BHO

Index: D

Pages 614-624

Calendar of State Papers, Ireland, 1608-1610. Originally published by Longman and Co, London, 1874.

This free content was digitised by double-rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

D.

Dacres, xcvi.

Dae, Denis, 512.

Dale, Capt. Denis, pension for, 430.

, —, 508.

, William, commissioner of plantation of Londonderry, 136.

, William, 438.

Dalway, John, 80.

, Mr., 367, 507.

Damet, Dr. William, 226.

Danes, see Easterlings.

Daniel, Mr., preacher, 79. See Daniell.

Daniell, Dr., translates New Testament and prayer book into Irish, 184.

, —, recommended for see of Tuam, ib.

, —, and to have treasurership of St. Patrick's in commendam, ib.

, Nicholas, 341.

Dansker, Capt., of Flushing, a pirate, 279.

Danvers, Lord, President of Munster, his troop of horse, 32.

, —, foot, 33.

, —, letter to Salisbury, with informations, 49.

, —, defends the course he took in treating with pirates, 71.

, —, the dangers at the time of O'Doherty's outbreak, ib.

, —, Father Archer and O'Sullivan Beere hasted from Madrid and Salamanca to send boat-loads of priests and Irish agents to encourage the revolt, ib.

, —, if not supported will resign the office of President of Munster, 72.

, —, cost of his journey to Ireland, 75.

, —, 78, 97, 98, 226, 228, 501, 507, 509, 510.

, —, Ormonde commends him, 120.

, —, unable to sail from fear of pirates, 130.

, —, reports capture of pirates 151.

, —, secured on escheated lands, claims made upon, 283.

, —, President of Munster, 366.

, —, remits fines for recusancy to the citizens of Cork, 401.

Darcy, Christopher, 380.

Darnans, the, of North Clandeboy, xiii.

Darrell, Sir Marmaduke, contractor for victualling King's ships, 316.

, Marmaduke, 382.

Dartrey, a county of Monaghan, ix.

Daruse, lands of, 134.

Davenport, Sydrack, 367.

Davies, Nevil, 120.

Davys, Sir John, his letters singularly instructive, xxix.

, —, on the circuits and inquisitions, ib.

, —, account of the flight of the Earls, xxxv.

, —, thinks it as providential for the settling of the kingdom, liv.

, —, lix, lx, lxii.

, —, goes as one of a commission to Donegal and Tyrone to indict the Fugitive Earls, lx.

, —, the proceedings and finding of the bills, ib.

, —, sends copy of the bill to Salisbury, lxii.

, —, the three points of treason in, lxii, lxiii.

, —, account of the proceedings to Salisbury, lxiii.

, —, and of the nature of the bills, ib.

, —, the separate proceedings against Tyrone at Strabane, lxiv.

, —, he is there indicted for assuming the title of O'Neale, ib.

, — the proofs offered, lxiv, lxv.

, —, his astonishment at Tyrone's flight, lxvii.

, —, his remarks upon it, ib.

, —, his estimate of Tyrconnell, lxix.

, —, Tyrone's estimate of Sir J. Davys's manners, lxx.

, —, he insults Tyrone in the presence of the Council, ib.

, is with Sir Arthur Chichester at the review of the troops at Lurgan Green, when Sir Cahir O'Doherty's death is announced, lxxviii.

, —, is ordered to draw a proclamation thereof, ib.

, —, his account of the assizes at Armagh in 1608, lxxix.

, —, of those at Dungannon, ib.

, —, at Coleraine, ib.

, —, of the proceedings under the commission of escheat, lxxix, lvxx.

, —, his journey from Dungannon to Coleraine, through the woods pan glyns of Glanconkeyne, lxxx.

, —, the wonders that accompanied the commissioners' journey, ib.

, —, remains in London during the autumn and winter of 1608, lxxxi.

, —, does not return to Ireland till 5 May 1609, ib.

, —, his amusing account of the reception of the agents for London at the camp of the commissioners of plantation at Derry, lxxxii.

, —, places the bishops of Ulster on the commission of 1609, lxxxvii.

, —, his reasons, ib.

, —, his remarks upon the map maker's murder, ib.

, —, the need hence of guards to accompany Sir Josias Bodley, ib.

, —, his account of the work done by the commissioners, lxxxviii, lxxxix.

, —, remains in London till 3 June 1609, xci.

, —, his account of the opening of the commission of 1610 at Cavan, xcii.

, —, its purpose, ib.

, —, to give the undertakers possession, ib.

, —, his account of the opening of this commission at Cavan, xcii, xciv.

, —, his curious remark as to the coincidences of dates and numbers in the death of O'Dogherty, 14.

, —, goes to England with Sir James Ley, instructed by Chichester, 65.

, —, he and Sir James Ley are familiar with all that has been projected for the settlement of Ulster, 67, 69.

, —, Chichester states that his expenses of journeys to London have been great, 70.

, —, his expenses as commissioner for indicting the Fugitive Earls, 75.

, —, 65, 67, 70, 72, 75, 77, 93, 112, 114, 116, 117, 200, 203, 204, 213, 215, 218, 222, 223, 225, 243, 256, 343, 390, 466, 497, 546, 551.

, —, his pension, 168.

, —, commissioner for Ulster plantation, 171.

, —, the King highly satisfied with, 176.

, —, new letters patent as AttorneyGeneral to be made out, 176.

, —, services of, in plantation acknowledged, 186.

, —, release of, from serjeantey, 153.

, —, since his return to Dublin finds the town full of people seeking news 204.

, —, or on law business, ib.

, —, but the courts are nearly empty of suits, ib.

, —, because the priests spread rumours of approaching troubles, 204.

, —, except for this, never was there a time of more universal inward peace, ib.

, —, the servitors object to the plantation that they are not allowed to choose their seats, 205.

, —, Sir Neal O'Donnel, and Sir Donnel O'Cahane have been arraigned, and are to be tried next term, ib.

, —, because juries cannot sooner be had from those remote countries, ib.

, —, has clear evidence against Sir Neal O'Donnel, ib.

, —, the King's book is admired for its strength, ib.

, —, on the renewal of the ancient charters of towns corporate, 214.

, —, has omitted in the new charters their privileges to buy and sell with the King's enemies, ib.

, —, to give the King's enemies safe conduct, ib.

, —, to shut their gates if the Deputy came with more forces than they could master, ib.

, —, Salisbury will smile to hear that the Bishop of Waterford claims among his privileges that the mayor shall not life up his sword within the cathedral precincts, 214.

, —, the citizens, though all papists, exclaim that he is thereby seeking to erect a papacy in Waterford, ib.

, —, because he will not allow the King's sword to be carried into his liberty, ib.

, —, anxiety of the State at the delay in the commission for the plantation of Ulster, ib.

, —, they fear the year will be lost, ib.

, —, the servitors have declined, hoping by long delay that they may be allowed to choose their seats, ib.

, —, if the empty veins of Ulster were once filled with good British blood the whole body politic would quietly recover perfect health, ib.

, —, fines imposed by Sir H. Brouncker on Munster recusants reduced, but not remitted, 215.

, —, W. Ravenscroft's letter to, ib.

, —, desires him to let him know whenever he is tired of his late purchase, ib.

, —, he shall have his money with advantage, ib.

, —, but hopes rather he may keep it, and add to it, ib.

, —, his account of the trial of Sir Neal O'Donnell, 222.

, —, Sir Neale objected to the Irish jury as too mean, and demanded one of English knights, 223.

, —, agreed that they were too mean to convict an Irish lord, ib.

, —, his opinion of Irish juries, 225.

, —, thinks they must try him in Middlesex as O'Rorke was, ib.

, —, or else keep him in prison till Ulster is planted, ib.

, —, the alacrity they all feel at setting forth on the commission into Ulster, 256.

, —, he and the Chief Justice have been appointed for the assizes of Lower Leinster, but they now go to Ulster, ib.

, —, sends a draught of the commis sion drawn by himself, ib.

, —, how the Bishop of Derry gained for the Church all the Termon lands, ib.

, —, pleased that Lord Audeley and his son become undertakers in Ulster, ib.

, —, report from Cavan of the plantation commission, 292.

, —, goes to England with the treasurer, 390.

, —, sues to be undertaker under Lord Salisbury, 426.

, —, thought meet to be a servitor, 428.

, —, has served seven years apprenticeship in Ireland, 451.

, —, hopes to be recalled, ib.

, —, statement of the measures carried into effect by him, 452.

, —, all things are now as in English courts, ib.

, —, any experienced English lawyer may take his place, ib.

, —, reports the proceedings of the commissioners (under their commission to give the undertakers possession) in Ulster in July and August, 1610 497–501.

, —, they gave natives their portions, ib.

, —, and servitors, ib.

, —, and proclaimed what precincts were for English and Scottish, and what for servitors and natives, and warned natives to retire to live under the servitors, ib.

, —, as the undertakers were not ready, the natives have been allowed to stay till 1 May 1611, ib.

, —, to remove them at once would have created a famine, ib.

, —, to such undertakers as appeared the commissioners gave warrants for possession, 498.

, —, and assigned them timber for building, ib.

, —, began at Cavan, ib.

, —, the protest of the Irish through a lawyer of the Pale, ib.

, —, speech in answer, ib.

, —, in Fermanagh and Donegal no effort at protest made, 499.

, —, Irish there contented with their lots, ib.

, —, except Connor Roe Maguire, who has one whole barony, ib.

, —, but was promised, two, ib.

, —, yet he did not oppose the sheriff, but gave up possession, ib.

, —, in Tyrone and Armagh where they expected least trouble met the most, ib.

, —, the O'Quins and O'Hagans, Tyrone's horsemen, spurned at their small lots, ib.

, —, said they would rather be tenants at will under the servitors, ib.

, —, than such small freeholders, liable to serve at assizes and on juries, 500.

, —, suggests that they be settled under the bishops, of whom they will grow as fond as young pheasants of a home hen, though not their nest mother, ib.

, —, as for the servitors, none would undertake last year only Lord Audley, ib.

, —, now so many press for lots that there is much ado to provide for them, ib.

, —, those who have got lots are for the most part servitors who had set up their rests in Ulster, ib.

, —, the unprovided are soothed by hopes of lots under the Londoners, the bishops, or of being placed in the glens of Tyrone, ib.

, —, the Londoners have made better preparation for building the town of Coleraine than the commissioners could have expected, ib.

, —, their workmen were so busy that he thought he saw the building of Carthage as described by Virgil, 501.

, —, his notes on the fishery of the Bann, 527.

, —, (Mr. Attorney), 547.

, —, his abstract of the King's title to the Earl of Tyone's late escheated lands in the county of Armagh, 552.

, —, —, in the county of Tyrone, 559.

, —, —, in the county of Coleraine, 562.

, —, —, in the county of the city of Derry, 565.

, —, —, of the Herenagh lands in the county of Derry, 566.

, —, —, ecclesiastical lands lying out of the island of Derry, 568.

, —, —, of the county of Donegal, 569.

, —, —, of the county of Fermanagh, 574.

, —, —, of the county of Cavan, 576.

, Lord, see Danvers.

Dawson, Joshua, civ, cv, cvi.

, Arthur, cvii, cviii.

, clerks of the papers in Ireland for 50 years, cv.

, Mr. Henry Hamilton-Cox, their descendant, ib.

, —, who gives Sir Arthur Chichester's papers to the Philadelphia Library, ib.

, —, his descent from Joshua Dawson, ib.

, —, suggestion that they came to him through this connexion, ib.

Dawtrey, Richard, 550.

Dean of Derry, to be endowed, 136.

Dean and Bishop of Derry, to be endowed, ib.

Deane, William, warrant to be made Bishop of Ossory, 398.

Deans and Chapters, creation, of in Down, Connor, and Dromore, 581.

Dearth in England, corn to be licensed to be exported, because of, 119.

Dease, see Deyse.

, Garrett, 375.

Debateable land, the, xcvi.

De Courcy, Sir John, brought English settlers to Lecale, xii.

Defective titles, commission of, xxviii.

, list of surrenders and sales under commissioners of, 324.

, discoveries to be allowed as in England, and the owner to compound, 370.

, otherwise the King to make a lease of his lands, ib.

, commission of, 455.

, Barnaby Ryche's charge that the King is abused in the execution of this commission, 552.

Deise, William, 90.

Delahide, James, 337, 511. See Delahoide.

Delahoide, James, of Moygaddy, co. Kildare, 325.

Delahoyde, James, 511.

Delvin, the Lady, 392.

, Lady, urged by Howth to dissuade Lord Delvin from submitting, 392.

, —, 103, 108.

, Mary, Dowager Lady, the surrender of the O'Ferralls' lands to be enrolled, 519.

, Lady, charge made to, against Lord Howth, 42.

, Lord, lxv, lxvi, lxviii.

, —, his confession of his conspiracy with Tyrconnell, ib.

, —, his discontent, ib.

, —, his confession at Dublin Castle, lxviii.

, —, privy to conspiracy, 2.

, —, his title to lands in Cavan thought defective, 56.

, —, excuses himself to Salisbury, 141.

, —, is accused by Lord Howth, ib.

, —, deposition of, in case of Lord Howth and Sir G. Moore, 153.

, —, Sir G. Moore's statements about, 169.

, —, escape of, makes constables more watchful, 178.

, —, 79, 103, 104, 205, 335, 344, 376, 381, 386, 391, 392, 394.

, —, prays that Groome, the friar lately sentenced to die, may be spared, 206.

, —, he (Delvin) will otherwise be held the author of his death, 206, 255.

, —, gives evidence against Owen Groome Magraith, a friar, 265.

, —, —, importance of this fact, ib.

, —, encouraged by Lord Howth to escape from prison, 386.

, —, affirms this repeatedly to Howth's face, ib.

, —, escape of, from prison, Chichester charged with favouring, ib.

, —, the message sent to him by Howth, 391.

, —, —, conflict of evidence as to its purport, 392.

, —, persists in his statement, ib.

, —, Lord Howth reveals his intention to escape from the castle, 394.

, —, country, Franciscan abbey in, 463.

, —, order for enrolment of his surrender of the O'Farralls' lands, 519.

, —, to make a second surrender of his lands in Longford, 581.

, —, —, fears this will prejudice his title, but has perfected the deeds, relying on the King's promise, ib.

, —, and Lady Delvin, his mother, 576.

Delvyn, see Delvin.

Delvyne, see Delvin.

Demands made of Philemy Reagh, 1.

Demesne lands restored to the bishops, 389.

Demesnes, bishops', 403.

Denball, Samson, a pirate at Tunis, 279.

Denham, John, recommended to be Chief Baron, 147.

, —, 213, 215, 382.

, —, made Lord Chief Baron, 445.

Denmark, the Irish natives to be removed for the service in, 408.

Denny, Arthur, 121.

, —, arrears of rent to be remitted to, 190.

Deposition of John Redlake, 477.

— of Ashton Courtney of Devonshire, Sanders Fleming, of Camphier, Ireland, G. Nichol, of Devonshire, Robt. Herries, of Bristol, Roger Cogin, Cannonnier, made prisoners in a prize, 483.

— of Thomas Barlow, 532.

— of Diggory Castles, alias Tomkins of Youghal, 547.

Deptford, Drake's monument at, 100.

, timber to be landed at, 149.

Deputy and Council, letters of, on commission of surrenders, very interesting, xxix.

De Rose, Lennan de, engineer, 80.

De Rosse, 473. See De Rose.

Derry, Bishop of, claims that the Termon lands are church lands, lxxxvi.

, —, —, how they are held, ib.

, —, —, their nature, ib.

, —, design of the King in issuing a second commission concerning, ib.

, —, his claims to the island of Derry, lxxxviii.

, —, his differences with O'Cahan, lxi.

, —, dispute of, with Sir George Paulet, 59.

, —, takes part with O'Cahan against Tyrone, 65.

, —, who got the apparel of his wife seized in O'Dogherty's outbreak, 94.

, —, Sir R. M'Donnell prays to have sequestration of Bann fishery transferred to him from Sir T. Phillips, 21.

, —, recommended to Salisbury, 12.

, —, offended with Chichester for advising him to leave off his too great care of the world, 253.

, —, and to betake himself to his spiritual calling, ib.

, —, his intrigues about the lands in Ulster, ib.

, —, to the damage of the plantation, 253, 255.

, —, his absence much felt, 271.

, —, his complaints have influenced the Chancellor, ib.

, —, required to send survey of church lands, 274.

, —, arrives at camp, 280.

, —, objects to proposals about bishops' lands, 281.

, —, letters of, confirm charges against Sir Donnel O'Cahane, 313.

, —, gives an account of the church lands in Ulster, 389.

, —, titles of Bishop and Dean of, and of citizens to be cleared, 412.

, —, found by inquisition (30th Aug. 1609), seised of Lisnemucky, one ballibo, in Coleraine county, before 11 of Elizabeth, 564.

, —, held of old part of the island of Derry, 565.

, —, found to be possessed of a house or castle and garden plot on the south side of the cathedral church in right of his see, near the Long Town in the island, ib.

, —, found also possessed time out of mind of an orchard or park on the east of the great fort in the island, paying to the Herenagh Laghina, four white groats a year, 566.

, —, found entitled to one quarter of land in Enishowen, 568.

, —, and had four balliboes in times past in O'Cahan's country, ib.

, —, two marks being thereout payable to the Archbishop of Armagh, ib.

, —, 246, 247, 254, 255.

, —, Dean of, held of old part of the island of Derry, 565.

, —, entitled to a small plot, but bounds unknown, 566.

, 207, 208, 209, 210, 222, 223, 227, 248, 249, 340, 347, 351.

, a wardable building, ix, x.

, surprise of, by Sir Cahir O'Dogherty, lx.

, Sir George Paulet, governor of, slain by O'Dogherty, ib.

, lxxx.

, island of, lxxxviii.

, —, claimed for the Bishop, ib.

, O'Dogherty's designs on, 1.

, burning of, 14.

, piece of ordnance to be moved from, to Droghedonan, 20.

, forts of, to be repaired, 27.

, Sir Oliver St. John's men at, 33.

, repairs of, approved by Privy Council, 47.

, land to be assigned to it, being entirely without land, 58.

, works to be executed at, ib.

, repairs of ramparts and forts of, 80.

, customs of, 136.

, exports of, ib.

, lands reserved to, 137.

, charter of, and other charters, to be modelled suitably, 136.

, buildings to be erected at, ib.

, city of, to have patronage of churches,ib.

, fines for houses at, 175.

, Sir Robert Jacob's account of, in 1609, 194.

, the fairest-begun city that ever was made in so short a time, ib.

, but is now all ruined except the ramparts, ib.

, hardly to be restored, till some great man who shall have O'Dogherty's country shall make his residence there, 194.

, present weakness of, ib.

, commodities vendible at, 340.

, Sir Neal O'Donnell tried for being party with O'Dogherty in the sacking and burning of, 223.

, moneys paid for relief of distressed citizens of, 230.

, plantation of, instructions for survey of, 316.

, —, points to be reported on, ib.

, —, detailed replies of viewers, 316, 317.

, —, on situation, 316.

, —, commodiousness and fertility, 317.

, —, timber, ib.

, —, minerals, ib.

, —, harbour, ib.

, —, fishery, 318.

, demands of the Londoners for 4,000 acres to be laid to, 347, 360.

, on same side of the river as the town, ib.

, to be freed from all monopolies already granted, 351, 361.

, liberties of, to extend four miles every way, ib.

, articles between the king and city of London for the plantation of Derry and county of Coleraine, 359.

, 200 houses to be built, and room left for 300 more, 360.

, 4,000 to be laid to the town on the Derry side, ib.

, sites to be given for houses for bishop and dean, ib.

, Londoners to have the customs of Coleraine and Derry, 361.

, salmon and eel fishings of Ban and Lough Foyle, ib.

, admiralty, ib.

, their own ships, if wrecked, to be restored to them, ib.

, to have Culmore Castle, ib.

, liberties to extend three miles every way, ib.

, 60 houses to be up by 1st Nov. 1611, 362.

, —, workmen to be collected by the sheriffs for building of, 379.

, composition made for, 420.

, old inhabitants of, Londoners dealt with that they may be admitted to be of the corporation, 488, 489.

, 500l. to be employed to their use, ib.

, impropriations belonging to the Archbishop of Armagh, a return to be made of, 489.

, none but a Briton to be sheriff for three first years, ib.

— bishopric, Londoners commend Dean Webb for Bishop, 488.

— —, bestowed on Dr. Braeth Babington, on promotion of G. Montgomery to see of Meath, 490.

, gunners at, 507.

, the county of the city of, extends three miles every way, 565.

, —, is as to three fourths an island, surrounded by Lough Foyle, ib.

, —, the other one fourth is divided by a bay from Enishowen, ib.

, —, the island contains by estimation only 300 acres English, ib.

, —, one moiety thereof in the diocese of Derry, the other moiety of Rapho, ib.

, —, it is found by inquisition taken, 1 Sept. 1609, that this island has been possessed in former times, part by the Bishop, part by the Dean, and part by the Abbot of Derry, ib.

, —, but the greatest part was held by two Herenaghs and their septs, the one called Laghina, the other O'Derry, ib.

, —, His Majesty's and sundry other persons titles to lands in, 565.

, the island of Derry, ib.

, —, the bishop's part of, ib.

, —, the dean's part of, 566.

, —, the abbot's part of, ib.

, —, the herenagh's part of, ib.

, Abbot of, held of old part of the island of Derry, ib.

, the abbot formerly owned in the island the site of the abbey of Columkille, 566.

, the two septs of the Laghines and O'Derry owned the rest of the island, ib.

— Laghine's lands being in the diocese of Derry, ib.

, and O'Derry's lands in the diocese of Rapho, ib.

, both had fines for blood, sanctuary, cuttings, and other royalties, which were collected by them and paid to the abbot, and nothing to either of the Bishops, ib.

, they were not removable by the Bishops, ib.

, the Termon and Herenagh lands, within the island, found to have been first given by Columkille to the several septs, ib.

, —, and were held by them in gavelkind, ib.

, —, they were given by the abbots before any bishops were placed in that see, ib.

, —, these Herenagh lands being the Abbot's portion, came to the Crown by the Act of Dissolution of Abbeys, &c., and were given to Sir James Fullerton in fee-farm, and by him sold to Sir George Paulet, ib.

, Dean of, found seised of Ballionen, in county of Coleraine, by inquisition (30th August 1609), 564.

, Herenagh lands in the island and city of, 565.

, —, the title and condition of it, ib.

, —, the island, parcel of Tyrconnell, ib.

, —, Tyrconnell, or O'Donnell's country, ever heretofore held by Irish customs and not by English tenure until the 1st year of King James I., ib.

, by the Statute 12th Elizabeth all Irish lords of Ulster and Connaught who should surrender their lands to the Queen or her successors, should have them re-granted free of all estates (except such as had good right by due course of Her Majesty's laws) according to the tenor of the re-grant, 566, 567.

, —, 1 Feb., 1 James, Rory O'Donnel, pretended Lord of Tyrconnell, surrendered, and had a re-grant of Tyrconnell, to him and his heirs in tail, the effect being to bar all estates except those held by the English law, 567.

, —, and thus the Erenagh's titles (being held by Irish tenure) were made void, ib.

, —, and thus, by the Earl of Tyrconnell's attainder, are vested, like the rest of Tyrconnell, in the Crown, ib.

, —, the residue of the lands in the county the city of Derry lie in Enishowen, and are come to the Crown by the same attainder, 567, 568.

, —, the rest of the temporal lands in the county of Coleraine which lie in O'Cahan's country are vested in the Crown, by 11th Elizabeth, 568.

, —, the lands are not yet granted, but remain at the King's disposal, ib.

, Dean of, possessed of four quarters in O'Cahan's country, ib.

, parson and vicar of, two parishes only in the county of the city of, with no lands, only two garden plots belonging to the parson and vicar, ib.

, county of the city of, the abbey lands, 18 quarters, granted in fee-farm, 29 August, 2 James I., to Sir Henry Brouncker, and came by mesne assignment to Sir George Paulet, ib.

, —, —, leases thereof, to Sir Henry Docwra, Sir Ralph Bingley, Sir George Carey, in 1602 and 1603, ib.

, Clogher, and Raphoe, Bishop of, recommended to be promoted to Meath, 14.

— and Rapho, Erenagh land in, 403.

, see also Londoners.

Derry Maclaghlin, 342.

Dersley, Roger, 548.

Dery, Barnaby, 84.

, Thomas, 83.

Description of Ulster in 1586, viii and foll.

Deserte Linn, commissions at, 294.

Desmond, Elizabeth, Countess of, petition for pension, 20.

, Earl of, proposed as President of Munster, xvii.

, —, 232.

, late Earl of, forfeited lands of, 577.

, Gerot, Earl of, rebellion of, 582.

, John of, called the Counte, 13.

, Morice FitzJohn, 475.

, in Munster, 474.

, good harbours in, ib.

, Countess of, petition to Salisbury, 449.

, —, has married her daughter, 450.

Devereux, Lieutenant, to be a "servitor," 428.

Devlins, the, horsemen of Tyrone, xxvii.

Devonshire, Earl of, lxxxvii, 207, 353.

, —, claim on 200l. of the traitor Tyrone, 302.

, names of chief undertakers from, in Munster, lxxvi.

, county of, 477,

Dezart alias Kells, priory of, 448.

Dido's colony at Carthage, alluded to by Sir J. Davys, 501.

Dies, William, 360.

Diffrin, see Dufferin.

Diffringe, see Dufferin.

Digby, Sir R., suit with Earl of Kildare remitted to ordinary course of law, 20.

, —, suit of, against Earl of Kildare, inquiry touching, 29.

, —, decree of Castle Chamber in his suit with Lord Kildare, 141.

, —, 210.

, —, suit with Lord Kildare, four papers regarding, 424.

, —, renews his claims against the Earl of Kildare, 517.

, —, remitted to Irish courts, 524.

Digges, Sir Dudley, 548.

Diggis fort, by Derry, 38.

Dillon, Bartholomew, called as witness by Lord Howth, 391.

, —, his evidence, 392.

, —, conflict of testimony, ib.

, —, maintains his statement, ib.

, —, confirmed by Howth, ib.

, —, Lord Howth's account of his deposition before the Council, 394.

, Bartholomew, denies that Howth ever spoke to him on the subject, 394.

, —, his letter to Howth contradicting Chichester's allegation, ib.

, —, 381, 391, 394.

, Henry, 233.

, Sir Henry, held a Presidency necessary in Ulster, xxi.

, Patrick, 79.

, Sir Robert, 109.

, Robert, 548.

, John, ib.

, Mr., in suit with a person who has gone over with the Treasurer, 408.

, the Lady, (otherwise) Bellew, 110.

Dios, William, commissioner of plantations of Londonderry, 136.

Discourse on Ireland by J. Hudson, xx.

Divelins, the, attend session at Dungannon, 16.

Dixon, Robert, 511.

Do, castle of, and eight quarters of land near Rathmullen, granted to John Arthur, of Dublin, merchant, 571. See Doe.

Doa, see Doe.

, Doagh, castle of, held by Neile M'Swyne, 9.

Doagh, see Doe.

, why used, ib.

Dob, John, 231.

Dobb, John, 75.

, Mr. John, 368. See Dob.

Docquet of Henry Reynoldes' disbursements, 19.

Docwra, Sir Henry, suitor for Ulster Presidency, xxii.

, —, his troop of horse, 32.

, —, his office of provost prejudicial to Derry, 59.

, —, Sir Donnel O'Cahane makes his submission to, in 1602, 65.

, —, 117, 366, 556.

, —, pension of, 168.

, —, fines received by, 175.

, —, referred to by Chichester for account of Sir Neale O'Donnel and his fellow prisoners, 306.

, —, O'Cahan's conditions with, upon his submission, 413.

, —, governor of Lough Foyle, 507.

Dod, Dr. Roger, 376.

Doddridge, John, 116.

Dodington, Captain, has a ward at Dongiven, 194.

, —, it will control the wild inhabitants between that and Glanconkein, ib.

, —, Edward, has undertaken a settlement in Ireland, and asks for favour, 291.

, —, to be a "servitor," 428.

, —, 504.

, —, Edward, 509.

Doe, Sir Ralph Bingley's men at, 33.

, castle of, a ward to be reserved at, 58.

, —, 81, 115, 367.

, —, constable of, William Elling, 509.

, —, Capt. Richard Bingley, ib.

, precinct of, 405.

, John, 73.

Dogherty, Phelim, a monk, deposition of, in Neale Garve's case, 309.

Dogs, Irish, 477, 479.

Donalonge, 366.

Donderry in Cork, 522.

Donegal, a new county of Ulster, viii.

, modern name of Tyrconnell, xxiv.

, "bangled" by Tyrconnell by sales and mortgages, 57.

, wards to be reserved in, 58.

, town of, a ward to be reserved at, ib.

, people of, claim to have freeholds, 160.

, four merchants (named) offer to become undertakers of the whole county of Donegal, 346.

, —, would build a fort near the sea side, ib.

, county of, 363, 369.

, castle and abbey of, 367.

, constable of, Capt. Basil Brooke, 509.

, county of, or O'Donnel's country, 569.

, King's title to forfeited lands in, ib.

, a mere Irish county till 1 Jas. I., ib.

, King's writ never ran there, ib.

, the Irish lords had cuttings and spendings, bonaght, and all other Irish exactions, ib.

, the country surrendered, and regranted under statute 12 Elizabeth, ib.

, except abbey and spiritual lands, and the castle of Ballashannon, town and fishing, and 1,000 acres adjacent, which were reserved to the King, ib.

, except also Castle Finne, and all Sir Neale O'Donnell's lands called Glan Fynne, and Monganah, 570.

, except also O'Doherty's country, containing the barony of Enishowen, ib.

, Herenagh lands in, ib.

, the titles all destroyed by the surrender and re-grant, as not being estates held according to the King's laws, ib.

, His Majesty's title to the temporal lands in, 569.

, conveyances made by the Earl of Tyrconnel, 571.

, lands excepted out of the Earl's patent, 572.

, ecclesiastical lands in, 573.

, — abbey of Kilmacreenan, ib.

, —, —, Killadonell, ib.

, —, — Asheroe, ib.

, Bishop of Derry's demense lands, ib.

, Bishop of Rapho's demesne lands, ib.

, Dean of Rapho's demesne lands, ib.

, glebe lands, ib.

, Herenagh lands, ib.

, county, see Tyrconnell.

Donellan, Nehemiah, Archbishop of Tuam, petition of, to be allowed to resign his see, 184.

Donelyes, the, attend sessions at Dungannon, 16.

Donganon, precinct of, 405.

, market of, 406.

Dongheon, in county of Coleraine, the King's fort of, 565. See Dungiven.

Dongiven, see Dungiven.

Donnalong, 346.

Donnell, John, 511.

Donnington, Captain, 367.

Donovan, see O'Donovan.

Doole, Oge, rides to O'Donnell at Castle Fynn, 2.

Dorrington, Captain, 547.

Doters, Wm., 360.

Douay, college of, 44.

, —, president of, ib.

, Tyrone of, xxxix.

Doubbeny, Nicholas, to be a servitor, 428.

Dounbar, Earl of, commissioner of plantation, 136.

Dowdal, Sir John, suit of, recommended, 40.

, —, 101, 126, 484. See Dowdall.

Dowdall, Francis, tenant of Arde rectory, Rathmullen, 448.

Down, an old county of Ulster, viii.

, description of, xi.

, large infusion of Anglo-Norman element in, xi.

, how divided into districts, xxiv.

, abbey of, in county of Wexford, 121, 122.

, Bishop of, censured for unduly procuring commendams, 457.

, —, his explanation and defence to Salisbury, 458.

, county of, Sir Robt. Jacob found to be as quiet in Feb. 1609, as the English Pale, 193.

, —, but they are (as the rest of Ulster) all false in their hearts, ib.

, dean and chapter to be erected in, 581.

Down, St. Patrick's monastery at, 448.

, abbey of St. Thomas and John at, ib.

, house of monks at, ib.

, quit-rents in, ib.

Downgevine, see Dungiven.

Downlis, the Lord of, 465.

Downton, Roger, clerk of the Pipe, inquiries as to his perquisites, 546.

Drake (Sir Francis), 100.

, John, of Drakeston, hostility of, to Sir G. Moore, 140.

, a pirate taken by Lord Thomond, 186.

, monument of, at Deptford, 100.

Drakeston, in Meath, 140.

Drea, John, 467, 473.

Drogheda, 221, 254, 322, 383.

, Lord Howth's men at, 33.

, suit for renewal of charters and privileges as to customs, 154.

, proposal to make a residence for the Deputy at, 423.

, Mayor of, arrests a party of decayed gentlemen of North Wales, 453.

Droghedonan, ordnance to be moved to, 20.

Dromagh, in Cork, 584.

Dromgoole, Thomas, bill to, 19.

, —, 227.

Drommore, castle and lands of, 584. See Dromore.

Dromore, Bishop of, 470, 471.

, bishopric of, 487.

, dean and chapter in, 581.

Dromynine, castle and lands of, 584.

Drumconragh, co. Dublin, 325.

Drumrusk Castle, constable of, Capt. Maurice Gritfith, 508.

Dublin, Archbishop of, 107.

, charter of, to be renewed, 132.

, suit for renewal of charter and privileges as to customs, 154.

, college, lands set apart for, to be distinguished by bounds, 182.

, being left desolate by the slaughter made of the Easterlings, was given by King Henry II. to Bristol, 209.

, —, to be inhabited from Bristol, ib.

— city, complains of soldiers cessed on them, 251.

, mayor of, 323.

, coroner of, ib.

, loans by merchants of, to Government, their names and loans, 341.

, complains of the cessing of soldiers on the city, 343.

, college lands, how marked in maps of escheated counties, 403.

Dublin Castle, 112, 230, 231, 234, 235, 250, 328, 386, 394.

, fugitive Earls charged with designs to seize it, lxii, lxv.

, prison, prisoners, and prison keepers of, 78.

, gaol in, 175.

, to be separated from Lord Deputy's dwelling, ib.

, Chichester obliged to leave it in summer for its noisomeness, 250.

, estimate of cost of repair of gaol in, ib. 251.

, —, of record depository, 250.

, John Cole, pensioner, for saving the prisoners from escape, on an outbreak, from prison in, when he was wounded, 337.

, Lord Delvin's escape from, 336, 394.

, constable of, Henry Pierce, 508.

Dudley, Lord, to be privy councillor, 191.

Duffe, James, prays for payment of moneys sent to Sir T. Ridgeway, 514.

, William, examination of, 393.

, of Drogheda, charges the young Prince with seducing the late Lord Essex's daughter, 453.

Dufferin, a country of Down, xi.

, sometime the inheritance of the Mandevilles, xii.

, now belongs to White, ib.

, usurped by Scots, ib.

, the, John White, of, 484.

Duffes, the, condemned for not bearing witness against Sir G. Moore, 140.

Dumfermline, Earl of, 483.

Dun, Doctor, Master in Chancery, 338.

Dunalong, fort of, 325.

Dunbar, Earl of, 483.

Duncannon Castle, fugitive Earls charged with design to seize it, xii.

, fort of, 12, 40, 98, 369.

, —, constable of, Sir Laurence Esmond, 508.

Dundalk, travellers northwards from, impeded by Shane O'Neill, xi.

, all stations north of, purely military, xv, lxxviii.

, Capt. Steward's men at, 33.

, the rendezvous for Chichester's journey to the north, 257.

, Chichester orders the captains of horse and foot to meet at, 385.

Dundrum estuary, Down, xxiv.

Dunegal, see Donegal.

Dunegall, see Donegal.

Dungall, see Donegal.

Dungannon, the new castle of, ix.

, Baron of, said to be about to marry M'Callum's daughter, xxxvi.

, assizes at, in 1608, lxxix.

, proceedings of Sir J. Davys and Sir T. Ridgeway, under commission of escheat and survey at, lxxix, lxxx.

, Sir J. Davys's journey from, to Coleraine, through the woods and glyns of Glanconkeyne, lxxx.

, trial and execution of rebels at, 7.

, sessions at, account of, 15.

, —, apostacy of a monk at, 16.

, gets his liberty and life thereupon, ib.

, barony of, 60.

, —, to be made a corporation, 61.

, Sir Robt. Jacob holds assizes there, in 1609, 195.

, was wont to be the receptacle of all traitors, 195.

, now in best order in Ulster, ib.

, all round Dungannon in peace, ib.

, well governed by the discreet and temperate carriage of Sir Toby Caulfeild, ib.

, if there is to be a president of Ulster, his house must be at Dungannon, and 3,000 acres laid to it, 369.

, Tirlagh M'Art O'Neill to have two middle proportions in, 429.

, castle, constable of, John Meeke, 509.

, 492, 541, 542.

Dungarvan Castle, constable of, Sir George Carey, 508.

Dungiven, one of chief places of Coleraine, 61.

, a ward under Capt. Dodington at, 194, 367.

, abbey of, 349.

, —, asked for by the Londoners, ib.

, —, already given to college at Dublin, ib.

, Castle, constable, Capt. Henry Dodington, 509.

Dunkirk, 383.

Dunluce, castle of, 21.

, cannon of, 1588 (Spanish Armada), taken out of sea at, 303.

Dunsoghly, surrender of and re-grant to Sir C. Plunkett, 518.

Durham, diocese of, 50.

Dutch, harbouring of, in England, complained of by Spaniards, 179.

Dutchmen, some hopeful project (unexplained) of, 242.

Dutch prize taken by pirates, 142.

Dutton, Richard, usher of the Exchequer, 514.

, Sir Thomas, to be scoutmaster-general, 432.

, —, scoutmaster, 507.