BHO

Index: C

Pages 595-614

Calendar of State Papers, Ireland, 1608-1610. Originally published by Longman and Co, London, 1874.

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Citation:

C.

Caddell Woogan, 332.

Cade, a mariner, arrested by Sir R. Monson, 398.

Cadiz, William Duffe, learns intelligence at, of Spanish preparations, 393.

, another report from, 398.

Cæsar, Sir Julius, commissioner for plantation of Londonderry, 136.

Cahir Castle, 379.

Cahir-na-Mart 325.

Calais, 99.

Calebeg, see Killybegs.

Calefeelde, see Caulfield.

Calefeild, Sir Toby, 10.

Calefield, see Caulfeild.

Cales, see Cadiz.

Callan, 384.

Calthorpe, Sir Charles, 70, 73, 229, 231, 233.

, —, second justice of Common Pleas, his yearly fee, 339.

Calvert, Robert, 75, 369.

Cambrensis, Giraldus, remark of, as to Tuesday being a fortunate day for the English, 14.

, book of, sent to Salisbury by Sir J. Davys, 135.

Campheir, Sanders Fleming of, pirate, 843.

Canary islands, 232.

Canevoyre Wood, 1.

Canterbury, Archbishop of, Chichester recommends Mr. Barlowe to, to be Bishop of Ossory, 390.

, —, censures Bishop of Down, 457.

Cantier, see Cantire.

Cantire, in Scotland, opposite to the coast of Antrim, xiii.

, Lord of, Angus M'Connell, ib.

Cantwell, Thomas, 476.

, John, of Cantwell's Court, co. Kilkenny, 324.

Captaincies and seneschalships, no more to be granted, 119, 127.

Captains of foot, list of, Nov. 1608, 96.

— of boats and constables of castles in the north, to be undertakers in Ulster, 366.

Caragh, Brian, his country, xiii.

Carberry, 474.

, vicarage of, 578.

Card [Chart], to be made of each county in Ulster, 293.

Carekanassy, 282.

Carew, Lord, 323, 329, 384.

, —, warrants issued by, 447.

, —, issued warrant to Limerick, ib.

, —, which was resisted, ib.

, —, fined and imprisoned the mayor, ib.

, John, 325.

— Papers, account of Ulster from, viii.

Carie, William, 511.

Carless, Christopher, pensioner, 338.

Carleton, Mr. Secretary Dudley, 373.

, Dudley, 348.

Carlingford, 334, 497.

— Chichester goes to, to see troops embarked for Sweden, 300.

, Castle, constable of, Marmaduke Whitchurch, 509.

Carlisle, Bishop of, xcix.

— Castle, some of the Græmes break out of, xcvii.

, Lord, obtained living of Graystocke in commendam, 458.

Carlow county, 324.

— — and Wexford, King's commission for Bonaght and Gallowglass in, 118.

, manor of, granted on fee-farm to Earl of Thomond, 551.

, —, in exchange with the King for the abbey of Galbally, 552.

, dispute of Thomond and Sir A. Loftus regarding order in, 412.

, Harpole's treasons while constable of, 401.

Carmick, Nicholas, 341.

Carnan, Owen, sues for 800 acres of land in Cavan, his suit recommended, 441.

Carnew, in Shillelagh, a ward placed at, 95,

, constable of, Richard Mitten, 508.

Carolan, Patrick, 380, 382.

, Shane Grane, 385, 386, and see Shane Grane O'Halloran, 385, 387.

, —, chief of the Carolans, 386.

, —, lies ill at his house, 387.

, —, a horseman in Sir G. Moore's troop, 387.

, —, sent for examination to Sir James Ley, 386.

, —, released by him, ib.

— —, a spirited fellow, ib.

, —, performed good service to the Crown, ib.

Carolans, the, 384, 385, 386.

, complaint of Lord Howth against, 275.

, Sir G. Moore "ordered to forbear them," but does not forbear, ib.

, are now both horse and foot, 276.

, the Deputy to be ordered to withdraw his favour from, ib.

, Lord Howth complains of the favour shown them by Chichester, ib.

, Chichester charged with protecting, 386.

, explanation regarding, ib.

, cessing soldiers on the country, 385.

, horses given to, by Howth, to take Sir Garret Moore's life, 387.

, warrant for prosecution of, demanded by Howth, 385.

Carpenter, supervisor at Youghal, 53.

, John, to be chief remembrancer in reversion to R. Hopper, 174.

, —, clerkship of Crown, &c., for Munster, grant of reversion of, 431.

, —, patent of, for reversion of some preferment in Ireland to be renewed, 518.

Carrickfergus, 65, 74, 75, 89, 96.

, troops to be conveyed to, 11.

, Chichester returns by, 28.

, troops at, 40.

, —, establishment for, approved, 47.

— Palace, repairs of, 80.

, no timber or wood nearer than Belfast, 89.

, there is nothing but stubbed oak near Carrickfergus, ib.

, Governor of, Sir Arthur Chichester, 507.

, ward of, ib.

— Castle, constable of, Capt. Faithful Fortescue, 508.

— Palace, constable of, John Dalway, ib.

, Chichester desires to be independent of Ulster Presidency, xxii.

, —, and government of Ulster, xxiii.

, Cecil desired to keep government of Ulster in his own immediate direction, ib.

Carrick (on Suir), 99, 121, 352.

Carrick, Teige ne, pensioner, 338.

Carrigefoyle, castle of, 388.

, —, petition of John O'Connor to be restored to, 455.

, —, is in custody of Sir Francis Barkeley, 455.

Carrigleamleary, 340.

, Lord Roch complains of Sir Dominick Sarsfield, chief justice of Munster, preventing him in the purchase of, 340.

, Sir Dominick Sarsfield states the defects of Lord Roche's title, 341.

Carroll, James, recommended as mustermaster general, 162.

, —, vice-treasurer, claim upon, for 200l. remaining in his hands, of the traitor Tyrone, 301.

, —, Chichester's statement regarding it, 301, 302.

, Sir James, 367.

, John, pensioner, 336.

, Thomas, 341.

Cartan, Patrick, 541.

Carter, William, 550.

, —, master of the "Sea Flower," 287.

Carter's, suspicious proceedings of, 151.

Carthage, 501.

, activity of the Londoners likened to Virgil's description of the building by Dido of her colony of Carthage, 501.

Carty, Dermot, 350.

, Dermond, 467.

, Owen M'Teig, co. Cork, 324.

Carvyle, John, his project of plantation upon 8,000 acres in Ireland, 323.

Cary, Sir George, 26, 198, 207, 508.

, John, 512.

Case of Countess Dowager of Kildare against Sir Robert Digby, 376.

Casey, John, 494.

Cashel, Archbishop of, 324.

, —, Kearney, Dr., 350.

, —, to be member of Council of Munster, xviii.

, —, King's letter regarding, 149.

, the old Archbishop of (Miles Magrath), dispute of, with the Bishop of Derry and Clogher, 288.

, Meiler Magrath, Archbishop of, urges Sir T. Ridgeway to get for him the bishoprics of Killaloe and Achonry, 353.

, —, they were promised him on his resigning Waterford and Lismore, ib.

, —, the King appoints W. Knight, an ancient master of arts, to be his coadjutor, 501.

, —, as well because of the Archbishop's great age, as that he is seldom resident at his see, ib.

, —, but dwells on his own temporal lands in Ulster, ib.

, —, W. Knight to succeed as archbishop when vacancy occurs, ib.

, diocese of, and Emly, 226.

, Emly, and Lismore, dioceses of, disordered, and commission of inquiry into their condition, 186.

, Catholic Archbishop of, 495.

Casie, James, 493.

Caslanlough, 465.

Cassie, James, 487.

Castell, Jo., 324.

Castie, Wm., pensioner, 338.

Castle Chamber, Court of, 74, 162, 210, and see Star Chamber, 382.

, —, paper lights and candlesticks for, 74.

, —, sentence of (draft) in case of Lord Kildare and Sir R. Digby, 141.

, —, decree of, ib.

, —, Archbishop Jones prays that the difference between him and Lord Howth may be heard in, 331.

Castle Connell, Theobald, Lord, 324.

— —, Bourke, Lord, 342.

Castle of Dublin, see Dublin Castle.

, record room to be prepared in, 154.

, tenure by knight's service as of, an unfit and hard condition for Ulster undertakers, 160.

Castlefinne, Sir Neale O'Donnell at, 37.

, meeting of Sir Neale Garve with O'Dogherty at, 308.

Castlefynn, 2.

Castlekarrow in Mayo, lands of, 185.

Castle Lough, 465.

Castlemaine Fort, constable of, Sir Thos. Roper, 508.

Castlenoe, Old Stone Bawn of, in Queen's County, lxxiii, lxxiv.

, —, grant of, to G. Harpoole, with the conditions of the Queen's County plantation, ib.

Castlepark, fortress of, 39.

, gunners at, 507.

, Haleboling, Galway, and Limerick, forts of, 374.

, fort of, assessment for repairs of, 409.

, —, Capt. Skipwith recommended as commander, ib.

, —, constable of, Capt. Henry Skipwith, 508.

Castlerahin, precinct of, 405.

Castleroe, constable kept at, to guard the fishery at, x.

Castlerooe, see Castleroe.

Castles, now in King's hands, commission to pass them to persons in England and Scotland willing to undertake them, 433.

, how far true that the Irish never built castles, xciv.

, undertakers to erect them, or stone houses, xcv.

Castleton, Delvin, vicar of, 376.

, Timothy, 550.

Castletown, in Cork, grant of, to David Roche, 517.

, in Wexford, 578.

, county, 494.

Castlre, 403.

Caston, Edmund, 550.

Casualties, receipts of, 578.

, officers of the, are to leave if they have not patents, 435.

Caswell, John, 511.

Catherlogh, 483.

, grant of, to Lord Thomond, 396.

, —, barred by Sir W. Harpole's lease, 396. See Carlow.

Caulfeild, Sir Toby, 97, 195, 364, 366, 472, 474, 510, 547.

, —, commanded in Armagh and Upper Tyrone, xxiii.

, —, his account of Tyrone's rents, xxvi.

, —, cows, rent charged upon, at a fixed rate per cow, xxvii.

, —, —, to be counted on a given day, ib.

, —, appointed receiver of Tyrone's rents after the flight, ib.

, —, renders a final account, ib.

, —, number of his men, 33.

— —, all around Dungannon in peace (A.D. 1609) through his discreet and temperate carriage as governor, 195.

, —, Sir Robert Jacob and his fellow justices relied on him, and were greatly governed by him, ib.

, —, Chichester would have him undertake Clancan, 364.

, —, to be an undertaker, 428.

, —, in a letter to Chichester informs him of the discontented minds of the people of Ulster, 474.

, —, on the divulging of the scheme of plantation by Sir Turlogh M'Henry, lately arrived from England; they say they will, many of them, have to become woodkerne of necessity, ib.

Caulfeild, Sir Toby—cont.

, —, for they will have no other means to live, ib.

, —, say they hope that so great cruelty will not be offered as to remove them from their houses in winter, ib.

, —, when they are to provide themselves by making up their harvest, ib.

, —, complain of the injustice after they had been pardoned, and promised by the King protection for goods and lands, ib.

, —, would not have been surprised if done after a war, ib.

, —, not a more discontented people in Christendom, ib.

, —, his account rendered of three and a half years' rents of Tyrone's lands to 1 Nov. 1660, from his flight to the plantation of Ulster in the latter date, 532–546.

, —, is allowed 100l. a year for his collection of Tyrone's rents in the counties of Tyrone, Armagh, and Coleraine, and in consideration of his charges in building, 545.

, —, was granted 300 acres adjacent to fort of Charlemont for 21 years, 6 June, 5th of James I., 554.

, —, is granted 20 and odd ballibetaghs, formerly belonging to the Abbey of SS. Peter and Paul, Armagh, 559.

, —, abbey of Annogh in Coleraine county granted to, 565.

Cavan Court, 369.

Cavan, 498.

, a government of Ulster, Sir Garrett Moore, xxiii.

, governor of, xxiv.

— county, opening of the commission of 1610 at, xci.

, —, Sir J. Davys's account of, xcii.

, known as O'Reilly's country, ib.

, attainder of the chiefs held to give the King the lands, ib.

, discharged of the estates of the inhabitants, ib.

, what they might be snpposed to allege in defence of their rights, xciii.

, instructions as to plantation of, 54.

, town of, land for, 55.

, to be made corporate, ib.

, people of, claim to have freeholds, 160.

, to be the end of the plantation commissioners' circuit, 282.

, plantation commissioners' visit to, 289.

, charters of incorporation, fiant for, 390.

, the commissioners of plantation began with, because the people more pliable than those in remoter parts, 480.

, and more land to dispose of, ib.

, next to Cavan most is in Fermangh, ib.

, which they take next, ib.

, barony of Tullochgarvie set out to servitors and natives, 505.

, warrant for new charter for, 514.

, otherwise Brenny O'Reilly, 576.

, Philip O'Reilly being seised of, rebelled, 1 Aug., 38th Eliz., ib.

, —, was slain in active rebellion, 19 Oct. in 38th Eliz., ib.

, —, is now forfeited, and in the King's hands, ib.

, a grant by His Majesty in fee-farm of lands in barony of Clonmahon, has been made to Baron of Delvin and the Lady Delvin, his mother, ib.

, another to Garrett Fleming, Esq., in barony Clanchy, 576.

, abstract of His Majesty's title to the temporal lands in, ib.

, touching ecclesiastical lands in, 577.

, Bishop of Kilmore's lands in, ib.

, abbey lands in, ib.

, glebe lands in, ib.

, advowsons in, ib.

Cavenagh, Art. M'Dermot, of the Murrows, co. Wexford, 324.

, Dermot M'Morish, ib.

, Donnel, 511.

, Gerald M'Murtagh, 324, 337.

Cavenaghs, the, 69, 472.

Cawclawny Castle, 228.

Cecil, policy of, for Ulster, xxv.

, Sir Robert, 476.

, Sir J. Davys's letters to, xxx.

Cessing of soldiers on the country, bad effects of, 143.

Chadderton, see Chatterton.

Chamberlain, Michael, 90.

Chambers, George, 341.

Chancellor, the Lord, 112.

, —, gets sick and is forced to leave the commission of plantation, 285.

, —, his yearly fee, 338.

, —, Lord Howth's charges against, 386.

, —, Lord Howth's account of his conduct in the Council, 394.

, —, objected to on the Council by Lord Howth as hostile to him, 391.

Chapelizod, church of, 484.

Chapters to be erected in Down, Connor, and Dromore, 581.

Charges incurred in suppressing northern rebellion, 43.

— of army in Ireland, ib.

, extraordinary, in Ireland, 44.

— for Ireland, estimate of, 153.

, army, in Ireland, ib.

, abstract of, ib.

, extraordinary, beyond the establishment, 334.

, what they are, enumerated, ib.

— of transport of men to Sweden, 263.

— of army, 1595–1606, 282.

— —, 1595–1609, 295.

— which may be spared, estimate of, 295.

, of army and garrisons, book of, 418.

Charlemount, Sir T. Caulfeild's men at, 33.

, fort of, on the Blackwater, 294.

, —, 63.

, —, Sir Toby Caulfeild at, extraordinary charges in building bridges and highways, and strengthening the fort, and building a house within the same, 545.

, market of, 406.

, making bridges and other works at fort of, 542.

, making bridges and highways, and strengthening the fort of, and building a house within the fort, 545.

, 100 acres and more laid to the fort at the north side, and demised to Sir Toby Caufeild for 21 years, provided he so long live, 561.

Charters, renewal of, to cities and towns, suit for, 154.

, —, without recommendation of the Government, has increased the pride of the Irish, 400.

, have been renewed, 452.

Chatterton, Capt. Thomas, daughter of, married to Marcell Rivers, 455.

, —, had a grant of land from the late Queen, ib.

, —, built and planted a fort in Ireland, 453.

, —, indenture between him and Queen Elizabeth (5 Oct., 13th Eliz.), 553.

, —, thereby undertook to conquer Orier, the Fews, and the Galloglass countries, ib.

, —, his failure, and death at the hands of the Irish, ib.

, —, how his title to Orier, the Fews, and the Galloglasses country in Armagh, though forfeited for his failing to conquer them, yet embarrassed all titles, because not found void by inquisition, 556, 557.

, —, at length (6 July 1609) inquisition taken, and the claim of his heirs then disposed of, ib.

Chauntry lands, judges to find a means to reduce them to the hands of the Crown, 370.

Chester, 106, 200, 201.

, Mayor of, 487.

Chetham and Long, 128.

, lease of revenue to, to be revoked, 129, 131.

Chetham, Thomas, 367.

Cheyney, Thomas, 548.

Chichester, Sir Arthur, lviii, lix, lxv, lxvi, lxvii, lxxiv, lxxv, lxxviii, lxxx, lxxxiii, 65, 507, 509, 510.

, —, held a presidency to be indispensable in Ulster, xxi.

, —, desires appointment for himself, xxii.

, —, report of his appointment, ib.

, —, desires Carrickfergus to be independent, ib.

, —, his paper on Ulster in 1607, xxiii.

, —, his letters on commission of surrenders very instructive, xxix.

, —, his policy for weakening the influence of the chiefs, xxx.

, —, his investment of the Tyrconnell rebels at Claudie, 1.

, —, considered Tyrone's flight better for the State than to have him in the Tower of London, lv.

, — his various suggestions as to the course to be pursued in consequence, lvi.

, —, proposes two plans, ib.

, —, Privy Council's answer, lvii.

, —, resolves on the indictment of the Fugitive Earls, lviii.

, —, is at Slane when he is apprised of the Earl's flight, lix.

, —, his remark that going on his keeping by an Irishman was generally followed by rebellion, lxi.

, —, applies this to Sir Donel O'Cahan, ib.

, —, his collections out of Lord Howth's discourses, lxvii.

, —, his plan for transporting the seven septs of Leix, lxxiv.

, —, they had rebelled 18 times between Philip and Mary's reign and accession of Jas. I., ib.

, —, the seven septs transplant under Mr. Crosby to Tarbert in Kerry in Ireland, in June 1609, lxxv.

, —, proceedings under the first commission in the plantation of Ulster, lxxviii.

, —, he and the other commissioners leave Dublin, 3 July 1608, ib.

, —, receive news of O'Doherty's death at the review of the forces on Lurgan Green, in co. Louth, ib.

, —, he digests his observations on each of the escheated counties and his plans of plantation in 1608, lxxxi.

, —, commits them in the form of instructions to Sir James Ley and Sir John Davys, lxxxi.

, —, which they carry over to England, lxxxi.

, —, his remarks on Lord Audley's extravagant project of plantation in Tyrone, lxxxiii, lxxxiv.

, —, his sarcastic observations on Lord Audley's "nearness," lxxxiv.

, —, his objections to the project of a plantation as drawn by the commissioners, lxxxv.

, —, disapproves of the lottery, ib.

, —, it is copied from the plantation of Canaan by the Hebrews, ib.

, —, but in Canaan there were cities ready built to be seized, ib.

, —, in Ulster none, ib.

, —, objects to the small provision made for the natives of Ulster, ib.

, —, the swordmen, who are the men of most credit, greatly incensed, ib.

, —, he sends out the judges on their circuits before their usual date to pacify them, ib.

, —, by declaring that men of credit would be provided for, lxxxvi.

, —, begins his journey to execute the commission of 1610 on St. James's day, xci.

, —, the day of that Blessed Saint in heaven and great monarch upon earth, ib.

, —, looks upon the flight of the Earls as providential, xciv.

, —, in enabling the King to colonise Ulster, ib.

, —, without English and Scottish justices and jurymen all commands were issued in vain, ib.

, —, for none would prosecute priests and Jesuits merely for performing their church duties, ib.

, —, earliest views of a fit scheme of plantation, ib.

, —, his first view of the Graemes, c.

, —, thinks them "a witty and understanding people," ib.

, —, "and withal very civil compared with the Irish," ib.

, —, but changes his opinion, ib.

, —, the Grahams to be planted together, c.

, —, benefits of, ib.

, —, disadvantages of, ib.

, —, his later opinion, cii.

, —, four volumes of his State Papers lodged in the Philadelphia Library, ciii.

, —, suggestions as to the true account of their getting there, civ, cv.

, —, probability that they came from Joshua or Arthur Dawson, clerks of the Papers, cv.

, —, their descendant gives them in 1799 to the Philadelphia Library, ib.

, —, proceedings on his learning O'Dogherty's death, 6.

, —, encamps in O'Hanlons country, ib.

, —, prosecutes the O'Hanlons and O'Neills, ib.

, —, takes few of them, ib.

, —, retires over the Blackwater, ib.

, —, Shane Carragh O'Cahane falls into his hands, ib.

, —, makes a progress through the counties, ib.

, —, issues commissions for survey of fugitives' lands, and of oyer and terminer, ib.

, —, trial and execution of rebels, ib.

, —, common law as traitors, ib.

, —, this mode produces more effect than trials by martial law, ib.

, —, deals with the principal, so as to secure their service, ib.

, —, marches to Glanconkayne, 8.

, —, pursues the rebels diligently, and kills and makes prisoners of many of them, ib.

, —, captures Phelimy Reagh, ib.

, —, reports what still remains to be done, ib.

, —, account of the late supplies of men from England and Scotland, ib.

, —, issues orders for payment of port customs, ib.

, —, will send full information by the chief justice or attorney general, ib.

, —, zealously assisted by his colleagues in the commissions, 11.

, —, has killed or taken the heads of the rebellion, ib.

, —, apprehension of rising of the rebels in Leinster through his absence, 18.

— —, kept in check by fear of him, ib.

, —, his successful journey to Coleraine, 22.

, —, returns from North, 25.

, —, calls Lord Howth before the Council to prove his charges against Sir G. Moore, 25.

, —, complains of his great expenses, 26.

, —, proceedings of, at Lifford, ib.

, —, leaves troops for defence, 27.

, —, he is execrated in Ulster, 31.

, —, fears entertained of his being made President of the North, ib.

, —, his troop of horse, 32.

, —, of foot, 33.

, —, his letters delayed by contrary winds, ib.

, —, charge of his journey, 34.

, —, his zeal and success commended, 46.

, —, instructions to Sir James Ley and Sir John Davys, 54.

, —, his instructions to Sir J. Davys and Chief Justice Ley going to England, 65.

, —, his narrative of his proceedings with Sir Donnell O'Cahane since his submission in 1602, ib.

, —, his views for the plantation of Ulster, 68.

, —, inequality of estates by giving pre-eminence to chiefs, its ruin, ib.

, —, allotments should not be too large, ib.

, —, whole countries not to be passed to one man, ib.

, —, natives should be satisfied, ib.

, —, should be placed in plains where they might be overlooked, ib.

, —, the Byrnes' and Tooles' country made in his time into the county of Wicklow, 69.

, —, the people grown to a good conformity, ib.

, —, but the chieftains ill affected, ib.

, —, as are the Cavanaghs, ib.

, —, plantation of Ulster cannot be begun till next summer (1609), ib.

, —, his letter to the King (15 Oct. 1608), 81.

, —, now the time to plant and reform that rude and irreligious corner of the North, ib.

, —, denies that he oppressed the Earls of Tyrone and Tyrconnell, ib.

, —, but admits he kept good spies upon them, ib.

, —, this was the cause of their flight 82.

, —, spent many hours upon Tyrone trying to make him a good subject, ib.

, —, sends his letter by Sir James Ley and Sir John Davys, ib.

, —, has sent over the surveys of Ulster by Sir James Ley and Sir John Davys, 85.

, —, has not inserted the values, ib.

, —, but has sent them by a private note, ib.

, —, because he hears the lands are promised to be given away to importunate suitors according to the survey value, ib.

, —, 100l. rent value to one, 200l. ditto to another, ib.

, —, protests that this will overthrow the expected plantation, ib.

, —, if the nobility and subjects of Scotland are to bring over the Islanders or their neighbours, thinks the lands had better been left with the Irish, ib.

, —, advises that the customs should be left to the towns, 86.

, —, it will discontent them, ib.

, —, they should be kept loyal, without which all may be some time or other endangered, ib.

, —, employs Francis Annesley and John Strowde as his agents to obtain for him the barony of Enishowen, 103.

, —, considers that Ulster should not be made waste, because the undertakers would not be able to re-stock it, 114.

, —, it was so in Munster, though better land and nearer to the sun, ib.

, —, recommends suits of the towns and cities, 128.

, —, reports Lord Howth's going to England to prosecute charges against Sir G. Moore, 136.

, —, advises repression and expulsion of priests and Jesuits, 143.

, —, suggests pardon of meaner sort of woodkerne, ib.

, —, makes suit for O'Doghertie's escheated lands, 146.

, —, promises to make a "cyvile" plantation, ib.

, —, advises that priests and friars may be castigated by martial law like rogues and beggars, 147.

, —, no answer to this advice, ib.

, —, suggestions as to the plantation, 156–161.

, —, desires to be undertaker for Tyrconnell, 180.

, —, thanks Salisbury for his favour in that suit, 192.

, —, thanks the King for bestowing on him Inishowen, O'Doherty's late country, 203.

, —, recommends George Courtney, his near kinsman, to Salisbury's favour, 239.

, —, he affects the good plantation of his seignory in Munster, ib.

, —, has a suit with Morice Fitzthomas Fitzgerald, ib.

, —, his account of Sir Neale O'Donnel's trial, 241.

, —, of his son, ib.

, —, would send him back to Oxford, 241, 251.

, —, Sir Neale's brothers and son kept in prison, 241.

, —, now the trial is over, will dismiss them home, 241, 251.

, —, opinion of Irish juries, 241.

, —, fears that the commission for Ulster may be so delayed that the winter will come before the commissioners go out, ib.

, —, has sent on bread to Newry for the forces that are to accompany the commissioners, ib.

, —, cannot make Ireland support itself by reason of hot-brained Jesuits that drive the people to rebellion, 242.

, —, or beggar them by feeding on them, ib.

, —, forwards some hopeful project of some Dutchmen of Amsterdam, ib.

, —, coin of England of so fine silver that little of it stays in Ireland, ib.

, —, thinks Sir John Davys has misunderstood Salisbury's intentions about the customs, 243.

, —, if the corporate towns be allowed to collect them, and to account for them, they will conceal the value, ib.

, —, obliged to leave the castle of Dublin in the summer, 250.

, —, for its noisomeness, ib.

, —, sends estimate of costs of strengthening castle prison, ib.

, —, and of record depository, 250, 251.

, —, of repair of Kilmainham, ib.

, —, lamentable alienations of church property, 250.

, —, alienations forbidden, ib.

, —, pluralities in, ib.

, —, has recalled all noblemen's sons from being educated in seminaries abroad, ib.

, —, also merchants' sons, ib.

, —, that the children of the transplanted Moores left behind may be sent to England, 251.

, —, and put to trades, ib.

, —, that Tyrone's and Caffar O'Donnell's children may be brought over, ib.

, —, recommends the suit of Francis Annesley for reversion of the Provostmarshalship of Connaught after Capt. Charles Coote's death, 252.

, —, has received commission for more exact survey of Ulster just in time to save the year, 253.

, —, will go out on 31 July, ib.

, —, takes horse and foot that lie in his way, ib.

, —, draws none from Connaught and Munster, ib.

, —, Chancellor unable to travel, ib.

, —, regrets absence of Bishop of Derry, ib.

, —, because of bishop's lands, ib.

, —, fears that he has laboured well his own ends, ib.

, —, to the damage of the plantation, ib.

, —, his intrigues, 253, 255.

, —, is offended with Chichester because he advised him to leave his too great care of the world, ib.

, —, and betake himself to his spiritual duties, ib.

, —, whom he takes with him to Ulster, 254.

, —, has made all the bishops interested in Ulster lands, commissioners, ib.

, —, would spare the life of Owen Groom Magrath, the friar, ib.

, —, why, ib.

, —, Viscount Gormanston and Sir Thomas Fitzwilliams, their offer of 200l. for Mr. Florio, 255.

, —, his journey to the north, 259.

, —, his party to rendezvous at Dundalk, ib.

, —, Lords of Council desire that as many native Irish as possible may be vented out of the land, 264.

, —, proposes to send 1,000 more to Sweden, ib.

, —, advises that Jesuits not leaving at the proclamation, should be hanged by martial law, 269.

, —, charged by Lord Howth with favouring the Carolans, 276.

, —, report of proceedings of plantation commissioners in Armagh, Tyrone, Cahir, and Donegal, 285.

, —, proceedings of, on breaking up the camp, 293.

, —, goes to Carlingford to superintend expedition for Sweden, 300.

, — reports on the claim of John Manwoode for 200l. of the late traitor Tyrone, 301, 302.

, —, suppresses a mutiny of the Swedish levies at Carlingford, 304.

, —, gets rid of a multitude of dangerous rebels by means of this expedition, 305.

, —, has made no charge for his travelling expenses, 307.

, —, his account of the broil at a tennis court, in Thomas Street, between Lord Howth and Sir Roger Jones, 322, 323.

, —, wherein one Barnewale was slain, ib.

, —, Tyrone asks leave to return to Ireland, 325.

, —, bespeaks favour for Captain John Vaughan to keep the fort of Dunalong, 326.

, —, as he expects that the Londoners will claim it, ib.

, —, suggests that Owen Groom Magrath, the friar, under sentence of death, be pardoned, 344.

, —, that Sir Neal O'Donnell and Sir Donel O'Cahan be sent over to London, ib.

, —, the danger would be great if they escaped out of prison, ib.

, —, observes that Howth has ever mixed truth and falsehood, 345.

, —, hopes he may never have anything more to do with him, ib.

, —, four merchants (named) offer to undertake the whole county of Donegal, 346.

, —, will build a fort near seaside, ib.

, —, his account of the different claims to the fishing of the Ban, 353.

, —, sends his "Considerations "touching the plantation of the es"cheated lands in Ulster," 355.

, —, the King's title to be cleared, ib.

, —, men of quality to be leaders, ib.

, —, so as to have followers, ib.

, —, others will consume the substance and undo themselves, ib.

, —, one or two chief undertakers near one another in each barony to give countenance to strangers, ib.

, —, knows some who will undertake a whole barony, ib.

, —, unless so, or on a common purse, has no hope of the plantation, ib.

, —, every powerful undertaker should be forced to make his dwelling on the straights, 356.

, —, or places of command, ib.

, —, his tenants not to disperse to edges of woods and into glens, as they did in Munster, ib.

, —, but to dwell near the chief undertaker, ib.

, —, as for the castles and bawns projected, thinks they cannot be built in less than four years, considering the many works on hand, ib.

, —, and the want of labourers, materials, tools, &c., ib.

, —, the planters should be enjoined to enclose part of their lands with ditches and quickset in a limited time, after the manner of England, ib.

, —, to bind men of quality to be so long resident would rather overthrow than further the plantation, ib.

, —, no wise man would do so, and may do it better by friends or substitutes, 356.

, —, his considerations touching plantation of Ulster, ib.

, —, undertakers should have three years' freedom from rent, ib.

, —, Munster undertakers had this, and horse and foot to guard them, ib.

, —, but not enough, though nearer England, and so many castles ready built to their hand, ib.

, —, all wanting in Ulster, ib.

, —, under tenants not to be liable for arrears of the King's head rent, 357.

, —, many seigniories thus wasted, and private men undone in the Munster plantation, ib.

, —, should all hold in common soccage, ib.

, —, tenures in capite burdensome, and the profits go not to the King but to his officers, ib.

, —, in lieu thereof the undertakers to be bound to make no estates for less than 21 years, ib.

, —, should not alienate without license, ib.

, —, and should be forbidden from marrying and fostering with the Irish, ib.

, —, the issue of the undertakers would thus be linked together in marriage and affection, ib.

, —, and strengthened against the Irish, ib.

, —, defects of the Munster plantation in this respect, ib.

, —, the Irish were allowed to dwell intermixed, hoping to civilize them, ib.

, —, instead of imitating the English, they scorned them, ib.

, —, plotted against their lives, ib.

, —, envied them and robbed them, ib.

, —, contrived forged titles to the lands they had built on and enclosed, ib.

, —, the Irish and English should dwell apart, 358.

, —, the Irish in the flat clear country, ib.

, —, or in town-reeds intermixed with English, ib.

, —, thus the many inferior Irish being quieted, may outweigh the higher discontented men, ib.

, —, the Irish must quit creaghting and dwell in town-reeds, ib.

, —, the English tongue must be preserved pure and neat, ib.

, —, this best done by forbidding intermarriage, ib.

, —, and by outnumbering the Irish, ib.

, —, it was thus the English tongue was preserved in the English Pale, ib.

, —, in Wexford, ib.

, —, and in parts of South Wales, ib.

, —, would have the Termons given in demesne to the bishops, ib.

, —, discharges of the estates of the Corbs and Erenaghs, ib.

, —, for he does not think them worthy of them, ib.

, —, unless as any other tenant allowed by the bishops, ib.

, —, would have glebes of 60 or 100 acres taken out of the bishop's lands for parsons, ib.

, —, bishops should be enjoined to build one strong house for their see house in each diocese, 359.

, —, and to bring tenants from England, ib.

, —, their Irish tenants to quit creaghting, 359.

, —, and to dwell in town-reeds, ib.

, —, benefices not to be given to the bishops to bestow at discretion, ib.

, —, some principal benefices to be left for the Lord Deputy to prefer his chaplains to, ib.

, —, proportions of land to be laid out for corporate towns, ib.

, —, for forts, free schools, hospitals, and the college near Dublin, ib.

, —, bishops to let their lands for three lives or 21 years, and not under, ib.

, —, his "instructions" to Sir T. Ridgeway, 362.

, —, concerning Sir Dominic Sarsfield, Patrick Fox, Auditor Ware, Sir Garrett Moore, ib.

, —, concerning fit undertakers from Ireland for the plantation of Ulster, 363.

, —, as Sir Oliver St. John, Sir James Perrot, Sir T. Williams, Sir Garrett Moore, Sir Oliver Lambert, ib.

, —, would have Sir Richard Bingley undertake Kilmacrennan, ib.

, Sir H. Folliott the land between Bondrowes and Ballyshannon, ib.

, —, Sir Fulke Conway, Brasilogh, ib.

, —, Sir Toby Caulfeild, Clancan, 364.

, —, Sir Fras. Roe, Munterdevlin, ib.

, —, Capt. H. Skipwith, Cullmackatreen, ib.

, —, Sir T. Chichester, Cullmackatreen, ib.

, —, his opinion of Sir Turlogh M'Henry O'Neal's claim, ib.

, —, of Connor Ro Maguire's, ib.

, —, the islands in Lough Erne to be given to worthy undertakers, but not to any Irish, ib.

, —, of Arthur M'Baron O'Neil, Tyrlogh M'Art. O'Neil, Henry and Con M'Shane O'Neil, Brian Crossach O'Neil, ib.

, —, of Sir Cormack M'Baron, 365.

, —, of his wife and children, ib.

, —, of Brian Maguire, ib.

, —, of the three M'Swynes, O'Boyle, M'Manus, and O'Cane, ib.

, —, of Sir Neal O'Donnel and Donnel O'Cane, ib.

, —, sends lists of those servitors, civil and military, in Ireland fit to be undertakers in Ulster, and where to be placed, 365.

, —, sends lists of the Council who may be induced, 366.

, —, sends lists of captains of companies who have already houses and fixed dwelling in Ulster, ib.

, —, sends lists of those who have none, but are willing, ib.

, —, sends lists of constables of castles and captains of boats in, ib.

, —, sends lists of other knights, servitors, and pensioners in pay, fit with help, 367.

, —, sends lists of other knights, servitors, and pensioners in pay, fit without help, ib.

, —, sends lists of other knights, servitors, and pensioners not in pay, ib.

, —, sends lists of other knights, servitors, and pensioners in pay who will undertake under greater undertakers, 368.

, —, instructions (second) to Sir T. Ridgeway touching the public, ib.

, —, wishes division by proportions (single, middle, or double) given up, and divisions by baronies chosen instead, 367.

, —, ministers should be provided for near the churches, ib.

, —, new parishes cannot be created till the country is better peopled, ib.

, —, and it will be hard to get new churches built, ib.

, —, it is for the King to dispose of the Erenagh lands, ib.

, —, undertakers should time their journeys so as to meet the commissioners in their respective counties, 369.

, —, there will be no inns for them, and no provisions otherwise, ib.

, —, in what order the commissioners will take the several counties, ib.

, —, if there is to be a president of Ulster, Dungannon must be the place ; a house must be built, and 3,000 acres laid to it, ib.

, —, priests and Jesuits must be banished, ib.

, —, wards and garrisons, ib.

, —, answer to Lord Howth's charges, 384.

, —, charges made against, by Lord Howth, ib.

, —, of protecting the Carrolans, ib.

, —, of disrespect and ill-usage of himself, 385.

, —, of revealing his secrets to the Chancellor, ib.

, —, answers, 385–7.

, —, charged with favouring Lord Delvin's escape, 386.

, —, his answer to this charge, ib.

, —, his familiarity with Sir G. Moore never harmed any one, 385.

, —, stays at Mellifont, ib.

, —, calls Lord Howth a "babbler," 386.

, —, sends Carrolan before Sir James Ley for examination, ib.

, —, suggestions for distribution of escheated lands, 390.

, —, refuses to suitors for lands license to go to England, 391.

, —, Lord Howth complains of his conduct in the Privy Council, 394.

, —, selected to be an undertaker, 428.

, —, is to have the placing of the natives in the plantation, 439.

, —, calls Bishop of Down to account about commendams, 457.

, —, to be a commissioner for passing lands to undertakers, 460.

, —, reports the rumours of Tyrone's return, but disbelieves them, 461.

, —, has given warning, however, to the forts, 462.

, —, warns Salisbury to be watchful against some attempt on the King's life or the Prince's, 467.

, —, announces the arrest of Florence Mulconry, ib.

, —, account of the settlement of Magennis's country, Iveagh, in county of Down, 470.

, —, a new settlement to be made, to give him larger demesne lands, 471.

, —, depriving the Irish Lords of their dependents the best reform, ib.

, —, a title discovered for the King in the Kinshelas country in Wexford, ib.

, —, through Viscount Beaumont, deceased, ib.

, —, Sir Thomas Beaumont is urged by some to put in his claim, 471.

, —, this country is the "den of the Cavanaghs," 472.

, —, the inhabitants are bonaghts or hired soldiers of the Cavenaghs, 472.

, —, will make a lease of 21 years to Sir Richard Masterson, ib.

, —, to try the title, ib.

, —, a better one discovered for the King through Viscount Beaumont, 471, 472.

, —, the people of Ulster will not be removed, even though to better land, without force, 472.

, —, accordingly has provided a small army to accompany the commissioners of plantation, ib.

, —, their discontent is declared by Sir Toby Caulfeild, ib.

, —, hopes to begin the commission for putting the undertakers into possession at Cavan on St. James's day, 479.

, —, the day of that blessed Saint in Heaven and great monarch on earth, ib.

, —, they shall find many stiff-necked people, for the word of removing and transplanting is to the natives as welcome as the sentence of death, ib.

, —, many of the commissioners pray to be dispensed because of ill-health, 480.

, —, and hardships of the journey, ib.

, —, Sir T. Ridgeway and Sir A. St. Leger only will accompany him, ib.

, —, takes with him some of the Council and Marshall Wingfield, ib.

, —, has some Irish dogs and mewed hawks for Salisbury.

, —, Saukewell, the pirate, thrown overboard by Easton, who offers to submit, 495.

, —, temporises with the pirates from his weakness, having only "the Lion's Whelp," ib.

, —, recounts the transportation of 600 Irish in two ships (Sept. 1616) to Sweden, 496, 497.

, —, 200 of these from Ulster, 497.

, —, residue were pirates and desperados from Munster and Connaught, ib.

, —, fear of being thus transported sends all the able and idle of Ulster to the woods, ib.

, —, it discontents and perplexes them no less than the late distribution of the lands, ib.

, —, after leaving Carlingford one of the ships was wrecked on the Isle of Man, but saved by a Scotch ship captain, ib.

, —, another ship was obtained in Scotland, and the men sent forward, ib.

, —, officers employed should have power to punish running away by death, ib.

, —, his account of their proceedings under the commission (July and August 1610) for putting the undertakers into possession, 501, 504.

, —, foresees failure, from the quality of such of the undertakers as are come, 502.

, —, those of the best judgment now begin to see the difficulty of planting almost five whole counties in so barren and remote a place, ib.

, —, undertakers will constantly press for liberty to keep the natives, ib.

, —, the Scotch are already in hand with the natives, promising them that they will get them license to stay, ib.

, —, if yielded to, the main work and plantation is overthrown, ib.

, —, the servitors will thereby be injuriously treated, ib.

, —, for the natives were to be assigned to them, ib.

, —, and have prepared the minds of the natives to the change, 502.

, —, discontent of the natives at the small portions of land assigned them, ib.

, —, especially in Tyrone, Armagh, and Coleraine, ib.

, —, who had put on English apparel and promised to live in town-reeds, and quit their creaghting, ib.

, —, now they have no land given them, and cannot be taken as tenants, which is very grievous to them, ib.

, —, for they had promised themselves better conditions under the King than under their old masters, ib.

, —, deems the natives to have been very badly treated in Tyrone, Armagh, and Coleraine, 502, 503.

, —, as to Tyrone, it was a great oversight to thrust the servitors and natives in a county that paid the King 3,000l. a year rent into little more than half a barony, 503.

, —, doubts the ill-will of the commissioners towards him, ib.

, —, prays he may not be guided by any directions of theirs, for they know not Ireland as well as he does, especially Ulster, ib.

, —, the people of these three counties have sent to Tyrone to hasten his return, or to send his son Henry, ib.

, —, or to send them arms and ammunition, wherewith to arm themselves against the plantation, ib.

, —, for they will die rather than be removed to the small portions assigned them, ib.

, — or seek a new dwelling in other countries, ib.

, —, the letter of Sir Donel O'Cahan out of the Tower of London, to his brother Manus, shows what firebrands are among them, ib.

, —, the priests preach that they are a despised people, worse dealt with than any nation ever heard or read of, ib.

, —, they were promised pardon and protection, and are now thrust out of their homes and compelled like vagabonds to go they know not where, ib.

, —, sees not how they can rebel, unless they get aid from foreign parts, ib.

, —, found himself so scantled by the commissioners division, that he had to forego his own 3,000 acres in Armagh, to make room for servitors, 504.

, —, and to strike out the names of his nearest kinsmen, ib.

, —, he has thereby foregone more acres of good land than he has in all the barony of Enishowen, ib.

, —, report of same to Privy Council, 505.

, —, marking the heart's grief of all the natives of Ulster, he doubled the garrisons of Coleraine, Mountjoy, and Charlemont, ib.

, —, writes to the King reciting his services in his office, 519.

, —, now six years in office, ib.

, —, plantation of Ulster effected, 520.

, —, results of this measure, ib.

, —, had rather labour with his hands in the plantation of Ulster, than dance or play in that of Virginia, ib.

, —, has endeavoured the extirpation of popery, 521.

, —, Art. M'Baron's promise to remove willingly to his new assignment, at May next, has worked wonders with the natives, 530.

, —, now fears that they will all remove on purpose to overthrow the plantation, ib.

, —, without them the undertakers would have to send 20 miles off for provisions, ib.

, —, and would be wearied out, ib.

, —, the new Wexford plantation, 531.

, —, urges the speedy issuing of a commission to find the King's title to that part of Wexford, occupied by the Irish, as intruders, ib.

, —, has made out a clear title for King, ib.

, —, Sir L. Esmonde and Sir Ed. Fisher have laboured to render some of the chief Irish there compliant, ib.

, —, these intruders have entered over the blood and bodies of good subjects, ib.

, —, the King must therefore expect some opposition from such unsound members, ib.

, Sir Thomas, 364.

, —, to be a servitor undertaker, 428.

, Mr. John, 368.

Chief Justice of King's Bench, his yearly fee, 338.

Chief Remembrancer of Exchequer, office of, to be granted to John Carpenter, 175.

Chiefries in Connaught, claims of, 397.

Child born in Tyrconnell with six toes, xxxvi.

, regarded as an omen, ib.

Children of Irish not to be sent for education over sea, 174.

, if abroad already, to be recalled, 265.

Chishall, William, controversy of, with Sir R. Boyle and T. Ball, 259.

, —, to be reheard on certain conditions, 260.

Chissel, William, 348. See Chishall.

Christchurch, 323.

Church, Established, lamentable alienations of its property, 250.

, —, pluralities in, ib.

, —, proclamation published against, ib.

Church lands in Ulster, commission of, 21 July 1609, to more accurately distinguish, lxxxvi.

, to be assigned to, in the settlement, 64.

, alienation of, to be restrained, 174.

, survey of, required by the King, 274.

, in escheated district, settled by a jury of clerks, 280.

, 13 jurors spoke Latin, ib.

— in Ulster, Chichester has done all in his power to forward the settlement of, 389.

, how marked in escheated counties maps, 402.

, inquisitions of, in every county, 409.

Churches, the, are commonly in ruinous condition throughout the escheated districts, 64.

, repair of decayed, in the Pale, 371.

"Churls," the English so called by O'Dogherty, xlix.

, have no courage, ib.

Cinque Ports, charter of, 136.

Cities, suits of the corporations of, to the King, 128.

Clabb, Patrick, arms taken from, 314.

Clan-Alister, in Antrim, xiv.

Clan-Alster, see Clan-Alister.

Clanawley, country in Armagh, x.

, appertains to Archbishop of Armagh, ib.

Clanawlle, see Clanawley.

Clanbrasill, a country in Armagh, x.

, has no horsemen but 80 kerne, ib.

Clancan, or M'Cann's country, in Armagh, x.

, has no horsemen, ib.

, has 100 kerne who live on stealth, ib.

, Chichester would have Sir Toby Caulfeild undertake it, 364.

Clancarty, Earl of, to be member of council of Munster, xviii.

Clanchy, precinct of, 405.

Clandeboy, South, in Down, xi.

, captain of, ib.

, North, in Antrim, xiii.

Clandonells, the, a "bastard kind of Scots," ib.

, —, all horsemen, ix.

, —, a sept of Tyrone, 61.

Clanmorish, freeholders of, to be discharged of the composition, 433.

Clanmorres, territory of, 577.

Clann-I-Banne, manor of, 397.

Clanricard, Earl of, lxxvii, 86, 97, 98, 226, 252, 328, 342, 366, 372, 381, 481, 507, 508, 509, 510.

, —, proposed as president of Connaught, xvii.

, —, his troop of horse, 32.

, —, — foot, 33.

, —, Chichester justifies him against the charge of being the author of his brother's (Thomas Bourke's) imprisonment, ib.

, —, will bring over his wife and little boy to England, 98.

, —, recommendation of suit of Galway to, 133.

, —, goes to England, 270.

, —, lands at Holyhead, having been detained 12 days in Dublin by winds, 281.

, —, old chiefries passed to, as rentcharge, 397.

, —, return of, long expected by Chichester, 462.

, —, re-grant to be made to, immediately on surrender, 435.

Clapham, James, 491.

, Lord, 388.

Clare, Sir Henry, 550.

, Sir Thomas, plantation by, in Thomond, 17.

, Father John, English Jesuit, 51.

Clarke, Sir Wm., pensioner, 338.

Claudie, island of, rebels in, 26.

, —, Tyrconnell rebels retreat to, 1.

, —, invested by Chichester, ib.

Clemoire, wood of, 94.

Clephane, see Clapham, James.

, Lord, see Clapham.

Clerk of the Check, 162.

— of the Crown, in cos. of Dublin, Kildare, Carlow, Queen's, &c., to Thos. Cole, in reversion after Eusebius Andrewes, 506.

— of the Pipe, inquiries directed as to fees of, 545.

Cleryndon, Richard, sent into England by Fr. Creswell, 53.

Cley, Phineas, 226.

Clifton, Sir John, lxxvi.

Climanty, near Lisgoole, 428.

Clinawley, barony, 575.

Clinton, John, 93.

Cloghamon, 121, 122.

Clogher, barony, 365.

, —, falls to Salisbury's lot, 434.

, —, favourable account of, ib.

, Bishop of, 247.

, —, his mensal lands in county of Tyrone, 561.

, bishopric of, 483.

, market of, 406.

, precinct of, 404.

, co. Galway, 324.

Clonaghles, rectory of, 514.

Clonauly, 541.

Clonawly, precinct of, 405.

Clonmahon, barony of, the O'Reillys chiefs of third part of it, 440.

, precinct of, 405.

Clonmell, 49.

, merchants examined at, bring reports from Spain, 398.

Clonroowe, lands of, 134.

Clonybrenin, on borders of Meath, 170.

Clotworthy, Capt., 367, 547.

, Capt. Hugh, 72, 229, 512.

Clough Fanne, Donegal, inheritance of Murtagh O'Dongan, 469.

Cloughoughter, castle of, 80.

, —, constable of, Capt. Hugh Culme, 509.

, to be reserved and regarded for, 55.

, Capt. Hugh Culme, repairs fort of, 80.

Clowanstown, Thos. Plunket of, 382.

Clownie [Clones], a convenient place to lodge troops in, 433.

Clundasa, lands of, 134.

Clunynglyn, lands of, 134.

Clyston, William, 549.

Coach, Sir Thomas, 367, 477, 478, 548.

Coall, Captain, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

Coalnemshy, see Coolnemsky.

Coat, for John Hoy, pursuivant, with the King's arms, 226.

Coates, Sir Thomas, served well in the wars of Ireland, and recommended for land in the plantation, 409.

Coath (Coates) Sir Thomas, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

Cockane, William, 136, 360, 488.

Cockayn, William, commissioner for plantation of Londonderry, 136.

Cocket, see Cocquet.

Cocquet customs of Limerick, to be granted to the corporation, 267.

— — of Waterford, ib.

— — of Cork, ib.

— — of Youghal, ib.

— — of Kinsale, ib.

— —, some farm of them to be reserved to the King, 268.

Codd, Martin, of Castletown, fine of, 578.

Cogan, Roger, 483.

Coif, Sergeant's, Sir J. Davys released from wearing, 153.

Coin of England so fine that little of it stays in Ireland, 242, 243.

Coinage of Ireland, a project for the relief of Ireland by minting these small moneys, 243.

, cruel effects of the corrupted coin, ib.

, want of small coin, ib.

, quantities of, in Spain, France, Germany, and Low Countries, ib.

, the projector will pay the King 2,500l, yearly in small coin, ib.

, these coins to be of 3d., 2d., 1d., and 1½ d.

Coins, small, ought to be of the same standard of fineness with England, 272.

Colby, John, 548.

Cole, Captain, 367, 547.

, — John, 337.

, Thomas, 506.

, Capt. William, 77, 227, 500, 512.

, —, has charge of boats on Lough Erne, 450.

, —, recommended for servitor's portion, 450.

Colegraunge, alias Graunge, rectory of, 448.

Colehorton, Sir Thomas Beaumont, of, 472.

Coleman, Laughlin, 512.

, Richard, 174.

Colenerer, see Toy of Conteneys.

Coleraine, a new county of Ulster, viii.

, corresponds in the main with Londonderry, x.

, contains O'Cahan's country, ib.

, castle of, ib.

— and Glanconkeyne, a government of Ulster, xxiii.

, its limits, xxiv.

, O'Cahan's territory, lx.

, —, now confiscated, ib.

, assizes at, in 1608, lxxix.

, —, 202, 207, 208.

, county of, Sir J. Davys's journey to, as commissioner in 1608, lxxx.

, —, passes through the woods and and glyns of Glanconkeyne, ib.

, —, the people as much surprised to see the Lord Deputy there, as the ghost in Virgil were surprised to see Æneas alive in Hell, ib.

, —, the great number of able inhabitants, lxxxv.

, —, and consequent danger and difficulty of planting, ib.

, —, 366, 369.

, —, rebellion in, 6.

, —, people of, appear in numbers at the commission of oyer and terminer in, 7.

, —, fastnesses of, discovered by the King's officers, and no longer available as cover for rebels, 16.

, —, surveyed and found to be vested im the Crown, 17.

, —, Chichester's successful journey to, 22.

, town, chief place of county, 60.

, a small county of three baronies, ib.

, chief septs of, ib.

, chief places of, 61.

, castle and abbey of, 89.

, buildings to be erected at, 136.

, customs of, 136.

, county of (called O'Cahan's country), 194.

, —, assizes for, held (1609) at Limavaddy, ib.

, —, Limavaddy, O'Cahan's principal house in, ib.

, —, an ill-favoured and ruinous castle, ib.

, —, —, but good land around it, ib.

, —, people quiet but ready to revolt, ib.

, —, all prisoners in, spared, and sent to serve in Sweden, 281.

, —, Chichester's interests near it affected by the London agents, 297.

, —, first conference with deputies of London, 347.

, —, deputies of London ask 3,000 acres to be laid to Coleraine, 347.

, —, on the Antrim side, 347, 348.

, —, but this belongs to Sir Randal M'Donnel, ib.

, —, are offered 1,000 acres on the Antrim side and 2,000 on the other, ib.

, —, but they decline, ib.

, —, second conference, ib.

, —, ask the whole county of Coleraine, 348.

, —, in fee-farm, 349, 350.

— and cities of Coleraine and Derry in free burgage, 350.

, the towns of Coleraine and Derry, and the county of Coleraine to be freed from all monopolies already granted, 351.

, articles between the King and city of London, for the plantation of Derry and county of Coleraine, 359.

, —, to be built on the abbey side, 360.

, 100 houses to be built and room left for 300 more, ib.

, 3,000 acres to be laid to the town on the abbey side, unless the King builds bridge, ib.

, then 1,000 acres on the abbey side and 2,000 acres on the other side of the river, ib.

, the Londoners are to have the town and entire county of Coleraine, estimated at 10,000 acres or thereabouts, ib.

, lands to be cleared of all private men's titles, except bishops' and deans' residences, and three or four Irish gentlemen (no more) now dwelling in the county, ib.

, to have the customs for 99 years, 361.

, the fishing of the Ban as far as Lough Neagh, ib.

, the admiralty, ib.

, —, their own wrecks restored to them, 361.

, —, the liberties extend three miles every way, ib.

, —, engage to have 40 houses up by 1 Nov. 1611, 362.

, —, workmen to be collected by sheriffs for building of Coleraine, 379.

, —, Londoners ask for liberties to extend four miles every way, 351, 361.

, priory of, 448.

, Londoners' money for works at, watched by pirates, 473.

, —, but missed, ib.

, activity of Londoners in preparing to build Coleraine, 500, 501.

, garrison, commander of, Sir Thomas Phillips, 508.

, county, by Act of attainder of Shane O'Neil, 11th of Elizabeth, vested in the Crown, 562.

, —, Queen Elizabeth restored to Hugh O'Neil, Earl of Tyrone, all that his grandfather, Con Backagh, held, ib.

, —, by inquisition at Dundalk it was found (16 Dec., 30th of Elizabeth), that O'Cahan's country lay within Tyrone's limits, but was not his, and the land only owed him services, ib.

, —, the late Earl, however, pretended to have cuttings on the lands, and imposed 200l. a year rent on O'Cahan's country, 563.

, —, O'Cahan appealed about three years since against the Earl's proceedings, to the King, ib.

, —, O'Cahan and Tyrone were to have been heard before the King, but Tyrone fled, ib.

, —, and is since attainted, ib.

, —, an abstract of His Majesty's title to the temporal lands in, 562.

, —, an abstract of His Majesty's title to the ecclesiastical lands in, 564.

, —, demesne lands in, of the Bishop Derry, ib.

, —, Termon and Herenagh lands in, ib.

, —, glebe lands in, 565.

, —, it was found by inquisition, 30th August 1609, that before Statute 11th of Elizabeth the Bishop of Derry was seised of Lisnemucky, containing one ballibo in Coleraine county, 564.

, —, and the Dean of Derry of twoquarters, called Ballionew, ib.

, —, Herenagh lands in, contain 100 ballibos, 565.

, —, the glebes containing 18 garden plots, ib.

, —, the abbey lands, 22 balliboes, ib.

, —, 18 granted to Sir John Sidney were purchased by the Earl of Tyrone from him, ib.

, —, the 18 balliboes purchased of Sir J. Sidney by Tyrone are (by Tyrone's attainder) revested in the King, 565.

, —, the four balliboes (residue of 22), are the possessions of the late Abbey of Anogh, and are passed to Sir Toby Caulfeild, ib.

Collection of Tyrone's rents from his flight in Sept. 1607 till 1 November 1610 (3½ years), when the lands were set out in plantations by Sir Toby Caulfeild, King's Receiver, 532.

College, Trinity, Ridgeway's account of the "title collidge," 70.

, commencement at, 70.

, —, how many doctors, bachelors in divinity, masters, and B.A., created, 70.

— lands in six counties, 403, 406.

Colleges, English, in Spain, 51.

Colletter [acolyte], one of the minor orders, 51.

Colley, William, president at Ruske, 170.

Collum, William, 491.

, Capt. Robert, ib.

Colrane, see Coleraine.

Comerford, Thomas, 384.

Commendams, unduly procured by Bishop of Down, 457.

, the Bishop's defence, 458.

, three, held from the King, ib.

Commissary of the victuals in Connaught, Thos. Smith, 507.

, in Munster, Sir Allen Apsley, 507.

Commission of accounts, 112, 113, 114.

— of arrears, 118.

— of defective titles and surrenders, xxviii, 118, 213.

— of Bonaght and Galloglass, 118.

— of escheat in 1608, lxxix.

, Sir J. Davys's account of proceedings under, lxxix, lxxx.

— for Irish causes, lxxx ; 222, 477, 486.

— to collect Crown debts, 470.

— for projecting a plantation of Ulster, names of commissioners, lxxxiv, note.

— for plantation of Ulster, lxxi.

— the three, for effecting, lxxvii.

— in 1608, 1609, 1610, ib.

, proceedings under commission of 1608, lxxviii.

, not of record, lxxviii, lxxix, note 2.

, must have issued about June, ib.

, assizes at Armagh, Dungannon, and Coleraine under it, lxxix.

, time occupied, was from 5 July to 2 Sept. 1608, lxxx.

, proceedings of the second commission in 1609, lxxxvi.

, its purpose, ib.

, the 19 articles of instructions to the commissioners annexed, ib.

— occupies from 31st July to 30th Sept. 1609, lxxxvii.

— of plantation, brief of proceedings, 409, 410.

— for survey of Ulster, 255.

— of survey and escheat for Ulster, 236, 246.

, articles of instruction annexed to, 237.

, names of Commissioners, 431.

— for putting undertakers of Ulster in possession, proceedings under (in July and August 1610), 497, 501.

, advices for, 480, 482.

— many of them pray dispensation for ill health, and fear of hardship, 480.

— for passing lands to undertakers, names of, 460.

— to sell Crown lands, 202.

— to hear suits concerning the Ulster plantation, ib.

— of martial government to the Earl of Ormonde, 104.

— for surrenders in Munster, 489.

— for Comynes, instructions for commissioners, 491.

— on O'Doherty, to find O'Doherty to have fled in rebellion, lxi.

— held super visum corporis, ib.

— equal to attainder, lxi, lxxix.

— for executing pirates and priests wished for by Sir A. Chichester, 473.

— to demise Crown lands, 470.

— of the middle shires, xcvi (and see "Grahams"), cii.

— between England and Scotland, ib.

, otherwise of the middle shires of Brittany, xcviii, note, xcix, ci, note.

, agreement of commissioners with Sir Ralph Sidley, ib.

, his undertaking to plant his seigniory of Roscommon with the Græmes of Esk, Leven, and Sark, xcix.

— names of the commissioners, ib.

Commissioners of arrears and surrenders, 485.

, of fugitives' lands, xxxv.

, Irish members, ib.

Common Prayer, book of, translated into Irish, 184.

, —, a copy of, sent to Salisbury by Sir J. Davys, 300.

, —, first set in hand by Sir James Ley, ib.

Compositions, the, of Leinster, Connaught, and Munster revived, 452.

Composte, Thomas, 549.

Comynes, customary gifts by which the lord retained his followers, 491.

, now that the followers are detached, the lord is to have a return of part of the gifts, ib.

Concealments in Connaught, commission for, 397.

Concordatums, enumeration of charges paid out of concordatum fund, 334, 335.

, certificate of, for three quarters of a year, ending 30 June 1609, 225.

Condestabile, the, complains of the King of England's league with United Provinces, 17.

Condon, David, suit of, with Arthur Hyde, 582.

, —, Essex's letter to, 583.

, Patrick, lxxvi, note.

, —, to be restored to blood and lands, 582.

Conelands, the, horsemen of Tyrone, xxvii.

Conley, John, a young friar, 463.

, Patrick, 341, 465.

, —, title of composition made for, 420.

, —, dwelling in Bred street, Dublin, 463.

, Mrs. Alice, her son writes from college of Tournay, complaining of great want of money, 48.

Connals, priory of, 598.

Connaught, 96, 217, 226.

, plantation in, 17.

, provost marshal of, 32.

, Lord Clanricarde's men in, 33.

, President of, Shane M'Manus said to be gone to, 37.

, charges for bringing prisoners from, 73.

, composition of, 96.

, assizes to be held in, twice a year, 154.

, surrender of lands to the Crown, ib.

, the store of waste land to be had in, prejudices the demand for Ulster lots, 193.

, provost marshal of, Fras. Annesley's suit, 252.

, clerk of council of, fees of, 261.

, assizes in, report on, 298.

, not above two or three notable malefactors tried at, ib.

, at least 2,000 idle men in, 299.

, composition of, 397.

, vice-president of, sends out warrants for provisions, ib.

, concealments in, ib.

, chiefries in, ib.

, decay of compositions in, 435.

, province of, tottering and unassured, 462.

, a vice-president must be appointed unless Clanricard return, ib.

, President of, Earl of Clanricard, 507.

, provost marshal of, Sir Chas. Coote ib.

, receipts of composition of, 578.

, receipts of composition of revenues of, ib.

Connor, Dean and Chapter to be erected in, 581.

Connors, the, and Moores, dispersed, 421.

Conron, Philip, 325.

Constable, Sir Ralph, 367, 512.

, —, pension of, 168.

Constables of castles and captains of boats, in Ulster, to be planters, 366.

— of castles, (Sept. 1610), in the four provinces, list of, 508.

Conteneys, the Toy of, 575.

Conventional signs in maps of escheated counties, 401, 403.

Conversion of tenures in Ireland, xxv and foll.

Conway, Sir Fulk, 77, 89, 97, 364, 366, 509, 510, 547.

, — lieutenant of Sir A. Chichester in Carrickfergus, xxiv.

, —, owns the great wood of Killultagh, 89.

, —, to be an undertaker, 428.

Conwey in Wales, 281.

Conymifalies, lands of, 134.

Cooke, Captain, 33, 97, 321, 368, 548.

, —, a servitor, to be an undertaker 428.

, —, musters delivered up to, 4.

, —, number of his men, 10.

, —, recommended by Salisbury, 320.

, Sir Anthony, 232.

, Capt. Hercules Francis, 510.

, Sir Richard, 26, 87, 178, 373.

, —, commissioner of plantation, 460.

— Sir Thomas, 213.

Coole and Tircanada, precinct of, 405.

Coolmakenna, precinct of, 401.

Coote, Capt. Charles, 252.

Cootnemoky, Mr. Wall of, 44.

Coquette customs, 257. See Cocquet.

Corb, Coarb, or Erenagh, of the Termon Magragh, 288.

Corballaymore, 202.

Corbett, John, 481, 512.

, —, appointed muster-master of Ireland, 581.

, Mr., 347.

, Mrs. Margaret, petition of, 414.

Corbit, Edward, late George, services of, 185.

, Margaret, his widow, pension for, ib.

Cork, Bishop of, 100, 101.

, —, to be member of Council of Munster, xviii.

, mayor and bailiffs of, report of decay of their city, 30.

, merchants of, 474.

, new charter for, petitioned for, 154.

, privileges as to customs, ib.

, good carriage of citizens of, 401.

, fines for recusancy remitted at, ib.

, ward of, 507.

, gentry of, assessed for repairs of forts, 409.

, county, 220.

, to what undertakers set out, lxxvi.

, intended to be divided and made into two, being 60 miles in length, 220.

, Youghal to be the county town of one half, ib.

, Youghal objected to by the gentry and freeholders, as lying at the utmost eastern border, ib.

, Lords of the Council suggest that while Cork shall still be kept as the county town, Rosscarbery may be the other, ib.

Corn, dearth of, in England, 119.

, to be stored for the winter use of garrisons, 22.

, export of, prohibited, except to England, 144.

Corn-powder sent into Ireland, return of, 148.

Cornewall, John, 544.

, Sir Thomas, 549.

, —, a principal undertaker in Lifford, with his consorts, their names and abilities, ib.

, Edward, ib.

, Gilbert, ib.

, Thomas, ib.

, George, ib.

, Robert, ib.

, James, ib.

Cornwallis, Sir Charles, his conferences with the Condestabile about the United Provinces, 17.

, —, 120.

, —, report on Irish in Spain, 179.

Cornwallis settlement of land in India, xxvii.

Corporate towns' lands in six counties, 403.

Corporate towns and free schools, lands of, 406.

Corporations, King's pleasure concerning, 149.

, the, in Ireland have renewed their charters, 452.

Corrach, a boat covered with hide, 27.

Corunna, 383.

, fleet at, supposed for transport of Earl of Tyrone to Ireland, 583.

, great meeting of ships and galleys at, 393. See Groyne.

Cosby, Captain, 127.

Coshogcowlie, grant of, to Sir James Fitzgerald, 162.

Cotteril, Clement, 477.

Cottingham, Mr., 93, 96.

, Philip, 70, 96, 114, 126, 225.

, —, sent to Ireland to report on timber for the navy, 21.

, —, sent to Munster with letter to the President, ib.

, —, is to view woods in Leinster and Connaught also, ib.

, —, and in Leix and Ophaly, ib.

, —, craves pardon for losing his letters, 22.

, —, has reported to Sir Jeffrey Fenton, ib.

, —, inspects woods in Munster, 29.

, —, goes into Desmond's country, ib.

, —, does not go to President of Munster, 30.

, —, assisted in search for timber, 40.

, —, his report referred to, 43.

Cottle, Mr., 367.

, John, 484.

Council-book of 14 January 1603, 575.

Council Chamber, 109, 227.

, necessaries for, 74.

Council, Privy, of Ireland, charged by Lord Howth as hostile to him, 391.

, —, took no notice of his words, as spoken in heat, 392.

Count, a Dutchman, host of Andrew Whitte, 13.

Counties, the, of Ulster, nine in number, viii.

, —, old, three, ib.

, —, newly made, six, ib.

, the six escheated, will all be surveyed before Michaelmas, 67.

, —, contents of, 403.

, Irish, ib.

Courcy, Sir John de, plantation in Ulster by, 17.

, Lord, see Cursie.

, —, bill to, 19.

Courcy's country, composition for, by Kinsale corporation to be for 20 years, 131.

Court town, co. Kilkenny, 325.

Courtnay, Aschton, 483.

, George, 239, 484.

, —, his suit with Morice Fitzthomas Fitzgerald, 239, 300.

, —, is a near kinsman of Chichester's, 239.

, —, affects the good plantation of his Munster seigniory, ib.

, Sir William, lxxvi.

Courts of Justice, the, fully established in Ireland, 452.

Coward, Captain, 200, 473.

Cowel, Robert, 511.

, Lieutenant, 368.

, —, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

Cowley, William, rent of vicarage of Carbry, 578.

Cows, to be assigned out of those forfeited by the rebels for defraying the King's charge, 22.

Coyle barony, co. Fermanagh, 575.

Cox, Mr. Henry Hamilton, civ, cv.

, —, the depositor of the Chichester papers in the Library of Philadelphia, civ.

, —, his descent from Joshua Dawson, "Clerk of the Papers," civ, cv.

, —, suggestion that these papers came from Joshua Dawson, or Arthur, his son, to Mr. H. H. Cox's father, cv.

, —, and thus through Mr. H. H. Cox to the Philadelphia Library, ib.

, Richard T., of Peoria, Illinois, U.S.A., cv, note.

, Katharine Ann, Miss, of Alexandra Villas, Queenstown, Cork, cv, note.

, Sir Richard, cvii, cviii.

Crafforde, see Crawford.

Crafoord, see Crawforde.

Craford, see Crawford.

Craforde, see Crawford.

, Captain Patrick, 510.

"Cranbourne town," so called, proposed to be built in O'Neal-land, co. Armagh, 425.

, also "Cicille's Fort," 425.

Cranston, xcvi.

, Sir William, his troop sent in pursuit of the Grahams, xcvii.

Crapp, Donatus, 350.

Crawford, Captain, 366, 428, 547.

, —, number of men, 33, 97.

, —, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

, —, recommended by the King as undertaker, 464.

, David, 463.

, Captain Patrick, Scottish soldiers assigned to, 10.

, Owen, 463.

"Creaghtes," the, have the lands when the great lords are in prison or abroad, 145.

"Creaghting," the practice of, to be suppressed, 65.

, natives can with difficulty be got to give up, 176.

Creaghts, suffered to return after the suppression of the rebellion, 27.

Crehall, Nicholas, pensioner, 339, 511.

Crely, Patrick, 541.

Cresswell, Father, an English Jesuit, 49.

Crickstown, see Krickstown.

Croagh, 494.

Crofton, William, 79, 228.

Cromwell, Lord, 79, 97, 366, 510.

, —, number of his men, 33.

, Mr. James, 102.

Crook, Mr., of Baltimore, 42.

, Mr. Thomas, of Baltimore, 100.

, —, wrongly charged with piracy, ib.

, —, Bishop of Cork's letter in favour of, ib.

, —, has gathered out of England a whole town of people at Baltimore, ib.

, —, Baltimore thereby was larger and more civilly and religiously ordered than any town in Munster, ib.

, —, though so lately founded, ib.

, —, is acquitted by the Lords of Council, 101.

Crookhaven, 99.

Crosby, Mr. Patrick, lxxiv, lxxv, ciii, 105, 217, 218, 240, 247, 329, 330, 372, 384, 473.

, —, his opinion of the Græmes, ciii.

, —, tells Chichester of a plan for transplanting them to Ulster, ib.

, —, offers to bring over an intelligencer with news of the Irish in Spain, 105.

, —, stayed by Lord Deputy, in order to bring the transplanting of the Moores to an end, 171.

, —, gets Tarbert for a place of transplantation for the seven septs, 217.

, —, they will bear him everlasting malice for this office, ib.

, —, Chichester sends Salisbury the letters of commendation received by Mr. Crosbie from the Queen's County planters, 218.

, —, he will thus see how much it is to their good liking, ib.

, —, to have "the breeching" of the young Moores, 264.

, —, offers to bring Eily O'Carroll to the King's hands, evicting Sir William O'Carroll, 372.

, —, suit of, for grant of the castle of Glyn, 388.

, —, order to pass castle of Glynne to, ib.

, —, leaves King's letter behind him at Bristol, ib.

, —, seeks to overthrow Sir William O'Carroll's patent, 420.

, —, deserves recompense, 421.

, —, servitor, claim of, on castle of Lixnaw, 432.

, —, to be called before the Council and advised to surrender it, 433.

, —, engaged that the transplanted O'Moores should not return, 453.

Crosomond, captain of the Janissaries, 279.

Crosse, Henry, 78, 232.

, Sir Robert, 550.

, the county of (Tipperary), high sheriff of, 462.

Crowe, William, 239, 367.

, John, petition for reversion of remembrancership of Exchequer, 419.

Crown lands, rents of, account of, 577, 578.

, inquisition of, in every county, 409.

, rents reserved, 154.

Cruise, Sir John, 221.

, Sir Thomas, ib.

, Dame Marian, ib.

, Sir John, married Margery, one of the daughters of Sir Theobald de Verdon, 221.

Cullen, co. Dublin, wood of, 546.

, Patrick, 50.

, Surgeon Edmond, 79, 507.

Cullin, manor of, co. Cork, 206, 207.

Cullinagh, lands of, 185.

Cullmackatrean, Chichester would have Capt. Skipwith undertake it, 364, 366.

Culme, Capt., 367, 547.

, Hugh, 76, 80, 509, 512.

, —, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

, Capt. Robert, 234.

, —, pension of, 430, 514.

, —, surrendered and re-granted to his son William, 431.

Culmore, 66.

, fort of, 330, 351, 361.

, O'Doherty's design upon, 1.

, taken by O'Dogherty, 38.

, a ward to be reserved at, 58.

, —, castle of, 60.

, fort of, repairs of, by Lieut. Baker, 80.

, the taking of, by O'Doherty, 222.

, Sir Neal O'Donnell party to the plot, ib.

, tried for it, ib.

, the London agents desire part of Chichester's claim at, 297.

, keeper of, Sir Arthur Chichester, 509.

Cumber, abbey of, 448.

Cumberland and Westmoreland, gentlemen of, c.

, subscribe for the transplantation of the Græmes into Ireland, ib.

Curates, lands of, 433.

Curlews, castle in the, constable of, Capt. John St. Barbe, 508.

Currency, remarks on, 272.

Currocke, see Corrach.

Cursie, Lord, 368.

Curtaine, Mr., 341.

Cusack, John, 341, 373.

, —, fine of, for wardship of Patrick Barnewall, 577.

, Christopher, promises to obtain plan of study for Robert Barnewall, 54.

, Sir Thomas, his book on the state of Ireland, xv.

, —, his proposal of four Presidencies, xvii.

, —, native element recognised in it, xvii, xx.

Customs, 243.

, of Limerick and other Munster cities, 257

, the, are now reduced in all the porttowns, 452.

, Chichester advises that the towns be not rendered discontented by taking from them the customs, 86.

, the King answers he will not allow the temporary grants of his predecessors, or their mere toleration to bind him, 128.