BHO

William III: June 1699

Pages 211-233

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1699-1700. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1937.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

June 1699

June 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission to Charles, duke of Bolton, to be lieutenant of the county of Southampton and of the town of Southampton and county of the same [S.P. 44. 347. p. 489]: to be lieutenant of Dorset [ibid.]: and warden and keeper of New Forest and the duckoy there, the manor and park of Lyndhurst, and the hundred of Rudbergh alias Redbergg. [Ibid. p. 490: S.O. 3. 20. f. 176, v.]
[Commission of Trade.] Royal warrant for a great seal to the effect following: whereas we are extremely desirous that the trade of our kingdom of England should be promoted, and are persuaded that nothing will more effectually contribute thereto than the appointing of fit persons to examine into the general trade of our said kingdom and to enquire into the matters hereinafter mentioned, with such powers and directions as are hereinafter specified:
we appoint the lord chancellor or keeper of the great seal; the president of our privy council; the keeper of our privy seal; the first commissioner of our treasury; the first commissioner of the Admiralty; our principal Secretaries of State; and our Chancellor of the Exchequer [and the holders of those offices for the time being]; and Thomas, earl of Stamford; Robert, lord Lexington; Sir Philip Meadows; William Blathwayt; John Pollexfen; John Locke; Abraham Hill and George Stepney, or any three or more of you, to be commissioners for promoting the trade of this kingdom and for inspecting and improving our plantations in America and elsewhere: and we direct that you meet in such place in our palace of Whitehall which we have assigned:
and we empower you, or any three of you, to enquire into the state of the general trade of England and the several particular trades into all foreign parts, and how the same are advanced or decayed and the causes thereof, and examine what trades are or may prove hurtful or beneficial to England, and by what means they may be improved or discouraged, and to enquire into the several obstructions of trade and the means of removing the same, and how new manufactures may be introduced:
and we authorise you to consider of some proper methods for setting on work and employing the poor, and making them useful to the public and thereby easing our subjects of that burthen, and in general to inform yourselves of all things relating to trade; as also to consider the best means to regain, encourage and establish the fishery of this kingdom:
and our further will is that you or any four of you do from time to time make representations touching the premisses to us or to our privy council in writing and to be signed by four or more of you:
and we require you to take into your care all records, grants and papers remaining in the plantation office or thereto belonging; and to inform yourselves of the present condition of our respective plantations, as well with regard to the administration of the government and justice in those places as in relation to the commerce thereof; and to enquire into the limits, soil and product of our several plantations, and how the same may be improved, and of the best means for easing and securing our colonies there, and how the same may be rendered most useful to England:
and we further require you, more particularly and in a principal manner, to inform yourselves what naval stores may be furnished from our plantations, and in what quantities and by what methods our purpose of having our kingdom supplied from thence may be made practicable; and to inform yourselves of the best methods of settling and improving in our plantations such other staples and manufactures as our subjects of England are now obliged to fetch from other princes and States, and what staples and manufactures may be best encouraged there; and what trades are taken up and exercised there which are or may prove prejudicial to England, by furnishing themselves or other our colonies with what has been usually supplied from England, and to find out proper means of diverting them from such trades:
and to look into the usual instructions given to the governors of our plantations, and to see if anything may be changed to advantage; and to take an account yearly by way of journal of the administration of our governors there, and to draw out what is proper to be represented to us, and to consider of proper persons to be governors or deputy governors, or to be of our council, or of our council at law or secretaries in our plantations, in order to present their names to us in council:
and we authorise you to examine and weigh such acts of the Assemblies of the plantations as shall be sent for our approbation, and to represent the usefulness or mischief thereof to our Crown, or to England, or to the plantations themselves, in case the same should be established for laws there; and to consider what may be recommended as fit to be passed in the Assemblies; to hear complaints of oppressions and mal-administrations, in order to represent what you think proper:
and to require an account of all moneys given for public uses by the Assemblies, and how the same have been expended:
and we empower you, or any three of you, to send for persons and papers for your better information, and to examine witnesses upon oath: and we declare our further will to be that you from time to time report all your doings, under the hands of the four of you, to us or to our privy council:
and we give power to you, or any three of you, to send for the advice of our attorney or solicitor-general or other our council at law:
and we further declare that we do not intend that our [principal officers of State] should be obliged to give constant attendance, but only when their presence shall be necessary. (Cf. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1696, p. 154.) [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 506–514: S.O. 3. 20. p. 124.]
June 1.
Kensington.
Commission to George Villiers, esq., to be captain of the company whereof Francis Yelverton, esq., was late captain in the first regiment of foot guards. [S.P. 44. 168. p. 234.]
His Majesty's letter for Robinson Soul to be admitted a child of the Charterhouse, upon the next vacancy. [S.P. 44. 163. f. 177.]
June 1.
The Hague.
Passes to Dennis Holme and Mathew Medding, soldiers, of capt. de Haen's company under the command of the Prince de Frize in the States' service. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
June 1.
Kensington.
Pass to Sir Philip Monoux, bart., with John Astley and Anthony Cope, esqs., and servants, to travel to France, etc. Latin. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 160.]:
the like for Tyringham Backwell and Lee Warner, esqs., with Mr. Charles Ellis and Morgan Price, to travel to France, Germany etc. [Ibid. p. 161.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Admiralty. Capt. John Edwards, of the Blackwell Hall sloop, having represented the many services he has done with the hazard of his life in discovering and seizing the enemies of the government, his Majesty recommends him, that the sloop may be entertained in his Majesty's service, and that he have a commission to command her. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 230.]
June 1. The petition of John Haynes to the king. The petitioner was appointed in an Act, 1 W. & M., a commissioner to put in execution the Acts made to prevent the exportation of wool, ' which he has ever since with very great vigour and expences performed.' Pursuant to those Acts, on 24 Jan. ult., there was seized at Great Yarmouth a quantity of wool on board two vessels, as recited in an annexed memorial: but in obedience to the king's pleasure, signified by Secretary Vernon, the seizure was delivered back to the proprietors, to the petitioner's great loss. He asks for compensation.
The memorial above referred to, showing that the vessels were the Anna of Leith, bound for Rotterdam, and the Unick of Rouen, bound for Leith. [S.P. 32. ff. 284–285.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Randolph Knipe, Messrs. Moyer and Beremberg of London, merchants, on behalf of Christopher Van Kochin, John Clayhills and other subjects of the king of Sweden, part owners of the ship Fortune of Narva, whereof John Russell, an Englishman but a free burgher of Narva was master; setting forth that the ship was built at Narva in '93 for account of Swedes, and Russell was made a burgher of Narva to qualify him to be master of her, and the owners permitted him to hold an eighth part.
In 1696 the master let the ship to freight, to one Mr. Francis Riggs, to go from London to Norway to fetch masts [etc.] for his Majesty's use; which was contrary to the Act of Navigation, the owners being Swedes. The master acquainted Sir Benjamin Ayloffe, agent for the owners in London, with it, who directed him not to proceed on the voyage; and the master thereupon declining the voyage, Riggs caused him to be arrested for breach of contract; which action was bailed by Sir Benjamin and Mr. Wolfe.
Notwithstanding, the master, unknown to Sir Benjamin and owners, contrary to their direction, went the voyage; whereby the ship became forfeited, and was seized by an officer of the Customs. Whereupon the petitioners obtained a noli prosequi for his Majesty's part of the ship, and compounded with the officer that seized her for his part, amounting to above £298.
The master caused the ship to be arrested in the Admiralty Court for seamen's wages, etc., in going the said voyage, and procured her to be seized as a perquisite of the Admiralty for having traded to France in 1694, falsely swearing the ship belonged to English owners; all which has put the owners to above £200 expense, more than the ship is worth.
There was an information exhibited in the name of one Tho. Bellamy in the court of exchequer against Riggs for the value of the masts, etc., imported, and there was a verdict for £250 to his Majesty for his moiety of the goods. The master is not able to make satisfaction to the owners for their damages, and the owners are remediless at law against Riggs.
The petitioners pray for a grant of his Majesty's part of the forfeiture of the value of the masts, etc., in consideration of their damages. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. 44. 238. pp. 355–7.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend — Marshall, for suspicion of treason (Mem. Thomas Marshaldaviera was apprehended July 4, and on July 21 was discharged on giving security, being in ill-health " and under a necessity of going to the Bath. ") [S.P. 44. 348. p. 56.]
Warrant to apprehend — Everard alias Jones. (Mem. Jones was taken July 5. His papers were examined in the presence of Mr. Baker, but nothing material appeared. However, being suspected to be a priest, he was continued in custody and told he should be committed to Newgate unless he would voluntarily leave the kingdom; which he promised to do, but in the meantime brought a habeas corpus from lord chief justice Holt; and, there being no proof of his being a priest, the messenger carried him before the lord chief justice, who on Aug. 15 admitted him to bail, to appear at the King's Bench.) [Ibid.]
Proceedings upon the petition of Hugh Jones of Bristol, setting forth that he served in the late wars: he asks for the next almsman's place in Bristol cathedral. Granted. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 358: for the petition, signed by Geo. Royse, dean: Nath. Lye and Thomas Cary, prebendaries, see S.O. 8. 27. No. 42.]
June 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent creating Sir David Colyear a free lord of parliament of Scotland, by the title of lord Portmore and Blackness. The warrant recites that Sir David is descended of an eminent family, which has signalised itself by adherence to his Majesty: that Sir Alexander Colyear, his father, served his Majesty in some of the most considerable posts of the armies of the States General, commanded by his Majesty in person; that Sir David has, both in the former war between the States General and the French king, as likewise during the whole tract of the last war between the Crown of England, the States General and their confederates against France, given remarkable demonstration of zeal and courage, both in Ireland and Flanders; particularly at the famous retreat at Arsell commanded by the prince of Vaudemont, where, having the honour to command the arrear-guard, he had opportunity to render his Majesty signal service. The grant is in tail male. (See The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, X, 202b.) [S.P. 57. 17. pp. 225–7.]
June 1.
Kensington.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, for the appointment of Humphrey Hethrington to be a justice of the King's Bench in Ireland, during his Majesty's pleasure, in the room of Sir John Lindon, deceased. [S.O. 1. 14. p. 197.]
The same, to pay to Sir Standish Hartstonge, late one of the barons of the court of exchequer in Ireland, £200 salary till June 5, 1695. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 378.) [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 198–9.]
The same, to pay to Charles, duke of Bolton, and Henry, earl of Galway, £1500 each, as royal bounty. [Ibid. p. 199.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the lords justices of Ireland, transmitting the warrant of May 31st, ult., for the dissolution of parliament. [S.P. 67. 2. p. 196.]
June 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for the grant of the dignity of a viscount of the kingdom of Ireland to Thomas Windesor, esq., second son of Thomas, late earl of Plymouth, by the style of viscount Windesor in the kingdom of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 224: S.O. 1. 14. pp. 197–8.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have none of your letters to acknowledge, and we don't at present desire a fair wind to bring them: we like it better as it is for his Majesty's passage, who I hope will have landed in Holland long before these letters arrive, having begun his journey at 11 last night.
Everybody will be able to inform you how his Majesty has disposed of the vacant employments, to whom he has committed the regency, and who are in the new commission for Ireland.
I can't tell whether I shall have anything hereafter to trouble you with, but request that I may be informed how you proceed and conclude with Monsr. Lilierode.
I suppose Mr. Hill will wait on his Majesty at The Hague: if so I desire the enclosed may be given him there or sent to Brussels. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 355.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Hill. I hope this will find you at The Hague, supposing you will wait on his Majesty before you take your journey to Turin. If you do so you will better understand what has passed here in the disposal of our vacant employments than I can or care to relate. But this I ought to tell you, that you could not have wished his Majesty better disposed than he was to put you into the commission of the Treasury, which I and many more thought the properest post for you If you ask why then was it not done, I can't answer for courtiers' intrigues but I am satisfied a master can't long want a servant he likes so well. There were other things proposed afterwards, that you might be a commissioner of the Customs, or in the Council of Trade, but the respect I have for you would not permit me to wish you had either. I know not whether this will agree with your sentiments, but I can judge only by my affection and esteem, which can't be satisfied till you are placed higher. Lord Jersey, whom I think very much your friend, seemed desirous you should come over, and that it would be for your interest. I am sorry there is no occasion for it at present.
It will be now your part to consider whether it may not be best for you to return with his Majesty, and to take your measures accordingly. I believe I need not tell you that you will find lord Albemarle ready to shew you any act of friendship. Copy. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 286.]
R. Yard to lord ambassador Williamson. His Majesty left Kensington about 10 last night, in order to embark at Margate, in which road the yachts and men-of-war, which attend his Majesty, are ordered to be.
The earl of Romney, lord Albemarle, Monsr. d'Auerquerke, lord Raby, lord Selkirk, and Mr. Blathwayt, and other persons of quality, accompany his Majesty.
The prince and princess of Denmark intend shortly to go to Windsor, where, it is said, T.R.H. will continue the greatest part of the summer.
Mr. Godolphin, son to lord Godolphin, is to be made one of the tellers of the Exchequer.
Lord Cornwallis was married yesterday to lady Charlotte Butler, only daughter to the late earl of Arran in Ireland, who was uncle to the duke of Ormond.
I make no doubt but the king is by this time near the coast of Holland, the wind being very fair. His Majesty has made lord Berkeley one of the lords justices of Ireland. The other two are the duke of Bolton and lord Galway. [P.S.] The earl of Stamford and lord Lexington are made commissioners of the Council of Trade in the room of the earls of Bridgewater and Tankerville. Mr. Prendergast is made a baronet. [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 287–288.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to the same]. Humphry Hethrington, esq., is made one of the justices of the King's Bench in Ireland, in the room of Mr. Justice Lyndon. Endorsed R. 16th, 1699. [Ibid. ff. 289–290.]
Ja. Vernon to the Admiralty. The enclosed memorandum on behalf of Walter Harris, formerly a surgeon in the navy, having been laid before his Majesty at the request of one of the Secretaries of Scotland, he commands me to send it to you for consideration, and would have Harris restored to a capacity of returning to his Majesty's service.
Enclosure. Walter Harris, having served as surgeon in H.M. navy from 1688 to 1695, had the misfortune to be engaged in a quarrel with capt. Graydon of the Vanguard, then his commander. Harris being very ill wounded, the prosecution of him was neglected for some months; but a warrant was issued from the Admiralty Board, and Harris, being unwilling to stand the test of a trial, had kept out of their way since 1695. About twelve months ago, capt. Graydon, being willing to pass from the prosecution, signified the same to the Navy Board. But Harris fears that at some time the warrant may be executed. He prays a pardon. [S.P. 44. 204. pp. 230–1.]
The same to the same. His Majesty directs you to consider the case of Mr. Dummer, and report whether he may not be left to the law, as he has desired, presuming that he can clear himself of the corruptions laid to his charge: and, in case he be allowed to undergo a judicial trial, whether it will be inconvenient if he be permitted to proceed in the execution of his office of surveyor of the navy, and that his suspension cease till there be a determination of this cause in the ordinary course of justice. [Ibid. p. 232.]
June 2.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. You will have conversed by now with the duke of Bolton, and will see that we, together with the lord chancellor, decided what matters the duke should bring to the king's notice, and in what way: for this reason I always thought that the chancellor ought not to go, merely from the point of view of the public service.
I very much hope that the king took this opportunity of rewarding the archbishop by giving him £1000. However short a time the commission may last he will have to bear the expense.
We and the revenue commissioners are anxious to help Mr. Fisher, but his business cannot be concluded without an agent. As you know the papers do not leave the offices unless the fees are paid, and Mr. Fisher's are stopped here at the secretariat. I will do what I can to get them out, but I cannot follow them. If lord Portland drew the attention of Mr. Vanhomric to the case perhaps he would take more trouble.
You know now that the Cork ship left as soon as we heard of her.
I have received the king's orders from Mr. Blathwait in favour of Mr. Waller, and I will execute them on the first opportunity. As regards Mr. Harrison I will do all I can for him.
[P.S.] When the Act of Parliament against foreigners appeared we deprived all those who had the misfortune to be foreigners of their command, and amongst them Mr. de la Faucille, who had the king's orders to command at Sligo. He is an old and excellent infantry officer, who is useful in that post. He has a pension from the king to take the place of pay. It will be for the good of the service if we can restore him to this command without contravening the Act; for lord Blany, who is the governor of the place, will never go there. (fn. 1) I beg you to let us have your opinion on this point in a letter to the lords justices. 3½ pp. French. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 124—125.]
June 2. Post warrant to Mr. Michael Tuly, to Chester. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 160.]
June 2.
Dublin.
E[dward] Harrison to James Vernon. Mr. Palmer shewed me part of your letter. Truly I would do anything to comply with a person of your worth and sincerity, and already have done more than I designed, to have the honour to be allied to your family. 'Tis true he is my eldest son, and I have done my part in his education, and would do anything for his settlement in so virtuous and honorable a family; but I dare not exceed the bounds I have set down, least I should be very much straitened: besides, if I settle all, I shall soon be despised, though I think my son good natured enough. I have more confidence in yourself than in any young people. I am very uneasy of this town, and hope to be soon at liberty to go home by your despatch. 2¼ pp. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 126–127.]
June 3.
Dublin.
W. Palmer to [James Vernon]. Mr. Harrison seems very tenacious and says he will write to you tonight. In the schedule of the lands there is a mistake: it was in the lands in Armagh: enclosed is the list of the lands as they should be. The young couple will excuse I hope this little delay.
[P.S.] Our new commissioners to enquire into the forfeitures are arrived. 2 pp.
County Armagh. The manor of Corbrackagg, in the barony of O'Neil, and containing the town lands following: Upper Edenderry, Lower Edenderry, Levaghery, Ballinagowen, Derryan- weele, Corbrackagg, Killykillmaine, Knocknamuckley, Ballyvicranill, Meaghan, Baltilome, with other towns that are freeholds, paying chief rents, and doing suit and service to the said court. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 128–130.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of capt. Thomas Gardner, late commander of H.M.S. Eagle; setting forth that he has served the Crown above 32 years at sea, 22 of them in commission, and was in command all the late war, and some years captain in admiral Rook's ship: that he behaved faithfully as certified by the late lord Berkely, Sir Geo. Rook, Sir Cloudesly Shovell, Sir David Mitchell and others: that upon offering his service lately to the Admiralty, upon fitting out 30 ships of war, they rejected him, with the imputation of being disaffected: he would fain have discovered his accusers and have confronted them before their lordships, but could never obtain a hearing. He prays to be restored to his right in his Majesty's service. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 350.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Sanson. Understanding that the commissioners of the Customs are considering officers to be employed in the north for preventing the exportation of wool by way of Scotland, I desire you will give the bearer, Mr. Crocker, a hearing; that he may inform you what pains he has taken in discovering the ill practices in the north; and I suppose you will recommend him. I don't know him otherwise than that he has sent me several letters concerning these abuses. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 36.]
The same to Dr. Clerke. I received yours of 29th ult., with Thomas's seditious news paper. I had one sent me before from Reading, and have had Thomas before me. He makes a very trivial excuse, and promises amendment. If one would have prosecuted him, the papers should have been marked, to prove they were delivered from the post office. If he does not take warning, his punishment is only deferred. [Ibid. p. 37.]
June 5.
The Hague.
Commission to John Newton, esq., to be captain of that company whereof Christopher Codrington, esq., was late captain in the first regiment of foot guards. [S.P. 44. 168. p. 235.]
Pass to Cornelius Smith, soldier, late of capt. Young's troop of the royal regiment of dragoons commanded by lord Raby. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of the 9th and 12th inst. I am sorry you have so little enjoyed your health in those parts. I hope you will find your own country agree better with you.
Since so little remained to be done with Monsr. Lilierode after his Majesty's arrival, I hope all is now over. I suppose the greatest difficulty will be about the Holstein garanty in our particular treaty, which the king did not think reasonable; and, if Monsr. Lilierode has orders to insist upon it, that may take up time.
We are very quiet here. I hear of no news but lord Cornwallis' marriage with lady Arran's daughter, which was this day celebrated. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 293.]
June 6.
South Wales.
Sir Charles Kimeys [Kemys] to the same. Since I was so unfortunate, by the death of my wife, to lose the opportunity of thanking lord Portland for the favours he did me in Holland (though lord Wharton promised me to do so), I desire to add this one favour more before you leave Holland, as to return my most hearty thanks to lord Portland, and to assure him, if it ever lies in my power to serve him in England (being at this time excluded out of sitting this last sessions in parliament by a senseless petition that was put in too late to be heard), I shall remember the favour he has done me. Endorsed, R. June 26th, 99. [Ibid. ff. 291–292.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the lords justices of Ireland, acknowledging receipt of their letters of 23, 25 and 26 ult. "I have by this night's post laid before the king what you wrote concerning several officers for whom commissions are desired: as soon as I receive his Majesty's directions the commissions shall be despatched." [S.P. 67. 2. p. 197.]
June 6.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I am very vexed that the king has not thought fit to give anything to the archbishop: I shall get out of it as best I can.
We shall take care to prevent any more ships being fitted out at Cork for the service of the Scots. We know the contractors and will keep an eye on them.
I am much obliged to you personally for writing to the Treasury in the king's name for the gratuity which the king allows us: it will partially make up for the falling off in salary.
I fear the new commission for the government of this country may change the duke of Bolton's resolutions: I say nothing on that point and preserve a discreet silence. Endorsed, R. 12. 99. 2 pp. French. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 131–132.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. John la Case, Anthony Moutet, Peter la Forest, Anthony Lartigue and John Jacob, poor French protestants lately disbanded in Ireland, are to have free passages to Holland. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 37.]
June 6.
The Hague.
Pass to Peter Smith, soldier, of col. Lesley's regiment, taken prisoner by the French at Dyxmuyde, lately escaped. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. In consideration of some services done by captain James Waller, deputy governor of Kinsale, the king has given him a pension of £200 p. ann.; to be paid out of the revenue of Ireland. Accordingly he is to be placed on the establishment of that kingdom. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 38.]
The same to the same. It was thought necessary during the war that a riding surveyor should be established on the coast near Harwich, who was particularly to have an eye upon the passengers who came or went that way. It has been suggested that the officer should be continued, but removed to Rochester, to observe those who pass that road and to hold a correspondence with the agent of the packet boats at Dover. Mr. John Stewart, lately employed under the commissioners for sick and wounded, is proposed for the post, and you are to direct the commissioners of Customs to appoint Mr. Stewart riding surveyor at Rochester, with the same allowance that was given to Mr. Macky at Harwich. [Ibid. p. 40.]
Ja. Vernon to the Treasury. Mr. Robinson, resident in the court of Sweden, has drawn on Mr. Lowndes for £1250, which he had directions to lay out for particular service. [Ibid.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the Admiralty. The French ambassador intends to go to Holland to wait on his Majesty, and desires a yacht. [S.P. 44. 100. p. 311.]
June 9.
Dublin.
W. Palmer to James Vernon. I have discoursed [with] Mr. Harrison about adding to the £300 p. ann. Whatever he writes, I desire you would not give way.
The lords justices having recommended Dr. Pr. Browne to be provost of our college, I beg you, if the letter passes your office, to give him what forwarding you can; or if in the other office to speak to Mr. Yard.
This packet, it seems, has brought over a copy of our new establishment; wherein it is said that the allowance for the commissioners of appeals is left out. If so, I admire at it; it being a right due to the subject by our great Magna Charta here, and the Act of Excise, and can be done only in prejudice to us, who are the present commissioners, to make way hereafter for some others. When it comes over (if it be so) we shall be forced to apply to the king, and desire your favour in it. It cost me as good as £300. If you should happen to see Mr. Lownes it would be of service to us to ask him if it be so that it is left out, and to give him the reason why it ought not.
I am attacked every way; these commissioners of forfeitures reporting strange things, that the grants are to be reassumed without regard to purchasers. It will be a barbarous case and will undo half the protestants here, amongst the rest myself; but we hope other things from an English parliament; and, though we expect to have three years' value laid on them, part surely will be on the grantee and part on the purchaser. Excuse the trouble of this, it being a matter which so nearly concerns me. 2 pp. Seal. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 133–4.]
June 9.
Dublin.
E[dward] Harrison to the same. I don't doubt, honoured sir, but you are very sensible that, through the great desire I have to enter into an alliance with you, I have already settled more upon my son, as to present maintenance and the lady's jointure, than either England or Ireland usually allows for such a fortune; and I am bound by the laws of nature to remember the rest of my family: but, if God spares my life and I receive any favour by your interest, I will enlarge my son's allowance; for I desire their living plentifully as much as you.
I am now going into the country, but, whenever you are pleased to consummate this affair, I will return to Dublin and very gladly finish matters: and, as I have not pressed on you to enlarge your daughter's fortune, so I hope you will not think it reasonable for me to trust to my son's generosity in my old age. 2 pp. Seal. [Ibid. ff. 135–6.]
June 10.
Dublin.
Jo. Methuen to Secretary Vernon. You certainly make a right judgment of the poor lord Trimbleston. Lord Galway is of the same opinion with me, but neither of us think you should concern yourself so as to bring the least suspicion on yourself. You will easily believe I am very desirous to come over, and indeed the king's business did require it, as likewise my own vindication as I was informed; but I could not be spared without great inconvenience, and the duke of Bolton would have been very uneasy. So far as I can judge I may be at London by the king's return, when I shall be able to lay the state of all things here more particularly before him in order to several resolutions necessary to be taken. What appears most certain in mine [sic] of the changes now made in England is that his Majesty's affairs are much embarrassed. I would it would appear as certain they would be made better by these alterations.
For what concerns Ireland, whoever is in the government shall have all the assistance I can give. For the order in the bishop of Derry's case I do the utmost to prevent any inconvenience, and hope some expedient may be found: which I shall endeavour here in hopes it is not unreasonable to desire that it may be done at London, the king's service being so much concerned. Before anything shall be done that may put it past remedy, I try every expedient; although it should be to engage myself to settle £50 p. ann. on the see of Derry. The bishop is in town, and all his friends whom I can engage are trying what they can do.
Our new commissioners are come; and I find, what I believed, that they will carry the execution of their commission very high; and endeavour, in their reports, not only to make the grants more considerable in value, thereby to engage the House to proceed in that matter, but also to insert in their report such things, not directly within the direction of the clause, as may furnish ample matter for reflection on the king's ministers who have served him both in England and Ireland. I do not believe we that [are] here at present are much concerned, and it may be myself least of all; but I shall endeavour to prevent the malice of several of the commissioners and the great heat of all of them, or at least the effect of it.
They were with my lords justices to desire, first, rooms to execute their commission in; and, afterwards, to desire in particular several rooms belonging to the Parliament House. At last, lord Drogheda coming in person, I advised my lords justices to sign an order to Mr. Robinson, the House keeper, that, application being made by lord Drogheda in his own name and the name of the rest of the commissioners to have some rooms at Chichester House, etc., Mr. Robinson should suffer lord Drogheda, etc., to use for that purpose such rooms at Chichester House as they should choose. Whereupon they chose to sit in the House of Lords; since when lord Drogheda has had some disgust at the rest: so that, not being resolved to act, he would not take the oaths at the King's Bench with the rest. But this morning he came to Chichester House, and took the oaths from one of the commissioners, but would not go to the King's Bench to be sworn, being not entirely resolved.
There is great probability of great difference among the commissioners themselves, and no great disposition of people to come in and be examined. I am informed they have sent this night to summons Mr. Thomas Brodrick, for fear he should go to England.
My son seems to have a difficult province at the court of Portugal, which makes me advise him the best I can: but, not knowing well his Majesty's thoughts, it is with some fear, which I should be free from if I thought you had sent him any directions from the king.
Although I have not now a right to trouble you with our affairs, yet I hope you will allow me sometimes the liberty; and let me know anything that may particularly concern us here. So far as a stranger can guess, you are like to be this summer more free from business than you have been for several years.
The provost is dead: and, my lord Galway resolving to recommend one Mr. Brown, I can't press for Mr. Burrige. I could not change lord Galway's mind; altho' I am very well satisfied he would be much better pleased with Mr. Burrige, and that a good man, well affected, is very necessary in that post. 3 pp. [Endorsed.] Copy of a letter from Mr. Methuen, lord chancellor of Ireland. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 137–8.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of the 16th and 19th. Since Monsr. Lilierode makes no greater advance, but his new orders contain the same or worse conditions, I have little hopes of seeing this treaty concluded. It is almost impossible we should come up to their price, and they have another bidder ready.
Mr. Smith took his oath to-day as Chancellor of the Exchequer.
I hear lady Mazarin is so ill that it is not expected she will hold out much longer. [S.P. 32. 15. f. 356.]
The same to postmasters general. Peter de Poisdebon, Peter Montaigu, Isaac Guillaume, Francis Ouvris, John Pauret, and David Roux are poor French protestants who have been disbanded in Ireland. You will give them a free passage to Holland. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 39.]
June 15.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I thank you with all my heart for your good offices in the matter of the £3000.
I am very pleased with the choice of lord Barkly; I admit that the news of another lord justice caused me great apprehension until I heard his name.
I greatly regret that I cannot hope to see the duke so soon: I have always got on perfectly with him. He has a sound judgment in matters of business, and that is not at all common; you can form a better opinion of that than I can, from his report to the king on affairs here. I am relieved to know that you approve my advice to the lord chancellor not to go to England. Had he gone I am certain that dangerous consequences would have resulted.
If the king wishes to put col. Hussey's pension under the name of capt. Waller, well and good. I admit that it grieves me to see protestants deprived of government and other posts, in order to reduce expenses, and to see papists put upon the pension list. The former have suffered in the king's service; the latter have done him disservice. I shall never oppose the king's wishes, but I know well that this is not in his interest, for the affection of those who love him must be cherished: the papists will never love him.
I am returning the letter you sent us: we cannot discover who wrote it. (fn. 2) D: Finglass will tell you more about it than we can. I know that it does not come from any of Lloid's friends. Few have seen it, and it will not be talked of here.
Capt. Harrison asked me to get his son a vacant company in the regiment lately given to col. Harvy; but I could not carry out my promise to you on this occasion, as the duchess of Bolton had asked me to recommend her brother, capt. Croft. (fn. 3) We wrote in his favour, and sent the letter to the duke.
I am glad to hear that he is occupying himself with the case of the Society against the bishop of Derry. He will succeed if anyone can; and it would be well for this country if he can; but this should have been done two years ago. Endorsed, R. 19–99. 3 pp. French. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 139–140.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the lords justices of Ireland. I have your letter of the 6th inst., recommending Mr. Peter Browne to succeed Dr. George Browne, deceased, in the provostship of the college of Dublin. I have sent it to Holland to receive his Majesty's pleasure. [S.P. 67. 2. p. 198.]
June 15–25.
Loo.
Warrant to the lords justices of Ireland, to grant the dignity of a baronet, of the kingdom of Ireland, to Thomas Prendergast of Gortinsygory, co. Galway, esq. [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 202–3.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. John Dupont, Michael Mariette, Peter Cavalier, Peter Gaches, John Bellié, James Dumas, Lewis Suel, Stephen Fournier, Stephen Viviers and Anthony Ferrier, poor French protestants disbanded in Ireland, are to have a free passage to Holland. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 40.]
June 15. Grant of the next almsman's place in Rochester cathedral to James Downing: in St. Peter's, Westminster, to James Gray: and in Worcester cathedral to Richard Meredith. [S.O. 5. 31. f. 59 and f. 59. v.]
June 15.
The Hague.
Pass to Donald McMillan and Alexander Tenant, of lt.-col. Murray's company in col. Colyear's regiment, in the States' service. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 23.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. The Dutch mail is not yet arrived, but I am to acknowledge the receipt of four tomes of the treaty of Ryswick.
We have no news here. The French ambassador goes tomorrow for Holland, in the Catherine yacht; and lord Portland talks of going about Monday. Mr. Conway Seymour, who was in a fair way of recovery, lies now dying, having contracted a fever by indulging himself too soon the eating of fruit and the drinking of iced wine.
The provost of Dublin college being lately dead, the lords justices have recommended Dr. Browne to succeed him. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 294.]
June 16.
The Hague.
Pass to Alexander Sparke, of capt. Hacket's company in col. Colyear's regiment, commanded at present by lt.-col. Murray. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 24.]
June 17.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I received your letter of the 10th inst. yesterday.
Monr. de la faucille has not been naturalised. The question is whether the command of a fortified town is included in the Act of Parliament in the same way as regimental officers. We were well aware that we must not expose ourselves to any criticism: that is why we deprived him of his command in the first instance. If you think he is included in the Act, or that he may be, we will leave things as they are: otherwise it would be to the public interest to keep a man in this fortress who is capable of commanding there.
We have two foreigners in the artillery who have not been naturalised, a Swede and a Frenchman. We suspended them too at first, but we replaced them after the letter which Mr. Pulteney wrote to me, of which I enclose a copy. I should be glad to to have your opinion on that point too: I should wish to avoid exposing ourselves to parliamentary enquiries.
I think Dr. Finglas's information [les avis de Dr. Finglas] rests on very slight foundation: I hope so. We cannot test the matter or do anything further if he does not think fit to communicate it to us.
Are you aware that the king refused to give to Mr. Abot the reversion of Mr. Muschamp's post, saying that he would not grant the reversion to any post to anybody; but that he promised verbally that he would give it to him when Mr. Muschamp had vacated it ? I think Mr. Abot is so well provided for now that he will think no more of it. But I don't know if the king will grant a reversion. I shall never advise the king to grant this post by reversion or otherwise except on condition that the person appointed discharge the duties himself; and in my opinion it is important to choose a man who is fit for the post, which it is not easy to do. He has to do all the army accounts, which are very intricate and difficult. I do not know whether capt. Harrison has had any experience of such business. I think he is a man who can do anything which he undertakes. The salary is £500, and £200 has to be spent on clerks if things are to be done well and the office well kept. There are fees, it is true, and other perquisites of which I do not know the details; but the legitimate perquisites cannot be large.
Please write to me frankly as to anything you desire, and I am sure you will wish me to do the same. I hope you will think the matter over; and, if you still entertain the idea of asking for this reversion, I will join you in so doing, in the certainty that I should be doing right. 4 pp. French.
[The enclosure above referred to, being a copy of a letter from J. Pulteney to the Earl of Galway, dated St. James's, April 4, 1699.] Yesterday I had your letter of 28th ult. When the late Act of Parliament for disbanding the forces in England and Ireland was depending in the House of Commons our train of artillery was regimental (that is, it consisted of 4 companies of gunners, being 30 in a company, besides officers): being constituted under that form, we apprehended it to be within the direct letter of the law, and would be disbanded by it. Whereupon lord Romney, by the king's order, broke that regimental corps, and immediately after granted new warrants to those very persons; whereby they are continued in the service of the ordnance, and enjoy their respective employments, not as a regimental body, but agreeable to the ancient constitution of the ordnance. This being done we conceived that no part of that Disbanding Act did extend to or affect the office of the ordnance.
We are not looked upon as any part of the 7000 men to be kept up in England. We have a distinct provision made for us by the House of Commons; and therefore, being neither within the words and meaning of that Act, there are several foreigners not naturalised now in the service of the office of ordnance: and one has been put in, even since the passing of that Act.
This I hope will sufficiently answer your question. 1½ pp. (Endorsed in Vernon's hand.) Ea. of Gallway, 17 June, 99. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 141–144.]
June 17.
The Hague.
Pass to Henry Duncan and George Roe, soldiers, of capt. de Laet's company in col. Colyear's regiment in the States' service commanded by It.-col. Murray. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 24.]
June 18.
The Hague.
Passes to Jane Sieba, with her child, wife of Peter Seba in the duke of Wurtemberg's regiment of foot now in States' service. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 24]: to Mary Winter, wife of John George Winter, soldier in the duke of Würtemberg's regiment of foot guards with her children: to Donald Ross and John Henry in col. Collier's regiment in the States' General service in Holland. [Ibid.]
June 19.
Topsham.
John Crosse to the lord chancellor. Last night I was informed by a friend that he saw Sir John Werden at a little private house in Topsham with two strange men; the people saying that one of them was a lord, the other a knight. They kept themselves close and gave order that no one should discover their being there. The person at whose house they were is an acquaintance of Mr. Osborne, who was a justice for this county of Devon.
Some small vessels since three weeks are come from France, but I do not know of any person of quality come in them. If you think fit to command me direct to me 'landwaiter in Topsham.' [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 295–296.]
June 20.
Dieren.
Warrant for a privy seal to pay an annuity of £1000 to Charles, earl of Arran, one of the gentlemen of the bedchamber. [S.O. 8. 27. No. 45, A.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
The lords justices approve of Tho. Mace, to be town clerk of the city of York, on the resignation of William Kitchingman. [S.P. 44. 347. pp. 501–2.]
Warrant of the lords justices for the incorporation of the wardens, stewards, assistants and fellowship of clothiers and weavers within the borough of Wilton, co. Wilts, and within four miles of the same (excepting the liberties, privileges and immunities granted to the weavers within the city of New Sarum) for better government of the clothing trade in those parts, with the powers [etc.] contained in the schedule of heads annexed, the persons therein named to be inserted in the manner proposed.
The schedule [above referred to] of heads to be inserted in the charter. [Ibid. pp. 502–6.: S.O. 3. 20. f. 178.]
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of the 23rd and 25th inst., N.S. I see the treaty has ended as you expected, and that Monsr. Lilierode's next commission is for France, as you have long foreseen. I suppose he will make himself there more intelligible. I don't wonder at his desire to keep the treaty still open, since it may help to better their conditions in France, and, if we consent to it, I hope it shall be upon considerations of our own.
I am in doubt whether this letter will find you in Holland: however I would not omit wishing you a prosperous voyage. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 297.]
R. Yard to the same. Mr. Duncomb's trial for false endorsing exchequer bills came on last Saturday in the court of King's Bench. Warwick Lake, esq., knight of the shire for Middlesex, was foreman of the jury, and, upon hearing the evidence on both sides, they brought him in not guilty.
The estate of Mr. Conway Seymour comes to a younger brother of his, of about 16 or 17 years old, now at Oxford. The coroners have found it wilful murder.
The French ambassador went away on Saturday last to wait upon the king in Holland, and lord Portland embarked yesterday at Greenwich. Endorsed, R. July 5, 99. [Ibid. ff. 298–299.]
J. Ellis to the same. After many hopes and fears Mr. Conway Seymer died on Sunday morning, rather of his irregularities, as is said, than of his wounds: yet the coroner's inquest has found it murder, and capt. Kirke must expect a smart prosecution. He is, it is said, gone into Holland.
The earl of Portland embarked this morning, and, it is given out, will not stay above two months in Holland, and that then he intends to return.
The earl of Manchester has lost his only son, a young child. Endorsed, R. July 5, 99. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 357–358.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. David Casaubon, Timothy Lafite, William Jalabert, James Casous, Anthony Charlot, Nicholas Bonenuit, Peter Petit, James Rottier, Francis la Rose, and Jacob Poque, are poor French protestants, disbanded in Ireland. They are to have a free passage to Holland. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 41.]
June 20.
Dieren.
Royal warrant to the lords of the Treasury of Scotland: adding John, lord Carmichael, Secretary of State, to their number. [S.P. 57. 17. pp. 227–8.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the duke of Bolton. I have enquired whether the lords lieutenants of counties were obliged to take their oaths before the privy council, and the clerks have drawn up the state of it, which is enclosed. We likewise consulted Mr. Solicitor this evening, who is of opinion that an alteration in the statute of 13 & 14 Charles II was introduced by the Act, 1 W. & M., that establishes new oaths instead of the old ones, and directs their being taken in the Chancery, King's Bench or Quarter Sessions, so that those who take the oaths in those places need not do it again at the Council Table.
Lord Stamford told me he had not taken the oaths for his lieutenancy at the Council Table, and thought himself under no obligation to do it.
[Enclosure.] By the Act, 13 & 14 Charles II, no peer shall be capable of acting as lieutenant or deputy lieutenant, unless he shall have first, before six of the privy council, taken the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, and this oath: "1, A.B., do declare and believe that it is not lawful on any pretence whatsoever, etc."; which oath is taken off by the Act, 1 W. & M. cap. 6; and the oaths required and intended to be taken by this last Act are: "I, A.B., do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to their Majesties King William and Queen Mary." "I, A.B., do swear that I do from my heart abhor, detest and abjure as impious and heretical," etc. Which oaths are administered in Chancery, King's Bench, and Quarter Sessions by an Act, 1 W. & M.
In the year 1689, and sometime afterwards, the greatest part of the lords lieutenants were sworn at Council. The last was the duke of Newcastle, 17 Feb. 1694.
March, 1695, North Wales, earl of Macclesfield: April, 1696, Devonshire, earl of Radnor: Cornwall, earl of Stamford: May, 1697, Oxford, lord Wharton: June, 1698, Suffolk, lord Cornwallis, passed their patents.
It does not appear that their lordships have been sworn at the Council. [S.P. 44. 101. pp. 41–2.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Ja. Houblon. I called at your house yesterday to acquaint you with an account I have from Portugal that the judge conservator had given great disgust to the factory there, who are so desirous to be rid of him that, if he can't be otherwise removed, they would rather have none. But the lords justices think it a point that ought well to be considered, and would know whether the merchants, residing here and trading to Portugal, concur. I send you copies of the envoy's letter and the merchants' representation. [Ibid. p. 44.]
Warrants for a privy seal for the restitution of the temporalities and discharge of the first fruits of the bishopric of Worcester to the Right Rev. Dr. William Lloyd, now bishop of that see, from the death of the late bishop. [S.P. 44. 151. p. 29: S.O. 8. 27. Nos. 44 and 45.]
June 22. Warrant to apprehend three persons [not named] at Topsham in Devon for suspicion of treason. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 104.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I must not omit writing to you till I hear you are embarked, though at present there is nothing to trouble you with.
The Duchess of Mazaren died yesterday after a long, lingering distemper, which ended in a lethargy.
The lords justices have ordered capt. Kerk and Mr. Cage to be suspended, who were the persons who begun and finished the quarrel with Mr. Seymour. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 10. f. 302.]
J. Ellis to the same. The duchess of Mazzarin died yesterday morning, without any manner of concern for what was past or what was to come, and has left the earls of Feversham and Mountague her executors. It was believed she had nothing to leave besides her monkies, parrots, and Mustapha, a Mahometan boy; but now it is reported she has bequeathed to somebody a title she had to 100m. crowns somewhere in France.
Sir Josiah Child, the general of the old East India Company, being dead, the stock of the new is risen. Endorsed, R. July 7, 99. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 359–360.]
June 23.
Treasury Chambers.
Wm. Lowndes to the auditor of the receipt, giving directions as to the payment of the marriage portions of lady Berkley and Mrs. May. (Treas. Cal., XIV, 396.) [S.P. 32. 11. ff. 300–301.]
June 23. Grant of an almsman's place in Carlisle cathedral to Thomas Creton. [S.O. 5. 31. f. 59, v.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Lord Jersey to the lords justices of Ireland. His Majesty has approved of Mr. Peter Brown, to succeed Dr. George Brown in the provostship of the college at Dublin. [S.P. 67. 2. p. 221.]
June 27.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to Mr. Vernon. I always understood that the return of the duke of Bolton to this country was most uncertain. His presence would be a great help to us, but at the same time he will be of much assistance in England for the transaction of our business, and it is very good for us that he is in the commission.
Lord Berkeley asks me to send him the yacht to Bristol. She was at Chester for a refit, but has just arrived here.
I am very glad to hear that the archbishop of Canterbury is favourably disposed to Dr. Brown for the post of provost of the college. I am sure his Majesty should choose him. French. 1½ pp. Endorsed, R. 3d. July. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 145–146.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to postmasters general. Enclosed is a list of some more French protestants, disbanded in Ireland. They are to have a free passage to Holland.
Peter Delon, Peter Maleges, Peter Souris, Peter Colmet, John Granier, Josué Roulland, Paul Bertin, Daniel Argencourt, Isaac Brunier, Anthony Brunier, Anthony Perier, Ja. Rou, Isa. Rouviere, John Vanderrite, John la Fortune, Thomas Brian, Anthony Laborie, James Dumas, Peter Sauset. [S.P. 44. 101. p. 43.]
June 29.
Dublin.
E[dward] Harrison to James Vernon. I would have answered yours of the 10th inst. sooner, had it not been term time. Sir Richard Levings and Mr. Palmer were so busy that (though I stayed in town all this time) I could make little progress. The queries from Mr. Foulks we have shewed to Sir Richard. I am now levying a fine, with a dedimus to London for my son's joining. I assure you the rent roll is not diminished (though my son tells me it was doubted).
As soon as this fine is levied and the dedimus sent over, I will go home and attend your further commands. Had you known me fully and doubted me no more than I do you, the young people had consummated before this time. But, sir, your time is mine.
I have several times waited on lord Galway, who speaks very kindly, but not a word of particulars. I told my son that I acquainted him with the death of a captain of horse, but my lord answered that that could not be done: so that in short (with submission I tell you) there will be no dependance on the government on this side of the water: for they have more pretenders than places, and an apology to you is easily framed.
Sir, I beg pardon for this, but I'me very sure, if you design any favours for my son or myself in this country, your interest must confirm it in England; otherwise little good is expected at our court. 2 pp. Seal. [S.P. 63. 360. ff. 147–148.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to lord ambassador Williamson. I have your letters of 2nd and 5th June, which have been laid before his Majesty, who I hope will be very soon at The Hague, and acquaint you himself what his intentions are as to the garanty for Holstein being repeated in the separate treaty between England and Sweden, which his Majesty sees no necessity for, nor does he understand the reason why it is pressed. Since Monsr. Lilierode seems to put on a more yielding temper, I suppose he will not insist on needless difficulties.
Monsr. Leyoncrona has communicated to me this evening what he says he has had orders for, viz.: that Denmark, Wolfenbuttle and Munster have entered into close measures with France, the first that he may be supported in oppressing the duke of Holstein, and the other two that they may be enabled to oppose the 9th electorate; to which end he says the duke of Wolfenbuttle would receive French troops into some of his towns, upon pretence that he can't otherwise secure himself against some of his neighbours. The use I made of it was that, since the danger threatened so immediately on the side of Holstein, why would they delay giving the securities required against dangers yet more remote on the side of Flanders ? [S.P. 32. 11. f. 302.]
June 30.
Turin.
Victor Amadeus II, duke of Savoy, to the intendant-général at Nice, setting out that the English and Dutch nations had requested the duke to grant certain exemptions, to facilitate trade through Nice and Villefranche. The duke has ordered a commercial treaty to be arranged with the English and Dutch: in the meantime he wishes them to enjoy exemption from dues of the port of Villefranche. Copy. French. [Ibid. ff. 303–304.]
June. Docquet of the appointment of Charles, duke of Bolton; Charles, earl of Berkeley; and Henry, earl of Galway; as lords justices of Ireland. [S.O. 3. 20. f. 179, v.]
Note for the dividend. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 305.]

Footnotes

  • 1. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1693, p. 69.
  • 2. Dated May 13, v. sup.
  • 3. Charles, 2nd duke of Bolton, married "3rdly, 1697, before 15th Oct., probably in Dublin, Henrietta Crofts, one of the illegitimate children of James (Scott), duke of Monmouth (some time James Crofts)." The Complete Peerage, II, 212.