in the annexed list mentioned," except the lands of Sir Neal O'Neal, mentioned in the list to be of the clear yearly value of £200, "which we have lately directed to be passed in lease to dame Frances O'Neal and her daughter." Annexed: the above mentioned list. (Treas. Cal. XIV, 351–5.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 163–70.]
May 18.
Kensington.
Commission to Leonard Cradock, esq., to be captain of that company whereof capt. John Pitt was late captain, in maj.-gen. Erle's regiment of foot: to Henry Holland, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of grenadiers whereof capt. George Trek is captain, in maj.-gen. Erle's regiment of foot: to John Walkeden, esq., to be exempt and captain of the 2nd troop of horse guards: to John Denty, gent., to be brigadier and lieutenant of the same troop: to Peter Toussaint to be chyrurgeon to the regiment of foot commanded by maj.-gen. Erle. [S.P. 44. 167. pp. 391–2.]
May 18.
Kensington.
His Majesty's letter for Thomas Andrews, to be elected to New College, Oxford, at the election for the year 1700. [S.P. 44. 163. p. 123.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Wm., lord Digby; setting forth that he is lord of the manor of Coleshill in Warwickshire, and that within the said manor and parish there are two highways; one, called Dock lane, leading from the Whitegates, in the possession of the petitioner, to Coleshill Heath and to Hill bicknell; and another small way, leading from the High Street in Coleshill to the common field called Park Field; which are crooked and uneven and very troublesome to those who pass that way, but would be beneficial to the petitioner, lying between the petitioner's grounds. He prays for leave to enclose the said highways, and to appropriate the ways lately made by the petitioner in his own ground (which are much more straight and convenient) in lieu thereof, if upon the return of the ad quod damnum it shall be found not to the prejudice of his Majesty or his subjects. Referred to the attorney or solicitor-general. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 332.]
Certificate that Edward, earl of Jersey, returned from his employment as ambassador extraordinary to the court of France on the 14th inst. [S.P. 44. 347, p. 458.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have none of your letters to acknowledge, the Dutch mail not being arrived.
I should have acquainted you that my lord of Canterbury designs that, out of the collect lately made for the Vaudois and French Protestants coming out of Switzerland, the sum of £1,500 be paid by advance for the use of such of them as intend to settle in the Elector of Brandenburg's territories; and he has desired me to write to Mr. Stepney to know whether any number of them are arrived there, that the money may be ordered accordingly, which the marquis de Rochegude, who solicits for that particular colony, desires you may be informed of, in hopes you will acquaint the Pensioner with it, who he thinks will procure the like orders for a proportionable sum to be paid out of their collect for the immediate relief of those poor people, that they may have wherewithal to subsist at their first arrival in a strange country.
I have been obliged to write again to you by your importunate solicitor, Surinam Clifford. He lately put another petition into his Majesty's hands, to the same purport with the former, for reparation to be demanded of the States: but I told him I could not trouble his Majesty for fresh directions, and he must follow the methods prescribed for his redress, or cease complaining.
His Majesty yesterday in council conferred the presidentship upon lord Pembroke, who then resigned the privy seal, which was given to lord Lonsdale.
I suppose next week the commission of the Admiralty will be filled up; also the vacancies in other commissions. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 351.]
The same to Mr. Hill. I acknowledged the receipt of your letters, and now I must acknowledge the receipt of your wine; I have drunk your health and find it very good.
I have said nothing to the king about your journey to Turin; this being a time that domestic employments are disposed of, I would not propose sending you out of the way. That is done time enough if our expectations fail us, and I know lord Jersey will do everything for your gratification, knowing as well as I do what you deserve.
I have chid Monsr. d'Aversberg for letting the matter rest so long about the Irish priest. He tells me in excuse that the ambassador's chief complaint is that the priest was taken out of his chapel. Upon enquiry I find it is no such thing, for he was met with accidentally several streets off from the chapel. I suppose when one takes up twenty more priests, they will wish they had sent this away. [Copy. S.P. 32. 11. f. 268.]
Newsletter [to Sir J. Williamson]. Yesterday the countess of Jersey arrived here from France, and with her the duchess de la Force, who has suffered so much upon the account of being a Protestant.
Mr. Southwell, one of the clerks of the council in ordinary, was sworn last night; as was Mr. Stanyan, who is appointed one of the clerks in extraordinary.
Letters from Ireland say that parliament is to be further prorogued to 28 September. Endorsed: R. June 5. 99. [Ibid. f. 269.]
May 19.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I think the duke of Bolton, who embarked last night, may arrive before this. The archbishop of Dublin took the oath yesterday, along with us. The wind is unfavourable, but the weather is so fine and warm that the duke should have a fair passage.
We have already informed you that parliament is prorogued till Sept. 28; the duke himself is taking with him our letter to you about the dissolution of that body.
I think Lloid is not far wrong about Thady Quine; but there was so much perjury, and so much else that was reprehensible when these cases were pleaded before the Court of Claims, that I admit I have great difficulty in coming to any conclusion. Redman Joy is very ill spoken of; one cannot believe what they say. These are inevitable and most unprofitable importunities. They complain of being discouraged because they are not paid what they ask, which must not be given to them. One must not be exposed to the reproach of having suborned witnesses.
The duke of Bolton took with him two notes about the cases of col. Hussey and William Burke.
I have not yet been able to get any certain news of the man Fieehee [? Ficher crossed out]; but, whether it be he or others, there are always agents employed, who raise great hopes in return for cash down.
Please inform Mr. de Lom (fn. 5) that we do not pay the arrears of the French pensioners, who only receive the present subsistence allowance. We cannot change an established and general rule without an order from his Majesty.
I do not recollect that we have ever received any recommendation of the claims of capt. Fisher to an income of £500 from the forfeited estates. We always answer regularly on every subject, and if you will be good enough to give us further information I will give you further particulars.
The importance of secrecy has been strongly impressed on capt. Waller, and I think he is to be trusted. We have received a letter from him of the 12th inst. He has been informed that one Watkins of Cork, late purser of a ship called The Dover, is fitting out a ship at Cork, intended, it is said, to take provisions to the new Scottish colony in America. Capt. Waller has no authority at Cork, but we have ordered the revenue commissioners to find out from the collector what this vessel is, what is her cargo, and when she will be ready to sail; and to give him instructions to stop her until he hears from them, in case she were ready to sail soon. Neither the revenue commissioners nor consequently the collector know anything of the secret. If this ship is destined in reality for this colony, we shall keep her back on various pretexts until we receive orders from you. You will please let us know if the king desires that she should be stopped, visited, and her papers seized.
I received to-day your letter of the 13th, and the letter for the lords justices. I am sending copies of both to the duke of Bolton, that he may follow your good advice in our affairs.
I am not at all of opinion that the lord chancellor should go to England. The duke of Bolton will give the king a very exact account of the state of our business here, and that should suffice. We agreed about everything before he left; and, if his Majesty finds our views somewhat conflicting, I think I could make them harmonise, if the contradiction were pointed out.
I understand that you desire that I should ask the king to give a company to capt. Harrison when a vacancy occurs. I have received orders from the king to recommend capt. Waller before anyone else. After that I shall not fail to write in favour of capt. Harrison, if that is what he wishes. If he desires something else let me know what it is, so that I can let you know for certain what I can do.
[P.S.] Since writing this letter I have made further enquiries about the case of capt. Fisher. A year ago or thereabouts we had orders to find him this sum of £500 a year. In accordance with the usual practice we referred him to the commissioners of revenue; who have said to those who have spoken to them on the subject that they can not find lands of this value, but that if capt. Fisher will come here himself or send someone to look for what he wants, they will give him every assistance. This is what all those who have had grants from his Majesty have had to do. The case was before us a year ago; I had completely forgotten it.
The archbishop of Dublin, a most modest man, does not dare to ask for anything for his equipage. If you will kindly mention the matter to the king please let me know his views, and I will encourage or discourage the archbishop accordingly. If the king assents he will greatly please the clergy. French. 7 pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 104–7.]
May 19.
Dublin Castle.
Note as to those [sur ceux] which Mr. Vernon sent us about col. Hussey and William Burke. Col. Hussey may have rendered services in France: lord Portland can be the only judge of that. If the king wants to give him an annuity it must not be settled; but by a letter from the king, to be renewed annually according to col. Hussey's merits.
As regards William Burke I think he was not very fortunate in France, and he has been glad to give out that he was neglected over there on account of his loyalty to the king. Such a man may be dangerous here. Anything the king does for him will attract others, and, if the king wishes to give money to those who need it, he should give it to those who have served him well and are really loyal and good protestants; they are just as badly off as these gentlemen who have always been opposed to the king and are untrustworthy. Unsigned; in lord Galway's hand. Endorsed "pour my lord duc." French. 2¼ pp. [Ibid. ff. 108–9.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. Enclosed is a list of some more poor French protestants lately disbanded in Ireland. You will give them a free passage to Holland.
Claude de St. Bonnet. Paul Boy. Pierre Dussole. André Boissaunier and Anne Louise, his wife. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 29.]
May 20.
Kensington.
Warrant for a privy seal to pay Abraham Stanyon, esq., "whom we have appointed to be secretary to the extraordinary embassy which we are sending to the Most Christian King," £300 for his equipage [etc.]. [S.O. 8. 27. No. 28.]
Mr. Stanyan's bill upon this warrant was signed May 24th, 1699, as also a bill from the Treasury constituting Philip Ryley, James Dewy, Wm. Clayton, Charles Dartiquenave and Maximilian Stephens, agents for bringing into the exchequer the arrears of taxes. [S.P. 44. 348. pp. 43–4.]
May 20.
Kensington.
Warrant for a licence to Winifred, countess of Niddesdale in Scotland, who went to France, to return and abide in England. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 60: S.O. 8. 27. No. 29: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174v.]
May 20.
Dublin.
[Edward] Harrison to [James Vernon]. I came to this town on the 10th inst. and waited on Mr. Palmer; and have agreed on the draught, which will be enclosed by him to you, drawn up by Sir Richard Levens, who was fee'd by us both jointly. I have consented to all his and your demands; and truly, were it not with you (of whom I have heard so worthily), I would not make such a settlement with any man living. If therefore you will sign the article sent over, I will stay in town, and sign it here. It will be very hard for me by so large a settlement to provide for my family, unless enabled by you and your interest with a civil employment, either for my son or myself, which I did hint at in my last letter; and perhaps that might be granted to me sooner than my son, being an elder man. Whatever you do in my favour my gratitude shall be shewed to your daughter.
I have twice waited on lord Galway, who received me very kindly; and told me that he had received two letters from you, and that you had recommended my son to him, but descended to no particulars; but spoke in general of posts in the army in which he had formerly been, which I believe is not suitable to either you or me; but all this is left to your own breast.
I hope the commissioner's place is not yet filled; which if you would procure for me, my son and your daughter should have half the benefit.
I hear the king does not usually grant reversions; but, if he could be induced to grant one to you, I could name a very creditable post for my son, which in all probability will fall soon; being enjoyed now by Mr. Denny Muschamp, above 60 years old. It is commissary general of the musters.
Our parliament is further prorogued until Michaelmas. I would willingly know whether they will sit again, or be dissolved. I have no further to add, but to wish to have this business happily effected and that the young people may be very happy.
Mr. Palmer was very positive about £400 jointure. I said that £300 was enough during my life, and £400 afterwards. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 110–111.]
May 20.
Council Office, Dublin.
W. Palmer to the same. On Tuesday Mr. Harrison and I met, when he gave me the rent-roll of his estate and the deeds, viz.: his father's settlement and will. By the first all the estate in Armagh, Donegal and Tyrone, is settled on him for life, remainder to his 1st, 2nd and 3rd sons, etc., so that estate, after Mr. Harrison's death, comes to capt. Michael Harrison; who can make what provision out of it he thinks fit for younger children.
The freehold in Down is not in Mr. Harrison's father's settlement, but is left him by will, whereby he has that in his own power. Those estates of freehold amount to £600 p. ann. The leases of Belfast and Magharleigh are worth about £400 p. ann. more. It was agreed that this estate should be settled on capt. Harrison.
The next thing was the jointure, which, on my positive insisting on £400 p. ann., was agreed. Then the present maintenance was considered, which Mr. Harrison was positive should be £300 p. ann., and no more.
We had most arguing about the provision for younger children, which Mr. Harrison agreed to leave to my counsel, and we both fee'd him to put these articles in form.
As to encumbrances on these estates it is impossible to know them, otherwise than by Mr. Harrison or capt. Harrison's information. He says they do not exceed £600. Mr. Harrison further consented that the £1500 should be paid here, and the exchange thereof, which will be above £200, to go to the young couple; £100 of it in a present of plate from Mrs. Harrison to my cousin, and the rest to the captain.
The counsel was Sir Rd. Levings. 5 pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 112–115.]
A list. Com. Ardmagh. Barony of O'Neal, land and manor of Corbraceoge: yearly rent £200.
Com. Donegall. Barony of Killmacrenan and lands of Castledoe and Ross Gwyll: yearly rent, £224.
Com. Tyrone. Barony of Dungannon, four towne—of Grange Tullahoge and four mountain towns, yearly rent, £80.
Com. Downe. Barony of Lower Iveagh, the two town lands of Magheradarton and Ballyhanap; yearly rent, £100. All land of inheritance.
Lands in leases.
Com. Antrim. A lease from the earl of Donegal, renewed in 1693 for 61 years, in and about Belfast, with two other leases from the earl, the yearly rent is, besides my own house and demeanes in Belfast, £332 19s. A lease from Edward, earl of Conway, deed., yearly rent: £195 19s. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 116–117.]
May 21.
Kensington.
Commission to Edwd. Harris, gent., to be ensign to major Charles Carrell's company, in brigadier Henry Trelawney's regiment of foot. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 393.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the attorney-general. I am to send you the enclosed petition of some poor French bakers, who are disturbed in the exercise of their trade by prosecutions. His Majesty is much concerned that people under their circumstances should not be permitted to gain a livelihood, and would have you consider their case. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 32.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. The commissioners, appointed to treat with the French ambassador, etc., upon the matters contained in the 8th art. of the treaty of Ryswick, have represented that they have adjusted with the French commissioners the valuation of the goods taken from the French at Fort Bourbon in Hudson's Bay, which by the treaty are to be restored to them, according to the capitulation made at the surrender of the fort. The same amount to £7086 17s., it being agreed that there were 19,623 beaver skins at 7s. each, and 547 elk skins at 8s. per skin. It still remains to be resolved by whom the said sum shall be paid, whether by the company, who received the skins and have converted them to their own use, or by his Majesty, from whom the company pretend to have a grant of the skins. His Majesty commands you forthwith to take this case into consideration, and report your opinion. [Ibid. pp. 32–3.]
The same to Mr. Sanson. You have been a witness to the perplexity we have been in about the wool seized in French and Scotch ships. I thought I had got to the end of it by engaging Haines, the commissioner, and Edwards, one of their deputies, to desist from their prosecution. I think the parcels of wool seized at Dover and Ramsgate are actually discharged and delivered, so that Edwards has performed what he promised.
Mr. Haines told me he had taken the same care as to the wool seized at Yarmouth in the Unique of Rouen; but Peter Trove, the master, came to me yesterday to complain of his being delayed. Haines was then in the office, and appointed to meet him this day at the Exchequer and the business should be ended. But, instead, he gave him the enclosed letter to Mr. Metcalfe, your solicitor. What the meaning of it is I know not; but the French ambassador teazes me intolerably, and it will be a public misfortune if there be a disappointment at last in the discharge of the wool. I desire therefore you will speak with Mr. Metcalfe, and inform yourself where this matter sticks; and I hope everybody will give their assistance in it, as I have done, merely in consideration of the public good. [Ibid. p. 33.]
The same to the Admiralty. The yachts and a convoy are to be ready by the middle of next week to attend his Majesty to Holland. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 224.]
The same to the same. I have laid before his Majesty your letter of the 19th with the extract of rear-admiral Benbow's instructions. He thinks that the squadron should stay in the West Indies beyond September, and therefore a further supply of provisions should be sent. He would have it considered in what condition those ships are for staying abroad, and whether they should be relieved.
He commands me to send you the enclosed extract of a letter from Sir Wm. Beeston, that care may be taken to pursue the pirates in those seas; and to send you the enclosed petition of Sir Ralph Delaval for your opinion of his pretentions to half the double pay as admiral of the blue.
[Enclosures.] (1) Extract of a letter from Sir Wm. Beeston to Mr. Secretary Vernon, dated at Jamaica, 8 Feb. 1698–9.
We begin to be infested with pirates, and, to add to their number, a vessel that came from New York, and cleared to go thither again about 6 weeks since, is turned rogue also, and has taken vessels on the coast of Hispaniola.
The 23rd of Jany. the Falmouth and the Lynn arrived here. Rear-adml. Benbow parted with them at Nevis and ordered them hither, but went with a negro ship (as is supposed) on the coast of the main, from whom we have yet heard no tidings. These ships would have done more service had they had orders to cruise after the pirates, than to lie here in port, where there are no orders for them, and get their men sick by idleness and drinking. The sailors tell me they know not why they were sent hither, so till the rear-admiral arrives I am wholly in the dark about them.
(2) Sir Ralph Delaval's petition to the king, dated May 6, 1699, praying for the allowance of half the double pay of admiral of the blue when at sea.
The petition sets forth that the king, before going into Flanders last, signified that the petitioner should be put on the ordinary establishment of the navy, and be provided for according to the posts he had served in. The petitioner had commanded the fleet in the commission of three, and had a commission signed to preserve his right for admiral of the blue. [Ibid. pp. 225–7.]
The earl of Jersey to the Admiralty. The French ambassador demands restitution of a French ship, the Levrette of Dunkirk, taken, as he alleges, by H.M.S. Experiment on 3–13 Oct., 1697, off Calais, 13 days after hostilities ought to have ceased in the Channel. I send, by his Majesty's command, a copy of the paper presented by the ambassador. [S.P. 44. 100. p. 309.]
May 22.
Kensington.
Warrant for a privy seal to pay John, viscount Lonsdale, lord privy seal, £4 a day in lieu of the ancient diet. [S.O. 8. 27. No. 30: S.P. 44. 347. p. 464: S.O. 3. 20. f. 172v.]
Warrant to lord Lonsdale to cause the privy seal to be affixed to instruments directed to the late keeper. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 463.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter Beckford, esq., setting forth that, in 1697, in a quarrel in the West Indies on the shore in Jamaica, he unfortunately killed one—Lewis, for which he fled into France, where he remains: that by several depositions the circumstances make him only guilty of manslaughter. He prays a pardon. Referred to the Commissioners for Trade. [S.P. 44. 237. p. 201.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Tho. Lechmere, esq.; setting forth that he went from London and waited upon his Majesty, the day after his landing, at Exeter, and attended his Majesty thence to London, and is the only person who came early into his Majesty's service who has received no mark of his royal favour: has always continued remarkably steadfast to his Majesty's interest: that his Majesty has declared his remembrance of the petitioner's early coming and his gracious intentions towards him. The petitioner has several children grown to men's estate, and through disappointments and misfortunes has contracted a debt of above £4000: without his Majesty's favour he will be ruined. Referred to the Treasury (his Majesty being disposed to do something for the petitioner). [S.P. 44. 238. p. 333.]
May 22. Proceedings upon the petition of the committee for the fabric of Greenwich hospital; "setting forth that they having found it necessary to purchase some small tenements and grounds near adjoining to the west side of the hospital, in order to the erecting an infirmary and other necessary offices thereon; and the site of the ground whereon now stand the old ruinous stables and barns, belonging to his Majesty, not being used nor inhabited, pray for a grant of the said ground, being 500 ft. long and 100 ft. broad, to the said hospital." Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 334.]
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody Peter Ellers, for having at sundry times fraudulently received great sums of money upon annuity orders (directed by him and recorded by the clerk of the pells) due to several other persons, and signing acquittances in their names without authority. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 116.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of the 26 and 29th inst., which have been laid before his Majesty, who believes nothing can be concluded with Monsr. Lilierode sooner than he shall arrive in Holland, he having now fixed his day for going from hence, viz.: Friday sennight. In the meantime his Majesty supposes that Monsr. Lilierode will receive an answer from Sweden, whether they will consent to a guaranty of the peace of Ryswick with the inclusion of the Spanish Netherlands in express terms; which are points his Majesty thinks fit to be insisted on, to make some amends for the much larger demands proposed on their side.
His Majesty, calling to remembrance that you thought the end of this month would be a convenient time for your return, he supposes the negotiation on foot will not occasion any long delay, and therefore he intends that one of the yachts, which attends him, shall bring you over.
His Majesty has disposed of the first commissioner's place of the Admiralty to the earl of Bridgewater, and I believe lord Haversham will be another in that commission. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 271.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. On Thursday last was held a general court of the New East India Company, to consider the by-laws made by their committee.
The earl of Westmorland died on Friday, after a few days' sickness.
It is said the king will be going to Holland in a fortnight or three weeks. Mr. Blathwayt is again to attend his Majesty.
The duke of Bolton is not yet arrived from Ireland, and so long as the wind continues easterly he cannot be expected.
The court of King's Bench have deferred giving judgment against Mr. Burton and Mr. Knight for falsely endorsing exchequer bills till next term. [Ibid. ff. 273–274.]
Newsletter to the same. [Ibid. p. 272.]
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have your letter of the 15th and am pretty indifferent whether the Elector thinks fit to demand the Irish priest or not. I told Comte d'Aversberg to-day that I had taken my resolution that the Spanish ambassador should never rescue the priest out of my hands, but he should get him out of the hands of public justice, if he could; for I would commit him immediately to Newgate. I believe I startled him. He desired I would forbear if only for three or four days. That I am willing to do till the cabinet council meets on Sunday next, and then I will desire the king's leave to put it in execution.
As to our vacancies I can give you but small account of them at present. Lord Bridgewater is made first commissioner of the Admiralty, whom all must own to be a man of probity and industry. He does not pretend to skill in these affairs, and therefore would have excused himself. Lord Haversham will be another in that commission. I have been in hopes that something worth your acceptance might fall to your share. If that does-not answer expectation, I have desired lord Jersey to send you for diversion to Turin. I am glad to find he is as ready to serve you as I can be, and much abler.
I suppose you will wait on the king at The Hague, and there you will remember you are in my province again, so that you will oblige me in letting me hear from you. Copy. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 275.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to lord ambassador Williamson. By Mr. Secretary's direction I give you the trouble of a letter from his Majesty to John Ernest, duke of Saxe Gotha, on the occasion of his wife's death, which Mr. Secretary desires you to get conveyed to him by some minister of that House, or other hand, at The Hague. His residence is at Saalfeldt, though his letter was dated at Hilperhusen, his brother's seat, where the lady died.
Col. Wharton has resigned his place in the Admiralty, and it is said col. Kendall has done the like, and then there are four vacancies there, two whereof are looked upon as filled already by the earl of Bridgewater, who will be at the head of the commission, and lord Haversham.
The earl of Abingdon is dead, and there is a report to-day as if the young earl of Thomond were dead too. Endorsed, R. June 5th, 99. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 352–353.]
Ja. Vernon to the Admiralty. The papers relating to capt. Caldwall having been laid before the king, he directs that he be forthwith restored to a command equal to that which was taken from him. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 228.]
The same to the same. Your report of the 18th inst., upon the petition of Sir Rich. Rooth, having been laid before the king, the pension of half-pay formerly granted to him as commander-in-chief of a squadron is to be restored. [Ibid. p. 229.]
The same to Mr. Tho. Taylor, J.P., in Canterbury. Lewis gave security to the mayor of Dover to come directly to me: therefore you will permit him to proceed. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 34.]
Proceedings upon the petition of James Gray; setting forth that he served the Crown 40 years in the navy as boatswain. He prays an almsman's place in St. Peter's, Westminster. Certified by lord Orford, lord Lucas, Sir G. Rook. Granted. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 354.]
May 23.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the privy council of Scotland, for the continuation of the adjournment of parliament from June 14th to Sept. 14th next, and for the issue of a proclamation accordingly. [S.P. 57. 17. p. 200.]
The same. We are informed that several heretable sheriffs, lords and baillies of regalities, have not qualified themselves, and therefor cannot by law constitute deputes. We require you therefore to appoint qualified persons, well affected to our government, to act as sheriffs, lords or baillies in the said jurisdictions, and you are to permit none named by those who are unqualified to officiate. [Ibid.]
The king to the lords of the Treasury of Scotland. We have considered the deductions craved by the tacksmen of the sixpenny excise from March 1st, 1698, to March 1st, 1699. We are resolved to grant no abatement of any of the funds granted by parliament for maintaining our forces, but that all questions be determined by you upon grounds of law. [Ibid. p. 201.]
The same. A representation has been made to us by John Smith, deput muster master, discovering several malversations committed by Mr. Bruce, our muster master general, containing an account of respites granted to the regiments lately disbanded, amounting to a considerable sum. We have ordered the account to be transmitted to you for impartial enquiry and report. [Ibid. p. 202.]
The king to the commissioners for visiting the universities, schools and colleges of Scotland, adding the earl marshal to their number. [Ibid.]
Royal warrant to the lords of the Treasury of Scotland. There is a petition, presented to us by Patrick Fea in Orkney, representing that his lands have been laid waste for several years. You will make enquiry into the truth of his petition, and, if you find the same to be instructed, we authorise you to grant him a discharge of the bygone superior duties for these years for his lands of Airy and Strenzie. [Ibid. p. 203.]
Warrant to insert Samuel Knipe, convicted of counterfeiting coin, in the next general pardon for that crime, upon condition of transportation. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 466.]
Warrant for the grant of the office of secretary and provost martial general of Bermuda to Edward Jones, gent., with a proviso for residence. [Ibid. p. 467: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant and confirmation to Charles Cocks, esq., of the office of clerk of the patents in the court of Chancery, vacant by the death of Sir Richard Piggott, knt., being appointed to the office by lord Somers, lord chancellor. Latin. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 482–7, and pp. 491–501: S.O. 3. 20. f. 173.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Wm. Moone and James Benn; setting forth that they became bail for James Hunt, who did not appear: they became bound for Hunt believing he might at that juncture be very serviceable to his Majesty and government as an evidence against the conspirators: they pray for remission of the forfeiture of their recognisance. Referred to the attorney or solicitor-general. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 335.]
May 23.
Kensington.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. Walter Aldey; setting forth that Robert Adams of Portscuir, co. Monmouth, yeoman, is executed for murder, and his estate to the value of £22 p. ann. is forfeited to his Majesty: the petitioner's ancestors were formerly seized of the estate, and the petitioner, through misfortunes, was obliged to part with it to Adams at a very great undervalue; great part of the money is yet unpaid: petitioner and his ancestors were always loyal, and the petitioner has done great service to his Majesty, and has a son now in his service. He prays a grant of the estate. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 336.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary, relict of Maccarthie Reagh of Ireland; setting forth that her late husband protected many English families in the late troubles, and, being in possession of a large, ancient estate, and at the head of a considerable body of horse and foot, submitted upon the earl of Marlborough's arrival before Kinsale, and brought into obedience most of his men, with their horses and arms: that the earl promised to represent the petitioner's husband's behaviour to his Majesty, and that he should receive such marks of favour as became a man of his quality; the truth of which the petitioner submits to the earl: that her husband had a pension of £100 p. ann. from Charles II, but died lately, leaving the petitioner with children in a perishing condition. She prays for the pension. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 339.]
May 25.
Kensington.
Warrant for revoking letters patent, dated 9 W. III, whereby Edward, earl of Orford; Henry Priestman; Sir Robert Rich, bart.; Sir George Rooke, knt.; Sir John Hoblon, knt.; James Kendall and Goodwin Wharton were appointed commissioners of the Admiralty: and for the appointment of John, earl of Bridgewater; John, lord Haversham; Sir Robert Rich, bart.; Sir George Rooke, knt.; and Sir David Mitchell, knt., to be commissioners [in their place.] [S.P. 44. 348. pp. 44–45: S.O. 3. 20. f. 173, v.]
Warrants for licences to Sir John Gifford, bart., and William Juxon, esq., to return from France. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 60: S.O. 8. 27. Nos. 31–32: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174v.]
Appointment by the king of Charles Ashton, clerk, to be one of the chaplains of "our royal hospital near Chelsea," of which he is to take joint care and charge with Emanuel Langford, D.D. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 393.]
May 25.
Kensington.
Commission to Stephen Piper, gent., to be solicitor to the first regiment of footguards [Ibid. p. 394]: to Francis Goore, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of dragoons commanded by col. William Lloyd [S.P. 44. 168. p. 234]: to Henry Kelly, esq., to be major of the same regiment [ibid.]: to Walter Leveson, esq., to be captain of the troop whereof lieut.-col. John Williams was late captain in the same regiment [ibid.].
May 25.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. I return you the articles of the treaty concluded by Mr. Hill for reestablishing the packet boats between Dover and Newport. His Majesty directs you to ratify them.
There was enclosed in this letter; the articles of a treaty: a letter of 1–11 May from Mr. Hill to the postmasters: an additional article to the treaty: a letter from Mr. Blathwayt, dated, at Loo, 3 Oct., '97, to postmasters. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 34.]
The same to postmasters general. Peter Montaigu, Salomon Berton, John Laurent and Thomas Jouin, poor French protestants lately disbanded in Ireland, are to have free passages to Holland. [Ibid. p. 35.]
The same to the Council of Trade. I am to send you enclosed extract of a letter from Mr. Robinson, resident at Stockholm, relating to the project of the treaty of commerce lately sent to his Majesty. You are to consider what he says of the article about free ships making free goods, whether it may not be rather prejudicial to England in case of such a war as the last; or how it may be qualified to make it of an equal mutual advantage to both kingdoms. You are also to consider what instructions may be necessary for Mr. Robinson, as a guide to his proceeding in this treaty. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 35.]
May 25.
Kensington.
Warrants: for the reprieve of Mary Ludgater, convicted at Chichester of the murder of her bastard child [S.P. 44. 347. p. 468]:
for a grant of the office of writing to the great seal of England all presentations to advowsons and other spiritual promotions in the king's donation (except archbishoprics and bishoprics) to William Clayton and Charles Clayton, gents., for their lives and the life of the survivor, upon surrender of a grant to John Nicoll of Gray's Inn, esq. [Ibid. pp. 522–5: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. We are to have a new commission of Admiralty, consisting of five persons only, viz.: the earl of Bridgewater, Sir Robert Rich, Sir George Rooke, lord Haversham and Sir David Mitchell.
His Majesty seems to hold his resolution of beginning his journey this day sennight. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 354.]
May 26. Richard Bradshaw to capt. Edwards. I must speak to you upon extraordinary business. I live in St. Nicholas Lane, Lombard St.
[Note.] I am satisfied by the merchant, Mr. Haye, that was concerned in the wool seized at Ramsgate, that capt. Edwards has discharged the same. [S.P.32. 11. f. 276.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to Sir J. Williamson]. Yesterday his Majesty dined with the earl of Ranelagh at his house near Chelsea college.
The Comte de Massé, envoy extraordinary from the duke of Savoy, had yesterday his public audience, and notified the birth of the Prince of Piemont.
Last night lord Ferrers of Chartley was sworn of the privy council. Endorsed, R. June 9th, 99. [Ibid. ff. 277–278.]
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. Mr. Macky, agent for the packet boats at Dover, was directed to send his servant several times to Paris, with packets to lord Portland and lord Jersey, and the servant has been employed on other journeys, for which no allowance has been made him. His disbursements, £73 7s. 9d., are to be paid to Mr. Macky out of the revenue of the Post Office. [S.P.44. 101. p. 36.]
May 26.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I beg you to excuse Lloid's importunities: it is a trouble which I foresaw but could not avoid, and I could not prevent his returning to England.
I have already informed you that in my opinion the lord chancellor should not go to England. Whatever he might do there, his journey would arouse the jealousy of the duke of Bolton, and this might make things very difficult for us on his return. I don't think there is anything of which we could not inform the king by correspondence, and I am sure the duke will report on business as we agreed; but, should there by anything contradictory, if the king will let me be informed on the subject, I think I shall be able to adjust matters without difficulty. Moreover the lord chancellor's presence is required over here, and he will not go without positive orders. 1½ pp. French. [S.P.63. 360. ff. 118–119.]
May 26.
Council Office, Dublin.
W. Palmer to Mr. Secretary Vernon. I enclose the draft of the articles agreed to by Mr. Harrison: the quantum for provision of daughters is £2500. Sir Richard Levings, whom I employed, has taken a great deal of pains. Mr. Harrison will wait in Dublin the finishing of this affair, as also does his lady, because a fine must be levied. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 120–121.]
May 26.
Dublin.
E[dward] Harrison to James Vernon. I have made an end with Mr. Palmer, who really was too positive and tenacious for me. If you agree to the articles you will be pleased to sign them and send them back to be signed by me here, that the young people may go together; and I hope God will give them many blessings.
The jointure is named £400 p. ann., but I hope you will let it be £300 during my life; but this is also left to your breast; for nothing now shall make me differ from you.
My lord bishop of Down and Connor is like to be my near neighbour at Lisburne, with whom I find you are acquainted, having heard him talk of you with great regard and deference. I hope, dear sir, you will make my unfeigned services acceptable to your lady as also to your eldest daughter. I shall be very pleased when I can call her by another name; and, tho' I be old, I do not despair of kissing all your hands at London. 1½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 122–123.]
May 26.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, for the grant of the dignity of a baron of Ireland to Henry Petty, esq., by the title of baron of Shelborne, co. Waterford. [S.O.1. 14. p. 172: S.P. 67. 2. p. 223]:
The same, for a grant of forfeited lands in Ireland, mentioned in a schedule, to Philip Harman. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 368–9.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 172–4.]
The same, for a grant to Richard, earl of Ranelagh, of an annuity of £300 from the Exchequer, Ireland. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 368.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 174–6.]
The same, to pay to col. Nicholas Purcel the balance of the rents of the leases directed by the warrant of March 8 ult. [v. sup.], of the forfeited estates of Sir Valentine Browne (lord Kenmare) after payment of prior charges, in satisfaction of the marriage portion of his wife Elissa, daughter of Sir Valentine Browne. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 368.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 199–201.]
The same, to allow to Bartholomew van Homrigh £1000 for his service as Commissary General of the provisions in Ireland since August, 1693, and for his service in transporting our troops from Ireland in the year 1690. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 368.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 201–2.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Nathaniel Harper, executor of John Ward; setting forth that Tho. Fellow, Saml. Fellow and Jacob Edge obtained judgment against him. He prays a writ of error (which was allowed on May 27). [S.P. 44. 238. p. 337.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Depommare, John Dufou and John Buisson; setting forth that they are French protestants, and were bred up in the trade of clothworkers, and particularly the use of the broad shears for shearing cloth and shag plush, and fled into this kingdom ten years since for the preservation of their lives and religion: that the clothworkers of London have lately brought actions against them in the King's Bench for following the said trades as not having served seven years thereto, although their work during their residence here has been only in shearing shag plush, and they have not meddled with shearing cloth. They will be ruined for want of ability to make their legal defence against so great a body corporate. They pray a noli prosequi or other relief. Referred to the attorney or solicitor-general. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 338.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Joseph Berriman; setting forth that in October, 1695, he, then living in the family of Charles Cottington, esq., was seized in a violent manner, as he was walking in Mr. Cottington's park, by Browne, the messenger, and his accomplices; who pretended to have the lord chief justice's warrant, and forcibly carried him to a lone house upon the common, and kept him there several days; threatening that, if he would not comply with their demands, they would prosecute him as a priest; and they carried him before a justice, who bound him over to the next assizes at Wilts.; where, he not being able to appear on account of sickness, the recognizances were forfeited, and though not estreated, are still in force. Since his Majesty's accession he has always comported himself with submission. He prays a stay of proceedings. Referred to the attorney or solicitor-general. [Ibid. p. 340.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Richd. Meredith; setting forth that he served the Crown by sea for many years and lost his leg in the service. He had a grant from King Charles of an almsman's place in Worcester, but by reason of the king's death has not yet obtained it. He prays a confirmation of the grant. Certified by the dean of Worcester, etc. Granted. [Ibid. p. 352.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Middleton of Durham, barber, an ancient freeman of Durham, who served in collecting the Crown revenue. He prays for the next almsman's place in Durham cathedral. Granted. [Ibid. p. 373.]
Allowance by the Secretary of State of the bill of extraordinaries of Edward, earl of Jersey, late ambassador extraordinary to his Most Christian Majesty. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 471.]
May 26.
The Hague.
Pass to the Sieur Bogeslaus de Lubienski, captain of the grand musqueteers of the king of Poland, going into England upon his Majesty's affairs. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
May 27.
Kensington.
Warrant for the denization of John Peter Vander Brande, heer of Cleverskerk. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 47: S.O. 3. 20. f. 176, v.]
Warrant for a licence to Henry, earl of Stafford, to return from France. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 61: S.O. 8. 27. No. 35: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174, v.]
Commission for John, lord Lovelace, to be guidon and major of the first troop of horse guards [S.P. 44. 167. p. 395]: to John Dalrymple to be chirurgeon to brigadier William Selwyn's regiment of foot. [S.P. 44. 168. p. 234.]
Warrant for payment of a pension to Sir Ralph Delaval, knt., for good service at sea. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 488.]
May 28.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the lords justices of Ireland: whereas John Burke, esq., commonly called Lord Bophin, by petition represented that by our letter to you dated April 2, 1698 [Cal. S.P. Dom., 1698, pp. 176–7], wherein we directed you to cause him to adjudged within the articles of Galway, he did not receive any benefit; but that, upon his disappointment therein, you transmitted to us a Bill (during the last session of parliament in that kingdom) for reversing his outlawry, which we approved in council, yet it did not pass into an Act of the said parliament: he therefore prays for our pardon for life only, that he may enjoy any future gifts or acquisitions:
we require you to cause letters patent to be passed containing our pardon unto John Burke of all treasons [etc.] on account of the late rebellion in Ireland. [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 176–7.]
The same: whereas Richard Blake of Ardfry, co. Galway, represented to us that he is a native of Galway, and was a burgess thereof in 1686: that he was at the camp before the said town when it was invested by our army commanded by the earl of Athlone: that his influence on his relations greatly contributed to the early surrender of the town: for which he had repeated assurances from the earl that he was comprised within the articles made upon the surrender: that he lived inoffensively in his house during the late rebellion in that kingdom, and protected his protestant neighbours from the violence of those times, and for his service and friendship to the protestants his house was burnt and all his goods consumed by the Irish army: that he is not outlawed for treason:
we require you to cause letters patent to be passed containing our pardon unto Richard Blake [etc.]. [Ibid. pp. 177–8.]
May 28.
Kensington.
Warrant to the attorney-general: whereas a prosecution is begun in our court of Exchequer against capt. James Moody, late commander of our ship Yarmouth, who was sometime since appointed commander in chief of a convoy to Turkey, for having contrary to instructions taken on board the said ship at Scanderoon several parcels of goods and [for] bringing them to England and receiving freight for the same: and whereas the [Turkey Company] have represented that the goods were the surplusage of what their ships could stow and were very much wanted to employ the poor manufacturers in this kingdom, and that the consul and factors at Aleppo earnestly solicited capt. Moody to take the same: our will is that you enter a noli prosequi. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 472–3.]
Warrant to insert Robert Seely in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate for piracy, without condition of transportation, in compassion to his tender years. He had been bound apprentice to a mariner and was put on board the Charles II, and being then very young had the misfortune to be carried away by Henry Every and his crew into the South Seas, where he endured a great deal of misery before they dismissed him. [Ibid. p. 473.]
Warrant for the grant of a baronetcy of England to John Peter Vander Brande, heer of Cleverskerk, late ambassador of the States General to the English court. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 47: S.O. 3. 20. f. 176, v.]
Treasury bills signed, for paying £1500 p. ann. to the earl of Pembroke, president of the council [S.P. 44. 348. p. 48]: for a grant of a parcel of forfeited paper to George Moult. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 365.) [S.P. 44. 348. p. 52: S.O. 3. 20. f. 173, v.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Commission to William Sabine, gent., to be ensign of capt. Robt. Johnson's company in col. James Stanley's regiment of foot. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 396.]
Ja. Vernon to the Admiralty. His Majesty would have you lay before him what you think may be conveniently retrenched from the present charge of the navy, and particularly consider what relates to half-pay, or double half-pay, pretended to by officers of the fleet in time of peace. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 229.]
The same to the Treasury. I am to send you the enclosed petition of Sir Thomas Cooke, which was presented to the House of Commons, and, by their order, laid before his Majesty. You will report, and his Majesty will then consider what may be done for his relief. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 38.]
Petition to the House of Commons of Sir Thomas Cooke, knt., creditor of Sir John Friend, late of London, knt., attainted and executed for high treason: sheweth that Sir John Friend was indebted to the petitioner upon bond: which was proved about two years since before the lords of the Treasury to be a just debt of above £3000 then remaining due. The petitioner is informed a grant for the estate of Sir John Friend is preparing to be passed for £5500 to be paid to the Exchequer. By reason of the forfeiture of Sir John Friend's estate the petitioner is in great hazard of losing his just debt, and prays the House to give him relief. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 341.]
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. The lords justices of Ireland have represented the extraordinary charges they have been at in holding two sessions of parliament, and the great expense of a progress through most parts of Ireland, undertaken only for the king's service. The king would have your opinion as to what may be done. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 39.]
May 29.
Kensington.
Commission to Leonard Holmden, esq., to be exempt and captain of the 2nd troop of horse guards: to John Bridger, gent., to be brigadier and lieutenant of the same troop. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 394.]
The king to the master and fellows of Christ's college, Cambridge, exempting Charles Ellis, M.A., fellow of Christ's college, from residence, that he may travel into foreign countries for the recovery of his health. [S.P. 44. 163. pp. 124–5.]
Warrant for a grant of the office of treasurer of the navy to Sir Thomas Littleton, bart., with the salary of £2000. p. ann., and an allowance of £1700 p. ann. for the paymaster and officers under him, and the use of a messuage at Deptford: with a revocation of the patent dated — March, 1 W. & M., whereby the office was granted to Edward Russell, esq., now earl of Orford. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 53: S.O. 3. 20. f. 175.]
Warrant for a licence to Walter Strickland, esq., to return from France. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 61: S.O. 8. 27. No. 36: S.O. 3. 20. f. 178, v.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Ludgater; setting forth that she was lately tried, at the sessions at Chichester, for the murder of her bastard child: that there was no evidence, but she was convicted upon the statute for not crying out for help. The child was still born. She prays a pardon. Referred to Sir Richard May, recorder of Chichester. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 343.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Wm. May; setting forth that he discovered a Spanish ship to be French, called the St. John of Brest: she was thereupon seized and condemned in Ireland near 4 years since. By command of the Commissioners of Revenue there he has been to this day, there and in England, attending the prosecution by reason of an appeal now dropt: he has had no allowance for loss of time, nor for his share of ship and cargo, nor for his expenses. He prays for a part of the proceeds of ship and cargo. Referred to the Treasury, the petition having been recommended by a committee of the lords commissioners of appeals. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 344.]
Proceedings upon the petition of col. Francis Collingwood; praying for a commission for lieut.-general in the Leeward Islands, in place of col. Hill, deceased, which will enable him to command the militia under the chief command of col. Codrington. Referred to the Council of Trade. [Ibid. p. 345.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Richd. Haddock, knt., comptroller of the navy; setting forth that he has served about 40 years, 13 or 14 as commander at sea, and about 26 as commissioner and comptroller of the navy: upon his dismission from the commission of victualling, in 1690, his Majesty, in addition to his salary as comptroller of the navy, settled £500 p. ann. upon him as bounty: that the same was taken from him in July '98, at his Majesty's going for Holland, by an order of retrenchment said to be made in pursuance of what had passed the sessions preceding in the House of Commons, although the bounty, being settled in the year '90, and included in the ordinary estimates for the year '90, did not (as he conceives) fall under that retrenchment. He prays the restoration of the bounty from midsummer, 1698. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 346.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Tho. Lawrence, bart.; setting forth that Edwd. Cranfeild, esq., has by warrant from the Treasury enjoyed the office of Commissioner of Customs in Barbados for several years, and the place of clerk of the naval office in Barbados by patent during his Majesty's pleasure and his residence in the island: that Cranfeild is now in England and intends not to return, but to officiate by deputy. The petitioner prays, in consideration of his losses and hardships suffered in his Majesty's service under the oppressions of col. Coply, late governor of Maryland, for a grant of the employment of naval officer and Commissioner of Customs in Barbados. Referred to the Council of Trade. [Ibid. p. 349.]
Proceedings upon the petition of the inhabitants of Knightsbridge; setting forth that they have endeavoured to build a chapel there, which has cost them a considerable sum: that they are unable to finish the same. They pray his Majesty's bounty. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 350.]
Proceedings upon the petition of John Vernon, merchant; setting forth that the lands of Clantarfe and Holybrooke, being the property of Irish papists, in 1641 were seized and sequestered on account of that rebellion, and set out to John Blackwell, an adventurer, towards satisfaction of £2700 adventure, according to Act of Parliament for satisfaction of adventurers. Then Blackwell, being in possession, for a valuable consideration assigned these lands to John Vernon, deceased, to whom the petitioner is heir. The said John Vernon laid out in improvements near £2000, and quietly enjoyed the same till the restoration of King Charles, and then entrusted col. Edward Vernon, his relation, to act for him, and by his advice made a writing to him, importing an agreement or proposal for the sale of the lands of Clantarfe (being part of the lands set out to Blackwell) to the said Edward Vernon for £1600, to be paid in 14 days after the date of the instrument; whereby the colonel became qualified the easier to obtain a patent for the same; which were and ought to be construed in trust for the said John Vernon, by reason of the agreement, and because no part of the £1600 was paid: and in execution of the trust Edward Vernon permitted John Vernon to receive the rents and profits for several years after passing the patent, which would have availed nothing if John Vernon had not, at his own cost, proved the ancient proprietors of those lands nocent and guilty of the rebellion.
John Vernon died in May, 1667, without making anything over to Edward by deed, and left his heir an infant, who, coming to age in 1676, filed a bill in Chancery against Edward Vernon and one Carter, with others, to whom, as was alleged, Edward Vernon had mortgaged the lands, to oblige Edward Vernon to execute the trust and for an account, and the court dismissed the bill. Since then Edward is dead leaving two daughters; one died without issue, and the other is waived for high treason, whereby it is his Majesty's right to redeem the mortgages: yet no inquisition has yet found his Majesty's title to it; so the mortgagees receive the whole profits, far exceeding their debts.
The parliament in Ireland, in the Act for settling possessions, excepted the petitioner in the Bill (nemine contradicente) in these words, viz.: Provided always that this Act nor anything herein contained shall extend to prejudice the right [etc.] of John Vernon, son and heir of John Vernon, esq., deceased, in law or equity to the manor, town and lands of Clantarfe and Holybrook with the island and appurtenances in co. Dublin.
Hereupon the petitioner went to Ireland to prosecute his right, and was advised, by the attorney-general there and other counsel, that, notwithstanding the said dismission, he had most just cause of suit against the said Edward Vernon and other defendants, but that his relief is become more difficult by the equity of redemption being forfeited to the Crown.
He prays that he may take out a commission to find his Majesty's title to the estate, and that it may be granted to some person in trust for the petitioner, that he may be enabled to bring the mortgagees to account.
Memdum. Copies of the opinions of R. Rochfort and J. Mead, counsellors in Ireland, were annexed. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. 44. 238. pp. 352–4.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Downing; setting forth that he served his Majesty at sea, and lost his left arm: he prays for an almsman's place at Rochester. Granted. [Ibid. p. 355.]
Allowance by the Secretary of State of the bill of Joseph Kerby, agent and consul at Amsterdam, for extraordinaries from 1695. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 474–5.]
May 29.
The Hague.
Pass to John Birch, soldier, of capt. Maubrun's company in col. Van Gumaen's regiment in the service of the duke of Wurtemberg. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Charles Montague; Ford, earl of Tankerville; Sir Stephen Fox, knt.; John Smith; and Henry Boyle; to be commissioners for executing the office of Treasurer of the Exchequer [commissioners of the Treasury] [S.P. 44. 348. p. 49: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174, v, in the margin "immediate, 31°."]
May 30. Treasury bill signed for a lease and grant to John Powney, esq., of lands near Windsor. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 48: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174.]
Post warrant to Mr. Harrison, the king's page, to Margate. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 160.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Warrant for the royal assent to, and confirmation of the election of the Right Rev. William, bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to be bishop of Worcester. [S.P. 44. 151. pp. 40–41: S.O. 8. 27. No. 40: S.O. 3. 20. f. 174.]
Warrant for a licence to Redmond Morris, gent., who went into France and has been in arms under the French king, to return (recommended by lord Galway in a letter to lord Albemarle) [S.P. 44. 348. p. 49: S.O. 8. 27. No. 37: S.O. 3. 20. f. 178]:
the same, to Robert Tayer, junr., who went into the French king's dominions. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 61: S.O. 8. 27. No. 38: S.O. 3. 20. f 174, v.]
May 30.
Kensington.
The king to the wardens and other the electors of New College, Oxford, and of Winchester College, requiring them to make choice of Nicholas Fen, a scholar of Winchester School, for New College, at the election which shall be in 1700. [S.P. 44. 150. p. 191.]
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, for a grant to trustees for William Shee of a lease of a farm called New Park in the city of Kilkenny. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 375.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 181–2].
The same, for a grant to Charles Dereing of forfeited lands for a further term. [Ibid. pp. 182–3.]
The same, for a grant of a pension of £1200 to Robert Craghead and others, to be distributed among the presbyterian ministers in the north of Ireland. [Ibid. pp. 183–4.]
The same, to pay a further sum of £500 to Tregonwell Frampton. [Ibid. p. 185.]
The same, to discharge Elizabeth Aldworth, widow of Boyle Aldworth, of arrears of rent due to the Crown, in consideration of the burning of his mansion house and towns by the Irish army. [Ibid. pp. 186–7.]
The same, for a grant to Thomas Ashe of Dublin of all the title which the Crown may have in a moiety of the manor of Moone, in the barony of Kilka and Moone, co. Kildare. [Ibid. pp. 187–8.]
The same, for a release to Joost, earl of Albemarle (1) of a yearly rent payable out of the estate formerly belonging to Daniel, late viscount Clare, co. Clare; (2) of a yearly rent payable out of the estate formerly belonging to Redmond and Hugh Mullady, co. Westmeath. [Ibid. pp. 189–191.] (Treas. Cal., XIV, 373–5.)
May 30.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to Sir J. Williamson.] Yesterday his Majesty went to the Tower to view the armoury, and thence to Greenwich, where he was entertained at dinner by the earl of Romney, and in the evening he returned to Kensington.
The earl of Tankerville is made one of the lords Commissioners of the Treasury, and it is said Mr. Boyle will be made one.
Sir Thomas Littleton is made treasurer of the navy; and col. Henry Mordaunt, treasurer of the Ordnance. It is said that Mr. Smith will be made Chancellor of the Exchequer.
Col. Harvey is made colonel of the regiment of horse late major general Leveson's; and Mr. Dormer, the equerry, is made one of the grooms of the bedchamber.
Col. Windsor is made viscount of Blackcastle in Ireland; and Mr. Petty, baron of Shelburn in that kingdom. The Sieur de Cleverskerk, late ambassador from Holland at this court, is made a baronet of England.
His Majesty holds his resolution of going on Friday next for Holland. Endorsed, R. June 12th. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 279–280.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to Ann, duchess of Hamilton, "keeper of our palace of Holyrood house ": by our letter to you of May 4th, 1696, we ordered the under-keeper of the palace to be put in possession of the little lodging, adjoining that which is called the chancellor's lodging. We understand that the same is a part of the appartment possessed by the former chancellors, and necessary for the accommodation of our present chancellor. You will therefore remove the under-keeper, and provide him with those ground-rooms of our palace in which he or his predecessors formerly lodged. [S.P. 57. 17. p. 204.]
Warrant for a tack of the teinds of the regality of Glenluce to John, viscount Stair, for 19 years from the expiration of the tack granted to him for 5 years on April 28, 1696. [Ibid. pp. 204–6.]
Docquet of the warrant for an exoneration of John, viscount Stair, for his exercise of the trusts of king's advocate or secretary for Scotland. [Ibid. p. 206.]
Docquet of the warrant for a charter to John, viscount Stair, of the lands and barony of Droaghan and the lands contained in the deceased John Cunningham of Droaghan his infeftments, and the teynds parsonage and vicarage of the said lands within the parish of Ocultrie, King's Kyle and sheriffdom of Ayr: and the lands which sometime pertained to Adam Mosman in the barony of Brigham, parish of Eccles and sheriffdom of Bervick; with a novo damus and charge from simple to taxt ward. [Ibid. p. 207.]
Docquet of the warrant for a gift of 400 merks Scots yearly to the magistrats and minister of Queensferry, for making up, with the old stipend, the sum of 800 merks. [Ibid.]
Docquet of the warrant appointing John Turnbull to be his Majesty's master tailor in Scotland. [Ibid. p. 208.]
Docquet of the warrant for a pension of £200 to lord Archibald Hamilton. [Ibid. p. 208.]
Warrant for a gift in corroboration of a former gift to James Johnstoun, son of the deceased Sir Archibald Johnstoun of Wariestoun, of £4000, to be paid out of the compositions to be made by the Treasury of Scotland for entries and casualties of the vassals of the late archbishops, bishops, etc. [Ibid. pp. 208–11.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Treasury of Scotland for the payment of the pension of £300 of David, earl of Buchan, preferably to others. [Ibid. pp. 211–12.]
Docquet of the warrant granting to Sir Alexander Hume, second son of the earl of Marchmont, the lands and barony of Cesnock, in the parish of Riccartoun and Galstoun and sheriffdom of Ayr, which pertained before to Sir George Campbell of Cesnock, now in the king's hands by recognition, with change from simple to taxt ward. [Ibid. p. 212.]
The king to the lords of the Treasury of Scotland: whereas the lands and barony of Cesnock holding ward of us have recognosced in our hands by reason of the subaltern infeftments granted by Sir George Campbell and his predecessors, we have signed a gift of recognition of the lands in favour of Sir Alexander Hume, advocate, but [only] as security of the rights and infeftments of the said lands granted to him for the sums due to him by Sir George Campbell, and without prejudice to Sir George of his right of reversion. You will therefore take a backbond of Sir Alexander declaring that the gift is only as [such] security. [Ibid. p. 213.]
Docquet of the gift to major Alexander Anderson, of the regiment of colonel Sir John Hill, of the escheat of James Anderson, elder, of Westertown, and John Anderson, his eldest son. [Ibid. pp. 213–4.]
Docquets of the gifts to George Hume of Whitefield of the escheats of Charles, earl of Hume, and of John Hume of Haliburton [Ibid. pp. 214–5.]
Docquet of the warrant for a gift of conjunct commissaries of St. Andrews to Mr. John Lindsay and Mr. David Bethun, upon the dimission of Mr. John Lindsay. [Ibid. p. 215.]
Docquet of the warrant for a gift to David McGill of Rankeiller of the town, lands and barony of Frendraught, which formerly belonged to — viscount of Frendraught, forfeited by decree of parliament; the manor place and tower of Frendraught to be the messuage of the barony. [Ibid. pp. 215—6.]
Docquet of the warrant for a charter to James, earl of Morton, of the lands and barony of Smithfield and lands "above mentioned," which formerly belonged to James, earl of Morton, deceased, his father, and were resigned in his favour: with a change from simple to taxt ward. [S.P. 57. 17. p. 216.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Docquet of the warrant for a charter to George Carruthers, eldest son of the deceased John Carruthers of Holmains, and his heirs male, which failing to his heirs and assigns, of the lands and barony of Holmains, in the stewartry of Annandale and sheriffdom of Dumfries, " which have recognosced and fallen in your Majesty's hands " by the alienations of the lands and barony or most part thereof made by the deceased John Carruthers to the said George Carruthers. The charter is granted with the burden of the debts due by the deceased, reserving power to George Carruthers to object against the same as accords: with a novo damus; an erection of the town of Meikle Daltoun in a free burgh of barony, a weekly mercat and five free fairs yearly: and union of the said lands and barony with the rights of patronage of Ecclesechan, Meikle and Litle Daltouns, and the said burgh of barony, in a barony to be called Holmains: with change of holding. [Ibid. pp. 216–7.]
Docquet of the warrant for a gift of the single escheat of Mr. John Elleis, elder, of Elleistoun, to Mr. James Anderson, writer to the signet. [Ibid. p. 218.]
Warrant for a pension of £100 to lady Ann Canaries: left indigent by the death of her husband, and in consideration of the noble family of which she is descended. [Ibid.]
Docquets of warrants for pensions of £300 to —, earl of Aboyn, and £200 to John, lord Glenurchy. [Ibid. p. 219.]
Warrant to enrol — Gamell in the invalids of Scotland, in consideration of wounds and the loss of his hand at the battle of Agarim in Ireland. [Ibid. p. 220.]
The petition of George Cuming, shewing that in September, 1695, he was assaulted by three soldiers in Edinburgh, and had the misfortune to kill one of them called Patrick Falconer. The petitioner was found guilty of manslaughter, but the sentence was changed to banishment: since which he served in col. John Buchan's regiment in Flanders until the same was broke. The petitioner's private affairs are ruined.
The king grants George Cuming royal protection to repair to Scotland for his private affairs. [Ibid. pp. 220–1.]
Warrants reciting that —, late bishop of Aberdeen, and —, late bishop of Morray, made application, and that they require assistance: and ordering the payment to them of £100 each. [Ibid. pp. 221–2.]
Warrant to the lords of the Treasury of Scotland to state the arrears due to captain Sixt Dalhem, lately of colonel Buchan's regiment, after Jan. 1st, 1691, and preceding 1693, and to pay the same out of what arises from the poll. [Ibid. pp. 222–3.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, reciting that the emoluments of the office of under-secretary have of late fallen so much that they are not sufficient for defraying the expenses of the necessary attendance in this place which that post requires: that Mr. Robert Pringle has served faithfully in that station: and ordering the payment to him of £400.
Nota. There being a letter designed for £200 to Mr. Carstairs, the king desired £400 to be insert in this for both. [Ibid. p. 223.]
Warrants to the same to pay £300 each to Sir Hugh Dalrymple, president of the college of justice, and to Sir James Stuart, king's advocate, in consideration of their charges " in coming hither by our order." [Ibid. p. 224.]
Commission to George Hay to be ensign in the regiment of guards: to capt. Archibald Pringle to be captain lieutenant in col. George Hamilton's regiment of foot. [Ibid. p. 225.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of capt. Garnet Coghlan in col. Stanley's regiment; setting forth that upon the marriage of the petitioner's father, John Coghlan, to the sister of col. John Fitzpatrick, deceased, it was settled by articles the said John Coghlan's lands and real estate in Ireland should after his death remain in tail male to his sons by his said wife: she died many years since, leaving the petitioner as eldest son, and several other children; after whose death the said John, marrying again, turned the petitioner and his brothers and sisters out of doors: that the petitioner and his brother are in his Majesty's service: that the father being concerned in the late rebellion, his estate became forfeited, but still continues in his possession, and he, careless of his children and doubtful in his title, daily sells and incumbers his lands and will soon dispose of all: that col. Gustavus Hamilton, having obtained a warrant for some forfeited lands in Ireland, procured upon untrue surmises some parcels of the petitioner's father's lands to be inserted, as the forfeited property of one John Coghlan of Tullamore, tho' he well knew the petitioner's father was not the man, and had sufficient notice of the settlement. The estate, tho' forfeited, is no addition to his Majesty's revenue, and would be a very great relief to the petitioner and his poor brothers and sisters, besides supporting their father during his life much better than he now is, and it would be a great security to the petitioner to be in possession when his father dies. He prays for a grant of the estate. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 347.]
May 31.
Kensington.
[Lords justices' commission.] Warrant for a great seal to the effect following: William III [etc.].:
whereas we have suddenly decided for weighty reasons personally (D.V.) to go abroad; and, desiring that our peace may be preserved during our absence and that justice may be administered, and that all the affairs of government in our kingdom of England and in Ireland, and the other dominions, plantations, and territories belonging to our crown of England, may be administered and ordered as if we were personally present in England:
know therefore that we, confiding in the wisdom [etc.] of Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury: John, lord Somers, lord chancellor of England: Thomas, earl of Pembroke, president of our council: John, viscount Lonsdale, keeper of our privy seal: William, duke of Devon, steward of our household: John, earl of Bridgewater, first commissioner of the Admiralty: John, earl of Marlborough, governor to H.H. the duke of Gloucester: Edward, earl of Jersey, one of our principal Secretaries of State: and Charles Montague, esq., first commissioner of our Treasury:
with the advice of our privy council, constitute the said Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, etc., ut supra, to be our guardians and justices of our kingdom of England and our lieutenants in the same during our absence out of the said kingdom, or until we shall otherwise ordain:
giving unto them and to the majority of them (when all are present), and, when in case of death, disability or impediment by sickness or otherwise, not more than six, five, or four are present, then to such six, five or four and to the majority of them, full power and authority to execute the office and place of guardians and justices of our said kingdom of England and of our lieutenants therein, and to do and perform all acts of government and other things which have been used or ought to be done by reason of that office; with command to all our subjects to be aiding and obedient to them as aforesaid:
and our will and pleasure is that all writs, letters patent, commissions and other instruments shall bear teste in the name of the first lieutenant for the time being and of the other lieutenants in the form following, viz.: witnesses, Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, and the other guardians and justices of the kingdom:
and we specially declare that they shall have full power in our kingdom of England to keep the peace, and to cause the laws and customs of the said kingdom to be observed by all, and to punish offenders; and to hold our present parliament, and to continue, prorogue and dissolve the same: and to summon and hold another parliament or parliaments:
and to direct and authorise our lieutenant or justices or governors general of our kingdom of Ireland for the time being to hold, prorogue and dissolve parliaments in the said kingdom, and to prepare and transmit Bills proposed to be enacted in the said parliaments, and to cause laws to be made in such parliaments according to the laws and statutes of Ireland:
and we further declare that they, or the majority of them as aforesaid, may summon and hold our privy council, and appoint committees of the same; and, with the advice of our privy council, publish proclamations, and do all things which have been used to be or can be done by us by or with such advice, enjoining all our privy council to be present:
and they may treat or appoint persons to treat with legates, commissioners and ministers of kings and princes, and make treaties [etc.]: and collate and present to all benefices, dignities and ecclesiastical preferments where the presentation or gift belongs to us, provided that our letters patent dated April 6, 1695, directed to Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, and John, archbishop of York, and others, for the better collation, presentation and disposal of ecclesiastical benefices, shall remain in full force:
and they may issue mandates [etc.] to the treasurer, or commissioners of the treasury, for the collection and issue [etc.] of our revenue under our privy seal:
and they may cause our militia and guards and garrisons within our realm to be mustered and called up, and they may cause new forces to be raised and assembled, if need be, and command all the said forces and all camps and forts and order our forces to march and be sent on active service for repelling and suppressing invasions, insurrections [etc.] and enforcing the laws and martial law in time of war, if it so happen, and as often and as far as may be according to the laws and statutes of our realm:
and [they may] issue orders to our commissioners [of the Admiralty] and all our officers, naval, military, and civil, and appoint all officers and servants and grant all offices, places and employments at our disposal and suspend and remove anyone from such office:
and they may grant pardons, both general and special, for high treason and all other crimes and offences, and remissions of all judgments, pains, penalties and forfeitures: and shall likewise have full power to direct, carry out and order the administration of our government and all business concerning our kingdom of Ireland and all other dominions, plantations and territories belonging to the crown of England, in as ample a manner as we could do if we were present:
lastly we declare our intention to be that the said Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, etc., ut supra, shall act in all matters according to law and justice and not otherwise. (fn. 6) Latin. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 475–81: S.O. 3. 20. f. 175: in the margin " immediate 31mo."]
May 31.
Kensington.
Warrants for grants to John Smith, esq., of the office of chancellor of the exchequer [S.P. 44. 348. p. 50]: and of undertreasurer of the exchequer, with a clause revoking the grant of that office to Charles Montague. [Ibid. p. 51: S.O. 3. 20. f. 176, " immediate, 2° June."]
Treasury bill for a grant to Francis Godolphin of the office of one of the four tellers of the receipt of the exchequer in place of Henry Carew, deceased [S.P. 44. 348, p. 52]:
the same for a grant to Charles Villiers and John Harrison of the office of one of the two searchers at Gravesend. [Ibid., Treas. Cal., XIV, pp. 370, 365.]
Warrant for a congé d'élire to the dean and chapter of Coventry and Lichfield to elect a bishop of that see, void by the translation of Dr. William Lloyd to the see of Worcester; and for a letter recommending the election of the Right Rev. Dr. John Hough, bishop of Oxford. [S.P. 44. 151. p. 41: S.O. 8. 27. No. 41: S.O. 3. 20. f. 175, v.]
Copy of the king's order directed to his lieutenant of his forest of Needwood and others: reciting that there has been committed of late great spoil and destruction of game and venison within the forest, parcel of the duchy of Lancaster: that he is desirous to preserve the game for his royal diversion. The king forbids his lieutenant or other officers during the present summer to kill or hunt deer in the forest. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 281.]
May 31. Treasury Bill revoking the last letters patent appointing commissioners for prizes and the letters patent for granting the office of receiver-general for prizes to James Herbert. [S.P. 44. 348. p. 48: S.O. 3. 20. f. 175: Treas. Cal. XIV, 365.]
May 31.
Kensington.
Commission to Humphry Cory, esq., to be captain of the company whereof capt. Jacob Bore was late captain in col. Francis Collingwood's regiment of foot. [S.P. 44. 168. p. 234.]
May 31. Post warrant to Mr. Allevonse, John Eersbeck, and John Castelyne, servants to lord Albemarle, to Margate. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 160.]
The like to Mr. William Meritt and John Vorhast, harbingers, Mr. Spicemaker and Mr. Bealing, to Margate. [Ibid.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the Treasury. The king has appointed Mr. Hill, his envoy extraordinary at the court of Brussels, to go with the same character to the duke of Savoy, to make the compliment upon the birth of the prince of Piedmont, and has allowed him £400 for extraordinary expenses. [S.P. 44. 100. p. 310.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Admiralty. It is his Majesty's pleasure that you direct that a yacht or small frigate, not exceeding 190 ton, be set up in his Majesty's yard at Chatham, according to the directions of the marquis of Carmarthen. [Ibid. pp. 310–1.]
Proceedings upon the petition of James Moody, late commander of the Yarmouth; setting forth that he was prosecuted for freight and suspended, and a stop put to his wages for 5 years past: that at the request of the Turkey Company his Majesty granted a noli prosequi: he has served in the navy 30 years and is almost disabled by wounds. He prays directions to the Admiralty for taking off the suspension and stop of his pay. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 351.]
May 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland for the dissolution of the parliament of Ireland begun upon Aug. 27th, 1695. [S.P. 67. 2. p. 195.]
Warrant for the pardon of Mary Ludgater, with condition of transportation. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 469.]
May. Docquets of a commission to Christopher Codrington as captain general and governor in chief of the islands of Nevis, St. Christophers, Montserrat, Antigua, Barbuda, Anguilla, and the rest of the Caribbe islands in America lying to leeward of Guardeloupe to the island of St. John de Porto Rico (Cal. America & W. Indies, 1699, No. 382.) [S.O. 3. 20. f. 171.]:
of the grant of a baronetcy to Edmund Denton of Hillisden, co. Bucks [Ibid.]
of a licence to Tho. Kavanagh, to return [Ibid., f. 174, v.]:
of a discharge to Sir John Rogers of £ 1095, usually paid for a baronetcy. [Ibid. f. 173, v.]
Note for the dividend to May 22. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 283.]
Dividend at the privy seal from the 22 inst. (being the day lord Lonsdale was made lord privy seal) to the 31st. [Ibid., f. 282.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Mordecai Abbott, appointed receiver-general of Customs, April 21, 1699.
  • 2. Cf. Lord Galway to Vernon, June 13th, infra.
  • 3. A durable fabric of wool.—N.E.D.
  • 4. See, Cal. S.P., America & W. Indies, 1699, No. 361.
  • 5. ? Lorn.
  • 6. For a medieval document of a similar nature, see Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1429–1436, p. 53.