BHO

Henry IV: November 1411

Parliament Rolls of Medieval England. Originally published by Boydell, Woodbridge, 2005.

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Citation:

In this section

1411 November

Introduction 1411

Westminster

3 November - 19 December

(C 65/72. RP , III.647-66. SR , ii.166-9)

C 65/72 is a roll of sixteen membranes, each approximately 330 mm. (13 ins) wide, sewn together in chancery style and numbered at the head and foot in a later hand. The text, which is in a neat and clear chancery script, and apparently written by a single hand, occupies the rectos of the membranes only, the versos being blank apart from the words 'Parl. 13 H. 4' written in a later hand at the head of each membrane. The roll is in good condition apart from some staining on mm. 1 and 4 and a tear at the right side of m. 3. A scrap of manuscript in a late medieval gothic book hand has been stitched to the right side of the head of m. 12r., and two pieces have been stitched to the right side of the head of m. 8v. Two-thirds of mm. 1 and 11 are blank, while half of m. 8 is blank. Several of the marginals are contemporary with the text, but others (including all of those to the commons' petitions) are in a later hand. The numbering of items in the text (included below) is added in the margin, also in a later hand. There is no internal evidence to suggest that the roll as it now exists is incomplete; however, the statute roll for the parliament includes two statutes (cap. vi, confirming the statute of 1410 banning galley-halfpennies and other foreign money from the realm; and cap. vii, setting out procedures for dealing with any 'riot, assembly, or rout of people) which, most unusually for this time, do not appear to be based on petitions from the commons, and one possible explanation for this could be that the original roll no longer survives in its entirety. A more likely explanation, however, is that these statutes originated with discussions between the king and his ministers rather than being based on common petitions - although even so it is surprising that the parliament roll contains no mention of this. Nor - equally surprisingly - does it contain any mention of the general pardon proclaimed by the king three days after the dissolution of parliament, even though this was issued by Henry 'of his grace in parliament' and at the 'special request' of the lords and commons. (fn. f1411int-1)

The most significant outcome of the parliament of January - May 1410 had been the concentration of executive authority in the hands of Henry, prince of Wales, and his supporters - especially Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, and Sir Thomas Beaufort, who had been appointed as chancellor shortly after the opening of that parliament. For the next eighteen months, from May 1410 to November 1411, it was the prince who effectively ruled England, while King Henry IV, whose health was steadily declining, and his former chief minister Archbishop Arundel, remained on the sidelines. The most testing problem facing Prince Henry's administration was, as ever, finance: unfortunately, the loss of the exchequer receipt roll for the Easter 1411 term makes it impossible to know quite how successfully he handled the crown's resources, but the surviving evidence suggests that he did reasonably well. Expenditure on the royal household continued to fall, and for much of this period the payment of annuities seems to have been suspended. A new source of credit also opened up: on 9 June 1410, Henry Beaufort lent £1,000 to the crown, the first in that remarkable series of loans which were to mark his personal contribution to the war effort over the next quarter-century and more. (fn. f1411int-2)

During the summer of 1411, however, ever louder calls for intervention in the French civil war threatened not only the relative financial equipoise but also the stability of the prince's government. Civil war - between the Armagnacs, or Orleanists, on one side, and the Burgundians on the other - broke out in France in the winter of 1410-11, and both sides turned to England for support. King Henry was inclined either to remain aloof or tofavour the Armagnacs, but he was opposed by the prince: thus, according to the Great Chronicle of London , when ambassadors from the duke of Burgundy arrived at Westminster in search of support, 'the kyng wolde none men graunte hym. And so they spaken to the prince, and he sente to hym the Erle of Arundell, the lorde Cobham, and other lordes with a faire and awell arrayed meyne [host]'. (fn. f1411int-3) This English expeditionary force left England in September, and in fact met with considerable success, helping the Burgundians to regain Paris and defeat an Armagnac force at St. Cloud on 9 November, but the prince's decision to help Burgundy left him at odds with the king, and during the autumn tension between father and son continued to mount. At a council at Lambeth on 9 September it was agreed - contrary to the prince's wishes, apparently - to allow Archbishop Arundel's claim to his right of visitation at Oxford university (where the authorities were suspected of laxity in dealing with Lollards), and in October six of the prince's household knights, including his steward Sir Roger Leche, were arrested and sent to the Tower, although they were soon released. (fn. f1411int-4) By this time the decision to summon parliament had already been taken. Writs were issued on 21 September for a meeting at Westminster, and on Monday 3 November, as the earl of Arundel and the duke of Burgundy closed in on the Armagnacs at St. Cloud, the lords and commons duly gathered in the Painted Chamber. (fn. f1411int-5)

The lords spiritual were the same as those summoned in 1410, but there were three new faces among the lords temporal. William Lord Willoughby, who had died in December 1409, was replaced by his twenty-six-year-old son Robert, while John Clifford, who had been born in 1388, took the place formerly held by his father Thomas, who had died in 1391. The third was Hugh Stafford, who had married Elizabeth, the eleven-year-old daughter and heiress of Bartholomew Lord Bourchier, who had died in May 1409. The returns of the elected members are incomplete, but 49 (of the presumed 74) knights of the shire are known by name, plus 98 of the burgesses, making 147 in all. Eighteen of these were 'closely associated' with the prince and his followers, but there were also sixteen retainers of the king elected, so it is doubtful whether the sympathies of the commons leaned decisively towards son rather than father. (fn. f1411int-6)

On Monday 2 November, the day before the session was due to meet, Henry IV issued letters patent appointing chancellor Thomas Beaufort to declare the parliament open on the following day and then prorogue it until the Wednesday, 'as the king cannot be present in person'. (fn. f1411int-7) The most likely explanation for this is simply that Henry was unwell. It is not impossible, however, that something more sinister prompted the delay, perhaps even an attempt to force the king to abdicate. The evidence for this is sketchy, but what evidence there is points in the direction of Prince Henry and the Beauforts. According to one anonymous chronicler, the prince personally confronted his father and suggested that he abdicate, because 'he could no longer apply himself to the honour and profit of the realm'. (fn. f1411int-8) Meanwhile, Henry Beaufort apparently put the same proposal to parliament, but the lords and commons wanted no part in it. The author of the Continuatio Eulogii seems to preserve an account of the same episode, although he places it in the year 1413: in this year, he says, 'a meeting was held between Prince Henry, the king's first-born son, Henry bishop of Winchester, and many other - in fact, nearly all - of the lords of England, as to which of them would ask the king if he was prepared to resign the crown of England and allow his first-born son to be crowned, because he was horribly disfigured with leprosy. (fn. f1411int-9) But he, having been asked, on the advice of certain lords refused to resign, and promptly went on a journey around a large part of England, despite the above-mentioned leprosy'. It is worth noting also that at the time of his quarrel with the duke of Gloucester in 1426, Henry Beaufort was accused of having at one time incited the prince to assume the government of the realm - although not actually to depose Henry IV. (fn. f1411int-10) It is, at any rate, tolerably certain that some attempt was made either just before or at the beginning of this parliament to effect a more formal transfer of power from the king to the prince, and that King Henry succeeded in beating off the challenge. It was, from the prince's point of view, an inauspicious start to a meeting which would eventually see him almost totally stripped of the power which he had exercised over the previous eighteen months.

Thomas Beaufort duly opened the parliament on 3 November and prorogued it until the following day, when, with the king now present, he made the customary opening speech. Immediately after this, William Lord Roos of Helmsley submitted to parliament a petition in which he accused Sir Robert Tirwhit, one of the justices of the King's Bench, of having, with 'about 500' armed men, set an ambush for him and two of his kinsmen and fellow peers, Lords Beaumont and de la Warre, at a loveday which had been arranged between Roos and Tirwhit at Wragby in Lincolnshire following a dispute between them over turf-digging and hay-mowing. In itself, the case was far from unusual, but the personal involvement of a royal justice in such a calculated act of violence, and the status of the protagonists, clearly gave it an interest above the usual, and it was more than three weeks before the case was settled. Archbishop Arundel and Richard Lord Grey of Codnor, the king's chamberlain, were appointed to arbitrate, although in fact Tirwhit soon admitted his guilt. Given his office, he doubtless considered himself fortunate to escape with no more than a requirement to make a fulsome public apology and a promise to provide a sumptuous feast for Roos and his followers. What is more, he retained his place on the King's Bench for the rest of his life - a further twenty years.

Meanwhile, Henry IV was busy reasserting his authority. On Thursday 5 November, for the third time in succession, the commons chose as their speaker Thomas Chaucer, who promptly asked to be excused but was told curtly that the king 'readily accepted' the commons' choice. Chaucer then made the customary request to act as speaker only under protestation, to which Henry - knowing his man as he did by now - replied that he might speak under such protestation as previous speakers had done, but no other, for the king 'did not under any circumstances wish to have any kind of novelty in this parliament', but was determined to exercise the same liberties and prerogatives as his predecessors had. This seems to have wrong-footed Chaucer, who now requested that he be given a further day in order to set down in writing the precise terms of the protestation under which he was expected to speak. Henry agreed to this, but in fact was unable to attend parliament on the Friday (he had 'various important and weighty matters' to deal with, which presumably means that he was unwell), and so it was not until the Saturday that Chaucer was able to present the written schedule containing his protestation - which in fact bore precisely the same wording as the protestations of earlier speakers.

Following this halting and rather testy first week, there is little indication of the chronology of the remainder of the session. The chroniclers barely noticed the parliament, (fn. f1411int-11) while the only dates after 7 November mentioned on the roll are 27 November (the judgment on Sir Robert Tirwhit), 30 November (the dismissal of the council), and 19 December, the last day. However, there is no doubting the king's and the archbishop's victory. At Arundel's insistence, the decision to uphold his right of visitation of Oxford was enrolled on the official record; Richard Courtenay, the university's vice-chancellor and the leader of the opposition to Arundel, was forced to resign, and the university apologised publicly to the archbishop. (fn. f1411int-12) By 30 November, the king felt secure enough to make his decisive move. According to the roll, Thomas Chaucer requested the king publicly to thank the prince and the other councillors for their labours on his behalf during the past eighteen months, adding that they had discharged their duties in true and loyal fashion. The councillors then knelt before the king, and Henry 'thanked them most graciously'. Even at this point the prince could not resist remarking that he and his fellows could have discharged their responsibilities even better had they been given adequate resources with which to do so - a sentiment with which his father doubtless sympathised - but the king simply thanked them again, at the same time making it quite clear that the responsibilities to which they were both referring were now a thing of the past. Despite the blandness of the official record, what had in fact happened was that the prince's council had been dismissed. Nor was there any talk on this occasion of nominating a new council in parliament - indeed quite the contrary, for Henry was determined to press home his advantage. On Saturday 19 December, the last day, Chaucer once again appeared before the king to ask him what he intended to do about 'a certain article' restricting the royal prerogative which had been enacted in the previous parliament. Henry was ready for this, having instigated the exchange by telling the chancellor to remind the commons about the article, and he replied without hesitation that he had every intention of exercising his royal prerogative to the full, in the same way as his predecessors had done. Chaucer had little option but to agree, and the article, with everything that followed from it, was annulled in full parliament. Unless the article referred to was the nomination of the council in the 1410 parliament - which is possible - there is no means of knowing what it said, but its abolition was clearly another sign of the king's ascendancy.

The extent of Henry's triumph evidently left some of those present in need of reassurance, however, for immediately after this Chaucer presented a further request: a 'great rumour' had arisen, he declared, to the effect that the king might still 'harbour in his heart' a grudge against certain of his subjects who had attended either this or the previous parliament, and he was asked to declare publicly that he regarded each and every one of them as his true and loyal subjects; Henry, 'of his special grace', assured them of his goodwill. It was presumably on the same day that the grant of taxation was made. Since the last of the three half tenths and fifteenths granted in the 1410 parliament did not fall due until Michaelmas 1412, the king could hardly ask for another lay subsidy in the usual form. However, the commons did agree to renew the wool subsidy and tunnage and poundage for a further year (from Michaelmas 1412, when they were due to expire), on condition that three quarters of the wool subsidy was assigned to the maintenance of Calais and the rest to the defence of the realm. They also granted the king a tax of 6s. 8d. per £20 worth of lands and rents per annum, to be raised within the next two months, although only (as with the income tax of 1404) on condition that it should not be treated as a precedent. This was hardly going to solve the crown's financial dilemma (it probably yielded little more than £2,000), (fn. f1411int-13) but at least it was something, and there were always other expedients to be tried. Thus the final day of the session also witnessed a declaration from the king that for a trial period of two years the royal mint at the Tower would coin fifty, rather than forty-eight, nobles from each pound of gold, and 360, rather than 300, pennies from each pound of silver. The ostensible reason for the change was 'the great scarcity of money at present in the realm', but it is not impossible that anticipation of the profit which the mint might make on seigniorage charges (which, during 1412, amounted to £2,833) played some part in the argument for change. (fn. f1411int-14) It was no doubt also on this final day of the parliament that the general pardon was proclaimed by the king - further evidence, no doubt, of his need to make concessions in return for money.

This ordinance for debasement of the coinage was the only legislative act of the parliament which was noted by any of the chroniclers, (fn. f1411int-15) and the only one of the other statutes which was of lasting significance was the statute of riots, which, as already noted, seems not to have originated with the commons (even this was to be overtaken within little more than two years, by the more comprehensive statute of riots issued by Henry V at the Leicester parliament of 1414). Otherwise, the livery legislation of 1399 was reiterated and extended, especially in relation to liveries distributed by communities or companies, while two separate petitions tackled the problem of free passage for traders on the river Severn. A further petition complained that the price of pepper, said to be 'the most commonly-used spice by all the commons of the realm', was reaching excessive levels, while 'grocers and Lombards' hoarded sackfuls of it in the hope of making a killing; they were ordered by the king to sell it for twenty pence per pound, and no more.

Once parliament was dismissed, the king moved immediately to consolidate the reassertion of his authority. On 20 December, Henry Lord Scrope was dismissed from the treasury and Thomas Beaufort from the chancery. Three days later Sir John Pelham, a royal chamber knight with impeccable Lancastrian credentials, was appointed as treasurer. The obvious candidate for chancellor was, naturally, Archbishop Arundel, and although he did not actually assume office until 5 January, it seems to have been accepted as early as 19 December that he would do so. (fn. f1411int-16) Both remained in office until the end of the reign, as did the new council which took shape during January. In addition to Arundel and Pelham, this comprised John Prophet as keeper of the privy seal, the archbishop of York (Henry Bowet), the bishops of Durham (Thomas Langley), Bath and Wells (Nicholas Bubwith), and London (Richard Clifford), the earl of Westmorland, and William Lord Roos - a council, in other words, very much after the king's heart, and with no place for Prince Henry or the Beauforts. (fn. f1411int-17) With the new administration also came a change in policy. Early in the new year envoys arrived from both sides in the French civil war requesting English help; it was decided, after lengthy discussion, to switch from a Burgundian to an Armagnac alliance, and thus in June 1412 the king's second son, Thomas duke of Clarence, was appointed to lead an English army to France to fight against those same Burgundians who, less than a year before, the earl of Arundel had been despatched to assist. Whether because of this decision specifically, or simply from a more general feeling of resentment at his exclusion from power, Prince Henry launched a further challenge to the king's authority during the summer of 1412, and at one point it even seemed as if he might come out in open revolt against his father. (fn. f1411int-18) With the king's health failing, however, it must have been becoming increasingly obvious that he only had to remain patient a little longer, and by September father and son were reconciled.

The parliament of November 1411 is the last of Henry IV's reign for which any records survive. A further parliament was, however, summoned, the writs being issued on 1 December 1412 for a meeting on 3 February 1413 at Westminster. (fn. f1411int-19) The members assembled at the appointed time, but the king was by now so ill that the parliament was never formally opened, so the knights and burgesses simply waited at Westminster until he died, and then dispersed to their homes. (fn. f1411int-20) Henry's death came on 20 March 1413, in the Jerusalem chamber within the lodging of the abbot of Westminster. He had maintained, right until the end, the political ascendancy which he had so determinedly recovered at the parliament of 1411. How long he might have continued to do so is another matter, but he died, as he would have wished, with his 'liberties and prerogatives' intact.

Text and translation

[p. iii-647]
[col. a]
[memb. 16]
ROTULUS PARLIAMENTI TENTI APUD WESTM' IN CRASTINO ANIMARUM, ANNO REGNI REGIS HENRICI QUARTI TERCIODECIMO. THE ROLL OF THE PARLIAMENT HELD AT WESTMINSTER ON THE MORROW OF ALL SOULS, IN THE THIRTEENTH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF KING HENRY THE FOURTH.
Prorogacion de parlement. [Adjournment of parliament].
1. Maresdy, lendemayn des almes, qe feust le tierce jour de Novembre, et le primer jour de parlement, les chivalers des countees d'Engleterre, et les citeins et burgeoises des citees et burghs, somons au parlement par brief du roy, feurent proclamez al heuse del chambre Depeinte deins le palois de Westm', en presence del seneschall de l'ostel du roy, come le manere est. Et puis apres vient en la dite chambre, a lieu ordeigne et assigne pur parlement, Thomas Beaufort, frere au roy, et chanceller d'Engleterre, et illoeqes, par comandement du roy, et par force d'un commissioun a luy directe en ce cas, en presence des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx lors y esteantz, et auxi en presence des chivalers des countees, et des citeins et burgeoises venuz a mesme le parlement, monstra et declara overtement la volentee nostre dit seignur le roy, en la fourme q'enseute. Coment par certeines causes moevantes mesme nostre seignur le roy, et auxi partant qe mesme nostre seignur le roy avoit bien entenduz qe pleuseurs des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et auxi des chivalers des countees, citeins et burgeoises, summonez par brief au parlement, ne feurent venuz au dit parlement a mesme le jour assignez, y pleust a mesme nostre seignur le roy de comander au dit chanceller et luy chargier de comencer le dit parlement, et de le proroger et continuer tanq'a mesquardy lors proschein enseuant, come par la dite commissioun illeoqes monstrez en parlement y purra pluis pleinement apparoir; de quele commissioun le tenure enseute en cestes parols: Henricus Dei gracia rex Anglie et Francie et dominus Hibernie omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint, salutem. Sciatis quod nos pro eo quod in propria persona nostra apud Westm' in crastino animarum proximo futuro quo die parliamentum nostrum ibidem teneri ordinavimus quibusdam certis de causis interesse non possumus, assignavimus et nomine nostro ordinavimus carissimum fratrem nostrum Thomam Beaufort cancellarium nostrum ad parliamentum predictum inchoandum et usque ad diem mercurii extunc proximo sequens nomine nostro continuandum et prorogandum. In cujus rei testimonium has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm' secundo die Novembris anno regni nostri terciodecimo. (fn. iii-647-7-1) 1. Adjournment of parliament. On Tuesday the morrow of All Souls, which was the third day of November and the first day of parliament, the knights of the counties of England, and the citizens and burgesses of the cities and boroughs, summoned to parliament by the king's writ, were proclaimed at the door of the Painted Chamber, in the presence of the steward of the king's household, as is customary. And then Thomas Beaufort, the king's brother and chancellor of England, came into the said chamber, to the place ordained and assigned for parliament, and there, by order of the king, and by force of a commission directed to him in this matter, in the presence of the lords spiritual and temporal, and also in the presence of the knights of the counties and the citizens and burgesses who had come to the same parliament, publicly explained and declared the wish of our said lord the king, as follows. How because, for certain causes moving our same lord the king, and also because our same lord the king was well aware that many of the lords spiritual and temporal, and also the knights of the counties, citizens and burgesses summoned by writ to parliament, had not come to the said parliament on the same assigned day, therefore it pleased our same lord the king to order and charge the said chancellor to open the said parliament, and to prorogue and continue it until the following Wednesday, as is more fully evident in the said commission shown then in parliament; the tenor of which commission follows in these words: Henry, by the grace of God king of England and France and lord of Ireland, to whom these present letters shall come, greeting. You are to know that because for certain reasons we are unable to be present in our own person at Westminster on the morrow of All Souls following, on which day we have ordained for our parliament to be held there, we have assigned and ordered our dear brother, Thomas Beaufort, our chancellor, to open the aforesaid parliament in our name and to continue and prorogue it in our name until the following Wednesday. In testimony of which things we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witnessed by myself at Westminster, 2 November in the thirteenth year of our reign. (fn. iii-647-7-1)
Per brevem de privato sigillo. By writ of privy seal.
Pronunciacioun de parlement. [The opening of parliament].
2. Item, mesqerdy le tierce jour de Novembre, les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et les communes d'Engleterre sommons pur le parlement adonqes esteantz en presence du roy, Monsire Thomas Beaufort, frere au roy, et chaunceller d'Engleterre, par commandement du roy pronuncia et declara les causes del sommons de parlement, en la fourme q'enseute. Primerement, il rehercea coment le roy avoit sommonez soun parlement principalment pur trois causes: c'estassavoir pur la [col. b] bone governance de soun roialme; pur la due execucioun et excercise de ses loies deins le roialme; et pur le bone et sauf garde et ordinance pur defense de ses paiis et terres dehors le roialme, et pur sauf garde du mier. 2. Opening of parliament. Also, on Wednesday 3 November, the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons of England who were summoned for the parliament being then in the presence of the king, my lord Thomas Beaufort, the king's brother and chancellor of England, by order of the king pronounced and declared the reasons for the summons of parliament, as follows. Firstly, he reiterated how the king had summoned his parliament principally for three reasons: namely, for the [col. b] good governance of his realm; for the due execution and exercise of the laws within the realm; and for the proper safeguard and provision for the defence of his countries and lands outside the realm, and the safeguard of the sea.
3. Et disoit outre, quant a la primere cause, c'estassavoir la governance de le roialme, deux choses feurent expedientz a chescuny, c'estassavoir loiall counseill sanz voluntarie affeccioun, due obeissance et honour a soun seignur liege. Et al secunde cause, c'estassavoir execucioun et excercise des loies deins le roialme, autres deux choses sont expedientz, c'estassavoir pur surement garder les loies ove due execucioun et hastif remedie pur abusioun de la loye en usurpacioun. Et al tierce cause, c'estassavoir pur la sauf garde de ses paiis et terres dehors le roialme, et pur la sauf garde du mier, deux choses sont expedientz, c'estassavoir cordialle relevacioun du roy en soun necessitee, et en cas nient purveuz discrete et hastif provisioun. Et partant qe le roy vorroit estre pleinement assertez coment cestes choses purront estre mieulx purveux et gardez, il avoit a ceste foitz sommonez soun parlement. 3. And he said moreover, as regards the first reason, thatis to say the governance of the realm, two things were expedient for everyone, namely loyal counsel without wilful bias, and due obedience and honour to their liege lord. And for the second reason, namely the execution and exercise of the laws within the realm, two other things are expedient, that is to say, the safe-keeping of the laws with due enforcement and speedy remedy for abuse in the usurpation of the law. And for the third reason, namely for the safeguard of his countries and lands outside the realm and for the safeguard of the sea, two things are expedient, that is to say gracious relief for the king's need, and, in those cases where provision has not been made, wise and quick provision. And because the king wishes to be fully informed as to how these things can be better provided for and protected, he has summoned his parliament at this time.
4. Et outre ce, mesme le chaunceller declarra overtement en parlement, q'y feust la voluntee du roy, qe seinte esglise ait et enjoie toutz ses libertee et fraunchises, et qe la graunde chartre, et chartre de la foreste, et toutz autres estatutz et ordinances faites devaunt ces heures, et nient repellez, soient tenuz et gardez, et mys en due execucioun. Et surce mesme le chaunceller chargea les ditz communes d'aler ensemble pur eslire leur commune parlour, en manere acustume, et luy presenter au roy en plein parlement lendemayn enseuant. Et puis apres les nouns des receivours et triours des peticions du parlement feurent luez en la fourme q'enseute: 4. And moreover, the same chancellor declared publicly in parliament that it was the king's wish that holy church should have and enjoy all its liberties and franchises, and that the Great Charter, and the Charter of the Forest, and all other statutes and ordinances made before this time and not repealed, should be kept and maintained and put into effect. Whereupon the chancellor charged the said commons to proceed together to the election of their common speaker in the customary way, and to present him to the king in full parliament on the following day. Then the names of the receivers and triers of petitions of parliament were read, as follows:
5. Receivours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irland, Gales et Escoce:

  • Sire Johan Wakeryng
  • Sire Johan Chitterne
  • Sire Johan Rome.
5. Receivers of petitions from England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • Sir John Wakering
  • Sir John Chitterne
  • Sir John Rome.
6. Receivours des peticions de Gascoigne, et des autres terres et paiis pardela la meer, et des isles:

  • Sire Johan Roderham
  • Sire Johan Hertilpole
  • Sire Henre Maupas.
6. Receivers of petitions from Gascony and the other lands and countries overseas, and the Channel Islands:

  • Sir John Roderham
  • Sir John Hartlepool
  • Sir Henry Maupas.
Et ceux qi veullent liverer leur peticions les baillent avant parentre cy et dymenche proschein. And those who wish to submit their petitions should deliver them between now and next Sunday.
[p. iii-648]
[col. a]
7. Et sont assignez triours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irland, Gales et Escoce:

  • L'ercevesqe de Canterbirs
  • L'evesqe de Wyncestre
  • L'evesqe de Duresme
  • L'abbe de Seint Alban
  • L'abbe de Westm'
  • Le count de Warrewyk
  • Le count de Westmerl'
  • Le seignur de Burnell
  • Le seignur de Morley
  • William Gascoigne
  • Monsire William Thirnyng
  • Robert Tirwhit.
7. And the following are assigned triers of petitions for England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • The archbishop of Canterbury
  • The bishop of Winchester
  • The bishop of Durham
  • The abbot of St Albans
  • The abbot of Westminster
  • The earl of Warwick
  • The earl of Westmorland
  • Lord Burnell
  • Lord Morley
  • William Gascoigne
  • Sir William Thirning
  • Robert Tirwhit.
- toutz ensemble, ou vi des prelatz et seignurs avauntditz au meins; appellez a eux les chaunceller, tresorer, seneschall, et chamberleyn, et auxint les sergeantz du roy quaunt y bosoignera. Et tiendront leur place en la chambre de chamberleyn pres de la chambre Depeinte. To act all together, or at least six of the aforesaid prelates and lords, consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, steward and chamberlain, as well as the king's serjeants, when necessary. And their session will be held in the Chamberlain's Chamber, next to the Painted Chamber.
[memb. 15]
8. Et sont assignez triours des peticions de Gascoigne, et des autres terres et paiis pardela la meer, et des isles:

  • L'ercevesqe d'Everwyk
  • L'evesqe d'Ely
  • L'evesqe de Baa
  • L'abbe de Waltham
  • L'abbe de Wynchecombe
  • Le cont d'Oxenford
  • Le cont de Suff'
  • Le seignur de Roos
  • Le seignur de Berkeley
  • Monsire Hugh Huls
  • Monsire William Hankeford
  • Robert Hulle.
8. And the following are assigned to be triers of petitions for Gascony and the other lands and countries overseas, and the Channel Islands:

  • The archbishop of York
  • The bishop of Ely
  • The bishop of Bath
  • The abbot of Waltham
  • The abbot of Winchcombe
  • The earl of Oxford
  • The earl of Suffolk
  • Lord Roos
  • Lord Berkeley
  • Sir Hugh Huls
  • Sir William Hankford
  • Robert Hull.
- toutz ensemble, ou vi des prelatz et seignurs avauntditz au meins; appellez a eux les chaunceller, tresorer, seneschall, et chamberleyn, et auxint les sergeantz du roy quaunt y bosoignera. Et tiendront lour place en la chambre Marcolf. To act all together, or at least six of the aforesaid prelates and lords, consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, steward and chamberlain, as well as the king's serjeants, when necessary. And their session will be held in the Marcolf Chamber.
Presentacioun de parlour. [Presentation and protestation of the speaker].
9. Item, joedy le quint jour de Novembre, viendrent les communes devant le roy et les seignurs en parlement, et presenterent Thomas Chaucer pur leur commune parlour. Et le dit parlour pria au roy de luy avoir pur excusez de celle occupacioun pur diverses causes. Et le roy respondi, q'il s'agrea bien a ce qe les communes avoient fait touchant leur eleccioun. Et puis apres pria le dit parlour, q'il purroit parler dessoutz protestacioun. A quoy le roy graunta q'il parleroit dessoutz tiele protestacioun come autres parlours avoient fait devaunt luy en temps de ses nobles progenitours et auncestres, et en soun temps demesne, mais nemye autrement, qar il ne vorroit aucunement avoir nulle manere de novellerie en cest parlement, mais q'il vorroit estre et esteer en ses libertee et fraunchise auxi entierment et a large come aucunes de ses ditz progenitours ou auncestres avoient estee en ascun temps passe. Et surce pria le dit parlour, de par les ditz communes, q'il pleust au roy, q'ils purront ent estre advisez tanq'al vendredy enseuant, pur mettre en escript leur dite protestacioun plus en especial, et de le monstrer a mesme nostre seignur le roy le vendredy suisdit. A quoy le roy s'agrea bien. Et partant q'a cell vendredy le roy ne purroit entendre d'oir les ditz communes, pur diverses graundes et chargeantes matires moevez et monstrez a cel vendredy, samady proschein enseuant qe feust le vi me jour de Novembre, les communes viendrent devaunt le roy et les seignurs en parlement, et illeoqes le dit parlour, en noun des ditz communes, pria au roy, q'il purroit parler dessoutz tiele protestacioun come autres parlours avoient faitz devaunt soun temps, sibien en temps de mesme nostre seignur le roy come en temps de ses nobles [col. b] progenitours. Et si riens serroit parlez par le dit parlour qe serroit en desplesance du roy nostre seignur, ou encontre ses regalie et prerogatif, qe Dieu defende, qe pleust a roy de l'accepter come chose faite de negligence, et pur defaut de seen et esciente, et pur nule autre malvoise volentee n'entencioun, et d'ent avoir le dit parlour et les communes pur excusez. A quoy le roy s'agrea bien. 9. Presentation of the speaker. Also, on Thursday 5 November, the commons came before the king and the lords in parliament, and presented Thomas Chaucer as their common speaker. And the said speaker asked the king to excuse him from this task for various reasons, but the king replied that he readily accepted the choice that the commons had made touching their election. And then the speaker asked that he might speak under protestation. To which the king granted that he might speak under such protestation as other speakers had done before him in the time of his noble progenitors and ancestors, and in his own time, but not otherwise, because he did not under any circumstances wish to have any kind of novelty in this parliament, but he wished to be and to remain entirely in his liberties and franchises and also at liberty to the same extent as his other said progenitors or ancestors had been at any time in the past. Whereupon the said speaker asked, on behalf of the commons, that if it please the king, they might consider this until the Friday following, in order to put their protestation in writing more specifically, and show it to our same lord the king on the aforesaid Friday. To which the king readily agreed. However, because on that Friday the king was unable to attend to hear the said commons, on account of various important and weighty matters which arose and required attention on that Friday, on the following Saturday, which was 7 November, the commons came before the king and the lords in parliament, and there the said speaker, in the name of the commons, asked the king that he might speak under such protestation as other speakers had done before his time, both in the time of our same lord the king and in the time of his noble [col. b] progenitors. And if anything was said by the said speaker to displease the king, or against his regality and prerogative, which God forbid, that it should please the king to accept it as something done on account of negligence, and lack of knowledge and understanding, and through no other evil wish or intent, and to allow the said speaker and the commons to be excused because of this. To which the king readily agreed.
La grante faite en parlement. [The grant of the subsidies].
10. A l'honour de Dieu, et pur la graunt amour et entier < affeccioun qe voz poveres communes de vostre roialme d'Engleterre ont > a vous, nostre tresredoubte seignur le roy, pur le bien de roialme, et bone governance en temps avenir, voz ditz poveres communes, par assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en ycest present parlement tenuz a Westm' lendemayn des almes, l'an de vostre regne treszisme, grauntont a vous, nostre tresredoubte seignur, la subside des leyns, quirs, et peaux lanutz, en queconqes portes d'Engleterre a eskippers, pur estre levez de la fest de Seint Michel proschein avenir tanq'a fest de Seint Michel en un an entier lors proschein enseuant, en la fourme q'enseute: c'estassavoir, des marchantz denizeins, pur chescun sak de layn, xliij s. iiij d.; et de chescun ccxl peaux lanutz, xliij s. iiij d.; et de chescun last des quirs, c s. Et des marchantz aliens, de chescun sak de layn, liij s. iiij d.; et de chescun ccxl peaux lanutz, liij s. iiij d.; et de chescun last des quirs, cvi s. viij d. Parissint qe les trois parties del dit subside soient assignez, ordeinez, et deliverez sur les paiementz affaires pur le sauf garde de voz ville et chastelle de Caleys, et de voz autres chasteux et forteresses en voz marches illeoqes. Et ceo qe remaynt outre les ditz trois parties del dit subside, soit despenduz et emploiez pur la defense de roialme. Et auxint voz ditz poveres communes, par assent suisdit, pur la seure et sauf garde de mere en queconqes parties d'Engleterre, en defense de vostre roialme d'Engleterre, grauntont a vous, nostre tressoveraign seignur, iij s. de chescun tonelle de vyn, entrant en le dit roialme et passant hors d'icell; forspris les toneux de vyn prises pur la prise a vostre oeps. Et ensement voz ditz communes, par assent suisdit, grauntont a vous, nostre tressoveraigne seignur le roy, pur mesme la seure et sauf garde de miere en chescune partie d'Engleterre, en defense du dit roialme, des marchantz sibien denizeins come aliens, xij d. de la livre de chescun manere marchandise venant deins le dit roialme et passant hors d'icell; forspris layns, quirs, et peaux lanutz passantz hors de roialme; et forspris vyns, chescun manere de blee, floure, pesson rees, et bestaille, entrant en le dit roialme; et forspris cervoise q'est amesne hors de roialme; pur vitailler vostre ville de Caleys par voz gentz des villes de Baudesey et Alderton sur Gosseford, et aillours, come ils sont chargiez puis le conquest del dite ville de Caleys. Purveu toutfoitz, qe cest graunt del dit subside des layns, quirs, et peaux lanutz, ne de tonnage ne pondage, en temps avenir ne soit pris en ensample de chargier voz ditz seignurs et communes de vostre roialme de nulle manere subside pur la sauf garde des ditz ville et chastelle de Caleys, et autres forteresses et chasteux es marches illeoqes, ne pur la defense de roialme, ne pur la sauf garde de mere, s'il ne soit par voluntee des seignurs et communes de vostre dit parlement, et ceo de novelle graunt affaire en plein parlement avenir. Et outre ce, voz ditz poveres communes, par assent suisdit, grauntont a vous, nostre tresredoute seignur, de chescun homme et femme, de quelle estat ou condicioun q'ils soient, eiantz terres ou rent a la value de xxli. par an outre les charges et reprises duement trovez, vi s. viij d., forspris terres et tenementz purchacez a mortmayn devant l'an vyntisme du regne le Roy Edward fitz a Roy Henry; et forspris ceux terres et tenementz es mayns des seignurs espirituelx et religiouses purchacez en frank almoigne puys le dit an vyntisme, et pur queux [p. iii-649][col. a] ils paient les dismes ovesqe la clergie. Et outre ce, de chescun homme et femme eiantz xxli. de terre ou rent entiers outre les xxli. de terre ou rent avauntditz, pur chescun xxli. de terre ou rent entiers outre les charges et reprises, vi s. viij d. Et ensy paramont de chescun homme ou femme pur chescun xxli. de ses terres et rentz annuelx entiers outre les charges et reprises, vi s. viij d.; forspris les avant forsprisez; pur estre paiez lendemayn de la purificacioun de Nostre Dame proschein avenir, pur ent disposer et ordeigner a la frank volunte de nostre dit seignur le roy; si qe les chivalers, esquiers, citeins, ne burgeys, venuz par brief a ycest parlement, ne soient faitz collectours, assessours, contrerollours, ne commissiouners pur coiller, receiver, ou levir la dite subside. Parissint qe cest graunt de subsidene soit mye treite en ensample en temps avenir. (fn. iii-647-41-1) 10. The grant made in parliament. For the honour of God, and for the great love and pure affection which your poor commons of your realm have for you, our most dread lord the king, for the good of the realm, and for good governance in future, your said poor commons, by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal in this present parliament held at Westminster on the morrow of All Souls in the thirteenth year of your reign, grant to you, our most dread lord,the subsidy on wool, hides, and woolfells to be shipped from any ports of England, to be levied from the feast of Michaelmas next [29 September 1412] until the feast of Michaelmas following, for a whole year, as follows: namely, from native merchants, for each sack of wool, 43 s. 4 d.; and from each 240 woolfells, 43 s. 4 d.; and from each last of hides, 100 s. And from alien merchants, from each sack of wool, 53 s. 4 d.; and from each 240 woolfells, 53 s. 4 d.; and from each last of hides, 106 s. 8 d. Provided that three quarters of the said subsidy are assigned, ordained and made over to the payments to be made for the safeguard of your town and castle of Calais and your other castles and fortresses in your marches there. And that what remains apart from the said three quarters of the said subsidy should be spent and used for the defence of the realm. And also your said poor commons, by the aforesaid assent, for the security and safeguard of the sea in all parts of England, in defence of your realm of England, grant to you, most sovereign lord, 3 s. from each tun of wine entering the said realm and passing out of it; except the tuns of wine taken by prise for your own use. And similarly your said commons, by the aforesaid assent, grant to you, our most sovereign lord the king, for the same security and safeguard of the sea in every part of England, in defence of the said realm, from both native and alien merchants, 12 d. in the pound on all kinds of merchandise imported into the said realm or exported from it, except for wool, hides and woolfells passing out of the realm; and except for wine, any kind of corn, flour, fresh fish and cattle entering the said realm, and except ale which is exported from the realm for the victualling of your town of Calais by your people of the towns of Bawdsey and Alderton on Gosford and elsewhere, as they have been charged to do since the conquest of the said town of Calais. Provided always that this grant of the said subsidy on wool, hides, and woolfells, and of tunnage or poundage, should not be taken as an example to charge your said lords and commons of your realm in future with any kind of subsidy for the safeguard of the said town and castle of Calais and the other fortresses and castles in the marches there, nor for the defence of the realm, nor for the safeguard of the sea, unless it is by the wish of the lords and commons of your said parliament, and by a new grant to be made in full parliament in future. And moreover your said poor commons, by the aforesaid assent, grant to you, our most dread lord, 6 s. 8 d. from every man or woman, of whatever estate or condition they be, who has lands or rent to the value of £20 a year net of the usual charges and expenses, apart from the lands and tenements bought in mortmain before the twentieth year of the reign of King Edward [I], son of King Henry [1291-2]; and apart from those lands and tenements in the hands of the lords spiritual and religious bought in frankalmoin since the said twentieth year, and for which [p. iii-649][col. a] they pay tithes with the clergy. And moreover, from every man and woman who has a full £20 of land or rent in addition to the aforesaid £20 of land or rent, for each full £20 of land or rent net of charges and expenses, 6 s. 8 d. And the same from every man or woman for each full £20 of their land or annual rents net of charges and expenses, 6 s. 8 d.; excluding the above exceptions; to be paid on the morrow of the Purification of Our Lady next [3 February 1412], to be disposed of and spent at the free will of our lord the king; as long as the knights, esquires, citizens or burgesses who have come by writ to this parliament are not appointed collectors, assessors, controllers or commissioners to collect, receive, or levy the said subsidy. And provided that this grant of a subsidy should not be treated as an example in future. (fn. iii-647-41-1)
Declaracioun des seignurs de conseille. [The king's councillors].
11. Item, lundy le darrein jour de Novembre, le dit parlour, en noun de ditz communes, pria au roy de remercier monsire le prince, l'evesqe de Wyncestre, l'evesqe de Duresme, l'evesqe de Bathe, l'evesqe de Seint David, le count d'Arundell', le count de Warrewyk, le count de Westmerl' et le sire de Burnell, et toutz les autres seignurs et officers qi feurent assignez par le roy d'estre de soun counsail au darrein parlement, de leur graundes labours et diligence. Qar come y semble es ditz communes, mon dit seignur le prince et les autres seignurs suizditz ont bien et loialment fait leur devoir, solonc leur promesse fait en dit parlement. Et surceo engenulantz monsire le prince, et les autres seignurs dessuisditz, declarez feust en noun des ditz seignurs par le bouche de moun dit seignur le prince, coment ils avoient fait leur peine, diligence, et labour, solonc leur dite promesse, et la charge a eux donez en parlement, a leur seens et esciente; le quel le roy recorda bien, et leur remercia molt graciousement. Et dist outre, q'il savoit bien, qe s'ils eussent eue pluis de quoy q'ils n'avoient, en manere come il feust parlez par bouche de mon dit seignur le prince, au temps qe le roy leur chargea d'estre de soun counsail en dit parlement, ils vorroient avoir fait leur devoir pur avoir fait pluis de bien qe ne feust fait en diverses parties pur les defense, honour, bien, et profit de luy et de tout soun roialme. Et dist auxi mesme nostre seignur le roy, q'il se tient pur bien content de leur bone et loial diligence, counsail, et devoir, pur le temps q'ils estoient de soun counsail, come dessuis est dit. 11. Declaration of the lords of the council. Also, on Monday the last day of November, the said speaker, in the name of the said commons, asked the king to thank my lord the prince, the bishop of Winchester, the bishop of Durham, the bishop of Bath, the bishop of St Davids, the earl of Arundel, the earl of Warwick, the earl of Westmorland and Lord Burnell, and all the other lords and officers who were assigned by the king to be on his council at the last parliament, for their hard work and diligence. Because it seemed to the said commons that my said lord the prince and the other aforesaid lords had fulfilled their duty well and loyally in accordance with their oath taken in the said parliament. Whereupon, with my said lord the prince and the other aforesaid lords kneeling, it was explained by my said lord the prince, in the name of the said lords, how they had done their duty, with diligence and industry, according to their said oath, and to the charge given to them in parliament, to the best of their wisdom and knowledge; which the king well remembered, and he thanked them most graciously. And he said moreover that he knew well that if they had had more than they had in fact had - as the prince himself had declared in person at the time when the king charged them to be on his council in the said parliament - they would have been able to do their duty better in many ways than it had been done, for his defence, honour, welfare and profit, and that of all his realm. Our said lord the king also said that he himself was well satisfied with their good and loyal diligence, counsel and duty during the time they had been on his council, as is said above.
[memb. 14]
Parentre le sire de Roos et Robert Tirwhyt. [Dispute between Lord Roos and Robert Tirwhit, justice].
12. Fait a remembrer, qe mesquardy le quart jour de Novembre, apres la pronunciacioun de parlement fait, le sire de Roos bailla a nostre seignur le roy en parlement une peticioun encountre Robert Tirwhit, un des justices de bank le roy, de quele peticion le tenure s'enseute: 12. Between Lord Roos and Robert Tirwhit. Be it remembered that on Wednesday 4 November, after parliament had been opened, Lord Roos delivered a petition against Robert Tirwhit, one of the justices of King's Bench, to our lord the king in parliament, as follows:
A nostre tressoveraign seignur le roy, et les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx de ceste present parlement, monstre, et soy compleint, William de Roos de Hamelak, chivaler, auxy bien pur nostre seignur le roy come pur luy mesmes, qe come Robert Tirwhit, un des justices de vostre bank, tresredoute seignur, oretarde suist en vostre dit bank un brief de trespas envers Johan Rate, seneschall des courtes de dit William de soun manoir de Melton Roos, Richard Robynet, baillif de dit William de soun dit manoir, Johan Bernard, Johan Tottenay, Thomas Gurnall', Johan Hamond, Stephan Doye, William Bocher, Johan Kedy, Johan soun fitz, Johan Moys, Robert Andrewe, et William Richardsoun, des queux ascunes sountz tenantz a volunte et ascunes villains a dit William de Roos; supposant q'ils en la severale turbarie de dit Robert Tirwhit a Wraweby foweront, et ses arbres et subboys illeoqes nadgairs cresceantz couperont, et ses herbe et ferne illeoqes nadgairs cresceantz faucheront, et les dites herbe et ferne, et les [col. b] ditz arbres et subboys, ensemblement ove les turbes del dite turbarie, projectez a le value de xlli., pristeront et emporteront. Deins quelle lieux sibien le dit William de Roos come ses tenantz suisditz claymont de droit commune de pasture, turbarie, et d'estoveres. Sur quoy le dit William de Roos, pur luy et ses ditz tenantz, et le dit Robert, soy compromisteront de la dite pursuyt, et toutz les dependances d'ycelle, en l'aggarde et ordenance de William Gascoigne, chief justicer. Et surce le dit William Gascoigne, par assent des parties suisdites, eux assigna d'estre devant luy le samady proschein apres le fest de Seint Michel darrein passe, a Wraweby en le counte de Nicole, ovesqe leur evidences, pur declaracioun de leur titles et droites en ycelle matire. Et le dit William Gascoigne soy aggrea, qe le dit William de Roos viendroit illeoqes ovesqe deux barons de ses cousyns, ou autres amys, en peisible manere, ovesqe tantz gentz come ils soloient pluis custumablement chivacher. Et qe le dit Robert viendroit ovesqe deux de ses cousyns ou amies, ovesqe tantz des gentz peisiblement come appent a lour estat et degree. As quelx jour et lieux, esteant illeoqes le dit William Gascoigne, mesme William de Roos, accordant a l'ordenance et agreament avauntditz, feust prest pur avoir declare soun title et droit, et attendu l'ordenance avantdite. Et le dit Robert Tirwhit nient obeiant a les ditz compromisse, ordenance, et agrement, nonobstant q'il feust justicer d'assises, et de le pees garder en le dit counte de Nicole, ne nient considerant l'estat de dit William de Roos, q'il feust un des justices de pees agarder en mesme le countee, mais ymaginant, pur defuer l'ordenance et agarde de dit William Gascoigne, par ymaginacioun et malice devaunt purpense fist lever et assembler a lieux et jour suisditz graund nombre des gentz, entour le nombre de cynqe centz, armez et arraiez affaire de guerre, encontre vostre pees, et en contempt de vous, tresredoute seignur, encontre l'estatutz en celle case ordeignez et purveuz, a graund < affray > de tout le pays enviroun; et les fist giser illeoqes en diverses parties en embushementz, en manere de guerre, bien pres le dit lieu limite par le dit William Gascoigne, en agait de dit William de Roos, Henry le sire de Beaumont, Thomas le sire de la Warre, cousyns a dit William de Roos, adonqes ensemble esteantz pur mesme la matire, accordant a mesme l'agrement, pur les forciblement surmounter et deshonurer en le traite suisdit, en graunde villanie, reproeve, et dishonour a dit William de Roos et les autres deux seignurs ovesqe luy illeoqes esteantz, eux de celle malice et agaite nient sachantz. To our most sovereign lord the king and the lords spiritual and temporal in this present parliament, William de Roos of Helmsley, knight, declares and complains, both on behalf of our lord the king and himself, that since Robert Tirwhit, one of the justices of your bench, most dread lord, recently sued in your said bench a writ of trespass against John Rate, steward of the said William's courts on his manor of Melton Roos, Richard Robinet, the said William's bailiff on his said manor, John Bernard, John Tottenay, Thomas Gurnall, John Hammond, Stephen Doye, William Bocher, John Kedy, John his son, John Moys, Robert Andrew and William Richardson, some of whom are tenants at will and some villeins of the said William de Roos, alleging that they had dug in the private turbary of the said Robert Tirwhit at Wragby and cut down his trees and shrubs formerly growing there, and cut his grass and ferns once growing there, and took and carried off the said grass and ferns and the [col. b] said trees and shrubs, together with the turves from the said turbary, estimated to be worth £40; in which place both the said William de Roos and his aforesaid tenants claim right of common pasture to dig for turves and estovers. Whereupon the said William de Roos, on behalf of himself and his said tenants, and the said Robert, submitted themselves with the said suit and all its corollaries to the arbitration and ordinance of William Gascoigne, chief justice. Whereupon the said William Gascoigne, with the agreement of the aforesaid parties, ordered them to be before him on Saturday after the feast of Michaelmas last [3 October] at Wragby in the county of Lincoln, with their documents, in order to explain their titles and rights in this matter. And the said William Gascoigne decided that the said William de Roos should come there with the husbands of two of his kinsfolk, or other friends, in a peaceful manner, with as many men as customarily rode with them. And that the said Robert should come peacefully with two of his kinsmen or friends, with as many men as is fitting for their estate and position. At which time and place, with the said William Gascoigne being there, the same William de Roos, in accordance with the aforesaid ordinance and agreement, was ready to explain his title and right and abide by the aforesaid ordinance. Yet the said Robert Tirwhit did not abide by the said submission to arbitration, ordinance, and agreement, even though he was a justice of assize, and keeper of the peace in the said county of Lincoln, nor did he respect in any way the status of the said William de Roos, who was one of the justices of the peace in the same county, but, in order to override the ordinance and judgment of the said William Gascoigne, plotted by scheming and malice aforethought to raise and assemble, at the aforesaid place and time, a large number of men, numbering about 500, armed and equipped to make war, against your peace and in contempt of you, most dread lord, contrary to the statutes ordained and provided in this case, to the great disturbance of all the surrounding lands; and they lay in wait there in several groups, in a war-like manner, close to the said place specified by the said William Gascoigne, in ambush for the said William de Roos, Henry Lord Beaumont, and Thomas Lord Warre, kinsmen to the said William de Roos, who had gathered together for the same matter according to the same agreement, in order to forcibly overcome and dishonour the aforesaid agreement, to the great shame, disgrace, and dishonour of the said William de Roos and the other two lords who were present there with him, who were unaware of this wrong and ambush.
Dount pleise a vous, tresredoute seignur, par advys de voz tressages seignurs en cest present parlement, ordeigner et faire tielle remedie, punissement et redresse de ceste orrible trespas et offense, sibien pur vous, tresredoute seignur, come pur le dit William de Roos, come a vous semble mielx necessaires, et pur escheuer tielx assembles et riotes en temps avenir. May it please you, most dread lord, with the advice of your most wise lords in this present parliament, to ordain and provide whatever remedy, punishment and redress for this evil trespass and offence, both for you, most dread lord, and for the said William de Roos, as seems most necessary to you, so that such assemblies and lawlessness can be avoided in future.
Quele peticion lue et entendue, et oiez les pleusurs raisons faitz d'ambe partz, et auxi les responces et replicaciouns a ycelles faites as diverses jours a eux assignez par le roy nostre seignur en parlement; darrainement, c'estassavoir, vendredy le xxvij me jour de Novembre, viendrent devaunt le roy et les seignurs en mesme le parlement, sibien le dit seignur de Roos ove soun consail, come le dit Robert Tirwhit ove soun consail, et illeoqes le dit seignur de Roos monstra a nostre dit seignur le roy, coment il avoit pursuiz sa dite peticion, et touchant mesme la peticion ce qe plerroit a mesme nostre seignur le roy de faire en celle matire il luy vorroit submittre a ses ordinance et governance, solonc ce qe pleust a nostre dit seignur le roy de luy comander. A quoy mesme nostre seignur le roy luy respondi, qe de ce faire il ne luy vorroit comander. Et puis apres le dit Robert disoit a mesme nostre seignur le roy, coment par ignorance et non-sciente il luy avoit governez en ceste matire, autrement [p. iii-650][col. a] q'il ne deust, en desplesance de luy; et de ce q'il luy avoit issint mespris envers mesme nostre seignur le roy il luy submist en la grace nostre dit seignur le roy, et luy pria de grace et de pardoun. Et le roy demanda de dit Robert, s'il luy submist en sa grace de la ignorance, ou de le fait. Et le dit Robert disoit, de la fait comprise en la dite peticion. Et enoutre, touchant les trespasses et grevances faites par le dit Robert au dit seignure de Roos, come suppose est par sa dite peticion, mesme celuy Robert luy compromist d'esteer a l'ordinance et agarde de deux seignurs del sank de dit seignure de Roos, tielx come luy plerra denomer. Sur quoy le dit seignure de Roos disoit, q'il le vorroit bien. Et illeoqes devaunt le roy et les seignurs suisditz il noma l'ercevesqe de Canterbirs, et le seignur de Grey, chamberleyn du roy, en cas q'ils le vorroient prendre sur eux. Et le dit Robert pria as ditz ercevesqe et chamberleyn, q'ils le vorroient prendre sur eux. A quoy mesme nostre seignur le roy disoit, q'il luy pleust bien qe le dit Robert luy avoit issint submys, et il volloit bien prendre sa submissioun: et le prist, qar il disoit, qe s'il voudroit avoir mayntenue soun dit fait, le roy deust avoir este juge parentre le dit seignur de Roos et luy. Et partaunt q'il luy avoit ensy submys, mesme nostre seignur le roy vorroit estre bone mene parentre eux d'aider qe la dite matire serra mesnez a bone fin. Et pur ce, sur le bone port le dit Robert envers le dit seignure de Roos en ceste matire, et sur les bone reule et governance mesmeceluy Robert enapres envers nostre dit seignur le roy, il disoit, qe tout sanz grace il ne passeroit ne departeroit de luy: et surce chargea mesmes les ercevesqe et chamberleyn < de le prendre > sur eux. Et mesmes les ercevesqe et chamberleyn, par comandement du roy, et al prier des parties illeoqes, le pristeront sur eux de le parfaire, par l'aide de Dieux. Les queux ercevesqe et seignure de Grey, eues bones deliberacioun et advis sur les matires dessuisdites, firent leur ordinance et agarde en ceste partie en la fourme q'enseute: Which petition having been read and heard, and the many views put by both parties, as well as the answers and responses made to them on various days assigned to them by the lord our king in parliament, had been heard; finally, that is to say on Friday 27 November, both the said Lord Roos with his counsel, and the said Robert Tirwhit with his counsel, came before the king and the lords in the same parliament, and there the said Lord Roos explained to our said lord the king how he had sued his said petition, and touching the same petition he was prepared to submit himself to whatever it might please our same lord the king to ordain or decide in this matter, in accordance with whatever it might please our said lord the king to order him. To which our same lord the king replied that he did not wish to order him to do this. Then the said Robert explained to our same lord the king how through foolishness and ignorance he had acted in this matter otherwise [p. iii-650][col. a] than as he ought, to his displeasure; and that for this crime against our same lord the king he put himself in the mercy of our said lord the king, and prayed him for mercy and pardon. Then the king asked the said Robert if he put himself in his mercy for his ignorance, or for his deed. And the said Robert replied, for the deed specified in the said petition. Moreover, touching the trespasses and wrongs done by the said Robert to the said Lord Roos, as alleged in his said petition, the same Robert submitted himself to the ordinance and judgment of two lords who were of the blood of the said Lord Roos, whomsoever it pleased him to name. Whereupon the said Lord Roos said that he truly wished it. Then before the king and the aforesaid lords he nominated the archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Grey, the king's chamberlain, assuming that they wished to take it upon themselves. And the said Robert asked the said archbishop and chamberlain if they would take it upon themselves. To which our same lord the king said that it indeed pleased him that the said Robert had submitted himself thus, and he certainly wished to accept his submission: and he accepted it, because he said that had he wished to justify his said deed, the king would have had to act as judge between the said Lord Roos and him. But because he had submitted himself thus, our same lord the king wished to act impartially between them, to help them to bring the case to a satisfactory conclusion. And on account of the good behaviour of the said Robert towards the said Lord Roos in this matter, and the good behaviour and conduct of this same Robert towards our said lord the king afterwards, he said that his mercy would not be entirely lacking in this affair; and thereupon the same archbishop and chamberlain were charged to take it upon themselves. And the same archbishop and chamberlain, by order of the king, and at the request of the parties there, took it upon themselves to accomplish it, with God's help. Which archbishop and Lord Grey, having had full deliberation and advice on these aforesaid matters, made their ordinance and judgment on this matter, as follows:
13. This is the ordenance that Thomas archebishop of Canterbury, and Richard lord the Grey, chamberleyn of our liege lord the kyng, haven mad betwen William lord the Roos on that oon partie, and Robert Tirwhit justice of the kynges bench on that other partie. First, where the forsaid lord the Roos, at the last parlement of oure sayd liege lord holden at Westm', compleyneth hym by a bille, surmettyng on the same Robert, that he, the Saterday neghst after the fest of Seint Michael last passed, atte Wraweby, in the shire of Lincoln, dyd assemble greet noumbre of men armed and arrayed ageyn the pees, to lygge in awayte for the same lord the Roos, and there hym to harme and dishonure, agayn the fourme of a loveday taken bytwen the same parties by William Gascoigne chief justice of the forsaid benche on whom, and to his ordenance, the forsaid lord the Roos and Robert hadden submytted hem, touchyng certein commune of pasture, and turf gravyng, the whiche the sayd lord the Roos claymes for hym self and his tenantz of Melton Roos in the town of Wraweby - prout in supplicacionem - as it is supposed by the same bille, and to the whiche loveday shulde have comen the same parties, ichon with certein nombre, accordyng to his degree, and as it was by fore ordeyned by the forsayd William Gascoigne. To whom at the same loveday the sayd Robert wold nouht graunte that he had submytted hym in that mater, but he saide, that it was his entencioun, that the said William Gascoigne shoolde treete bitwen the forsayd lord the Roos and hym. And in the same parlement, herd and understonden the forsaide bille, the forsaid Robert hath said to oure forsaid liege lord the kyng, that he knoweth wel that in the matier on hym [col. b] surmetted by the sayd bille, he ne hath noght born hym as he sholde hav doon. Wherof he besought the kyng of grace, and that he wold vouchesauf to praye the lord the Roos, that he wold chese two lordes of hys kyn, and ther the sayd Robert wolde submitte hym to thaire ordinance in the forsayd mattere, and alle the circumstance therof. And ther, atte desire of oure forsaid liege lord, the said lord the Roos chese the forsaid archebisshop and chamberleyn, the whiche, by force of the submissioun that the said Robert in hem hathe maad, haven ordeyned in the manere and fourme that sueth. That is for to say, that touchyng the forsayd matere of commune of pasture and turf gravyng, the forsaid lord Roos and Robert schall fullych stonde to the < ordinance > and arbitrement of the forsaide William Gascoigne, the whiche, atte cost of bothe parties, shalle come to the forsaid place of commune atte such resonable tyme as it likyth the forsaid lord the Roos to assigne. Item, at such a tyme resonable as it shalle like the same lord the Roos to assigne, the same Robert Tirwhit schal do couche two tonnes of wyn of Gascoigne at Melton Roos; and at suche a day resonable after as it shal like to the said lord the Roos, the said Robert schal do brynge to the same place two fatte oxen, and twelf fatte shepe, to bee dispended on a dyner to hem that there schal be atte. The whiche day, the sayd Robert schal do come alle the knyghtes and esquiers and yomen that had ledynge of men on his partie atte forsaid loveday; and in presence of the forsaid lord the Roos, and alle other that ther schal been, the forsaid Robert schal reherce the wordes that he saide to oure forsaide liege lord in the parlement bifore saide; and in especial he schal seye to the forsaid lord the Roos: My lord the Roos, I knowe wele, that ye been of suche birthe, estate, and myghte, that if yow had lyked ye myght have comyn to the forsaid loveday in such array, that I schoold have been of no myghte to have mad no party; but let it liked you to come in aisy wyse, havyng consideracioun to youre degree. And of alle that by sinistre informacioun, I havyng doute of harme of my body, in myn entent for salvacioun of myself dyd assemble thise persones that here been, and other moo, nought for to doo harme ne offence to yowe, my lord the Roos; and that I will here excuse me as yhe will devyse. Yet, for as myche I am a justice, that more than an other comun man scholde have had me more discretly and peesfully, I knowe wele that I have failled and offende yow, my lord the Roos, wherof I beseke yow of grace and mercy, and offre yow v c mark to ben paied < at youre will. > 13. This is the ordinance that Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, and Richard Lord Grey, chamberlain of our liege lord the king, have made between William Lord Roos on the one part, and Robert Tirwhit, justice of the King's Bench, on the other part. Firstly, whereas the aforesaid Lord Roos, at the last parliament of our said liege lord held at Westminster, complained to him by petition, alleging against the same Robert that, on Saturday after the feast of Michaelmas last, at Wragby in the county of Lincoln, he had assembled a large number of men armed and equipped contrary to the peace to lie in wait for the same lord Roos, to injure and dishonour him there, contrary to a loveday arranged between the same parties by William Gascoigne, chief justice of the aforesaid bench, to whose ordinance the aforesaid Lord Roos and Robert had submitted themselves, concerning certain common pasture and turf-digging which the said lord Roos claims for himself and his tenants of Melton Roos in the town of Wragby - as in the supplication - as is alleged in the same petition, and to which loveday the same parties should have come, each with a certain number of men according to his degree, as had been previously ordained by the aforesaid William Gascoigne. To whom at the same loveday the said Robert would not admit that he had submitted himself in that matter, but he said that it was his intention that the said William Gascoigne should draw up an agreement between the aforesaid Lord Roos and him. And in the same parliament, the aforesaid petition having been heard and understood, the aforesaid Robert said to our aforesaid liege lord the king that he well knew that in the matter alleged against him [col. b] in the said petition he had not behaved as he should have done. Whereupon he sought the king's mercy, saying he would agree to ask Lord Roos that he would choose two lords from his kinsmen, and then the said Robert would submit himself to their ordinance in the aforesaid matter and all the circumstances thereof. And there, at the wish of our aforesaid liege lord, the said Lord Roos chose theaforesaid archbishop and chamberlain, who, by virtue of the submission that the said Robert made on this, have ordained as follows. That is to say, that touching the aforesaid matter of common pasture and turf-digging, the aforesaid Lord Roos and Robert shall fully abide by the ordinance and judgment of the aforesaid William Gascoigne, who, at the expense of both parties, shall come to the aforesaid common place at whatever reasonable time it pleases the aforesaid Lord Roos to assign. Moreover, at whatever reasonable time it shall please the same Lord Roos to assign, the same Robert Tirwhit shall deliver two tuns of wine from Gascony to Melton Roos; and whenever it shall please the said Lord Roos, the said Robert shall bring to the same place two fattened oxen and twelve fattened sheep, to be eaten at dinner by those present. On which day the said Robert shall come with all the knights, esquires and yeomen who led the men of his faction at the aforesaid loveday, and in the presence of the aforesaid Lord Roos and all others present the aforesaid Robert shall repeat the words that he said to our aforesaid liege lord in the aforesaid parliament; and in particular he shall say to the aforesaid Lord Roos: 'My Lord Roos, I know well that you are of such birth, estate, and might that if you had wished you could have come to the aforesaid loveday with such a following that I should have been quite unable to challenge you; yet you wished to come in the former way, having consideration for your position. And through misleading information, I was afraid that I would be harmed, so with the intention of saving myself, I did assemble these persons there, not to cause harm or offence to you, my Lord Roos; and I will apologise here in any way you wish. Moreover, since I am a justice, I should have behaved more wisely and peacefully than any other common man, and I know well that I have failed and have offended you, my Lord Roos, whereof I pray for your grace and mercy and offer you 500 marks to be paid at your will'.
14. Item, it is ordeyned, that this offre maad, the forsayd lord the Roos schal sey: that, at reverence of the kyng, that in this cas hathe schewyd hym good and right wys lordschuppe, he will no thyng take of the forsayd Robert, but the forsayd wyn, oxen, and shepe, for the dyner of them that been there present. And furthermore, the forsaid lord the Roos, in presence of them that ther ben openly schal forgevyn the forsaid Robert, and alle other that in the array aboven sayd weren assembled at the loveday, taken with the same sayd Robert, all her offence and trespace; except oonly .iiij. persons, that is to say, Richard Haunsard, knyght, William Kelk, Roger Bernestoun, and Roger Kelk the sone of the forsayd William; the whiche .iiij. persones we ordeyneth, that the same Robert schal brynge at the assignement of the forsayd lord the Roos to hys owen castelle, the castelle of Bever, in his presence; with that, that they also knoweleche here offence, and submitte hem to the same lord the Roos, praying hym of grace and mercy. [p. iii-651][col. a] And thenne thys submyssioun maad, the same lord the Roos schalle so doon to hem, that they schalle tellen hem wel payed with favour and grace. 14. Also, it is ordained that, this offer having been made, the aforesaid Lord Roos shall say that, out of respect for the king, who in this case has shown him good and most wise lordship, he will take nothing from the aforesaid Robert except the aforesaid wine, oxen, and sheep, for the dinner of those present there. Furthermore, the aforesaid Lord Roos, in the presence of those present, shall publicly forgive the aforesaid Robert and all the others in the abovesaid party who were assembled at the loveday and who came with the same said Robert, for all their crimes and trespasses; except only four persons, that is to say, Richard Haunsard, knight, William Kelk, Roger Berneston, and Roger Kelk, the son of the aforesaid William; which four persons we ordain that the same Robert shall bring at the direction of the aforesaid Lord Roos to his own castle, the castle of Belvoir, into his presence; so that they too can acknowledge their offence and submit themselves to the same Lord Roos, praying him for grace and mercy. [p. iii-651][col. a] And then, this submission having been made, the same Lord Roos shall act towards them in such a manner that they shall consider themselves well and mercifully treated.
[memb. 13]
Pur l'ercevesqe de Canterbirs. Oxon'. [Petition of the archbishop of Canterbury concerning the University of Oxford].
15. Memorandum quod venerabilis in Christo pater Thomas archiepiscopus Cantuar' in presenti parliamento nostro exhibuit quandam peticionem una cum quadam cedula eidem annexa in hec verba: A tressovereign seignur nostre seignur le roy supplie humblement vostre humble chapellein, Thomas ercevesqe de Canterbirs, qe pleise a vous, tressoverein seignur, par assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et les communes, en cest present parlement, de grauntier, approver, ratifier, et confermer, tout ceo q'est compris en une cedule a iceste bille annexe; et qe mesme ceste cedule puisse estre enrollee et enact en cest present parlement, solonc la fourme et effect de mesme la cedule. Et qe mesme la cedule et tout ceo q'est compris en icelle soient de ataunt de force, effect et auctorite, et mesmes les force effect et auctorite eient et teignent come ils ussent este faitz en cest parlement et par auctoritee de mesme le parlement. 15. On behalf of the archbishop of Canterbury. Oxford. Be it remembered that the venerable father in Christ, Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, presented a petition with a schedule attached to it in our present parliament, in these words: To the most sovereign lord our lord the king, your humble chaplain Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, humbly requests that it might please you, most sovereign lord, by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons in this present parliament, to grant, approve, ratify and confirm all that is stated in a schedule attached to this petition; and that the same schedule be enrolled and enacted in this present parliament in accordance with the terms and effect of the same schedule. And that the same schedule and all that is mentioned in it should then take force, effect and authority, and the same force, effect and authority should be upheld and maintained, as they are accustomed to be upheld, in this parliament and by authority of the same parliament.
Memorandum quod cum Ricardus secundus nuper rex Anglie propter diversas dissensiones lites et discordias quondam habitas in universitate Oxon' super jure et titulo visitacionis dicte universitatis ac de quadam bulla exempcionis pretensa ad excludendum archiepiscopum Cantuar' tunc existentem et successores suos ac quoscumque alios ordinarios infra universitatem predictam ac quoscumque fundatores dicte universitatis ac collegiorum ejusdem universitatis a visitacione dicte universitatis et ab omni jurisdiccione ordinaria per eosdem archiepiscopum ordinarios ac fundatores et suos successores ac commissarios suos in eadem universitate faciendis et excercendis, per brevem suum venire fecerit in cancellaria sua apud Westm' bullam predictam, et cancellarium et procuratores dicte universitatis adtunc existentes sufficiens warentum sigillo communi universitatis predicte sigillatum pro se et universitate predicta habentes et secum in cancellaria predicta deferentes, ad exhibendam publicandam ostendendam et presentandam coram dicto nuper rege in cancellaria predicta bullam predictam, necnon ad respondendum ibidem et ulterius faciendum et recipiendum quod per eundem nuper regem et consilium suum ordinatum fuisset et diffinitum, prout de recordo in eadem cancellaria plenius liquet. Ac postmodum iidem cancellarius et procuratores pro se et tota universitate predicta submiserint se de materiis predictis ordinacioni et diffinicioni dicti nuper regis; qui quidem nuper rex - habita inde matura et pleniori deliberacione cum consilio suo, ac clare considerans bullam predictam fore impetratam in prejudicium corone sue ac legum et consuetudinum regni sui enervacionem et in hereticorum et lollardorum ac homicidarum et aliorum malefactorum favorem et audaciam dicteque universitatis verisimilem destruccionem - ordinavit et per brevem suum precepit et inhibuit dicto [sic: read 'dictis'] cancellario magistris doctoribus, et scolaribus universitatis predicte in fide ligeantia et dileccione quibus sibi tenebantur, ac sub pena amissionis privilegiorum universitatis predicte, et sub forisfactura omnium aliorum que sibi forisfacere poterant, ne dictam bullam in aliqua sua parte exequi seu excercere, seu beneficium aliquod exempcionis per bullam illam aliqualiter reportare seu recipere presumerent, set omnibus exempcionibus et privilegiis in ea parte contentis, coram tunc dilecto clerico suo magistro Ricardo Ronhale quem ad eos ex causa predicta destinavit, palam et publice pro imperpetuo renunciarent, ac super renunciacione hujusmodi quandam certificacionem sibi sub sigillo dicte universitatis, ac publica instrumenta fieri et sibi per eundem clericum suum transmitti facerent sub penis supradictis; postmodum allegantus prefato cancellario et aliis sibi adherentibus [col. b] nomine universitatis predicte visitacionem predictam ad dictum Ricardum nuper regem solum et insolidum pertinere; consideransque quod visitacio universitatis predicte ad prefatum archiepiscopum et successores suos ac ad ecclesiam suam Cantuar' pertinuit et pertinere debuit,quodque ipse aut progenitores sui cancellarium ac universitatem predictam retroactis temporibus minime visitare consueverant, voluit et ex certa sciencia sua declaravit quod visitacio cancellarii ac procuratorum dicte universitatis qui pro tempore forent necnon omnium doctorum magistrorum regencium et non regencium ac scolarium ejusdem universitatis quorumcumque eorumque servientium, aliarumque personarum cujuscumque status vel condicionis extiterint, libertatibus aut privilegiis dicte universitatis utencium, seu illis gaudere volencium, necnon universitatis predicte eciam ut universitatis, ad prefatum archiepiscopum et successores suos ac ecclesiam suam predictam pertinuit et pertinere debuit, ac futuris temporibus pertineret. Postmodumque predictus nuper rex per diversa brevia sua cancellario procuratoribus magistris doctoribus et scolaribus universitatis predicte preceperat quod ipsi archiepiscopo predicto et successoribus suis in visitacione sua predicta in eadem universitate facienda, in omnibus sub penis predictis parerent et obedirent. Postmodumque sicut datum fuit intelligi domino nostro Regi Henrico quarto post conquestum quod visitante Thoma archiepiscopo Cantuar' jure suo metropolitico diocesis Lincoln' anno regni dicti Henrici regis duodecimo venit ad predictam universitatem Oxon' ad exequendum in forma juris ecclesiastici ibidem visitacionem suam Ricardus Courtenay adtunc cancellarius universitatis predicte ac Benedictus Brent et Johannes Byrch, adtunc procuratores dicte universitatis, ac quamplures alii eis adherentes in eadem universitate, dictum archiepiscopum de visitacione sua predicta et jurisdiccione ejusdem archiepiscopi manu forti injuste impedierunt, et ei absque causa raciounabili resistebant. Super quo diverse lites dissensiones et discordie inter prefatum Thomam archiepiscopum et eosdem cancellarium et procuratores ac alios scolares universitatis predicte eorumque fautores, de et super jure et impedimento visitacionis et jurisdiccionis predictarum mote fuerint et exorte in universitate predicta. Et super hoc presente Thoma comite Arrundell', et aliis personis honorabilibus secum existentis in universitate predicta tam prefatus archiepiscopus pro se et ecclesia sua predicta quam prefatus Ricardus Courtenay cancellarius universitatis predicte et Benedictus Brent et Johannes Byrch procuratores ejusdem universitatis pro se et eorum adherentibus in materiis predictis ac pro universitate predicta per assensum eorumdem adherencium se submiserunt et concesserunt stare arbitrio judicio et ordinacioni ac decreto illustrissimi principis et domini dicti domini nostri Regis Henrici, de super jure et impedimento visitacionis et jurisdiccionis predictarum per dictos magistrum Ricardum cancellarium et sibi adherentes prestitos, ac de dissensionibus litibus et discordiis predictis et earum dependenciis. Et super hoc dictus dominus noster Rex Henricus dictum magistrum Ricardum Courtenay cancellarium ac dictos Benedictum Brent et Johannem Byrch procuratores venire fecit coram eo in propria persona sua apud Lambhith' in crastino nativitatis Beate Marie dicto anno regni sui duodecimo ad faciendum et recipiendum quod per eundem dominum regem de avisamento consilii sui foret consideratum in materiis predictis. Be it remembered that since Richard the second, late king of England - on account of various dissensions, disputes and discords which formerly arose in the University of Oxford concerning the right and title of visitation of the said university, and concerning a certain bull of exemption claiming to exclude the present archbishop of Canterbury and his successors, and any other ordinaries within the aforesaid university, and any founders of the said university and the colleges of the same university, from visiting the said university, and from all ordinary jurisdiction to be enforced or exercised by the same archbishop, ordinaries and founders, and their successors and commissaries, in the same university - by his writ caused the aforesaid bull to be brought into his chancery at Westminster, and ordered the chancellor and proctors of the said university who then held office (having and bearing with them in the aforesaid chancery a sufficient warrant sealed with the common seal of the aforesaid university for themselves and the aforesaid university) to show, publish, display and present the aforesaid bull before the said late king in the aforesaid chancery, and also to answer in the same place, and furthermore to acknowledge and accept whatever might be ordained and decreed by the same late king and his council, as is clearly apparent from the record in the same chancery. And afterwards the same chancellor and proctors, for themselves and the whole aforesaid university, submitted themselves with the aforesaid matters to the ordinance and decree of the said late king; which late king, however - having had mature and full deliberation on this with his council, and clearly considering the aforesaid requested bull to be to the prejudice of his crown and the weakening of the laws and customs of his realm, and to the benefit and support of heretics, lollards, murderers and other malefactors, and the likely destruction of the said university - ordained, ordered and enjoined by his writ to the said chancellor, masters, doctors and scholars of the aforesaid university, who were bound to him in faith, allegiance and love, and on penalty of the loss of the privileges of the aforesaid university and the forfeiture of all other things for which they were capable of incurring forfeiture to him, under no circumstances to enforce or administer either the said bull or any benefit they have presumed to obtain or receive through that bull of exemption, but to openly and publicly renounce all exemptions and privileges sought by way of it before his then dear clerk Master Richard Ronhale (whom he sent to them to deal with this matter), and to cause to be made out to him a certain certification and public instrument detailing this renunciation under the seal of the said university, to be sent to him by his same clerk under the aforesaid penalty; and he subsequently declared to the aforesaid chancellor and his other adherents, [col. b] in the name of the aforesaid university, that the aforesaid right of visitation pertained alone and entirely to the said Richard, the late king. Considering also that visitation of the aforesaid university has pertained and ought to pertain to the aforesaid archbishop and his successors, and to his church of Canterbury, and that he himself and his progenitors were accustomed at least to visit the chancellor and the aforesaid university in the past, he wished and declared from his certain knowledge that visitation of the chancellor and proctors of the said university at the time (and also all the doctors, masters, regents and non-regents and scholars of the same university and any of their servants, and other persons of whatever status or condition they may be, with the liberties or privileges of the said university, and also the aforesaid university as a university) has pertained and ought to pertain to the aforesaid archbishop and his successors, and his aforesaid church, and should pertain to them in future. Then afterwards the said late king, through various writs to the chancellor, proctors, masters, doctors and scholars of the aforesaid university, ordered them to obey and yield to the same aforesaid archbishop and his successors in his aforesaid visitation to be made in the same university in all things, upon the aforesaid penalty. Afterwards however, as our lord King Henry the fourth after the conquest has been informed, although Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, visiting the diocese of Lincoln by his metropolitan right, came to the aforesaid university of Oxford in the twelfth year of the reign of the said King Henry to carry out his visitation in the same place by ecclesiastical right, Richard Courtenay, then chancellor of the aforesaid university, and Benedict Brent and John Birch, then proctors of the said university, and many other of their followers in the same university, unjustly impeded the said archbishop from his aforesaid visitation and the jurisdiction of the same archbishop by main force, and resisted it without reasonable cause. Whereupon various disputes, dissensions and discords were provoked and arose between the aforesaid Archbishop Thomas and the same chancellor, proctors and other scholars of the aforesaid university and their accomplices, concerning and in relation to both the right and the impeding of the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction in the aforesaid university. And on this, with Thomas, earl of Arundel, being present, and other honourable persons being with him in the aforesaid university, both the aforesaid archbishop, for himself and his aforesaid church, and the aforesaid Richard Courtenay, chancellor of the aforesaid university, and Benedict Brent and John Birch, proctors of the same university, for themselves and their followers in the aforesaid matters and for the aforesaid university, by the assent of the same followers, submitted themselves and agreed to abide by the decision, judgment, ordination and decree of our most illustrious prince and lord, the said lord King Henry, concerning the right and impeding of the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction by the said Master Richard, the chancellor, and the adherents sworn to him, and concerning the aforesaid dissensions, disputes and discords and their consequences. And on this our said lord King Henry caused the said Master Richard Courtenay, the chancellor, and the said Benedict Brent and John Birch, proctors, to come before him in person at Lambeth on the morrow of the Nativity of Blessed Mary in the said twelfth year of his reign [9 September 1411] to accept and acknowledge whatever had been decided by the same lord king, with the advice of his council, on the aforesaid matters.
16. Et predictus archiepiscopus ibidem coram prefato domino rege comparuit et tam prefatus archiepiscopus quam iidem cancellarius et procuratores adtunc ibidem coram dicto domino nostro rege submissionem predictam in omnibus ut predicam est fore factis in forma predicta recognoverunt, et ibidem concesserunt stare arbitrio judicio et ordinacioni ejusdem domini nostri regis de et super jure et impedimento visitacionis et jurisdiccionis predicte ac aliis materiis predictis et omnibus dependenciis earumdem. Qui quidem dominus rex postea .xvij. die mensis Septembris dicto anno duodecimo apud Lambhith' predictis auditentis et intellectis [p. iii-652][col. a] tam allegacionibus quam responsionibus partium predictarum, et eciam habens consideracionem ad dictam submissionem factam tempore dicti Regis Ricardi ac ordinacionem judicium et determinacionem super eandem submissionem tangentam visitacionem et jurisdiccionem predictas; ac clare considerans quod visitacio universitatis predicte eciam ut universitatis et omnium in universitate predicta commorancium, ad dictum archiepiscopum et successores suos ut de jure ecclesie sue predicte pertinet et de jure pertinere deberet, et quod iidem cancellarius et procuratores ac alii eis in hac parte adherentes, eundem archiepiscopum de visitacione et jurisdiccione predictis injuste et absque titulo seu rationabili causa manu forti impedierunt, dicta judicium ordinacionem et determinacionem predicti Ricardi nuper regis ratificavit approbavit et confirmavit pro imperpetuo duraturo. Et ulterius tam auctoritate sua regia quam virtute submissiounis predicte sibi facte adtunc ibidem, arbitratus fuit ordinavit consideravit decrevit et adjudicavit quod predictus archiepiscopus et successores sui imperpetuum habeant visitacionem et jurisdiccionem in universitate predicta tam cancellarii commissarii quam procuratorum ejusdem universitatis qui pro tempore fuerint, necnon omnium doctorum magistrorum regentium et non regentium ac scolarium ejusdem universitatis quorumcumque eorumque servientium, aliarumque personarum cujuscumque status vel condicionis extiterint, et eciam ejusdem universitatis ut universitatis; et quod cancellarium commissarium et procuratores universitatis predicte qui pro tempore fuerint eorumque successores et omnes alii in dicta univesitate pro tempore commorantes futuris temporibus, eidem archiepiscopo et successoribus suis in visitacione et jurisdiccione universitatis predicte eciam ut universitatis in omnibus pareant et obediant. Et quod nec dictos cancellarium commissarium nec procuratores universitatis predicte nec eorum successores nec aliquis alius in universitate predicta aliquod privilegium seu beneficium exempcionis ad excludendum prefatum archiepiscopum seu successores suos de visitacione et jurisdiccione predictis in universitate antedicta colore alicujus bulle seu alterius tituli cujuscumque erga predictum archiepiscopum aut successores suos clament habeant seu vendicent ullo modo in futuro. Et quod quociens cancellarium commissarium vel locum tenens ipsorum vel alicujus ipsorum vel procuratores dicte universitatis qui pro tempore fuerint vel eorum successores sive aliquis eorum impedierint vel impedierit prefatum archiepiscopum vel successores suos aut ecclesiam suam predictam aut ipsorum vel alicujus ipsorum commissarium vel commissarios de hujusmodi visitacione seu jurisdiccione dicte universitatis vel in aliquo contravenerint vel aliquis eorum contravenerit dicto arbitrio ordinacioni sive judicio per prefatum Ricardum nuper regem facto sive arbitrio judicio decreto consideracioni vel ordinacioni ipsius domini nostri Regis Henrici in hoc casu, vel si aliquis dicte universitatis in futuro impedierit dictum archiepiscopum vel successores suos aut ecclesiam suam predictam aut ipsorum vel alicujus ipsorum commissarium vel commissarios de visitacione sua aut jurisdiccione antedictis vel in aliquo contravenerit dictis arbitrio ordinacioni sive judicio per prefatum Ricardum nuper regem in forma predicta factis vel arbitrio judicio decreto consideracioni seu ordinacioni ipsius domini nostri Regis Henrici, et quod cancellarium commissarium et procuratores universitatis predicte tunc non fecerint diligenciam et posse eorum ad adjuvandum dictum archiepiscopum vel successores suos aut ecclesiam suam predictam seu commissarium vel commissarios suos in hujusmodi casu, ac eciam ad puniendum hujusmodi impedientes et resistentes quod tociens omnes franchesie libertates et omnia privilegia ejusdem universitatis, in manus domini regis vel heredum suorum seisiantur, in eisdem manibus ipsorum domini regis vel heredum suorum remansura, quousque predictus archiepiscopus vel successores sui pacificam visitacionem et jurisdiccionem in forma predicta in dicta universitate habuerit vel habuerint; et eciamtociens [col. b] cancellarium commissarium et procuratores ejusdem universitatis qui pro tempore fuerint et eorum successores ac universitas predicta solvant et teneantur solvere ipsi domino nostro Regi Henrico et heredibus suis mille libras legalis monete Anglie. 16. And the aforesaid archbishop appeared there before the aforesaid lord king, and both the aforesaid archbishop and the same chancellor and proctors, who were also there before our said lord the king, acknowledged the aforesaid submission in all things, as is aforesaid, which had been made on all the aforesaid terms, and there agreed to abide by the decision, judgment and decree of our same lord king concerning and in relation to the right and impeding of the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction and the other aforesaid matters and all their consequences. After this however, the lord king, on 17September in the said year at Lambeth, having heard and understood [p. iii-652][col. a] both the aforesaid allegations and the replies of the aforesaid parties, and also having consideration for the said submission made in the time of the said King Richard, and the decree, judgment and determination on the same submission concerning the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction; and clearly considering that the visitation of the aforesaid university, both as a university, and in relation to all those who reside in the aforesaid university, pertains and ought to pertain lawfully to the said archbishop and his successors as by right of his aforesaid church, and that the same chancellor and proctors, and their other followers in this matter, have unjustly hindered the same archbishop from the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction by main force and without right or reasonable cause, has ratified, approved and confirmed the said judgment, ordinance and decree of the aforesaid late King Richard for evermore. And moreover, both by his royal authority and by virtue of the aforesaid submission then made to him in the same place, it was decided, ordained, considered, decreed and adjudged that the aforesaid archbishop and his successors should have right of visitation and jurisdiction forever in the aforesaid university both of the vice-chancellor and the proctors of the same university at the time, and also of all the doctors, masters, regents and non-regents and scholars of the same university whomsoever, and their servants and other persons of whatever status or condition they may be, and also of the university as a university; and that the vice-chancellor and proctors of the aforesaid university at the time and their successors, and all others residing in the said university in future, will submit to and obey the same archbishop and his successors in visitation and jurisdiction of the aforesaid university also as a university in all things. And that neither the said vice-chancellor nor the proctors of the aforesaid university, nor their successors, nor any other in the aforesaid university will claim, have or allege any privilege or benefit of exemption to exclude the aforesaid archbishop or his successors from the aforesaid visitation and jurisdiction in the aforesaid university by authority of any bull or any other title against the aforesaid archbishop or his successors in any way in future. And that if the vice-chancellor or his deputy, or any of them, or the proctors of the said university at the time, or their successors, or any of them, impede the aforesaid archbishop or his successors, or his aforesaid church, or the commissary, or any of the commissaries of the same, from any visitation or jurisdiction of the said university, or any of them contravenes in any way the said decision, decree or judgment made by the aforesaid late King Richard, or the decision, judgment, decree, consideration or ordinance of our same lord King Henry in this matter; or if any person of the said university in future impedes the said archbishop or his successors, or his aforesaid church, or the commissary, or any of the commissaries of the same, from his aforesaid visitation or jurisdiction, or in any way contravenes the said decision, ordinance or judgment made by the aforesaid late King Richard in the aforesaid way, or the decision, judgment, decree, consideration or ordinance of our same lord King Henry; or if the vice-chancellor and proctors of the aforesaid university do not do all they can do to assist the said archbishop or his successors or his aforesaid church, or the commissary or his commissaries in this matter at that time; then, in order to punish those who obstruct and resist this, all the liberties of franchise and all privileges of the same university will be seized into the hands of the same lord king or his heirs, remaining in the same hands of the same lord king or his heirs until the aforesaid archbishop or his successors shall enjoy peaceful visitation and jurisdiction on the aforesaid terms in thesaid university; on each occasion that they do this, moreover, [col. b] the vice-chancellor and proctors of the same university at the time and their successors and the aforesaid university will be bound to pay £1000 in English legal money to our same lord king Henry and his heirs.
17. Qua quidem cedula visa ac cum matura et diligenti deliberacione examinata et intellecta, dictus dominus rex in pleno parliamento asseruit et declaravit omnia et singula in eadem cedula contenta per ipsum, secundum quod in eadem continetur facta arbitrata ordinata considerata decreta et adjudicata in omnibus esse et extitisse. Et sic de assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium necnon communitatis in eodem parliamento existencium qui super eisdem pleniorem deliberacionem similiter habuerunt et eisdem decreto et judicio plenarie concenserunt et aggreaverunt, eandem cedulam et omnia et singula in eadem contenta concessit approbavit ratificavit et confirmavit, quodque eadem cedula in rotulo parliamenti secundum formam et effectum ejusdem irrotularetur et inactaretur. Ac eciam quod eadem cedula et omnia in ea contenta sint tanti et talis valoris effectus et auctoritatis et eosdem valorem effectum et auctoritatem habeant et teneant, acsi in presenti parliamento et per auctoritatem ejusdem parliamenti facta extitissent. 17. Which schedule having been seen, examined and understood, following mature and diligent consideration, the said lord king declared and proclaimed in full parliament the validity of each and all of the matters specified in the same schedule, in accordance with what is specified in the same, and decided, ordained, considered, decreed and adjudged all these things to be in force. And thus by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and also the commons present in the same parliament, who have similarly had full deliberation on the same, he granted and agreed the same schedule, and granted, approved, ratified and confirmed each and all the matters specified in the same, and that the same schedule should be enrolled and registered on the roll of parliament, in accordance with the terms and effect of the same. And also that the same schedule and everything mentioned in it should be of such value, effect and authority, and should have and take the same value, effect and authority as if they had been made in the present parliament and by authority of the same parliament.
Et puis apres, sur diverses matires moevez parentre le dit ercevesqe et l'ercevesqe d'Everwyk, surcerteines privileges pretenses par le dit ercevesqe d'Everwyk pur le college appellee la Quenhalle en la universitee d'Oxenford, le dit ercevesqe de Canterbirs, en presence du roy et des seignurs en le dit parlement promyst, qe si le dit ercevesqe d'Everwyk purroit sufficientment monstrer ascun privilege, ou especialtee de record, parount le dit ercevesqe de Canterbirs ne deust user, n'excercer, sa visitacioun du dite college, il se vorroit ent abstinier. Sauvant a luy toutefoitz la visitacioun de les escolers demurrantz en le dit college, solonc les juggementz et decrees faitz et donez par le dit Roy Richard, et par nostre seignur le Roy Henry q'orest, come en le record ent fait pluis pleinement est declarez. And then afterwards, various questions having arisen between the said archbishop and the archbishop of York, concerning certain privileges claimed by the said archbishop of York for the college called the Queen's Hall in the University of Oxford, the said archbishop of Canterbury, in the presence of the king and the lords in the said parliament, promised that if the said archbishop of York is able sufficiently to show any privilege, or particular document, whereby the said archbishop of Canterbury should not perform or exercise his visitation of the said college, he would willingly refrain from it. Saving to himself forever the visitation of the scholars dwelling in the said college, in accordance with the judgments and decrees made and given by the said King Richard, and by our lord the present King Henry, as is more fully explained in the record made on this.
Pur la fundacioun del college de Fodryngheye. < York. > [Concerning the foundation of the college of Fotheringhay by the king and the duke of York].
18. Item, une cedule contenant la fourme de certeines lettres patentes pur founder un college perpetuelle de certeins seculers persones par nostre seignur le roy, et Edward duk d'Everwyk, a Fodryngheye en le counte de Norhampton', et de lour granter certeines possessions, libertees, fraunchises, et acquitances pur lour sustenance, feust lue devaunt le roy et les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et les communes, en cest present parlement esteantz, en la fourme q'enseute: 18. Concerning the foundation of the college of Fotheringhay. York. Also, a schedule giving the form of certain letters patent for the foundation of a perpetual college for certain secular persons by our lord the king and Edward, duke of York, at Fotheringhay in the county of Northampton, and of their grant of certain possessions, liberties, franchises, and acquittances for their support, was read before the king and the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons who were present in this present parliament, as follows:
Henricus Dei gracia rex Anglie et Francie et dominus Hibernie omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint salutem. Sciatis quod nos (caritatis et devocionis fervore succensi cupientesque cultum divinum dum vitam duxerimus in humanis ad laudem et decorem nominis illius qui prospera cuncta largitur et nulla bona irremunerata relinquit adaugere, ut cum nos ab hac luce terrena simus orbati luce perpetua in ipsius conspectu qui vera lux est congaudere valeamus) quoddam collegium perpetuum in quodam solo sex acras terre continente, infra procinctum domini carissimi consanguinei nostri Edwardi ducis Ebor' de Fodryngheye in comitatu Norht' situatum, quod quidem solum ab eodem consanguineo nostro per cartam suam nobis heredibus et assignatis nostris in hac parte factam adquisivimus in honore gloriosissime virginis Marie genitricis domini nostri Jehu Cristi et omnium sanctorum de certis personis secularibus, videlicetde uno magistro duodecim capellanis octo clericis et tresdecim choristis vel infra numerum illum, divina pro salubri statu nostro et carissime consortis [p. iii-653][col. a] nostre Johanne regine Anglie, ac Henrici principis Wallie filii nostri primogeniti et ceterorum liberorum nostrorum ac prefati consanguinei nostri et Philippe consortis sue duxerimus, et pro animabus nostris cum ab hac luce migraverimus, ac pro animabus carissimi domini et patris nostri Johannis nuper regis Castelle et Legionis et ducis Aquitann' et Lancastr' necnon carissime matris nostre Blanchee ac nuper consortis nostre Marie et Edmundi nuper ducis Ebor' et Isabelle consortis sue ac animabus omnium fidelium defunctorum juxta statuta et ordinaciones in hac parte facienda, inibi celebratura imperpetuum, de assensu dicti consanguinei nostri, quem simul nobiscum in premiis in tam pio negocio participare, et tanquam alium fundatorem perpetuum ejusdem collegii esse volumus, fundare facere et stabilire intendimus ac per presentes fundamus facimus et stabilimus perpetuis annuente Deo temporibus duraturis, volentes et concedentes pro nobis et heredibus nostris quod magister capellani clerici et choriste in predicto collegio pro tempore existentes et successores sui magister et collegium Beate Marie et omnium sanctorum de Fodryngheye imperpetuum nuncupentur. Et quod magister capellani clerici et choriste collegii predicti similiter pro tempore existentes et successores sui per nomen vel sub nomine magistri et collegii Beate Marie et omnium sanctorum de Fodryngheye, sint persone habiles capaces et perpetue ad impetrandum recipiendum et adquirendum omnimoda terras tenementa redditus servicia proficua ecclesias emolumenta jura et possessiones spiritualia et temporalia tam de nobis et heredibus nostris quam de aliis personis quibuscumque, licet ea immediate de nobis vel heredibus nostris per baroniam vel per servicium militare aut alio modo quocumque teneantur; et ea ingrediendo absque licencia a persona nostra vel heredum nostrorum impetranda sive optinenda, eisdem magistro et collegio et successoribus suis pro sustentacione sua possidend' et retinend' imperpetuum. Et quod iidem magister et collegium et eorum successores habeant unum commune sigillum pro negociis et agendis suis serviturum. Et quod ipsi et successores sui possint placitare et implacitari ac prosequi omnimodas causas querelas et acciones reales personales et mixtas cujuscumque generis sint vel nature; et ad respondendum vel defendendum in eisdem coram judicibus secularibus et ecclesiasticis quibuscumque. Et ulterius volumus et concedimus per presentes pro nobis et heredibus nostris dictis magistro et collegio quod ipsi dictum solum sex acrarum terre tam pro ecclesia dicti collegii ac aliis domibus et edificiis eidem necessariis quam pro mansis magistri et singularum personarum ipsius collegii et aliis necessariis suis in eodem solo construendis habeant et teneant eisdem magistro et collegio et successoribus suis in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosinam imperpetuum. Et insuper ad affectum quod persone dicti collegii in celebracione hujusmodi Deo perpetuo famulature melius manuteneri valeant et sustentari de assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium ac communitatis regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento existencium, dedimus concessimus et assignavimus et per presentes damus concedimus et assignamus magistro et collegio predictis in auxilium sustentacionis personarum in eodem degencium et officiariorum ac familiarium suorum quandam annuam firmam sexaginta et septem librarum sex solidorum et octo denariorum quam Johannes Cheigne chivaler nobis annuatim post festum Pasche proximo futuro guerra inter nos et illos de Francie mota durante, reddere tenetur pro custodia maneriorum de Newent et Kingeston, temporalium prioratus de Newent cum pertinenciis in comitatu Glouc' et Hereford', ad abbatiam Beate Marie de Cormeiles alienigenam spectantcium in manu nostra occasione guerre predicte existentium. Habendum et percipiendum dictis magistro et collegio et successoribus suis dictam annuam firmam sexaginta et septem librarum sex solidorum et octo denariorum post dictum festum Pasche per [col. b] manus dicti Johannis Cheigne et executorum suorum ac assignatorum suorum et aliorum quorumcumque firmariorum sive occupatorum eorumdem maneriorum; videlicet medietatem ejusdem firme ad festa Sancti Michaelis et alteram medietatem inde ad festa Pasche guerra predicta durante. Et ulterius de assensu predictorum dominorum et communitatis concessimus et per presentes concedimus pro nobis et heredibus nostris prefatis magistro et collegio quod si maneria predicta cum pertinenciis aut eorum alterum seu aliqua possessionum spiritualium sive temporalium cum pertinenciis ad dictum prioratum de Newent spectancium vel aliqua possessionum spiritualium aut temporalium cum pertinenciis ad prioratum de Avebury in comitatu Wiltes' qui est cella abbatis Sancti Georgii de Bankervill' in Normann' in manu nostra occasione guerre predicte similiter existentium, qualitercumque spectantium aut aliqua parcella possessionum ipsarum, per sursumreddicionem aut mortem firmariorum sive firmarii vel occupatorum sive occupatoris predictarum possessionum spiritualium aut temporalium ad predictum prioratum de Newent spectancium vel alicujus parcelle earumdem sive per sursumreddicionem aut mortem firmarii seu occupatoris dictarum possessionum spiritualium aut temporalium ad dictum prioratum de Avebury spectancium vel alicujus parcelle earumdem, seu per restitucionem sive restituciones litterarum nostrarum patentium dictorum firmariorum vel occupatorum aut eorum alicujus de firmis suis seu de firma sua in hac parte sibi inde confectarum, eisdem magistro et collegio vel successoribus suis inde faciendum, aut pro non solucionibus sive non solucione firmarum suarum aut firme sue in hac parte debitarum, sive per impotenciam firmariorum sive occupatorum predictorum vel alicujus eorumdem vel per resumpcionem generalem aut specialem eorumdem prioratum et possessionum eisdem spectancium aut alicujus eormdem auctoritate parliamenti vel alia via vel causa quacumque ad manus nostras vel heredum nostrorum deveniant seu devenire debeant, eisdem magistro et collegio et successoribus suis immediate remaneant. Et quod ipsi in eisdem ingrediantur et prioratus illos ac possessiones spirituales et temporales quascumque ad eosdem spectantes et quamlibet parcellam earumdem habeant et teneant sibi et successoribus suis, simul cum juribus rebus et pertinenciis suis quibuscumque guerra predicta durante, absque aliquo nobis vel heredibus nostris inde reddendo in sustentacionis sue incrementum, et absque impedimento vel impeticione nostri vel heredum nostrorum aut ministrorum nostrorum quorumcumque et absque aliqua licencia a nobis vel heredibus nostris inde optinenda sine aliqua prosecucione vobis vel heredibus nostris imposterum in hac parte faciende. Preterea si contingat prioratus predictos simul cum possessionibus eisdem pertinentibus de assensu et concessione abbatum et conventuum abbatiarum predictarum dictis magistro et collegio et successoribus suis per nos minime amortizatos et appropriatos existere, tunc de assensu eorumdem dominorum et communitatis volumus et concessimus ac licenciam dedimus et per presentes concedimus et licenciam damus pro nobis et heredibus nostris, tam abbati et conventui dicti loci de Cormeiles et eorum successoribus quod ipsi quandocumque sibi placuerit, per scriptum suum commune dictum prioratum de Newent, cum omnibus dominiciis maneriis ecclesiis juribus terris tenementis redditibus serviciis porcionibus pencionibus feodis militum advocacionibus ecclesiarum et aliorum beneficiorum quorumcumque, jurisdiccionibus visibus franciplegii franchesiis immunitatibus quietantiis consuetudinibus et libertatibus cum pertinenciis ac aliis rebus et possessionibus spiritualibus et temporalibus quibuscumque eidem prioratui de Newent qualitercumque et ubicumque annexis seu pertinentibus sive ad eundem spectantibus dare possint et concedere ac de monasterio suo de Cormeiles transferre, quam abbati et conventui predicti loci Sancti Georgii de Bankervill et eorum successoribus, quod ipsi quandocumque eis placuerit, per scriptum suum commune dictum prioratum de Avebury cum omnibus dominiis maneriis ecclesiis juribus terris tenementis redditibus serviciis porcionibus pensiounibus feodis militum advocacionibus [p. iii-654][col. a] ecclesiarum et aliorum beneficiorum quorumcumque jurisdiccionibus visibus franciplegii franchesiis immunitatibus quietantiis consuetudinibus et libertatibus cum pertinenciis ac aliis rebus et possessionibus spiritualibus et temporalibus quibuscumque dicto prioratui de Avebury qualitercumque et ubicumque pertinentibus annexis sive spectantibus, similiter dare possint et concedere ac de monasterio suo Sancti Georgii de Bankervill' transferre magistro et collegio predictis et eorum successoribus ac ipsorum ecclesie sive collegio Beate Marie et omnium sanctorum de Fodryngheye supradictis. Habendum et tenendum prioratus predictos ac omnia et singula premissa ad eosdem prioratus et eorum quemlibet spectancia sive pertinencia prefatis magistro et collegio et successoribus suis et ecclesie sue dicti collegii in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosinam in auxilium sustentacionis sue imperpetuum et in partem dotacionis sue et collegii supradicti. Et eisdem magistro et collegio et successoribus suis quod ipsi a prefatis abbate et conventu dicti loci de Cormeiles et successoribus suis predictum prioratum de Newent cum omnibus et singulis rebus et possessionibus juribus et pertinenciis spiritualibus et temporalibus predictis eidem prioratui qualitercumque et ubicumque ut premittitur annexis sive pertinencibus aut spectantibus, quam a dictis abbate et conventu Sancti Georgii de Bankervill' et successoribus suis dictum prioratum de Avebury, cum omnibus et singulis rebus, possessionibus juribus et pertinenciis predictis quibuscumque eidem prioratui de Avebury qualitercumque et ubicumque ut predictum est annexis pertinencibus sive spectantibus recipere possint, et tenere sibi et successoribus suis magistris et collegio dicti loci Beate Marie et omnium sanctorum de Fodryngheye et ecclesie sue ibidem in forma predicta, sicut predictum est imperpetuum absque aliqua alia prosecucione vel licencia erga nos vel heredes nostros ulterius in hac parte facienda impetranda sive optinenda et absque aliquo nobis vel heredibus nostris solvendo sive reddendo licenciam pro nobis et heredibus nostris similiter dedimus specialem; statuto de terris et tenementis ad manum mortuam non ponendo edito aut aliquo alio statuto sive ordinacione in contrarium facto aut restriccione in ultimo parliamento nostro facta sive habita, seu eo quod possessiones alienigenas infra potestatem nostram existentes pro expensis hospicii nostri assignentur, seu eo quod dicte abbatie de Cormeiles et Sancti Georgii de Bankervill', et similiter dicti prioratus de Newent et Avebury, aut ipsarum abbatiarum aliqua vel ipsorum prioratuum aliquis de fundacione progenitorum nostrorum quondam regum Anglie, et patronatu nostro existat vel existant aut eo quod predictus prioratus de Newent aut aliqua possessionum ad eundem spectancium abbati et conventui dicte abbatie de Cormeiles et eorum monasterio dictusque prioratus de Avebury seu aliqua possessionum eidem pertinencium abbati et conventui prefate abbatie Sancti Georgii de Bankervill', et eorum monasterio, in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam seu pro divinis celebrandis elemosinis distribuendis aut hospitalite tenenda vel alio onere spirituali sive temporali qualitercumque et ubicumque supportando, per progenitores nostros dati concessi sive collati aut data concessa sive collata fuerunt seu alia causa quacumque non obstante. Et insuper pro majori securitate dictorum magistri et collegii ut persone ejusdem divinis inibi quietius intendere valeant et altissimo cum tranquillitate famulari disponere et ordinare volentes, de assensu dictorum dominorum et communitatis concessimus et per presentes concedimus pro nobis et heredibus nostris eisdem magistro et collegio quod ipsi et successores sui imperpetuum sint quietiet exonerati erga nos et heredes nostros de omnimodis omnibus annuitatibus apportis redditibus exaccionibus firmis et arreragiis firmarum et apportorum necnon de decimis quintisdecimis subsidiis contribucionibus quotis et tallagiis quibuscumque nobis per clerum Cantuarien' provincie sive per clerum Ebor' provincie seu per communitatem regni nostri [col. b] Anglie, vel eorum aliquem concessis aut nobis vel heredibus nostris in futurum per cleros et communitatem predictos seu eorum aliquem extunc concedendis, et eorum quolibet sive earum qualibet, tam racione persone magistri dicti collegii et singularum personarum pro tempore degentium in eodem, et similiter racione quorumcumque bonorum sive catallorum dicti collegii per ipsos jam habitorum et optentorum et imposterum per ipsos et successores suos optinendorum, quam racione sive causa dictorum prioratum ac terrarum tenenementorum ecclesiarum jurium rerum et possessionum spiritualium et temporalium eisdem seu eorum alteri pertinencium sive spectancium et cujuslicet parcelle eorumdem quandocumque et qualitercumque iidem magister et collegium inde possessionati fuerunt ac racione sive causa omnium et singulorum terrarum tenementorm reddituum ecclesiarum porcionum pensionum et possessionum spiritualium et temporalium que eisdem magistro et collegio per nos ad presens collata data concessa vel assignata existunt, et similiter que iidem magister et collegium et eorum successores ex collacione concessione donacione vel assignacione nostra vel heredum nostrorum seu aliorum quorumcumque decetero sunt habituri et optenturi. Et similiter de eodem assensu concessimus et per presentes concedimus pro nobis et heredibus nostris prefatis magistro et collegio quod ipsi et successores sui ac omnes et singuli homines et tenentes dominicorum maneriorum terrarum et tenementum ac possessionum spiritualium et temporalium quorumcumque eisdem magistro et collegio qualitercumque et ubicumque collatorum [memb. 11] donatorum concessorum sive assignatorum seu conferendorum donandorum concedendorum sive assignandorum quieti sint imperpetuum pro terris et tenementis suis, ac bonis et catallis suis venerabilibus et aliis quibuslibet eorum infra dominica et potestatem nostra de omnimodis theoloniis muragiis picagiis lastagiis stallagiis pontagiis passagiis panagiis cariagiis prisis et chiminagiis ac geldis misericordiis sectis comitatuum et hundredorum ac de murdris et latrociniis quibuscumque. Et quod iidem magister et collegium et successores sui similiter habeant imperpetuum tam omnimoda catalla felonum et fugitivorum utlagatorum et wayviatorum pro quacumque causa ac felonum de se, et visus franciplegii et quicquid ad hujusmodi visus pertinet, ac fines et amerciamenta de omnimodis hominibus et tenentibus omnium et singulorum dominicorum maneriorum terrarum tenementorum possessionum et feodorum eisdem magistro et collegio tam jam collatorum sive concessorum quam imposterum conferendorum sive concedendorum, et de omnibus residentibus infra eadem dominica maneria terras tenementa possessiones et feoda quam omnimoda forisfacturas annum diem vastum et estreppamentum et quicquid ad nos vel heredes nostros pertinere poterit de anno die et vasto estreppamento et forisfacturis infra dominica maneria terras tenementa possessiones et feoda illa omnia et singula qualitercumque accidentia et eciam casura sive coram nobis aut coram alio quocumque justicario vel ministro nostro, vel heredum nostrorum seu alterius cujuscumque et in quacumque curia adjudicata sive adjudicanda fuerint quamquam dicti tenentes non sint integri tenentes ipsorum magistri et collegii aut successorum suorum seu iidem tenentes, ac dicti homines et residentes officiarii seu ministri nostri vel heredum nostrorum existant, seu eorum aliquis existat. Et similiter quod iidem magister et collegium et successores sui imperpetuum habeant infra omnia et singula dominica maneria terras tenementa possessiones et feoda predicta tam per ipsos jam habita quam per eosdem et eorum successores optinenda, libertates de infangenthef et outfangenthef acomnia catalla confiscata et confiscanda et catalla vocata wayf et stray, et omnimoda catalla vocata manuopera cum quacumque persona in eisdem capta et imposterum capienda, et per eandem personam coram quocumque judice deadvocanda, ita quod dicti magister et collegium et successores sui per se et ballivos ac ministros suos omnia et singula hujusmodi catalla felonum et fugitivorum utlagatorum wayviatorum felonum de se ac [p. iii-655][col. a] catalla confiscata et catalla vocata manuopera et wayf et stray necnon forisfacturas annum diem vastum et estreppamentum supradicta et quicquid ad nos vel heredes nostros de hujusmodi anno die vasto estreppamento et forisfacturis ac catallis predictis et eorum quolibet pertinere poterit, levare percipere et habere possint, et quod liceat eisdem magistro et collegio et eorum successoribus ac ballivis et ministris suis, ponere se de eisdem et eorum quolibet in seisinam et ea retinere licet per ministros nostros vel heredum nostrorum per antea seisita fuerunt absque occasione impedimento vel impeticione nostri vel heredum nostrorum aut justiciorum vicecomitum escaetorum vel aliorum ballivorum seu ministrorum nostrorum vel heredum nostrorum quorumcumque restriccione predicta aut aliquo premissorum, seu eo quod valor libertatum quietantiarum franchesiarum ac sex acrarum terre supradictarum per nos eisdem magistro et collegio sic concessarum, aut valor annuus dicti prioratus de Avebury, cum omnibus possessionibus et rebus eidem pertinentibus cujus custodiam Johanni Rome clerico pro quinquaginta et quinque libris sex solidis et octo denariis inde annuatim solvendis commisimus seu valor annuus ecclesiarum de Newent Bekford et Dymmok que sunt possessiones spirituales ad predictum prioratum de Newent spectantes, pro quibus dictus Johannes Cheyne et Thomas Horston clericii nuper firmarii earumdem centum et quinquaginta marcas nobis annuatim reddere tenebantur in litteris nostris presentibus juxta formam cujusdam statuti per nos nuper editi, minime specificatur aut aliquo alio statuto sive ordinacione in contrarium edito sive alia causa quacumque similiter non obstante. In cujus rei testimonium has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm' .xviij. die Decembris anno regni nostri terciodecimo. Henry, by the grace of God king of England and France and lord of Ireland, to all who shall read these present letters, greeting. You are to know that we - having been inflamed by the fervour of charity and devotion, and desiring divine service whilst we are alive to the glory and honour of the name of Him who greatly favours all and leaves no good deeds unrewarded, so that when we are taken from this earthly light we may be able to rejoice in perpetual light in the sight of the same who is the true light - have founded a certain perpetual college in a certain field containing six acres of land situated within the precinct of our dearest kinsman, Edward, duke of York, at Fotheringhay, in the county of Northampton, which certain field we have acquired from our same kinsman by his charter made to us, our heirs and assigns in this matter, for the honour of the most glorious Virgin Mary, mother of Our Lord Jesus Christ, and all the saints, for certain secular persons; namely for a master, twelve chaplains, eight clerks and thirteen choristers, or less than that number, for salutary divine service for our health and that of our dear consort [p. iii-653][col. a] Joan, queen of England, and Henry, prince of Wales, our first-born son, and our other free men, and our aforesaid kinsman and Philippa, his consort, and for our souls when we have left this light, and for the soul of our dearest lord and father John, late king of Castile and Leon and duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, and also for our dearest mother Blanche, and our late consort Mary, and Edmund, late duke of York, and Isabella, his consort, and the souls of all the faithful departed, to be celebrated there forever according to the statutes and ordinances to be made in this matter, by the assent of our said kinsman, whom we wish to participate with us in the aforesaid pious enterprise and be another perpetual founder of the same college we intend to found, create and establish; and by these presents we found, create and establish it, to last, God willing, forever. And we wish and grant for us and our heirs that the master, chaplains, clerks and choristers in the aforesaid college at the time, and their successors, will be called the master and college of St Mary and All Saints of Fotheringhay forever. And similarly that the master, chaplains, clerks and choristers of the aforesaid college at the time, and their successors, by or under the name of the master and college of St Mary and All Saints of Fotheringhay, will be suitable and able persons perpetually to procure, receive and acquire lands, tenements, rents, services, profits, churches, emoluments, rights and possessions, spiritualities and temporalities of every kind, both from us and our heirs and from all other persons whomsover, even if they are held directly from us or our heirs by barony or military service or in any other way whatsoever; and to enter into them without obtaining or acquiring a licence from us or our heirs; to be held and preserved by the master and college and their successors for their support forever. And that the same master and college and their successors will have a common seal to use for their business and legal affairs. And that the same and their successors will be able to plead, implead and prosecute all kinds of causes, suits and actions, real, personal and mixed, of whoever's initiation or creation they might be; and reply and defend them before all secular and ecclesiastical justices. Moreover, we wish and grant, for us and our heirs, by these presents to the said master and college, that they shall have and hold the said field of six acres of land, both for the church of the said college and the other houses and buildings necessary for the same, and for the manses of the master and each person of the same college and their other necessities to be built on the same field by the same master and college and their successors, in free, pure and perpetual alms forever. Moreover, so that the persons of the said college will better be able to be maintained and supported in this perpetual celebration of God, by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons of our realm of England who are present in this present parliament, we have given, granted and assigned, and by these presents we give, grant and assign, to the aforesaid master and college, in aid of the maintenance of their persons, officers and community living in the same, a certain annual farm of £67 6s. 8d. which John Cheyne, knight, is bound to pay us annually after the feast of Easter next, during the war between us and France, for the custody of the manors of Newent and Kingston, and the temporalities of the priory of Newent with their appurtenances in the counties of Gloucester and Hereford, which belong to the alien abbey of St Mary of Cormeilles, and are in our hands by reason of the aforesaid war; which said annual farm of £67 6s. 8d. is to be held and received by the said master and college and their successors after the said feast of Easter by [col. b] the hands of the said John Cheyne and his executors and assigns and any other farmers or occupiers of the same manors; namely, half of the same farm at the feast of Michaelmas, and the other half thereof at the feast of Easter during the said war. Moreover, by the assent of the aforesaid lords and commons, we have granted and by these presents have confirmed for us and our heirs to the aforesaid master and college that if the aforesaid manors with their appurtenances, or any of them - or any of the possessions, spiritualities or temporalities with their appurtenances belonging to the said priory of Newent; or any of the possessions, spiritualities or temporalities with their appurtenances which belong to the priory of Avebury in the county of Wiltshire, which is a cell of the abbey of St George of Bocherville in Normandy, and are also in our hands by reason of the aforesaid war, belonging in any way to or forming any part of the possessions of the same; by surrender or death of the farmers or farmer or occupiers or occupier of the aforesaid possessions, spiritualities, or temporalities belonging to the said priory of Newent, or any part of the same; or by the surrender or death of the farmer or occupier of the said possessions, spiritualities or possessions belonging to the said priory of Avebury, or any part of the same; or by the return of our letters patent concerning the said farmers or occupiers or any of them concerning their farm in this matter made to them thereof, made to the master and college or their successors in respect thereof; or because of the non-payment of their farm or the non-payment of his farm due in this matter; or through the incapacity of the aforesaid farmers or occupiers or any of them; or by the general or special resumption of the same priory and the possessions belonging to the same, or any of them, by the authority of parliament or other means or causes whatsoever - should come or ought to come into our hands or those of our heirs, they will forthwith remain with the same master and college and their successors. And that they may enter into them and have and hold those priories and any spiritual and temporal possessions belonging to the same and any part of the same for themselves and their successors, together with all their rights, effects and appurtenances, during the aforesaid war, without our hindrance or interference, or that of any of our heirs or ministers, and without obtaining any licence in respect thereof from us or our heirs, and without any prosecution to be made henceforth by us or our heirs. Moreover, if it happens that the aforesaid priories, together with the possessions pertaining to the same, by the assent and grant of the abbots and convents of the aforesaid abbeys are in any way alienated in mortmain and appropriated by us to the said master and college and their successors, then by the assent of the same lords and commons we wish and have granted and given licence, and by these presents we grant and give licence for us and our heirs, both to the abbot and convent of the said place of Cormeilles and their successors, that whenever it might please them - by their common deed of the said priory of Newent, with all demesne lands, manors, churches, rights, lands, tenements, rents, services, portions, pensions, knights' fees, advowsons of churches and other benefices whatsoever, jurisdictions, views of frankpledge, franchises, liberties, quittances, customs and liberties with appurtenances, and any other effects and spiritual and temporal possessions annexed or pertaining to the same priory of Newent or belonging to the same in any way and wherever - they will be able to give and grant and transfer from their monastery of Cormeilles to them, and to the abbot and convent of the aforesaid place of Bocherville and their successors, whenever it might please them, by their common deed, the said priory of Avebury with all demesne lands, manors, churches, rights, lands, tenements, rents, services, portions, pensions, knights' fees, advowsons [p. iii-654][col. a] of churches and other benefices whatsoever, jurisdictions, views of frankpledge, franchises, liberties, quittances, customs and liberties with appurtenances, and any other effects and spiritual and temporal possessions pertaining, annexed or belonging in any way and wherever to the said priory of Avebury; and they will similarly be able to give and grant and transfer them from their monastery of St George of Bocherville to the aforesaid master and college and their successors, and their abovesaid church or college of St Mary and All Saints of Fotheringhay; so that the aforesaid priories and all and each of the aforesaid belonging or pertaining to the said priories, and any of them, may be had and held by the aforesaid master and college and their successors and their church of the said college in free, pure and perpetual alms, in aid of their maintenance, forever, as part of their endowment and that of the aforesaid college. And the same master and college and their successors will also be able to receive from the aforesaid abbot and convent of the said place of Cormeilles and their successors the aforesaid priory of Newent with each and every aforesaid spiritual and temporal thing, possession, right and appurtenance annexed, pertaining or belonging to the said same priory in any way and wherever, as mentioned above, and from the said abbot and convent of St George of Bocherville and their successors the said priory of Avebury, with each and every aforesaid thing, possession, right and appurtenance whatsoever annexed, pertaining or belonging to the same priory of Avebury in any way and wherever, as aforesaid, and to hold for themselves and their successors, the masters and college of the said place of St Mary and All Saints of Fotheringhay, and their church there forever in the aforesaid manner, as is aforesaid, without any other prosecution or licence to be made, procured or obtained against us or our heirs in future, and without paying or rendering anything to us and our heirs; for this we have similarly given special licence for us and our heirs, notwithstanding the statute published concerning lands and tenements in mortmain, or any other statute or ordinance made to the contrary or restriction enacted or delivered in our last parliament, or the fact that alien possessions which are within our dominion are to be assigned for the expenses of our household, or of those of the said abbeys of Cormeilles and St George of Bocherville, and similarly those of the said priories of Newent and Avebury, or any of the same abbeys or any of the same priories which are of the foundation of our progenitors sometime kings of England and are of our patronage, or the fact that the said priory of Newent or any possession belonging to the same by the abbot and convent of the said abbey of Cormeilles and their monastery, and the said priory of Avebury or any possession pertaining to the same abbot and convent of the aforesaid abbey of St George of Bocherville, and their monastery, in free, pure and perpetual alms, or for divine service to be celebrated, alms to be distributed, or hospitality to be maintained, or any spiritual or temporal charge to be supported in any way whatsoever and wherever, given, granted, or conferred by our progenitors, or have been given, granted or conferred, or any other cause whatsoever. And moreover, wishing to provide and ordain for the greater security of the said master and college, so that the people of the same may be able to maintain divine services there more easily, for the greater tranquillity of the community, by the assent of the said lords and commons and by these presents we grant for us and our heirs to the same master and college that they and their successors will be quit and discharged forever with regard to us and our heirs from all annuities, revenues, rents, exactions, farms and the arrears of farms and revenues, and also of tenths, fifteenths, subsidies, payments, quotas and tallages whatsoever granted to us by the clergy of the province of Canterbury, the clergy of the province of York, or the commons of our realm [col. b] of England, or any of them, or to be granted to us and our heirs in future by the aforesaid clergy and commons or any of them forthwith, both with respect to the person of the master of the said college and each person now living in the same, and similarly with respect to any goods or chattels of the said college already held and acquired by the same or to be acquired hereafter by the same and their successors, and with respect to or on account of the said priory and any lands, tenements, churches, rights, effects and spiritual and temporal possessions pertaining or belonging to the same or any of them, and any part of them, whensoever and howsoever the same master and college came into possession of them, and with respect to and on account of all and each of the lands, tenements, rents, churches, portions, pensions and spiritual and temporal possessions which are conferred, given, granted and assigned to the same master and college by us at present, and similarly which the same master and college and their successors will hold or acquire by our bestowal, grant, gift or assignment or that of any of our heirs henceforth. And similarly, by the same assent we have granted and by these presents confirmed to the aforesaid master and college for us and our heirs that they and their successors, and each and every man and tenant on the demesnes, manors, lands and tenements, and spiritual and temporal possessions whatsoever conferred [memb. 11] given, granted or assigned, or to be conferred, given, granted or assigned peacefully to the same master and college in any way and wherever, will be held as their lands and tenements forever, and their ecclesiastical goods and chattels, and any of them within our demesne and dominion, together with all kinds of tolls, murage, pickage, lastage, stallage, pontage, passage, pannage, carriage, prises and taxes for the use of roads or paths, and gelds, amercements, suits of the counties and hundreds, and all murderers and thieves whatsoever. And that the same master and college and their successors shall similarly have forever both all kinds of chattels of felons and fugitives, outlaws and vagrants for whatever cause, and suicides, and views of frankpledge and whatever pertains to views of this kind, and fines and amercements from all kinds of men and tenants of each and every demesne, manor, lands, tenements, possessions and fees both now conferred and granted to the same master and college, and to be conferred and granted hereafter, and from all the resident tenants within the same demesnes, manors, lands, tenements, possessions and fees, and all kinds of forfeitures, and every kind of year, day, waste and right of waste that will be able to pertain to us or our heirs from year, day and waste, right of waste and forfeiture within each and every demesene, manor, lands, tenements, possessions and fees in any way which have arisen or may arise before us or before any of our justices or ministers whatsoever, or our heirs or any of them, and have been adjudged or will be adjudged in any court, even if the said tenants are not full tenants of the said master and college or their successors, or if any of the same and the said men and resident officials are ministers of us or our heirs. And similarly that the same master and college and their successors will have forever within each and every aforesaid demesne, manor, land, tenement, possession and fee both presently held by the same and to be acquired, the liberties of infangthief and outfangthief and all confiscated chattels and those to be confiscated, and chattels called waif and stray, and all kinds of chattels called mainour together with all persons taken in the same or to be taken hereafter who are impleaded before any of our justices; so that the said master and college and their successors, by themselves or their bailiffs and ministers, will be able to levy, receive and have each and every kind of chattels of felons and fugitives, outlaws, vagrants, suicides and all the aforesaid [p. iii-655][col. a] confiscated chattels, and chattels called mainour and waif and stray, and also forefeitures, year, day, waste and right of waste from any such aforesaid year, day, waste, right of waste, forfeitures and chattels which may pertain to us and our heirs; and the same master and college, their successors and bailiffs and ministers, shall be permitted to put themselves in seisin of any of the same and retain them, even if they were formerly held by our ministers or those of our heirs, without any suit, impediment or impeachment by us or our heirs, justices, sheriffs, escheators, or any of our bailiffs or ministers, or our heirs whomsoever on account of the aforesaid restriction or any of the foregoing; even if the value of the liberties, quittances, franchises and the abovesaid six acres of land thus granted by us to the same master and college - or the annual value of the said priory of Avebury, with all its possessions and things pertaining to the same, the custody of which we have committed to John Rome, clerk, for £55 6s. 8d. to be paid annually thereafter; or the annual value of the churches of Newent, Beckford and Dymmok which are spiritual possessions belonging to the aforesaid priory of Newent, for which the said John Cheyne and Thomas Horston, clerks, former farmers of the same, were bound to pay 150 marks at least to us annually as specified in our present letters in accordance with the terms of a certain statute recently published by us, or any other statute or ordinance published to the contrary, or similarly any other cause - should be set at less. In testimony of which we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witnessed by myself at Westminster, 18 December, in the thirteenth year of our reign.
Sur quoy, eue bone advis et deliberacioun par nostre dit seignur le roy et les seignurs et communes avauntditz sur tout la contenue de dite cedule, mesme nostre seignur le roy, del assent de les seignurs et communes suisditz, voet et grante, qe lettres patentes, contenantz les fourme et effect en la dite cedule comprisez, soient faitz et ensealez dessoutz soun grand seal, et pleinement executz en toutz pointz, solonc les purport et contenue d'icelles, et qe mesmes les lettres patentes soient pleinement enactez, et enrollez en rolle de parlement. (fn. iii-647-73-1) Whereupon, when our said lord the king and the aforesaid lords and commons had had good advice and deliberation on all the contents of the said schedule, our same lord the king, by the assent of the aforesaid lords and commons, wills and grants that letters patent stating the terms specified in the said schedule should be made and sealed under his great seal, and fully enforced in all points according to their tenor and content, and that the same letters patent should be fully recorded and enrolled on the roll of parliament. (fn. iii-647-73-1)
[memb. 10]
Pur Monsire Johan Lumley. [Petition from Sir John Lumley for restitution of his inheritance].
19. Item, une peticion feust baillee en parlement par les communes d'Engleterre pur Monsire Johan Lumley, en les parols q'enseuent: 19. On behalf of Sir John Lumley. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament by the commons of England for Sir John Lumley, as follows:
Pleaise au roy nostre seignur soveraigne, de vostre treshabundant grace, en cest present parlement, par advis de toutz les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en le dit parlement esteantz, graunter a vostre liege Johan de Lumley, chivaler, q'il a le noune et abilite d'estre fitz et heir a Rauf de Lumley, et frere et heir a Thomas de Lumley fitz le dit Rauf frere le dit Johan, [et] poet estre restore et restitut: la rebellioun et forfaiture des ditz Rauf et Thomas envers vous et vostre roiale mageste, et le juggementz donez envers eux, par quelle ils feurent atteintz de treson, nient obstantz; et q'il et ses heirs soeint faitz ables d'estre heirs a toutz leur auncestres, a clamer par eux, par title de descent, resorte, ou en autre manere, as queux ils deussent avoir este heirs, si les ditz juggementz n'eussent este donez. Et q'il et ses heirs desorenavaunt soient heirs as ditz Rauf et Thomas, et ables d'avoir, user, et enjoier chescun accioun, clayme, pursuyt, demande, chalange, et avauntage, come heirs as ditz Rauf et Thomas, et a toutz ses auncestres, en la fourme suisdite, des seignuries, chastelx, manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, vieus de frankeplegge, hundredes, parkes, chaces, garennes, et wrekkes de meer, et autres seignuries et libertees, fraunchises, commodites, et profitz queconqes, dount les ditz Rauf et Thomas, ou ascun de leur auncestres, ou autres a leur [col. b] oeps, joyntement et severalement, feurent seisez, en fee simple ou en fee taille. Et qe mesme le suppliant poet estre restitut en cest present parlement, et fait able d'avoir, come heir les ditz Rauf et Thomas et de toutz ses auncestres, en la fourme suisdite, toutz les seignuries, chastelx, manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, vieus de frankeplegge, hundredes, parkes, chaces, garennes, et wrekkes de meer, et autres seignuries, libertees, fraunchises, commoditees, et profitz queconqes, lesqueux feurent as ditz Rauf et Thomas al temps de lour mort, ou ascun de lour auncestres, en la suisdite fourme, et dount ils, ou autres a leur oeps, feurent seisez ou feoffez, joyntement ou severalment en fee simple ou en fee taille, des queux le dit suppliant, ou autres a soun oeps a present sount seisez, de vostre doune et graunt par voz graciouses lettres patentes autrefoitz a luy ent faitz. Et auxi qe le dit suppliant en toutz les seignuries, chastelx, manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, vieus de frankeplegge, hundredes, parkes, chaces, garennes, et wrekkes de meer, et autres seignuries, libertees, fraunchises, commoditees, et profitz queconqes, queux feurent a dit Rauf ou Thomas, ou ascun a leur oeps, a temps de leur mort, come heir les ditz Rauf et Thomas, purra entrer, et eux a luy et a ses heirs, sanz ascun autre pursuyt ent faire, retenir poet: les ditz juggementz donez envers les ditz Rauf et Thomas, ou ce qe le sank parentre les ditz Rauf et Thomas et le dit suppliant feust corumpez par les causes suisdites, nient contresteantz; pur Dieux, et oevre de charitee. May it please our lord sovereign king, from your most abundant grace, in this present parliament, with the advice of all the lords spiritual and temporal present in the said parliament, to grant to your liege John de Lumley, knight, that he might have the name and ability to be the son and heir to Ralph de Lumley, and the brother and heir to Thomas de Lumley, son of the said Ralph, brother of the said John, and that he should be able to be restored and reinstated: notwithstanding the rebellion and forfeiture of the said Ralph and Thomas against you and your royal majesty and the judgment given against them, by which they were attainted of treason. And that he and his heirs should be made able to be heirs to all their ancestors, as claimed by them, by title ofdescent, resort, or in another manner, to whatever they ought to have as heirs, as if the said judgments had not been given. And that henceforth he and his heirs should be heirs to the said Ralph and Thomas, and able to have, use and enjoy any action, claim, pursuit, demand, challenge and advantage, as heirs to the said Ralph and Thomas, and to all their ancestors, in the aforesaid manner, concerning the lordships, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, views of frankpledge, hundreds, parks, chases, warrens and shipwrecks, and other lordships and liberties, franchises, commodities and profits whatsoever, of which the said Ralph and Thomas, or any of their ancestors, or others to their [col. b] profit, jointly and separately, were seised, in fee simple or in fee tail. And that the same supplicant should be able to be restored in this present parliament and be able to have, as heir to the said Ralph and Thomas and all their ancestors, in the aforesaid manner, all the lordships, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, views of frankpledge, hundreds, parks, chaces, warrens and shipwrecks, and other lordships, liberties, franchises, commodities and profits whatsoever which belonged to the said Ralph and Thomas at the time of their death, or any of their ancestors, in the aforesaid manner, and of which they, or others to their profit, were seised or enfeoffed, jointly and separately in fee simple and in fee tail, of which the said supplicant, or others to his profit are seised at present, by your gift and grant by your gracious letters patent previously made to him concerning this. And also that the said supplicant should be able to enter into all the lordships, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, views of frankpledge, hundreds, parks, chases, warrens and shipwrecks, and other lordships, liberties, franchises, commodities and profits whatsoever which belonged to the said Ralph or Thomas, or to others to their profit, at the time of their death, as heir to the said Ralph and Thomas, and be able to retain them for himself and his heirs without having to make any further suit for them; notwithstanding the said judgments given against the said Ralph and Thomas, or that the blood between the said Ralph and Thomas and the said supplicant was corrupted for the aforesaid reasons; for God, and by way of charity.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust respondue en la fourme q'enseute. Le roy, de l'advis et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et a la request des communes en parlement, ad ottroiez ceste peticion en toutes choses, solonc ce q'est contenuz en ycelle. (fn. iii-647-79-1) Which petition having been read and heard, reply was given as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and at the request of the commons in parliament, has granted this petition in all things, in accordance with those things specified in it. (fn. iii-647-79-1)
Pur William Laysyngby. [Petition for pardon from William Lasenby].
20. Item, une peticion feust baille en parlement par les communes d'Engleterre pur William Laysyngby, en les parols q'enseuent: 20. On behalf of William Lasenby. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament by the commons of England on behalf of William Lasenby, as follows:
A tresgracious, tresredoubte, et tressoveraign nostre seignur le roy supplie humblement vostre povere liege William Laysyngby, qe come devaunt William Gascoigne, et autres voz justices assigneez, il estoit atteintez de treson, et adjuggiez a mort, come en le record ent fait pluis pleinement appiert; par force de quel juggement toutz ses terres, tenementz, biens et chateux queconqes a vous feuront forfaitz. To our most gracious, most dread, and most sovereign lord the king, your poor liege humbly requests that, as he was attainted of treason before William Gascoigne and your other appointed justices, and sentenced to death, as is more fully evident in the record made on this; by force of which judgment all his lands, tenements, goods and chattels whatsoever were forfeited to you.
Que pleaise, de vostre benigne grace et noble seignurie, grauntier, ordeigner, et adjuggier ore en cest present parlement, par advis et assent de toutz les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et la commonalte en ycel esteantz, qe le dit suppliant a le noun et abilitee d'estre persone able a la commune ley, et q'il et ses issues soient persones ables et heirs d'avoir, user, et enjoiser chescun accione, clayme, pursuyte, demande, chalange, et avantage, come heirs a leur auncestres, et a chescun d'eux, des toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, libertees, franchises, vieus de frankeplegge, courts, hundredes, wapentakes, et autres commoditees queconqes, dount le dit suppliant, ou ascun de ses auncestres, ou autres a leur oeps, joyntement ou severalment, feurent seisez, en fee simple ou en fee taille, come sy nul tiel forfaiture ne juggement unqes eust estee. Et qe le dit suppliant poet estre restitut en vostre dit parlement, et fait able d'avoir, user, et rejoiser toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, vieus de frankeplegge, courts, hundredes, et toutz autres seignuries, libertees, custumes, fraunchises, et commodites queconqes, queux feuront a dit suppliant, ou a ascun de ses auncestres, et dount il, ou ascun de ses auncestres, ou autres a soun ou a leur oeps, ou d'ascun d'eux, feuront [p. iii-656][col. a] seisiez, jointement ou severalment, en fee simple ou en fee taille. Et qe le dit suppliant et ses heirs en les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, avowesons, vieus de frankeplegge, courtes, hundredes, wapentakes, et toutz autres seignuries, libertees, custumes, fraunchises, et commoditees queconqes, queux feuront a luy, ou a ascun de ses auncestres, ou a autres al oeps d'ascun d'eux, poet et poient entrer en ycelles, et en chescune parcelle d'eux, et les reteiner a luy et a ses heirs, sanz estre mys a aultre pursuyt afaire par brief ou par peticioun queconqes, come sy nul tiele forfaiture et juggement unqes ust este: les ditz forfaiture, atteindre, juggement, ou execucioun d'ycelle nient faite, estatut, ordenance, graunts, lesses, douns par vous faitz, ou ce qe le sank parentre le dit suppliant, ses heirs, et toutz leur auncestres, par la cause suisdite feust corumpuz, nient contresteant. May it please you, from your benign grace and noble lordship, to grant, ordain, and adjudge now in this present parliament, by the advice and assent of all the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons present there, that thesaid supplicant should be restored to the name and ability of being a person able at the common law, and that he and his descendants should be persons and heirs able to have, use, and enjoy any action, claim, pursuit, demand, challenge and advantage, as heirs to any of their ancestors, of all the manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, liberties, franchises, views of frankpledge, courts, hundreds, wapentakes and other commodities whatsoever of which the said supplicant or any of his ancestors, or others to their profit, jointly and separately, were seised, in fee simple or in fee tail, as if no such forfeiture or judgment had ever been made. And that the said supplicant should be able to be restored in your said parliament, and be able to have, use, and enjoy all the manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, views of frankpledge, courts, hundreds, and all other lordships, liberties, customs, franchises and commodities whatsoever which belonged to the said supplicant or to any of his ancestors, and of which he, or any of his ancestors, or any others to his or their profit, were [p. iii-656][col. a] seised, jointly and separately, in fee simple or in fee tail. Also that the said supplicant and his heirs should be able to enter into the manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, advowsons, views of frankpledge, courts, hundreds, wapentakes, and all other lordships, liberties, customs, franchises and commodities whatsoever, and into any part of them, which belonged to him or to any of his ancestors, or to others to any of their profit, and retain them to himself and his heirs, without being obliged to bring any further suit by writ or petition, as if no such forfeiture or judgment had ever been made; notwithstanding the said forfeiture, attaint, judgment, or the non-execution of it, or any statute, ordinance, grants, leases, or gifts made by you, or that the blood between the said supplicant, his heirs, and all their ancestors, was corrupted for the aforesaid reason.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust respondue en la fourme q'enseute: le roy, de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx, et a la request des communes en parlement, ad ottroiez ceste peticion en toutes choses, solonc ce q'est contenuz en ycelle. (fn. iii-647-85-1) Which petition having been read and heard, reply was given as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual, and at the request of the commons in parliament, has granted this petition in all things, in accordance with that specified in it. (fn. iii-647-85-1)
Pur Rauf Grene. [Petition from Ralph Green for restitution of his inheritance].
21. Item, une peticione feust baillee en parlement par Rauf Grene, en les parols q'enseuent: 21. On behalf of Ralph Green. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament by Ralph Green, as follows:
A tresexcellent et tresredoute seignur nostre seignur le roy supplie treshumblement vostre humble liege Rauf Grene, esquier, qe come en l'an primer de vostre gracious regne, le avauntdit Rauf avoit livere en vostre chauncellerie par voz briefs, come fitz et heir en le taille de Monsire Henry Grene, qe feust adjuggez a la mort a Bristuyt le xxix me jour de Juyll, l'an du regne le darrein Roy Richard qe feust .xxiij., de toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentz, services, et reversiouns, ove toutz fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, fraunchises, droites, et libertees queconqes a ceux appendantz ou appurtenantz en ascun manere, ove leur appurtenantz, queux feurent a dit Monsire Henry Grene en Engleterre, sibien d'iceux en queux le dit Henry avoit estat a luy et a ses heirs de soun corps engendrees come de ceux q'il tient par la curtosie d'Engleterre, de droit le dit suppliant, apres la mort Maude, nadgairs femme l'avauntdit Monsire Henry, mier l'avauntdit Rauf. Et come ency soit, qe a le parlement tenuz a Westm' le xix me jour de Novembre, l'an de voz regnes primer, l'avauntdit juggement, a prier des communes en le dit parlement, par vous, ove l'assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en mesme le parlement esteantz, pur bone juggement feust affermes. Et puis pleust a vous en mesme le parlement a declarer, de tenir a vous par voie de conquest toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, fraunchises, droites, et libertees avauntdites, ove leur appurtenantz, queux alors feurent a dit Henry. Et come auxint de vostre grace, le vi jour de Septembre, l'an primer de voz regnes, par voz lettres patentes vous grauntastes au dit suppliant toutz les issues et profitz provenantz des terres et tenementz qe Henry Grene soun pier tenoit, a luy et a ses heirs de soun corps engendrez, ou par ley d'Engleterre, de l'heritage Maude nadgairs sa femme, mier au dit Rauf: To the most excellent and most dread lord our lord the king, your humble liege Ralph Green, esquire, requests most humbly that since, in the first year of your gracious reign, the said Ralph received livery in your chancery by your writs, as son and heir in tail to Sir Henry Green, who was adjudged to death at Bristol on 29 July in the twenty-third year of the reign of the last King Richard [1399], of all the manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, and reversions, with all fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, franchises, rights and liberties whatsoever appendant or appertaining to them in any way, with their appurtenances, which belonged to the said Sir Henry Green in England, both those in which the said Henry had title for himself and his heirs begotten of his body, and those which he held by the courtesy of England, by right of the said supplicant, after the death of Maud, the late wife of the aforesaid Sir Henry, mother of the aforesaid Ralph. And since after that, at the parliament held at Westminster, on 19 November in the first year of your reign [1399], the aforesaid judgment, at the request of the commons in the said parliament, was confirmed by you, by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal attending the same parliament, as a good judgment; and then afterwards it pleased you to declare in the same parliament that all the aforesaid manors, lands, tenements, fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, franchises, rights and liberties, with their appurtenances, which then belonged to the said Henry would be held by you by way of conquest. And since afterwards, of your grace, on 6 September in the first year of your reign [1400], by your letters patent you granted to the said supplicant all the issues and profits issuing from the lands and tenements which Henry Green, his father, held, to him and his heirs begotten of his body, or by the law of England, from the inheritance of Maud, his late wife, mother of the said Ralph:
Que pleaise a vous, tressoveraign seignur, de vostre grace especial, par assent de les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en cest present parlement esteantz, et par auctoritee de mesme le parlement, de grauntier au dit Rauf et a ses heirs, qe l'avauntdit liveree des manoirs, terres et tenementz, rentes et services, ove toutz fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, droites, fraunchises, et libertees avauntdites, ove leur appurtenauntz, fait hors de voz mains a l'avauntdit Rauf, soit bone et effectuel, et vaillable au dit Rauf et a ses heirs, a tenir come dessuis, et pleynement de pardoner, par assent des ditz seignurs, par auctorite [col. b] d'icest present parlement, a dit Rauf et a ses heirs l'entree en les manoirs, terres, et tenementz, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, droites, fraunchises, et libertees avauntditz, ove leur appurtenantz, q'il avoit par le liveree avantdit, et l'occupacioun d'iceux puis en cea, coment qe tiel livere a dit Rauf ne feust pas duement fait ou pursuez, ou autrement fait sanz peticion en especial a vous par luy pursuez, et par vous a luy ottroiez. Et outre, come le dit Rauf soit entree en diverses manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, fraunchises, droites, et libertees, queux le dit Henry Grene soun pier tenoit, a luy et a ses heirs males de soun corps engendrez, sanz ascun liveree hors de voz mains suer, ou par peticion a vous fait: que pleaise a vous, de vostre grace especial, ove l'assent de les ditz seignurs en cest present parlement esteantz, et par auctorite de mesme le parlement, de pardoner al dit suppliant, et a ses heirs, les ditz entrees en toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, fraunchises, droites, et libertees qeconqes, ove toutz leur appurtenantz, queux le dit Henry Grene tenoit, a luy et a ses heirs males de soun corps engendrez; et qe l'avauntdit Rauf et ses heirs soient ables et persones ables d'enjoier et avoir l'enheritance de toutz les manoirs, terres, et tenementz, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, et avowesons, droites, fraunchises, et libertees avauntditz, ove leur appurtenauntz, en successioun et enheritance, en le maner come il ad ent liveree a luy fait, et come il les tient; et q'il et ses heirs soient persones ables, et ables d'estre heirs a dit Henry, et a toutz ses auncestres, d'avoir et pursuer chescune accione auncestrelle, et d'avoir enheritance par discent du dit Henry, ou des autres leur auncestres dount la descent serra fait par mesmez degrees depart le dit Henry, et depardoner, par auctoritee de cest parlement, par assent des ditz seignurs, au dit Rauf toutes les issues et profitz pris ou levez de les manoirs, terres, tenementz, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, et avowesons, fraunchises, droites, et libertes avauntditz, ove leur appurtenantz; les juggement, et affermance de juggement, conquest, ou declaracioun des conquestes avauntditz, statutz, ou autres ordinances queconqes a contrarie faitz, ou ce qe le sank feust corumpe parentre le dit Henry et le dit Rauf, nounobstantz. Et outre, de vostre pluis habundante grace, de pardoner et relesser, par auctorite d'icest parlement, par assent des ditz seignurs, au dit Rauf et ses heirs tout le droit et clayme qe vous avez, ou a vous appartient, ou apperteigner poet ou purroit, a cause de juggement avauntdit, affermance de juggement, ou conquest avauntditz, en toutz les manoirs, terres, tenementz, rentes, services, reversiouns, fees, homages, gardes, mariages, avowesons, fraunchises, libertees, droites, et profitz queconqes avauntditz, ove leur appurtenauntz: exceptez et reservez tout temps les services entz d'auncien temps a vous et a voz heirs duez, ascunes estatutz, declaracioun, ou ordinances faitz a contrarie nientobstantz, pur Dieu, et en oevre de charitee. May it please you, most sovereign lord, of your special grace, by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal attending this present parliament, and by the authority of the same parliament, to grant to the said Ralph and his heirs that the aforesaid livery of the manors, lands and tenements, rents and services, with all the aforesaid fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, rights, franchises and liberties, with their appurtenances, from your hands to the aforesaid Ralph, should be good and effective, and valid for the said Ralph and his heirs, to be held as above; and to pardon fully, by the assent of the said lords, by authority [col. b] of this present parliament, the said Ralph and his heirs the entry into the aforesaid manors, lands and tenements, fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, rights, franchises and liberties, with their appurtenances, that he received as a result of the aforesaid livery, and his subsequent occupation of them, even though that livery to the said Ralph was not properly made or sought, or effected except by a special petition submitted by him to you, and granted by you to him. Moreover, as the said Ralph has entered into various manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, franchises, rights and liberties which the said Henry Green, his father, held for himself and his male heirs begotten of his body, without suing for any livery from your hands, or by petition made to you: may it please you, of your special grace, by the assent of the said lords attending this present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, to pardon the said supplicant and his heirs the said entries in all the manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, franchises, rights and liberties whatsoever, with all their appurtenances, which the said Henry Green held for himself and his male heirs begotten of his body; and that the aforesaid Ralph and his heirs should be persons able and qualified to enjoy and have the inheritance of all the aforesaid manors, lands and tenements, fees, homages, wardships, marriages and advowsons, rights, franchises and liberties, with their appurtenances, in succession and inheritance, in accordance with the livery made to him thereof, and as he held them; and that he and his heirs should be persons able and qualified to be heirs to the said Henry and all his ancestors, to have and pursue any ancestral action and to have inheritance by descent of the said Henry or of his other ancestors, from whom the descent should be reckoned by the same degrees as if from the said Henry; and to grant, by authority of this parliament, by the assent of all the lords, to the said Ralph, all the issues and profits taken or levied on the aforesaid manors, lands, tenements, fees, homages, wardships, marriages and adowsons, franchises, rights and liberties, with their appurtenances; notwithstanding the judgment and the confirmation of the judgment, the acquisition or declaration of the aforesaid acquisitions, statutes, or any other ordinances made to the contrary, or that the blood was corrupted betwe en the said Henry and the said Ralph. And moreover, of your most abundant grace, to grant and release, by authority of this parliament, by the assent of the said lords, to the said Ralph and his heirs all the right and claim which you have, or which appertains, or is able to appertain, to you, by reason of the aforesaid judgment, confirmation of judgment, or the aforesaid acquisition, in all the aforesaid manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees, homages, wardships, marriages, advowsons, franchises, liberties, rights and profits whatsoever, with their appurtenances: excepting and reserving forever the services due on them to you in the past; notwithstanding any statutes, decree, or ordinances made to the contrary; for God, and by way of charity.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust respondue en la fourme q'enseute: le roy, de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en cest present parlement, ad ottroiez ceste peticion. (fn. iii-647-91-1) Which petition having been read and heard, reply was given as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal in this present parliament, has granted this petition. (fn. iii-647-91-1)
[memb. 9]
Pur les gentz de Guyen'. [On behalf of the people of Guyenne].
22. Item, une peticion feust baillee en parlement par les gentz de Guyene, en les parols q'enseuent: 22. On behalf of the people of Guyenne. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament by the people of Guyenne, as follows:
Au roy nostre tressoveraign seignur, et a toutz les atures seignurs de cest present parlement, suppliont treshumblement voz foialx lieges de vostre paiis de Guyene, que come par les grauntz oppressiouns, demolicions d'osteilx, et destruccioun de biens, et desheritementz de leurs propres heritages, et autres devoirs et appartenances quielxconqe, pluseurs d'iceulx sont deserts et mys hors par les garnes [p. iii-657][col. a] et forces de voz anemys, qi par long temps ont dure en vostre dit paiis de Guyene, come ceulx qui pur garder leur loiaulte envers vostre tresexcellente coroune ont voullu du tout de gerpir et lesser toutes leur ditz heritages et biens dessuisditz. De quoy pluseurs a cause de ce se sount retraits en vostre roialme d'Engleterre, et pluseurs autres y sont venuz demurer de leur bone gree, les quielx tant des uns qe des autres se sont mariez en vostre dit roialme en pleuseurs bones villes, et autres lieux d'icelluy; esquielx ils sont demurantz et habitantz come voz vrayes lieges, et y ount acquis par leur graund labour et travail pluseurs hostielx, terres, rendes, possessiones, et revenues. Et soit ainsy qe pleuseurs nes de vostre dit roialme par graund mespris lour font et dient de jour en jour pleuseurs injures et villanies, come de les appeller alliants, et autres pleuseurs inconvenients, les quielx injures leur sont faitz a tresgrant mespris de vostre dit paiis de Guyene, et de la graund loialte qu'ilx ont toutditz envers vostre dite coroune, et a leur perpetuel et final destruccioun come ceux qi ne scevent aller aillours pur acquerir leurs vies, leur honneur garde, si de vostre benigne grace en pite ne leur est surce purveu de remedie graciouse et covenable. To our most sovereign lord the king and all the other lords in this present parliament, your faithful lieges of your land of Guyenne most humbly request that because of the great oppressions, demolition of houses and destruction of goods, and disinheritances of their rightful inheritances and other rights and appurtenances, many of them are destroyed and excluded by the armies [p. iii-657][col. a] and forces of your enemies, who have been in your said land of Guyenne for a long time; for those who maintain their loyalty towards your most excellent crown have been required to abandon and entirely leave all their said inheritances and aforesaid goods. On account of which many of them have withdrawn to your realm of England, and various others have come to live there willingly, and some from each of these groups have married in your said realm in various good towns and other places there; and they are living and dwelling as your true lieges and have acquired various houses, lands, rents, possessions and revenues there by their hard labour and work. However, many people who were born in your said realm through their malice do and say many injuries and evils to them day by day, such as calling them aliens, and many other undesirable names, which wrongs are committed to the great slander of your said land of Guyenne and the great loyalty which it has always shown towards your said crown, and may lead to their permanant and final destruction, since they do not know where else to go in order to protect their lives and preserve their honour, unless a gracious and suitable remedy is ordained for them on this.
Qu'il pleaise a vostre roialle magnificence, de vostre grace especiale grauntier, qe toutz maneres des gentz voz liges de vostre dite paiis de Guyenne, quielxconqe, et de quiel estat ou condicioun qe soient, qui a present sont demurans en vostre dit roiaulme, et y ont demoure, ou seront demourans par temps avenir, et leurs heirs et successours a jamays puissent estre desclarez, reputes, recordes, et publies en cest present parlement pur voz foialx liges et loiaulx, et qu'ilx puissent demurer, vendre, achatre, possedir, et acquerir terres, rendes, possessions, tenementz, et autres biens quielxconqe, pur eulx et pur leurs heirs et successours, de deins vostre dit roiaulme. Et qu'ilx puissent user, joyr, et exploiter generalment de toutz leur biens, terres, rendes, possessions, hosteilx, esmoluments, tenementz, devoirs, et revenues, par eulx acquis, ou acquerre, quielxconqe, si avant come voz autres liges nees dedeins vostre dit roiaulme d'Engleterre, come droit et raison le requirent. Et enoutre, comander et chargier estroitement a toutz voz justices, officers, subgitz, et ministres, et a chescun d'eux, et a toutz voz autres liges quielxconqe, qe a voz ditz liges de vostre dit paiis de Guyene, demurantz a present en vostre dit roialme, et qi y ont demoure, ou demoureront ou habiteront, et a leur heirs ou successours qi ores sont ou par temps avenir seront, ne facent, ne seuffrent estre fait, ou a aucun de eulx, mal, damage, force, grevance, destourbier, ne empeschement, en corps ne en leurs biens cy dessuz desclares et expressez, ne autres en nulle manere par nulle voie ou condicioun qe soit. Et si aucune chose estoit faite a l'encontre, qe prestment et sanz delay le facent reparer et mettre en estat dehu. Et surce facent inhibicioun et proclamacioun a toutz voz lieges par toutes les bones villes, et autres lieux de vostre dit roialme, qe d'ores enavant ne les vueillent appeller alliants, ne dire aucunes villenie, injures, ne reproches, sur tielle peine come a vostre tresexcellent discrecioun, par advys et deliberacioun de vostre tres honourable counseil, semblera mieulx affaire en tiel cas. Et qe toutes ces choses dessuisdites puissent estre entrees et enactes en rolle de parlement de record, et qe puissent estre proclamees par toutes les citees, burghs, et bonnes villes, et par toutes les countees d'Engleterre; pur Dieu, et en oevre de sainte charitee. May it please your royal magnificence to grant of your special grace that all manner of your liege people from your said land of Guyenne, whomsoever, and of whatever estate or condition they be, who at present are dwelling in your said realm, or have dwelt there, or will dwell there in future, and their heirs and successors forever should be declared, considered, reported, and proclaimed in this present parliament to be your faithful and loyal lieges, and that they should be able to live, sell, buy, possess and acquire lands, rents, possessions, tenements and other goods whatsoever, for themselves and their heirs and successors, within your said realm. Also that they should be able to use, enjoy and generally benefit from all their goods, lands, rents, possessions, houses, emoluments, tenements, rights and revenues whatsoever acquired or to be acquired by them, as fully as your other lieges born within your said realm of England, as right and reason demand. And moreover to order and charge urgently all your justices, officers, subjects and ministers, and all your other lieges whomsoever, that to none of your said lieges of your said land of Guyenne who are presently dwelling in your said realm, or who have dwelt or will dwell or live there, and their present and future heirs or successors, will they cause, nor suffer to be caused, harm, damage, force, grievance, hindrance, or impeachment against their persons or goods, as declared and expressed above, or otherwise in any way or by any means. And if anything should be done against them, that they should make amends and redress it at once and without delay. Whereupon let them issue a prohibition and proclamation to all your lieges throughout all the major towns and other places in your said realm that henceforward they will not call them aliens, nor speak any evil, injuries, or insults, under threat of whatever penalty seems best in accordance with your most excellent discretion, with the advice and deliberation of your most honourable council in this matter. And that all these aforesaid things should be entered and recorded on the roll of the record of parliament, and that they should be proclaimed throughout all the cities, boroughs and good towns, and throughout all the counties of England; for God, and by way of holy charity.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust responduz en la fourme q'enseute: le roy, de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en plein parlement, ad grauntez ceste peticion, et q'ils ent aient litteres patentes et briefs de temps en temps, tantz et tielx come serront bosoignables en le cas. Which petition having been read and heard, reply was given as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal in full parliament, has granted this petition, and that they should have letters patent concerning it and writs from time to time, as many and such as will be necessary in this matter.
[col. b]
Pur l'abbe de Fourneys. [Petition from the abbot of Furness alleging false suits in Yorkshire].
23. Item, une peticion feust baillee en parlement pur l'abbe et convent de Fourneys, en les parols q'enseuent: 23. On behalf of the abbot of Furness. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament on behalf of the abbot and convent of Furness, as follows:
As tressages communes de cest present parlement supplient les poveres oratours l'abbe et convent de l'abbacie de Fourneys, de l'ordre de Cisteux, qe come la dite abbacie est assis en une isle en le counte de Lancastre; et ils ount terres et tenementz, rentes et possessions en Craven deins Staynclif wapentak et Frendles wapentak en le counte d'Everwyk, queux sount del fundacioun del dite abbacie, entre queux abbacie et possessions et wapentakes sont xl leukes, et deux periloues braces du mere contenantz en laeure .xij. leukes, par queux chescun an pleuseurs gentz sont pariez et noiez. Et bientarde, pleuseurs mail veullantz, ymaginantz pur destruier la dite abbacie et divines servicez illeoqes, feinent feintees seutes en les dites wapentakes envers le dit abbe, de trespas, dette, et autres contractes, bien sacheantz qe le dit abbe ne purravenir as dites wapentakes sanz peril de soun corps; et pur soun non apparance les seneschealx, baillifs, et ministres illeoqes amercient le dit abbe grevousement, et encrescent excessivement de jour en autre les ditz amerciementes, et les facent lever torcionousement de leur tenauntz, en destruccioun du dite maison et divine service celle partie, si remedie ne soit purveu en cest present parlement. To the most wise commons of this present parliament, your poor petitioners the abbot and convent of Furness of the Cistercian order request that whereas the said abbey is situated on an island in the county of Lancashire; and they have lands and tenements, rents and possessions in Craven within Staincliffe wapentake and Frendles wapentake in the county of York, which are of the foundation of the said abbey, between which abbey and possessions there are forty miles, and two perilious stretches of sea measuring twelve miles in breadth, in which many people are killed and drowned every year. And very recently, various evil people, plotting to destroy the said abbey and divine services there, have brought feigned or false suits in the said wapentakes against the said abbot, of trespass, debt and other contracts, well knowing that the said abbot is unable to come to the said wapentakes without physical danger; and because of his non-appearance the stewards, bailiffs, and ministers there have grievously amerced the said abbot, and have excessively increased the said amercements from day to day, and cause them to be levied unlawfully from their tenants, to the destruction of the said house and divine service in that region, if a remedy is not ordained in this present parliament.
Que pleise considerer les premisses, et prier a nostre seignur le roy, de grauntier par auctoritee de parlement, qe le dit abbe et ses successours purront faire leur generalx attournes desouz le seal del abbe du dite abbacie pur le temps esteant, pur gaigner ou perdre en toutz maneres des plees et quereles contre l'abbe du dite abbacie, ou pur l'abbe pur le temps esteant movez, pendantz, ou a movers, en les courtes des dites wapentakes. Et qe mesmes les attournees purront substituer desouz eux, en lieu du dit abbe, autres attournes en mesmes les courtes, pur les causes suisdites. Et qe mesmes les attournes, et chescun d'eux s'ils toutz ne purront estre presentz, soient resceuz et acceptez en mesmes les courtes pur le dit abbe, pur les causes suisdites. Et qe le dit abbe, ne ses successours pur toutz jours ne soient amerciez en les dites courtes, n'ascunes d'icelles, pur ascun noun seute ou defaut en ascun plee, autrement qe persones seculers sont; pur Dieu, et en oevre de charitee. May it please you to consider the foregoing, and pray our lord the king to grant by authority of parliament that the said abbot and his successors should be able to appoint their attorney-generals under the seal of the abbot of the said abbey at the time in order to win or lose in all kinds of pleas and suits brought against the abbot of the said abbey, or initiated, or pending, or to be initiated by the current abbot, in the courts of the said wapentakes. Also that the same attorneys should be able to substitute under them, in place of the said abbot, other attorneys in the same courts for the aforesaid causes. And that the same attorneys, or any of them if they are not all able to be present, should be received and accepted in the same courts in place of the said abbot for the aforesaid causes. Also that neither the said abbot, nor any of his successors, should ever be amerced in any of the said courts on account of any nonsuit or default in any plea, other than as secular persons are; for God, and by way of charity.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust responduz en la fourme q'enseute: le roy, de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et a la request des communez en cest present parlement, ad ottroiez ceste peticion. (fn. iii-647-102-1) Which petition having been read and heard, reply was given as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and at the request of the commons in this present parliament, has granted this petition. (fn. iii-647-102-1)
Pur Monsire Johan Colvyle. [Petition from Sir John Colville concerning the church of Newton]..
24. Item, une peticion feust baillee en parlement par Monsire Johan Colvyle, en les parols q'enseuent: 24. On behalf of Sir John Colville. Also, a petition was delivered in parliament by Sir John Colville, as follows:
A nostre tresredoute et tressoverein seignur le roy supplie vostre bachiler Johan Colvyle, qe come vous, tresgracious seignur, de vostre grace especial, pur l marcz a vous paiez en vostre hanaper, grantastez, et licence donastez, pur vous et pur voz heirs tant come en vous estoit, a la reverende pere en Dieu Johan evesqe d'Ely, q'il l'advoeson de l'esglise de Neweton, q'estoit de sa patronage, doner purroit et grauntier a le maistre ou gardein du chauncerie de la chapelle de Nostre Dame de Neweton, a avoir, et tenir as ditz maistre ou gardein et chapelleins, et leur successours a toutz jours: Et auxint au mesme les maistre ou gardein et chapelleins grauntastez, et licence donastez, q'ils mesme l'advoeson del doun et graunte du dit evesqe receiver, et mesme l'esglise approprier, et icelle ainssi approprie en propre oeps tenir puissent, en recompence des advoesons a la value de xx li. par an a eux a purchacer a toutz jours grauntez par devaunt; l'estatut des terres et tenementz nient a metters a mortmayn, ou ce qe la dite advoeson ou patronage du dite esglise de Neweton de vous soit tenuz en chief, ou soit parcelle de la fundacioun ou dotacioun de l'eveschee d'Ely, ou ce [p. iii-658][col. a] qe nul vicair en mesme l'esglise de Neweton serroit endowez solonc la fourme de l'ordinance et estatut ent faitz, ou autre cause queconqe nient contresteant, sicome en voz graciouses lettres patentes ent faites est contenuz pluis au plein. Et combien qe en diverses estatutz faitz, sibien en temps de vostre darrein predecessour, come en vostre demesne, entre autres il soit contenuz: Qe delors enavaunt en chescun esglise ainsi approprie, ou approprier, une seculer persone soit ordeigne vicair perpetuel, institut et induct canonicement en ycelle, et ensement endowez par la discrecioun de l'ordinarie, pur faire divine service, et enformer la poeple, et hospitalitee tenir illeoqes, forspris l'esglise de Haddenham; et qe nul religious soit fait vicair en ascune esglise, et qe une resonable somme de monoye des fruitz d'autiels esglises ainsi appropriers serroit annuelment distributz entre les poveres parochiens d'icelle. (fn. iii-647-106-1) To our most dread and most sovereign lord the king, your bachelor John Colville requests that whereas you, most gracious lord, from your special grace, in return for fifty marks paid to you in your hanaper, have granted and given licence, for you and your heirs, as far as is in your power, to the reverend father in God John, bishop of Ely, that he should be able to give and grant the advowson of Newton church, which is of his patronage, to the master or warden of the chantry of the chapel of Our Lady of Newton, to have and to hold to the said master or warden and the chaplains and their successors forever. You also granted and gave licence to the same master or warden and chaplains for them to receive the same advowson of the gift and grant of the said bishop, and to appropriate the same church, and to be able to hold it as appropriated to their own profit, in recompense for advowsons worth £20 a year previously granted to them to purchase forever; notwithstanding the statute against lands and tenements which are placed in mortmain, or that the said advowson or patronage of the said church of Newton is held of you in chief, or is part of the foundation and endowment of the bishopric of Ely, or that [p. iii-658][col. a] no vicarage should be endowed in the same church of Newton in accordance with the terms of the ordinance and the statute made on it, or any other thing; as is stated more fully in your gracious letters patent made on this. And although in various statutes made both in the time of your last predecessor and in your own, amongst other things it is stated - That henceforth in every church thus appropriated, or to be appropriated, a secular person shall be ordained perpetual vicar, canonically instituted and inducted in it, and also endowed at the discretion of the ordinary, in order to perform divine service, instruct the people, and maintain hospitality there, except for Hadenham church; and that no religious should be made vicar in any church, and that a suitable sum of money from the fruits of these churches thus appropriated should be distributed annually among their poor parishioners. (fn. iii-647-106-1)
Nientmains, tressoveraign seignur, vous plese considerer, qe en le lieu du dit vicair seculer le meistre ou gardein du dite chauncerie qe ore est, et toutz ses successours qe serront toutdys persones seculers et perpetuels, ou ascun des chapelleins d'icelle chauncerie, en leur nouns averont, ou avera, la cure des parochiens du dite esglise de Neweton, en mesme le manere come un vicair illeoqes deust avoir. Et qe la ou le parson du dite esglise, ou un chapellein en soun noun, taunt soulement ad la charge de faire divine service en la dite esglise de Neweton, les ditz maistre ou gardein, et chapelleins, serront tenuz de illeoqes faire divine service chescun jour festivale ove note, forspris certeins jours en l'ordeinance du dit Johan ent faitz especifiez, et chescun jour ferial par un ou pleuseurs sanz note. Et qaunt a l'ospitalitee du dite esglise, qe n'ad este par devaunt forsqe par une persone tant soulement ove ses servantz, ore la serront un meistre ou gardein, et trois chapelleins, et quatre clercs, ou pleuseurs, et autres leur servantz. Et qe en le lieu du dit resonable somme a destribuer entre les poveres parochiens, la serront continuelment pur toutz jours trovez dys ou dousze poveres hommes, issint qe l'effect du dit estatut la serra continuelment observez, come avaunt est dit: et sur ce, de vostre grace especiale, et de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx et les communes de cest present parlement, et par consideracioun del fyn suisdit, ordeiner, et expressement declarer en mesme vostre present parlement, qe la dite esglise de Neweton soit appropriez, sanz ascun vicair illeoqes a estre endowe, solonc fourme de voz lettres patentes avauntdites, et icelles voz ordinance et declaracioun ensy afaire vous pleaise < faire > estre enactez en mesme vostre parlement de record; les ditz estatutz, ou ascun autre estatut ou ordinance fait, ou afaire, au contrair, ou autre cause queconqe, nient contresteant; pur Dieu, et en oevre de charitee. Nevertheless, most sovereign lord, may it please you to consider that instead of the said secular vicar, the present master or warden of the said chantry and all his successors, who will always be secular and perpetual persons, or one of the chaplains of that chantry, will have the cure of souls of the parishioners of the said church of Newton, in the same way that a vicar would have it there. Also that whereas the parson of the said church, or a chaplain on his behalf, only has the responsibility to perform divine services in the said church of Newton, the said master or warden and chaplains will be bound to perform divine service there each feast day with music, except for certain days specified in the ordinance which the said John made concerning this, and each feast day without music. And with regard to the hospitality of the said church, which had not existed before except through one parson only with his servants, now a master or warden, three chaplains, and four or more clerks, and their other servants, will be there. And that instead of the said reasonable sum of money to be distributed among the poor parishioners, ten or twelve poor men will be continually supported there for ever, so that the tenor of the said statute shall be continually observed there, as is said above: and thereupon, from your special grace, and by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons of this present parliament, and in consideration of the abovesaid fine, to ordain and expressly declare in your same present parliament that the said church of Newton shall be appropriated without any vicarage being endowed there, in accordance with the terms of your aforesaid letters patent; and that it may please you to cause your ordinance and decree thus to be made to be recorded on the record of your same parliament; notwithstanding the said statutes or any other statute or ordinance made, or to be made, to the contrary; for God, and by way of charity.
Quele peticion lue et entendue feust responduz en la fourme q'enseute: Le roy, de l'advys et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et a la requeste des communes en parlement, ad ottroiez ceste peticion, solonc la contenue d'icelle. Which petition, having been read and heard, was answered as follows: The king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and at the request of the commons in parliament, has granted this petition, in accordance with that specified in it.
Adnullacioun del restreint fait au darrein parlement. [Annulment of the restraint on the king made in the last parliament].
25. Item, Samady le xix me jour le Decembre, qe feust le darrein jour de parlement, les communes viendrent devaunt le roy et les seignurs en parlement, et illeoqes le parlour pur les ditz communes rehercea, coment le roy avoit envoiez le chaunceller d'Engleterre pur monstrer ad ditz communes un certein article qe feust fait a darrein parlement, et le dit parlour, en noun des ditz communes, pria, qe pleust a mesme nostre seignur le roy de faire declaracioun de soun entent touchant le dit article. A quoy mesme nostre seignur le roy respondi, et dist, coment il desirra d'avoir et garder ses libertee et prerogatif en toutz pointz, auxi entierment come aucuns de ses nobles progenitours ou predecessours avoit fait, [col. b] eu, ou usez devaunt soun temps. A quoy le dit parlour, en noun des ditz communes, et auxi mesmes les communes de leur commune assent s'agreerent bien; de quoy le roy leur remercia, et dist, q'il vorroit estre et esteer en auxi graunde libertee, prerogatif, et fraunchise, come aucun de ses progenitours avoit este devaunt luy en aucun temps passe. Et surceo, mesme nostre seignur le roy en plein parlement adnulla le dit article, et toutz les circumstances et dependences d'icelle en toutz pointz. 25. Annulment of the restriction made in the last parliament. Also, on Saturday 19 December, which was the last day of parliament, the commons came before the king and the lords in parliament, and there the speaker reiterated on behalf of the said commons how the king had sent the chancellor of England to show the said commons a certain article which had been made in the last parliament; and the said speaker, on behalf of the said commons, prayed that it might please our lord the king to explain his intentions concerning the said article. To which our lord the king replied by saying that he wished to have and preserve his liberties and prerogatives in all respects, as wholly as any of his noble progenitors had done, [col. b] had, or used before his time. To which the said speaker, on behalf of the commons, as well as the same commons by their common assent, readily agreed; for which the king thanked them, and said that he wished to have and to retain the same great liberties, prerogatives and franchises as each of his progenitors had enjoyed before him at any time in the past. Whereupon our same lord the king in full parliament annulled the said article and all its circumstances and corollaries in all respects.
[memb. 8]
Declaracioun pur les signurs et communes. [Declaration on behalf of the lords and commons concerning the alleged ill-will of the king].
26. Item, mesme le jour, une peticion baillee en parlement feust lue par comandement du roy, de quele peticion le tenure s'enseute: 26. Declaration on behalf of the lords and commons. Also, on the same day a petition delivered in parliament was read by order of the king, the tenor of which petition follows:
Au roy nostre tresredoubte et tressoveraign seignur supplient treshumblement voz humbles lieges les seignurs espirituelz et temporels, et communs de vostre roiaume, qe come graund murmur ad este en vostre poeple, que vous avez eu en vostre coeur pesantee envers aucuns de voz lieges venuz et estantz par vostre somonsa cest vostre present parlement, et a vostre darrein parlement tenuz a Westm'. Par quoy plaise a vostre majeste roiale, de vostre noblesce et droiture, en confort et rejoisement des ditz suppliantz, declarer vostre noble entencioun en cest present parlement, qe vous tenuz avez et reputez touts les estats, et chescun de eulx de mesmes voz parlementz, pour voz foialx et loialx liges et soubgis, come ceulx qui ont este, sont, et seront, toudis voz foiaulx liges, et humbles soubgis. To our most dread and most sovereign lord king, your humble lieges the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons of your realm most humbly request that, whereas a great rumour has arisen among your people that you harbour in your heart ill-will towards various of your lieges who have come and are present by your summons at this your present parliament, or who came to your last parliament held at Westminster; because of which may it please your royal majesty, of your nobility and justice, for the ease and reassurance of the said supplicants, to declare it as your noble intention in this present parliament that you think, maintain and consider all the estates, and each one of them in your same parliaments, to be your faithful and loyal lieges and subjects, and regard them as people who have been, are, and will always be your faithful lieges and humble subjects.
Quele peticion le roy de sa grace especiale en plein parlement ad grauntez et ottroiez. Which petition the king of his special grace has granted and allowed.
Dissolucioun de parlement. [Commendation of the queen and the king's sons. Dissolution of parliament].
27. Item, mesme le jour, le dit parlour, en noun des ditz communes, pria a nostre dit seignur le roy, d'avoir pur recomendez en especiale l'estat de nostre dame la roigne, et auxi les estats de monsire le prince, Monsire Thomas, Monsire Johan, et Monsire Humfrey, ses honurables filz. De quoy mesme nostre seignur le roy leur remercia molt entierment. 27. Dissolution of parliament. Also, on the same day, the said speaker, in the name of the said commons, asked our said lord the king to commend in particular the welfare of our lady the queen, and also the welfare of our lord the prince and Sir Thomas, Sir John, and Sir Humphrey, his honourable sons. For which our same lord the king thanked them most earnestly.
Et sur ce les peticiones bailleez par les communes en parlement feurent lues, et respondues en plein parlement. Et puis apres qe les dites peticions feurent ensy lues et respondues, le chaunceller d'Engleterre, par commandement du roy, remercia toutz les seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et les ditz communes, de leur grantz labour et diligence faitz et euez en dit parlement. Et auxi leur remercia de la graunte par eux a luy faite a cest foitz. Et leur monstra outre, coment y feust la volentee du roy pur dissolver soun parlement a present: Et surce chargea les chivalers des countees, et les citeins et burgeoises venuz par somons au parlement, de pursuir briefs pur leur gages, come le manere est. Et ensi finist mesme le parlement. Whereupon the petitions delivered by the commons in parliament were read and answered in full parliament. After the said petitions were thus read and answered, the chancellor of England, by order of the king, thanked all the lords spiritual and temporal and the said commons for the great trouble and diligence which they had shown and exhibited in the said parliament. Also, he thanked them for the grant made by them at this time. And he told them moreover how it was the king's wish to dissolve his parliament at present. Whereupon he ordered the knights of the counties and the citizens and burgesses who had come by summons to parliament to sue writs for their wages, as is customary. And thus the same parliament finished.
Ordenance pur la monoye. [Ordinance regarding money and the mint].
28. Item, pur la graunde escarcete de monoye q'y ad a present deins le roialme d'Engleterre, et pur pleuseurs autres meschiefs et causes notables, de l'advis et assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx, et a la request des communes en parlement, ordeignez est et assentuz, qe la maistre de la monoye deins le tourre de Londres purraffaire de chescun lb. d'or du pois de la tourre l nobles d'or, et de mesme la lb. et pois d'argent xxx s. d'esterlinges; parainsi qe celles or et argent soient d'aussy bone allay come la veile monoye, sibien dedeins la ville de Caleys come en le tourre de Londres. Et qe semblablement purront faire toutz autres q'ont faisoure de monoye d'auncien temps par auctoritee et grante roialle a comencer ceste ordinance a le fest de Pasqe proschein advenir, et a durer tanq'a fin de deux ans lors proschein enseuantz. Purveuz toutesfoitz, qe si a [p. iii-659][col. a] la fin des ditz deux ans y semble qe mesme ceste ordinance soit encontre le bien et profit du roy et de soun roialme, q'adonqes mesme ceste ordinance cesse tout outrement. Et qe mesme nostre seignur le roy, par advis de soun counsail, [col. b] le purra reparer, reformer, et amender, pur le bien et profit de luy et de soun dit roialme, come mieultz y bosoignera en le cas; ceste ordinance nonobstante. 28. Ordinance regarding money. Also, on account of the great scarcity of money at present in the realm of England, and on account of many other misfortunes and notable causes there, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and at the request of the commons in parliament it is ordained and granted that the master of the mint in the Tower of London should make from each pound of gold, by the weight of the Tower, 50 golden nobles, and from the same pound and weight of silver, 30 s. sterling; provided that this gold and silver should be made from as good alloy as the old money, both within the town of Calais and in the Tower of London. And similarly that they should be able to make all the other money that they have made in the past by royal authority and grant; this ordinance to begin at the feast of Easter following, and to last for the following two years. Provided always that if at [p. iii-659][col. a] the end of the said two years it seems that this same ordinance is contrary to the benefit and profit of the king and his realm, then this same ordinance shall cease entirely. And that our same lord the king, with the advice of his council, [col. b] may be able to alter, change, or amend it for his benefit and profit and that of his said realm, as seems best in this matter; notwithstanding this ordinance.
[memb. 7]
LES COMMUNES PETICIONS. [THE COMMON PETITIONS].
PLEISE A NOSTRE TRESREDOUTE SEIGNUR LE ROY, EN SUPPORTACIOUN DE SES POVRES COMMUNES, PAR ASSENT DES SEIGNURS ESPIRITUELX ET TEMPORELEX EN YCEST PARLEMENT, GRANTER LES PETICIONS ENSUANTZ. THE COMMON PETITIONS. MAY IT PLEASE OUR MOST DREAD LORD THE KING, IN SUPPORT OF HIS POOR COMMONS, BY THE ASSENT OF THE LORDS SPIRITUAL AND TEMPORAL IN THIS PARLIAMENT, TO GRANT THE FOLLOWING PETITIONS..
[col. a]
I. I. [Liberties and Franchises]
29. Primerement, qe seint esglise eit toutz ses libertees et fraunchises, et qe toutz les seignours espirituelx et temporelx, et les autres lieges du roy eiantz libertees et fraunchisees, et toutz les citees et burghs du roialme, eient et enjoient toutz lour libertees et fraunchisees, queux ils ount des grauntz de les progenitours nostre dit seignur le roy, et de soun graunt demesne, ou confermement; forspris la fraunchise oretarde graunte a les escolers de l'universitee d'Oxenford; et qe la graund chartre, et la chartre de la forest, et toutz autres bones estatuitz avant ces heures faitz, et nient repellez, estoient en lour force. 29. I. Firstly, that holy church should have all its liberties and franchises, and that all the lords spiritual and temporal and the other king's lieges should have and enjoy all their liberties and franchises which they have by the grant of the progenitors of our said lord the king or from his own grant or confirmation; except the franchise recently granted to the scholars of the University of Oxford; and that the Great Charter and the Charter of the Forest, and all other good statutes made before this time and not repealed, should be enforced.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy le voet. (fn. iii-647-131-1) The king wills it. (fn. iii-647-131-1)
II. < Communes des countees d'Essex et Hertford'. > II. [Accounts of the sheriffs of Essex and Hertford].
30. Item, suppliont les chivalers, esquiers, et le communaltes des countees d'Essex' et Hertford': qe come en estatuitz faitz, sibien en temps tresnoble Roy Edward tierce, l'an de soun regne primer, come en temps nostre tresredoubte seignur le roy q'orest, l'an de soun regne primer, a les peticions des communes du roialme fuist purveu et ordeigne: 'Qe toutz les viscountz d'Engleterre, et en especial les viscountz d'Essex' et Hertford', a cause qe la communalte del counte de Essex paierent a Roy Richard nadgairs roy d'Engleterre mm marcz, n'ascounterent en l'escheqer nostre seignur le roy de nulle deniers a lever de nulluy, sinon par lour serementz'; (fn. iii-647-134-1) nientcontristeantz les ordinances avantditz, les viscountz d'Essex' et Hertford' unqore sount chargez en le dit escheqer des diverses graundes sommes des deniers nient levables dedeins les countees suisditz; c'estassavoir, de ccxxili. ix s. ij d. del ferme des countees suisditz puis terres donez; et de l marcz del ferme des profitz de mesmes les countees; en graund destruccioun des viscountz avauntditz, et oppressioun des communes des ditz contees. 30. II. Commons of the counties of Essex and Hertford. Also, the request of the knights, esquires and commons of the counties of Essex and Hertford: that whereas in statutes made, both in the time of the most noble King Edward the third, in the first year of his reign [1327], and in the time of our present most dread lord the king, in the first year of his reign [1399], at the petition of the commons of the realm it was decreed and ordained - That none of the sheriffs of England, and specifically not the sheriffs of Essex and Hertford, because the commons of the county of Essex had paid 2000 marks to King Richard, late king of England, should account in the exchequer of our lord the king for any money to be levied from anyone, except by their oath (fn. iii-647-134-1) - notwithstanding the aforesaid ordinances, the sheriffs of Essex and Hertford are still charged in the said exchequer for various large sums of money that cannot be levied within the aforesaid counties; namely, for £221 9 s. 2 d. for the farm of the aforesaid counties excluding land granted out; and 50 marks for the farm of the profits of the same counties; to the great damage of the aforesaid sheriffs and the oppression of the commons of the said counties.
Please a voz tressages discreciouns, considerez les matiers avauntditz, de supplier nostre seignur le roy a discharger les ditz viscountz desoreenavaunt, par auctorite de ceste parlement, de les sommes avauntditz, forsqe d'atant de mesmes les sommes come les ditz viscountz eux voudront charger par lour serementz affaire en le dit escheqer; issint q'ils n'eient mestier de suir a nostre seignur le roy, ou a soun counseil, pur ascune pardon avoir de les ditz sommes en temps avenir. Ou autrement, qe les viscountz des ditz countees, sur lour acomptz a renders desoreenavaunt, soient tantsoulement chargez pur les deux fermes avauntditz de c marcz sanz pluis. Et qe les ditz viscountz eient allouance chescun an en lour accomptees des aunciens almoignes, fees, et annuitees, qe amountent a lxvli. v s. queux soloeint avaunt ces heures estre allouez deins les deux fermes suisditz. May it please your most wise discretions, considering the aforesaid matters, to petition the king to discharge the said sheriffs henceforth, by authority of this parliament, of the aforesaid sums, except for whatever sums the said sheriffs are willing to be charged for by their oaths to be made in the said exchequer; as a result of which they should not have need to sue to our lord the king or his council in order to have any pardon for the said sums in future. Secondly, that the sheriffs of the said counties, on their accounts to be rendered henceforth, should be only charged for the two aforesaid farms of 100 marks, and no more. Also that the said sheriffs should have a yearly allowance in their accounts for the ancient alms, fees and annuities, which amount to £65 5 s., which they were accustomed to be allowed in the two aforesaid farms before this time.
[col. b]
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Monstrent les viscountz ainsi grevez, chescun an sur lour accompt, a roy nostre seignur lour grevances et perdes en especial; et mesme nostre seignur le roy lour voet faire grace et pardon tiel come luy semblera par sa discrecion . Let the sheriffs thus aggrieved show, each year on their account, their grievances and losses specifically to our lord king; and our same lord the king will allow them grace and pardon as best seems to him by his wisdom.
III. < Communes des countees de Norfolk' etc. > III. [Accounts of the sheriffs of Norfolk and Suffolk].
Item, suppliont les chivalers, esquiers, et les communaltees des countees de Norff' et Suff': qe come en estatuitz faitz sibien en temps del tresnoble Roy Edward tierce, l'an de soun regne primer, come en temps de nostre tresredoute seignur le roy q'orest, l'an de soun regne primer, a les peticions des communes du roialme, fuist purveu et ordeigne: Qe toutz les viscountz d'Engleterre ne accompterent en l'escheqer nostre seignur le roy de nulle denier a lever de nully, sinon par lour serementz. Nientcontristeantz les ordinances avantditz, les viscountz de Norff' et Suff' unqore sount chargez en le dit escheqer des diverses graundes sommes des deniers nient levables deins les ditz countees de Norff' et Suff'; c'estassavoir, de cli. appellez de veteri incremento, dount homme ne sciet ou ascune denier serra leve; et de diverses autres sommes des fermes et profitz des ditz countees de Norff' et Suff', lesqueles ne sount auxi levablez, a cause qe diverses hundredes, et autres profitz de mesmes les countees, sount donez as diverses seignurs et autres persones; et autres certeins hundredes d'icelles countees de Norff' et Suff' furent d'auncien temps extenduz as certeins graundes sommes, et ne sount a present de tiel value come l'auncien extente amounte; en grand destruccioun des viscountz, et oppressioun des communes des countees de Norff' et Suff' avauntditz. III. Commons of the counties of Norfolk, etc. Also, the request of the knights, esquires, and commons of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk: whereas in statutes made, both in the time of the most noble King Edward the third, in the first year of his reign, and in the time of our present most dread lord the king, in the first year of his reign, at the petition of the commons of the realm it was decreed and ordained - That none of the sheriffs of England should account in the exchequer of our lord the king for any money to be levied from anyone, except by their oath - notwithstanding the aforesaid ordinances, the sheriffs of Norfolk and Suffolk are still charged in the said exchequer for various large sums of money that cannot be levied within the said counties of Norfolk and Suffolk; namely, for £100 called de veteri incremento, of which no-one knows how a single penny can be levied; and for various other sums from the farms and profits of the said counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, which also cannot be levied, because several hundreds and other issues of the same counties have been given to various lords and other persons; and certain other hundreds in those counties of Norfolk and Suffolk were assessed at particularly large sums in the past, and are no longer as valuable as the old assessed amount; to the great damage of the sheriffs and the oppression of the commons of the aforesaid counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.
Please a nostre seignur le roy considerer les matiers avauntditz, et surce graciousement discharger les viscountz des ditz countees de Norff' et Suff' q'ore sount, et pur le temps serrount, par auctoritee de cest present parlement, de les sommes avantditz, forsqe d'atant de mesmes les sommes come les ditz viscountz de Norff' et Suff' eux voudrent charger par lour serementz affairs en le dit escheqer, solonc la fourme des ordinances avauntditz; issint q'ils n'eient mestier desore enavant de suir a nostre seignur le roy, ou a soun conseil, pur ascune pardon avoir de les sommes avauntditz. May it please our lord the king to consider the aforesaid matters, and thereupon graciously to discharge the present and future sheriffs of the said counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, by authority of this present parliament, of the aforesaid sums, except for whatever sums the said sheriffs of Norfolk and Suffolk are willing to be charged for by their oaths to be made in the said exchequer, in accordance with the terms of the aforesaid ordinances; as a result of which they should not have need to sue to our lord the king or his council in order to have any pardon for the said sums in future.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Monstrent les viscountz ainsi grevez, chescun an sur lour accompt, a roy nostre seignur lour grevances et perdes en especial; et mesme nostre seignur le roy lour voet faire grace et pardon tiele come luy semblera par sa discrecioun. Let the sheriffs thus aggrieved show, each year on their account, their grievances and losses specifically to our lord king; and our same lord the king will allow them grace and pardon as best seems to him by his wisdom.
IIII. < Communes del countee de Devon'. > IIII. [Accounts of the sheriff of Devon].
Item, priont les chivalers, esquiers, et communaltee del counte de Devon': qe come en estatuitz faitz [p. iii-660][col. a] sibien en temps de tresnoble Roy Edward tierce, l'an de soun regne primer, come en temps de nostre tresredoute seignur le roy q'orest, l'an de soun regne primer, fuist purveu et ordeigne par estatuit: Qe toutz les viscountz d'Engleterre n'ascompteront en l'escheqer nostre seignur le roy de nulle denier a lever de nulluy, sinon par lour serement. Nientcontristeant cella, les viscountz du dit counte unqore sount chargez en le dit escheqer des diverses graundes sommes nient levables deins le dit counte; c'estassavoir, d'un somme, sub titulo de vicecomite de remissione firmarum post terras datas xxli. Et sub alio titulo, de eodem vicecomite de firmis et proficuis comitatus predicti c marcz appellez blaunche ferme; en graund destruccioun des ditz viscountz, et oppressioun des communes du dit counte. IIII. Commons of the county of Devon. Also, the request of the knights, esquires, and commons of the county of Devon: whereas in statutes made [p. iii-660][col. a] both in the time of the most noble King Edward the third, in the first year of his reign, and in the time of our present most dread lord the king, in the first year of his reign, it was decreed and ordained by statute - That none of the sheriffs of England should account in the exchequer of our lord the king for any money to be levied from anyone, except by their oath - notwithstanding this, the sheriffs of the said county are still charged in the said exchequer for various large sums of money that cannot be levied within the said counties; namely, for a sum of £20, under the name: de vicecomite de remissione firmarum post terras datas. And under another name: de eodem vicecomite de firmis et proficuis comitatus predicti, 100 marks, called the white farm; to the great damage of the said sheriffs and the oppression of the commons of the said county.
Pleiase a nostre tresgracious seignur le roy considerer les matiers suisditz, et surce discharger les ditz viscountz desore enavant, par auctoritee de cest present parlement, de les sommes avauntditz, forsqe d'atant de mesmes les sommes come les ditz viscountz eux voudront charger par lour serementz affaire en le dit escheqer; issint q'ils n'eient mestier de suir a nostre seignur le roy, ou a soun counseil, pur ascune pardon avoir de les ditz sommes en temps avenir. May it please our lord the king to consider the aforesaid matters, and thereupon to discharge the said sheriffs henceforth, by authority of this present parliament, of the aforesaid sums, except for whatever sums the said sheriffs are willing to be charged for by their oaths to be made in the said exchequer; as a result of which they should not have need to sue to our lord the king or his council in order to have any pardon for the said sums in future.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Monstrent les viscountz ainsi grevez, chescun an sur lour accompt, a roy nostre seignur lour grevances et perdes en especial; et mesme nostre seignur le roy lour voet faire grace et pardon tiele come luy semblera par sa discrecioun. Let the sheriffs thus aggrieved show, each year on their account, their grievances and losses specifically to our lord the king; and our same lord the king will allow them grace and pardon as best seems to him by his wisdom.
V. < Communes des countees de Surr' etc. > V. [Accounts of the sheriffs of Surrey and Sussex].
Item, suppliont les chivalers, esquiers, et communaltees des countees de Surr' et Sussex': qe come en estatuitz faitz sibien en temps tresnoble Roy Edward tierce, l'an de soun regne primer, come en temps de nostre tresredoute seignur le roy q'orest, l'an de soun regne primer, a les peticions des communes du roialme fuist purveu et ordeigne: Qe toutz les viscountz d'Engleterre n'ascompteront en l'escheqer nostre seignur le roy de nulle denier a lever de nully, sinon par lour serement. Nientcontristeantz les ordinances avauntditz, les viscountz de Surr' et Sussex' unqore sount chargez en le dit escheqer des diverses graundes sommes de deniers nient levables deins les countees suisditz; c'estassavoir, de xvili. vij s. vi d. qe del ferme des countees suisditz puis terres donez; et de cli. del ferme des profitz de mesmes les countees; en graund distruccioun des viscountz avantditz, et oppressioun des communes des ditz countees. V. Commons of the counties of Surrey etc. Also, the request of the knights, esquires, and commons of the counties of Surrey and Sussex: whereas in statutes made, both in the time of the most noble King Edward the third, in the first year of his reign, and in the time of our present most dread lord the king, in the first year of his reign, at the petition of the commons of the realm it was decreed and ordained - That none of the sheriffs of England should account in the exchequer of our lord the king for any money to be levied from anyone, except by their oath - notwithstanding the aforesaid ordinances, the sheriffs of Surrey and Sussex are still charged in the said exchequer for various large sums of money that cannot be levied within the said counties; namely, for £16 7 s. 6 d. for the farm of the aforesaid counties excluding land granted out; and £100 for the farm of the profits of the same counties; to the great damage of the aforesaid sheriffs and the oppression of the commons of the said counties.
Please a nostre seignur le roy considerer les matiers suisditz, et surce graciousement discharger les ditz viscountz desore enavaunt, par auctorite de cest parlement, de les sommes avauntditz, forsqe d'atant des mesmes les sommes come les ditz viscountz eux voudront charger par lour serement affaire en le dit escheqer; issint q'ils n'eient mestier de suir a nostre seignur le roy, ou a soun counseil, pur ascune pardon avoir de les ditz sommes en temps avenir. Et qe les tresorer et barons de l'escheqer [memb. 6] pur le temps esteantz dischargent sibien les viscountz queux sont ore devaunt eux accomptantz, come toutz autres enapres pur le temps esteantz, et a eux facent allowance en lour accompts par lour serementz, sanz delaie ou difficultee queconqe. Et ensement grantier, qe le viscount del counte d'Everwyk, et les viscountz des countees de Salop' et Kent, et les viscountz d'autres countees, et chescun de eux, en cas semblable, come appartient, purront auxint accompter par lour serementz des fermes, issues, profitz, et commoditees de lour countees, et ent estre allowez, sanz pursuir a nostre seignur le roy, ou a soun counseil, pur pardoun avoir en temps avenir. May it please our lord the king to consider the aforesaid matters, and thereupon graciously to discharge the said sheriffs henceforth, by authority of this parliament, of the aforesaid sums, except for whatever sums the said sheriffs are willing to be charged for by their oaths to be made in the said exchequer; as a result of which they should not have need to sue to our lord the king or his council in order to have any pardon for the said sums in future. And that the treasurer and barons of the exchequer [memb. 6] at the time should discharge both the sheriffs who now account before them and all others hereafter at the time, and they should make allowance to them in their accounts by their oaths, without any delay or difficulty. And similarly to grant that the sheriff of the county of York, and the sheriffs of the counties of Shropshire and Kent, and any of the sheriffs of other counties, in cases which are clearly similar, also should be able to account by their oaths for the farms, issues, profits and commodities of their counties, and be allowed this, without suing to our lord the king or his council in order to have pardon in future.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Monstrent les viscountz ainsi grevez, chescun an sur lour accompt, a roy nostre seignur lour grevances et perdes [col. b] en especial; et mesme nostre seignur le roy lour voet faire grace et pardon tiele come luy semblera par sa discrecioun. Let the sheriffs thus aggrieved show, each year on their account, their grievances and losses [col. b] specifically to our lord king; and our same lord the king will allow them grace and pardon as best seems to him by his wisdom.
VI. < Eschequer. > VI. [Accounts in the exchequer].
31. Item, suppliont les communes: qe come la ou il ad este usez en temps passez, solonc la nature d'accompts, et les usages et custumes de vostre escheqer, qe toutz maneres officers accomptables, les queux ount duement accomptez avant ces heures a cause de lour offices en mesme l'escheqer, par lour serementz, et auxi par force des garantz sufficeantz, devant les tresorer et barons illoeqes, soleient avoir a la fyn de lour accompts due allouance, et surce un quietus est, en fynal discharge de eux envers le roy: sauvant tout dys la prerogatyf du roy en celle partie; c'estassavoir, qe si le roy fuisse deceu parmy faux allouance ou concelement, il ne deveroit estre excludez ne forbarrez de soun profit a luy appurtenant en tiel cas, par force des tielx allouances et quietus est. Nient meyns, non obstant qe ascunes officers semblablement ount duement accomptez long temps passez en le dit escheqer de toutz maneres choses appurtenantz a lour offices, par lour serementz, et auxi par garantz lors acceptez pur bones et sufficeantz, et surce ount eux lour allouances et lour quietus est en plein discharge de eux, en manere accustume, et ce par agard de toutes les barouns du dit escheqer, sount unqore vexes, durement molestez, et grevez par proces trop rigorous fait en le dit escheqer, et compellez de venir illoeqes ariere accompt faire, et auxi a respondre hastiment par divers proces as diverses articles et defautes a eux surmys, par novell rehersaill, et examinacioun des ditz accompts devant mesmes les barouns, lesqueux ycelles accompts avoient este oiez, auctorisez, et allouez long temps passez, sicome y piert de record en le dit escheqer. 31. VI. Exchequer. Also, the commons pray that, whereas it has been customary in the past, in accordance with accounting methods and the usages and customs of your exchequer, that all kinds of accounting officers who have duly accounted in the past because of their offices in the said exchequer, by their oaths, and also by force of an adequate warranty, before the treasurer and barons there, have been accustomed to have due allowance at the end of their accounts, and thereupon a quietus est, in final discharge of them with respect to the king: saving always the prerogative of the king in this matter; that is to say, that if the king is deceived by false allowance or concealment, he is not excluded or barred from the profit pertaining to him in such a case by virtue of any such allowance and quietus est. Nevertheless, notwithstanding that various officers duly accounted in this fashion a long time ago in the said exchequer for all kinds of things appertaining to their offices, by their oaths, and also by warrants which were then accepted as good and adequate, and thereupon had their allowances and their quietus est in full discharge of them, in the customary manner, and this by the decision of all the barons of the said exchequer, they are still harassed, severely troubled, and aggrieved by most rigorous processes brought in the said exchequer, and compelled to return to make account, and also to reply quickly by numerous processes to various articles and wrongs alleged against them by a new recital, and by examination of the said accounts before the same barons; which accounts were heard, authorised, and allowed long ago, as is clear from the record in the said exchequer.
Please a vostre roial mageste graciousement cest matier considerer, et pur eschuir le malveis ensample, et auxi les perils q'en purront surdre et ensuyr, a tresgraund damage, disheriteson, et destruccioun final a toutz ceux q'ount estez en temps passe, et serront en temps avenir, accomptables a vostre dit escheqer; et de faire ordeigner, qe nulle persone accomptable, apres soun accompt pur soun office renduz, et allouance a luy fait par les barouns du dit escheqer, et auxi apres q'il eit un quietus en plein discharge de luy envers le roy, des toutz choses, pointes, et articles dount il ad accomptez, ne soit desore enavant treit en le dit escheqer, a nulle riere accompt rendre, ne autre foitz mys a responce des choses allouez par agarde et commune assent de toutz les barons du dit escheqer, sinon par faux allouances ou concelementz, si ascuns purront estre trovez pur le profit nostre seignur le roy, et qe adonqes les ditz faux allouances et concelementz soient respoignables, sanz ascune riere accompt rendre d'ascune accompt par devant oiez, terminez, auctorisez, et allouez en manere accustume en vostre dit escheqer, par advys et agarde et commune assent de toutz les barons illoeqes. May it please your royal majesty graciously to consider this matter and - in order to avoid an evil precedent, and also the dangers which may arise and ensue, to the very great damage, disinheritance, and total destruction of all those who have in the past, or will in future, account in your said exchequer - to cause it to be ordained that no-one who accounts, after he has rendered the account for his office and allowance has been made to him by the barons of the said exchequer, and provided that he has had a quietus in full discharge of himself with respect to the king for all things, points and articles for which he has accounted, should henceforth be brought into the said exchequer to render any arrears, nor summoned to answer a second time for anything allowed by the judgment and common assent of all the barons of the said exchequer; except in cases of false allowances or concealments, if any should be found, for the profit of our lord the king, in which case he must answer for the said false allowances and concealments without paying any arrears from any account previously heard, determined, authorised, and allowed in the customary manner in your said exchequer, by the advice, decision and comon assent of all the barons there.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'avisera. The king will consider this further.
VII. < Communes de countees de Oxenford etc. > VII. [Petition from the commons of the counties of Oxford and Berkshire concerning the University of Oxford].
32. Item, suppliont treshumblement sibien les chivalers, esquiers, et autres gentiels des countees d'Oxenford et Berk': come les maire et burgeys del ville d'Oxenford, qe come nostre seignur le roy oretarde, par disloial suggescioun, ad graunte par ses lettres patentes al chaunceller et escolers d'universitee illoeqes, et a lour successours a toutz jours, q'ils, ne lour servantz, ne nulle qe soit south lour privilege, ne serroit mys a respoundre devant ascune juge nostre seignur le roy, de treson, felonie, ou maheyme par eux fait deins la ville ou countee suisditz, sinon devaunt lour seneschall de mesme la ville. Et s'ilx pledent a issue de paiis, qe la moite de l'enquest serra pris par gentz qe sount desouth lour privilege, et lour servantz, retournez par les bedell du dit universitee. Et qe [p. iii-661][col. a] chescun jugge et ministre nostre seignur le roy doit liverer a eux les appels et enditementz des matiers suisditz quant ils par eux sount requys, sur peyne de ccli. Le quele est moult encountre commune droit de la ley de terre, et la regalye nostre seignur le roy, et overt matire pur faire debate et dissencion entre les escolers illoeqes et les suppliantz avantditz et autres lieges nostre dit seignur le roy. 32. VII. Commons of the counties of Oxford etc. Also, the request of the knights, esquires, and other nobles of the counties of Oxford and Berkshire, and the mayor and burgesses of the town of Oxford: whereas our lord the king recently, acting on disloyal information, granted by his letters patent to the chancellor and scholars of the university there and their successors forever that they, or their servants, or anyone under their authority, should not be made to answer before any judge of our lord the king for treason, felony or mayhem committed by them in the aforesaid town or county, except before their steward in the same town. And if they plead at issue, that half of the inquest will be taken by people who are under their authority, and their servants, who will have been returned by the beadle of the said university. And that [p. iii-661][col. a] every judge and minister of our lord the king should be obliged to deliver to them the appeals and indictments concerning the aforesaid matters when requested by them, under a penalty of £200. Which is greatly against the common right of the law of the land and the regality of our lord the king, and manifestly likely to cause dispute and dissension between the scholars there and the aforesaid supplicants and other lieges of our said lord the king.
Please a nostre tresgracious seignur le roy de sa benigne grace graciousement considerer la matere avauntdit, et les < meschiefs > queux purront avenir en ycelle partie, et surce grantier, qe les ditz lettres patentes en ycest present parlement soient repellez, adnullez, revokez, et tout outrement cassez, et de cy enavant pur nulle tenuz. May it please our most noble lord the king from his benign grace graciously to consider the aforesaid matter, and the wrongs which will ensue here, and thereupon to grant in this present parliament that the said letters patent should be repealed, annulled, revoked and entirely cancelled, and henceforth considered null and void.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'advisera. The king will consider this further.
VIII. < Layns, peaux lanutz, etc. > VIII. [Staple at Calais].
33. Item, suppliont voz communes: qe come en temps de tresnoble Roy Edward, et de Roy Richard nadgairs roy d'Engleterre, ordeignez fuist, sibien par diverses estatuitz du parlement, come par diverses actes du counseil, les queux estatuitz et actes ount estee et sount par vous, tresredoute seignur, confermez, qe l'entier repair de layns, peaux lanutz, quirs, esteyne, plumbe, et de toutz autres marchandises appurtenantz a vostre estaple, issantz hors de vostre roialme d'Engleterre, et de voz terres de Gales, d'Irland, et de Berwyk sur Twede, serroit dedeins vostre ville de Caleys, tant pur la prosperite de mesme la ville, come pur la sauf governance des ditz commoditees; au fyn qe toutz les marchauntz hantans ycelle serroient d'un libertee et condicion de les mettre illoeqes a vende, pur l'encrees et commune profit du vostre dit roialme. La quele repaire des ditz commoditees ad estee entier au dit lieu de Caleys, sanz disseverance, jesqes a oretarde, qe par enformacion des certeins persones pur lour singuler profit, il pluist a vous, tresgracious seignur, a eux grauntier licence d'eskipper certein quantite des leyns et des autres commoditees appurtenantz a vostre dit estaple, pur les amesner vers quels parties qe lour pleist de la la meer. 33. VIII. Wool, woolfells, etc. Also, the request of your commons: whereas in the time of the most noble King Edward [III], and King Richard [II], late king of England, it was ordained, both by several statutes of parliament and by various acts of the council - which statutes and acts have been and are confirmed by you, most dread lord - that the entire return of wool, woolfells, hides, tin, lead, and all other merchandise appertaining to your staple passing out of your realm of England or your lands of Wales, Ireland, and Berwick upon Tweed should be taken to your town of Calais, both for the prosperity of the same town and the safeguard of the said commodities; provided that all the merchants who go there should enjoy the freedom and the right to to offer them for sale there, for the benefit and common profit of your said realm. And these commodities were sent wholly to the said place of Calais, without exception, until recently, when, on the information of certain persons, for their own profit, it pleased you, most noble lord, to grant them a licence to export a certain quantity of wools and other commodities pertaining to your staple and take them to wherever it pleased them overseas.
Sur quoy, tresgracious seignur, il pleiase a vostre treshaute et purveu discrecion, de considerer, qe tiels persones qe facent ascune pursuit pur tiels licences, n'eient talent de repairer a vostre dit estaple l'ou ils covient d'estre serchez par vostre sercheour, mais pur les amesner aillours ou vous n'avez sercheour, pur lour singuler profit, en deceit de vous, et de voz custumes et subsidies a vous par voz communes grauntez, et tantbien en tresgraund damage du vostre ville suisdite, come en anientisement del prise des ditz commoditees esteantz deins vostre dit estaple, le quele tournera a tresoutrageouse damage de tout vostre dit roialme en commune. Et qe surce, sibien pur vostre profit come pur la commune profit du vostre dit roialme, et de vostre pluis habundant grace a ottroier, de vous graciousement abstiner de grauntier tiel licence par sinistre informacion en apres a nulluy, d'amesner ascuns des ditz commodites hors de vostre dit roialme et terres suisditz aillours qe a vostre dit estaple esteant dedeins vostre dit ville de Caleys; exceptz ceux leyns qe serrount eskippez pur passer outre les mountayns. Et qe vostre especial graunt en les premisses soit enacte en cest present parlement. Et enoutre, tresgracious seignur, a ce qe nous sumes certeinement enformez, qe diverses persones, tant bien de voz lieges, come Holondoys et Celandoys, ount amesnez, et unqore continuelment de jour en jour amesnent hors de vostre dit roialme layns, peaux lanuz, quirs, esteyne, et autres diverses merchandises, sanz ascune custume ent paier, en tresgraund desceit de vous, tresgracious seignur, et en arerisment de tout vostre roialme en commone. Pur quoy, tresredoute seignur, il pleiase a vostre tresgracious seignurie d'ordeigner par estatut en cest present parlement, qe toutz ceux de voz lieges, si ascuns y soient, qe en tiele manere voillent amesner ascuns des ditz commoditees hors de vostre dit [col. b] roialme, q'ils purront forfaire atant de value come les ditz biens purront amountier [memb. 5] tielment cariez hors de vostre roialme suisdit, et lour corps a fyn et raunceon a volunte de vous, tresgracious seignur. Et qe chescun estranger, come Holondoys, Celandoys, et autres, en lour eskippesson des ditz commoditees, si ascuns y soient, q'ils soient constreintz par voz custumers, et autres voz officers a ce ordeignez, de trover sufficeant suirte de voz lieges d'atant de somme come les ditz commoditees vaillent. Et qe yceux commoditees ne serront par eux, ne par nulle autre en lour noun, aillours qe a vostre dit estaple a Caleys amesnez, a fyn qe lour plegges soient par lour suirte constreintz de paier a vous, tresgracious seignur, les sommes contenuz en lour suirtes avauntditz, s'il aveigne qe les ditz estrangers, ou ascune en lour nouns, amesnent ascuns des ditz commoditees aillours qe en la manere et forme come devant est dit. Et celuy qe les voet espier, et suir pur le profit de vous, tresgracious seignur, eit le tierce partie pur soun travall et labour. Whereupon, most noble lord, may it please your most high and wise discretion to consider that these persons who seek these licences have no intention of returning to your said staple where they are likely to be searched by your searcher, but intend to take them elsewhere where you do not have a searcher, for their personal profit, thereby deceiving you and reducing the customs and subsidies granted to you by your commons, and doing great damage to your aforesaid town through diminution of the prise on the said commodities which exists in your said staple, which will result in the most excessive damage to your said realm in general. And thereupon, both for your profit and the common profit of your realm, to grant from your most abundant grace that you will graciously refrain from granting any such licence as a result of misleading information hereafter, for anyone to take any of the said commodities outside your said realm and aforesaid lands elsewhere than to your staple within your said town of Calais; except for those wools which are shipped to be taken over the mountains. And that your special grant on the foregoing should be enacted in this present parliament. Moreover, most noble lord, we are reliably informed that several persons, not only your lieges but also people from Holland and Zeeland, have exported, and still continue daily to export from your said realm, wools, woolfells, hides, tin, and various other merchandise, without paying any custom on it, to your great deceit, most noble lord, and to the prejudice of all your realm in general. Because of which, most dread lord, may it please your most noble lordship to ordain by statute in this present parliament that if any of your lieges proposes to export any of the said commodities from your said realm in this manner, [col. b] they will forfeit the value of whatever goods [memb. 5] they export from your aforesaid realm and pay a fine and ransom their bodies at your will, most noble lord. And that every foreigner, whether from Holland, Zeeland, or elsewhere, who proposes to export the said commodities, should be obliged by your customs officers and your other officers appointed for this to find adequate surety from your lieges for as much as the said commodities are worth. And these commodities will not be brought by them, or by anyone else on their behalf, elsewhere than to your said staple at Calais, otherwise their pledges should be constrained by their surety to pay to you, most noble lord, the sums specified in their aforesaid sureties, if it happens that the said foreigners, or anyone on their behalf, exports any of the said commodities elsewhere than is specified in the manner and form above. And whoever wishes to spy on and prosecute them for your profit, most noble lord, should have the third part for his trouble and labour.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy se voet abstiner tanq'a proschein parlement d'aucune tiel licence grantier, d'eskipper les laynes qe sount de la cresceance decea l'eawe de Coket; purveu toutesfoitz, qe les laynes qe sount de la cresceance depardelea la dite eawe de Coket, pur aide et relevacioun de les ville et chastelle de Berwyk soient amesnez et eskippez illoeqes, selonc les forme et effect des lettres patentes ent faites a les gentz du dit ville de Berwyk, saunz aucune restreint a contrair. Et quant a la remenant de cest peticion, soient les estatutz ent faitz tenuz et gardez. The king will refrain from granting any such licence to ship the wool produced on this side of the River Coquet until the next parliament; provided always that the wool produced beyond the said River Coquet should be brought and shipped for the aid and relief of the town and castle of Berwick, according to the terms and effect of letters patent made on this to the people of the said town of Berwick, without any restriction to the contrary. As regards the rest of this petition, let the statutes made on it be kept and maintained.
IX. < Assises. > IX. [Appointment of justices of assize].
34. Item, suppliont les communes: qe come il soit ordeigne par estatut en la fourme q'ensuyt: Item, concordatum est et statutum quod nullus homo de lege sit decetero justiciarii assisarum vel communis deliberacionis gaolarum in propria patria sua; et quod capitalis justiciarius de communi banco assignetur inter alios ad hujusmodi assisas capiendas et gaolas deliberandas, set quo ad capitalem justiciarum de banco regis fiat sicut pro majori parte centum annorum proximo preteritorum fieri consuevitur (fn. iii-647-186-1) - qe mesme l'estatuit soit fermement tenuz et gardez. 34. IX. Assizes. Also, the commons pray that, whereas it was ordained by statute as follows - Also, it is agreed and decreed that no lawyer henceforth should be a justice of assize or of common delivery of gaols in his own neighbourhood; and that the chief justice of the Common Bench should be assigned among other things to hold these assizes and gaol deliveries; but as regards the chief justice of King's Bench, it should be done as it was accustomed to be done for the greater part of the past one hundred years (fn. iii-647-186-1) - that the same statute should be firmly kept and maintained.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit cest estatut tenuz et gardez, non obstant ascune estatuit et ordinance fait a contrair. Et qe nulle chief justice du bank le roy soit ascunement enapres fait justice as assises prendre en ascune counte deins le roialme d'Engleterre, forspris en le counte de Lancastre. Et qe cest estatut teigne force tan come y plerra au roy pur salvacion de sa prerogatif. (fn. iii-647-189-1) Let this statute be kept and maintained, notwithstanding any statute and ordinance made to the contrary. Also that no chief justice of the King's Bench henceforth should be made a justice of assize held in any county within the realm of England, except in the county of Lancaster. And that this statute should hold force for as long as it pleases the king for the preservation of his prerogative. (fn. iii-647-189-1)
X. < Marchantz estrangers. > X. [Foreign merchants coming to England].
35. Item, suppliont humblement a vostre roial mageste voz foialx lieges les communes du vostre roialme: qe nulls merchauntz estraunges repairantz en mesme vostre roialme ovesqe lour merchandises soient mye resceuz ne recettez, par favour ne par nulle autre voie, sinoun en mesme la manere come voz foialx lieges marchauntz Englois semblables sount resceux en Flaundres, et en autres lieux outre la meer; c'estassavoir, deins hostrie notable Englois, et de bone fame, et qe toutz voies ils ne presument ne facent achater ascune chose ne marchaundise deins vostre dit roialme, sinon tiels come l'oste de le dit hostrie en purra avoir notice, et plein conusance. Et auxi, qe tiels marchauntz estraunges metteront a vewe tout lour merchaundise par eux mesmes deins vostre dit roialme a vendre deins xl jours proscheins ensuantz lour entree en chescun port ou ils soient deins vostre dit roialme, sur peyne de forfaiture de lour ditz merchandises, et le punissement de lour corps a la volunte de vous, tresredoute seignur le roy. Et outre ce, q'il ne serra nulle brocour des ditz merchandises, sinoun hommes Engloises nees, enfraunchises deins les ditz portez, sur mesme la [p. iii-662][col. a] peyne. Et qe les mairs, bailifs, et ministres de toutz les portz en Engleterre, et seignurs des autres villes l'ou merchaundises sount portez par les avantditz estraunges merchantz, et facent la contrarie des articles devant declarez, eient poair de eux arester, et les ditz merchandises a prendre et forfaire, a la oeps le roy le moite, et l'autre moite a celuy qe voet faire l'execucioun et trover le defaute. 35. X. Foreign merchants. Also, the commons pray that no foreign merchants entering your realm with their merchandise should be either admitted or received, by favour or by any other means, except in the same way as your faithful lieges, the English merchants, are received in Flanders, and in other places overseas; that is to say, in well-known English hostels, of good repute; and that they should not in any way attempt or arrange for the purchase of any merchandise in your said realm, except such things as the host of the said hostelry is informed about, and has full knowledge of. Also, that such foreign merchants should display all their merchandise brought by themselves into your said realm for sale within forty days following their entry into any port where they are within your said realm, upon penalty of forfeiture of their said merchandise and corporal punishment at your will, most dread lord the king. Moreover, that there should be no middleman for the said merchants except native Englishmen, enfranchised within the said ports, upon the same [p. iii-662][col. a] penalty. And that the mayors, bailiffs, and ministers of all the ports in England, and the lords of other towns where merchandise is brought by the aforesaid foreign merchants who act contrary to the articles stated above, should have authority to arrest them, and to seize the said merchandise as forfeit, half to the king's use, and the other half to whomsoever wishes to enforce this and reveal the fault.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soient les estatutz ent faitz tenuz et gardez, et soient certeins seignurs assignez d'examiner les ditz estatuitz, et la contenue de cest peticion, parentre cy et le proschein parlement; a quel parlement monstrent les ditz seignurs ensy a assigners lour advys celle partie. Let the statutes made on this be kept and maintained, and let certain lords be assigned to examine the said statutes, and the content of this petition, between now and the next parliament; at which parliament let the said lords thus assigned give their advice on this matter.
XI. < Marchantz. > XI. [Export of merchandise to the western parts].
36. Item, suppliont voz marchauntz Englois: qe pleiase a vostre tresgracious seignurie grantier et ordeigner par estatuit en cest present parlement, qe voz ditz marchauntz Englois et chescun de eux purront fraunchement, saunz pursuyr a roy, eskipper toutz maneres des leyns, quirs, et peaux lanutz, plumbe, esteyne, et toutes auteres maneres merchandises, atant de foitz come lour plerra, en les parties de west, passantz les estroites de Marrok outre les mounteynes, paiantz primerement a nostre seignur le roy les custumes, subsidies, et autres devoirs ent duez et accustumez, parissint q'ils eskippont les ditz commoditees en les portz de Loundres, Sandewich', et Suthampton', et nemy aillours. Et enoutre, q'ils trovent sufficeant suyrte a lour eskippeson, qe les ditz commoditees serrount amesnez outre les mounteyns; sur peyne de forfaire la value d'icelles. 36. XI. Merchants. Also, the request of your English merchants: may it please your most gracious lordship to grant and ordain by statute in this parliament that all of your said English merchants should be able to export at will all kinds of wool, hides, woolfells, lead, tin, and all other kinds of merchandise, without suing to the king, whenever it pleases them to the western parts, passing through the straits of Morocco beyond the mountains, having first paid to our lord the king the customs, subsidies and other duties due and accustomed on them; provided that the said commodities are shipped through the ports of London, Sandwich or Southampton, and not elsewhere. Moreover, that they should find adequate surety for their cargo that the said commodities will indeed be taken beyond the mountains; upon penalty of forfeiture of their value.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'advisera. The king will consider this further.
XII. < Spice. > XII. [The price of pepper].
37. Item, suppliont les communes: qe please a vostre hautesse de considerer le graunt chierte q'est a present de peper, q'est le pluis usuel spicerie a tout le commune de roialme, nonobstant qe graunt pleinte de tiel spicerie y ad en meyns des groceres et Lumbardes, et autres merchauntz aliens, en bales, au fyn de les gardre pur les vendre a pluis haut price qe n'est a present. Please a vous, tresgracious seignur, de considerer la necessite de vostre commune, qe les ditz bales puissent estre mesne hors, et d'estre venduz a resonable encrees et gayne outre le primer achate d'iceux. 37. XII. Spice. Also, the commons pray that it may please your highness to consider the high price of pepper at present, which is the most commonly-used spice by all the commons of the realm, despite the large amount of this spice which is in sacks in the hands of grocers and Lombards and other alien merchants, who keep it in order to sell it at a higher price than it is at present. May it please you, most gracious lord, to consider the need of your commons, so that the sacks can be brought out and sold at a reasonable surplus and profit above its initial price.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy voet, qe les marchauntz, et autres queconqes qi ount peper a vendre, < vendent > leur dit peper q'ils ount ou aueront, chescun livere a xx d. saunz pluis; sur peyne de forfaiture d'icelle en qi mayns q'il soit trovez, sibien aliens come denizeins, jesqes la venue de novelle peper en Engleterre, au fyn qe a celle temps mesme le peper soit venduz pur resonable meindre price. The king wills that the merchants, and any others who have pepper to sell, should sell their said pepper which they have or will have at 20 d. per pound and no more; upon penalty of its forfeiture by whoever has it, whether aliens or natives, until the import of new pepper into England, which same pepper should then be sold at a reasonably cheap price.
[memb. 4]
XIII. < Lyveree de drap. > XIII. [Liveries of cloth].
38. Item, suppliont les communes: qe come il soit ordeigne par estatut fait l'an de regne nostre dit seignur le roy primer: Qe nulls ercevesqe, evesqe, abbe, ne priour, ne nulle autre homme de seint eglise, ne temporelle, de quel estate ou condicion q'il soit deins le dit roiaume, done ascune livere de drap a nulluy, mes soulement a ses meynalx et officers, et a ceux qe sount de lour counseil sibien espirituelx come temporelx apprisez de l'un ou de l'autre loie, sur peyne de faire fyn et raunceon a la volunte du roy - ordeignez est et establiez, qe sibien celle estatut, come estatut de livere des chaperons en temps de Roy Richard second, soient fermement tenuz et gardez, et mys en due execucion. (fn. iii-647-209-1) Ajouste a ycelle, qe si ascune chivaler, ou aucune autre persone de meindre estat, doigne ascune tiel livere de drap, ou des chaperons, countre le fourme des ditz estatutz, q'il encourge la peyne de c s. pur chescun tiel livere de drap, ou de chaperons, apaiers au roy atant de foitz q'il ferra la contrarie d'icestes estatut et ordinances. [col. b] Et qe celuy qe resceive ascune tiel livere de drap ou de chaperons, encourge semblablement la peyne de xl s. a paiers a roy, come desuis est dit. Et eit celuy qe vorra suer en ce cas la moite des tielx peynes pur soun travaille; et ne soient les ditz peynes ascunement pardonez. Et outre ce, accordez est, qe nulle congregacioun ne compaignie se face de tiel livere de drap ou de chaperons as custages propres d'icelle congregacion ou compaignie, sur peyne de chescun homme d'icell congregacion ou compaignie qi face la contrair de cest estatut ou ordinance paie a roy xl s., les gildes et fraternitees, et auxi les gentz de mestier des citees et burghs deins le roialme, qe sount foundez et ordeignez a bone entent et purpos, tant soulement exceptz. Et aient les justices as assises prendre poiar d'enquerer de temps en temps en lour cessiouns de les matiers dessuisditz, et de ce certifier en le bank le roy. Que please a vostre tresgracious seignurie d'ordeigner en cest present parlement, qe l'avauntdit estatut soit duement execut, a l'avantage de vous, et pur ease et tranquillite de voz lieges. 38. XIII. Livery of cloth. Also, the commons pray that, whereas it was ordained by statute made in the first year of the reign of our said lord the king - That no archbishop, bishop, abbot, prior, or any other man of holy church, or layman, of whatever estate or condition he be within the said realm, should give any livery of cloth to anyone, but only to their household servants and officers, and to those who are of their council, whether spiritual or temporal, learned in one law or the other, upon penalty of making fine and ransom at the king's will - to ordain and establish that both this statute and the statute concerning livery of hoods made in the time of King Richard the second should be firmly kept and maintained, and duly enforced. (fn. iii-647-209-1) Adding to this that if any knight, or any other person of lesser estate, gives any such livery of cloth or hoods contrary to the terms of the said statutes, he should incur a penalty of 100 s. for each such livery of cloth or hoods, to be paid to the king whenever he acts contrary to these statutes and ordinances. [col. b] And that whoever receives any such livery of cloth or hoods should similarly incur a penalty of 40 s. to be paid to the king, as stated above. And let whosoever wishes to sue in this matter have a half of any such penalties for his labour; and the said penalties should not be waived in any way. Moreover, it is agreed that no community or company should make any such livery of cloth or hoods at the expense of that community or company, upon penalty that each man of that community or company who acts contrary to this statute or ordinance should pay 40 s. to the king, excepting only the guilds and fraternities, and also the people of the mysteries of the cities and boroughs within the realm which are established and ordained for good intent and purpose. Also, let the justices of assize have authority to inquire from time to time in their sessions on the aforesaid matters, and to certify them in the King's Bench. May it please your most gracious lordship to ordain in this present parliament that the aforesaid statute should be duly enforced, to your advantage and for the peace and quiet of your lieges.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy le voet. (fn. iii-647-212-1) The king wills it. (fn. iii-647-212-1)
XIV. < Communes du countee de Northumbr'. > XIV. [Petition from the commons of the county of Northumberland concerning crime].
39. Item, monstrent humblement les povers communaltees, et les terre tenantes del counte de Northumbr': coment ils sount enpoverez et anientisez, et ascuns destruitz de lour biens et chateux, par commune larcyne, et orible larouns et leur maintenours deins mesme le counte, et deins les fraunchises des diverses seignurs a ycell counte annexez; et de noun venue de les justices pur faire due execucion; a grand damage et anientisment del povere poeple nostre seignur le roy, et a cause de abettance et mainteignance suisdit. 39. XIV. Commons of the county of Northumberland. Also, the poor commons and land tenants of Northumberland declare that they are impoverished and ruined, and various of their goods and chattels destroyed by common theft and by evil thieves and their supporters within the same county, or within the franchises of several lords which are annexed to that county; and by the absence of justices to enforce the law; to the great damage and ruin of the poor people of our lord the king, on account of the aforesaid support and maintenance.
Qe please a vostre hautes, pur le bone governance de mesme le counte, ordeigner, qe nulle coroner vende n'enbesaill nulle enditement devaunt luy pris, sur peyne de xxli. Et qe chescun viscount fra venir devant les justices d'assises toutz ses prisoners, sur peyne de xlli. Et qe nulle justice faile de sa venue a sa cessioun un foitz a meyns par an, sur peyne de perdre lour gages. Et qe les coroners et viscount deliverent lour enditementz par endenture dessouths lour sealx a les justices de les assises prendre, sur mesmes les peynes. Et qe chescun mayntenour deins mesme le counte ferra fyn a roy solonc la discrecion de mesmes les justices. Et qe mesmes les justices d'assises purront avoir pleyn poair d'enquerer a lour cessiouns des toutz les articles avantditz, et les determiner devant lour departier hors du counte, pur avantage nostre seignur le roy. Et qe chescun chaunceller pur le temps esteant poet grantier brief direct as tresorer et barouns de escheqer, pur allouer a viscount et eschetour du dit counte, ou a chescun de eux, pur faire lour serement de les discheues deins mesme le counte. Considerantz qe le dit counte est si long de la ley, qe nulle justice, ne baron de l'escheqer, voillont y venir pur nulle nisi prius prendre, a graund destruccion et anientisement du dit paies. Et qe nulle ore ne argent passe en Escoce pur bestail, ne pur autre merchandises, mes merchaundises pur merchaundises, sur peyne de forfaiture d'icell, et lour corps a la volunte nostre seignur le roy, tanqe fyn soit fait. Et qe cest matier purra estre enquys par les justices du pees en lour sessiouns, pur l'avantage nostre dit seignur le roy. Et qe cest peticion, et la graunt surce fait, soy extend tant soulement en le dit counte de Northumbr', et nemy aillours. May it therefore please your highness, for the good governance of the same county, to ordain that no coroner should sell or suppress any indictment taken before him, upon penalty of £20. And that each sheriff should cause all his prisoners to come before the justices of assize, upon penalty of £40. Also that no justice should fail to come to his session at least once during the year, on penalty of losing his wages. And that the coroners and sheriff should deliver their indictments by indenture under their seals to the justices who hold the assizes, on the same penalty. And that anyone guilty of maintenance within the same county should make fine to the king according to the discretion of the same justices. And that the same justices of assize should have full authority to inquire at their sessions concerning all the aforesaid articles, and determine them before they leave the county, for the profit of our lord the king. Also that whoever is chancellor at the time should have the power to issue a writ addressed to the treasurer and barons of the exchequer in order to permit the sheriff and escheator of the said county, or one of them, to make their oath concerning the issues arising within the same county. Considering that the said county is so far distant from the law that no justice or baron of the exchequer is willing to go there in order to hold any nisi prius, to the great injury and ruin of the said county. And that no gold or silver should be sent into Scotland for cattle or for any other merchandise, upon penalty of forfeiture of it, and their bodies to be at the king's pleasure until that fine has been paid. And that this matter ought to be inquired into by the justices of the peace in their sessions, for the said lord king's profit. And that this petition, and the grant made on it, should apply only in the said county of Northumberland, and nowhere else.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soient justices assignes en celles parties de faire leur inquisicions come y busoignera; et soient les estatutz faitz en ce cas tenuz et gardez. Let justices be appointed to make their enquiries in those parts as necessary; and let the statutes made in this matter be kept and maintained.
XV. < Pro villa de Sutton. > XV. [Petition from the town of Sutton or Plymouth, for the election of its own officers].
40. Item, suppliont voz communes pur toutz les gentz inhabitantz et recehantz deins la ville de Sutton Priour et Sutton Vautort, autrement appelle Plymmouth: [p. iii-663][col. a] qe come pres la dit ville est un grande port, et arrivalle pur niefs et autres vesselx dedeins venantz, qe sovent foitz en temps de guerre la dite ville et les gentz dedeins par les enemys a nostre seignur le roy et ses tresnobles progenitours avaunt ces heures ount estee destruitz, et unqore, qe Dieu defende, de legier purront; a cause qe la dite ville n'est pas enclose ne muree d'ascune forteresse defensable pur resister les enemys suisditz. 40. XV. On behalf of the town of Sutton. Also, the request of the commons for all the people dwelling and residing in the town of Sutton Prior and Sutton Vautort, otherwise called Plymouth: [p. iii-663][col. a] whereas there is a large port next to the said town, and a landing place for boats and other vessels arriving there, so that often in the past in time of war the said town and the people living there have been attacked by the enemies of our lord the king and his noble progenitors; and it could still easily happen, which God forbid, because the said town is not enclosed nor walled like other defensible fortresses in order to resist the aforesaid enemies.
Please a vostre roial mageste considerer les graundes mieschiefs des ditz suppliantz, vile, port, et tout la pais environ, en la fourme suisdite; et de vostre grace especial grauntier as ditz suppliantz, lour heirs, et lour successours, inhabitantz et recehantz deins mesme la ville, q'ils, lour heirs, et lour successours, enhabitantz deins mesme la ville, purrount chescun an a le fest de Seint Michell, en certein lieu deins mesme la ville par eux a limiter, eslier un mair pur la bone governance de mesme la ville. Et q'ils, lour heirs, et lour successours, soient un corps corporat pur purchacer franc tenement a terme de vie, ou en fee, sanz licence roial. Et qe chescun nief ou vesselle alien, et estraunge alien, queux ne sount pas a roy, qe viendra et arrivera deins l'avantdit port tanqe a terme de cent anz proscheins ensuantz, paiera pur soun ancorage al commune boist du dit ville pur faire la murage entour la dit ville xij d. et de chescun tonelle de vyn qe aviendra deins mesme le port d'ascune estraunger alien ij d. et de chescun fardaille de toille ou de drape al value de x li. venant a dit port ij d. et de chescun quarter de seel q'est descharge de estraunge homme alien en le dit port un mail; et de chescun ton lode de ferre d'estraunger ij d. Et qe pur les ditz sommes en fourme suisdit rehercees, le mair et ses successours du dite ville qe pur le temps serra, pur le nounpaiement d'icelles sommes, purra les ditz niefs et vesselx et autres chosez southnommez distreindre, et la somme par luy leve al commune boist mettre, pur la fesure du murage suisdite; et ce sanz fyn ou graund fee paier en la chauncerie. May it please your royal majesty to consider the great hardship of the said supplicants, the town, port and all the surrounding area, as described above; and to grant of your special grace to the said supplicants, their heirs and successors, dwelling and living in the same town, that they and their heirs and successors dwelling in the same town should be able to elect a mayor each year on the feast of Michaelmas, in a certain place to be specified by them within the said town, for the good governance of the same town. And that they and their heirs and successors should be a corporate body able to buy free tenements for terms of life or in fee without royal licence. Also that any alien, or any foreign boat or vessel which is not for the king, which arrives in the aforesaid port during the next 100 years should pay 12 d. into the common chest of the said town for its anchorage in order for walls to be built around the said town; and for each tun of wine which is brought into the same port from each alien, 2 d.; and for each bundle of linen or cloth to the value of £10 which arrives in the said port, 2 d.; and for each quarter of salt which is unloaded by a foreigner in the said port, a halfpenny; and for each ton-load of foreign iron, 2 d. And that in order for the above-mentioned sums to be collected, the mayor or his successors in the said town at the time should be able to distrain the said boats and vessels and other things named above for non-payment of them, and the sum levied by him should be put in the common chest for the construction of the aforesaid wall; and this without any fine or large fee to be paid in chancery.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Compounent les suppliantz ove les seignurs q'ount fraunchises illeoqes, parentre cy et le proschein parlement; et a mesme le parlement facent ils report de lour accord, et le roy ent serra advisez defaire ce qe muelx luy semblera en le cas. Let the supplicants meet with the lords who have franchises there between now and the next parliament; and let them report concerning their decision at the same parliament, and let the king be advised on it, in order to do what seems best to him in the matter.
XVI. < Savarne. > XVI. [Tolls on the River Severn].
41. Item, priount les communes: qe come les lieges hommes de vostre roialme d'Engleterre de tout temps dont memorie ne court ont eu franc passage parmye l'aewe de Savarne, quele est un braas du meer, pur mesner vyns, oiel, et lour autres merchaundises, biens, et chateux, par tielx vesselx come eux plerront ordeigner pur lour profit, de queconqes parties de dela tanq'a crossage en la counte de Salop, et d'illoeqes vers les parties de dela a lour volunte, sanz tol, custume paier, ou autre imposicion queconqe a ascuny, forspris les subsides et custumes duez a vous, nostre tressoveraigne seignur le roy, tanqe oretarde, qe les balifs et les hommes de la ville de Gloucestre, et les balifs et les hommes de la ville de Wyrcestre, et Briggenorth', pur lour several profit, ount ordeigne et mys un imposicion sur voz lieges des countees de Hereford', Salop', et Staff' et d'autres paiis environ, menant vyn, oiel, ou autre merchaundises, biens ou chateux, par l'aewe suisdit parmy ascuns des villes de Gloucestre, ou Wyrcestre, et Briggenorth, avauntditz. C'estassavoir, qe chescun merchaunt et autres de les countees et paiis suisditz paierount a chescun de les villes d'icelles, pur un tonelle de vyn v d. et pur chescun tonelle d'oil v d. et en mesme la manere pur lour autre merchandises, biens, et chateux, amesnez par mesmes les villes en l'aewe suisdite, solonc la quantite d'icelle poisant un tonell de vyn. Et mesmes les deniers solonc lour imposicioun ount levez de voz ditz lieges extorcenousement, [col. b] a graund oppression, damage, et arrerisment de mesmes voz lieges, et malveys ensample, si due remedie ne soit ordeigne celle partie. 41. XVI. Severn. Also, the commons pray that, whereas the liege men of your realm of England from time immemorial have had free passage up and down the river Severn, which is an arm of the sea, in order to take wine, oil, and their other merchandise, goods, and chattels on such vessels as pleased them, to make their profit, from anywhere overseas up to the crossing in the county of Shropshire, and from there overseas at their will, without paying tolls, customs, or any other tax to anyone except the subsidies and customs due to you, our most sovereign lord the king; recently, however, the bailiffs and men of the town of Gloucester, and the bailiffs and men of the towns of Worcester and Bridgnorth, for their personal profit, have decreed and imposed a tax on your lieges from the counties of Hereford, Shropshire, and Staffordshire, and from other areas in the vicinity, who take wine, oil, or other merchandise, goods or chattels along the aforesaid river through any of the aforesaid towns of Gloucester, Worcester and Bridgnorth. That is to say, that each merchant or other person from the aforesaid counties and areas must pay to each of those towns, 5 d. for a tun of wine, and 5 d. for each tun of oil, and similarly for their other merchandise, goods and chattels taken through the same towns on the aforesaid river, in proportion to its quantity in relation to the weight of a tun of wine. And they have extortionately levied the same money, in accordance with their tax, on your said lieges, [col. b] to the great oppression, damage, and ruin of your same lieges, and an evil precedent if due remedy is not ordained in this matter.
Please a vostre hautesse et gracious seignurie d'ordeigner, par advys des seignurs en cest present parlement, qe la dit imposicion, ne nulle autre, desore enavant soit leve de voz lieges, en tiele < cause > avant expresse, par les balifs, ou autres ministres, des ditz villes de Gloucestre, Wyrcestre, et Briggenorth, ne d'ascune de eux pur le temps esteantz, sur la forfaiture de lour fraunchises, queles ils et les hommes des mesmes les villes ount en ycelles, et de rendre a celuy qe luy sente estre greve en celle partie, s'il voil suer, ses damages a treble. May it please your highness and gracious lordship to ordain, with the advice of the lords in this present parliament, that neither the said tax nor any other should henceforth be levied on your lieges in the way specified above, by any of the bailiffs or other officers of the said towns of Gloucester, Worcester or Bridgnorth at the time, under penalty of the forfeiture of the franchises which they and the men of the same towns have there, as well as paying to whomsoever feels himself to be aggrieved in this matter, if he wishes to sue, his damages threefold.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]Let certain men from the said towns be summoned to be before the king's council on the quinzaine of St Hilary next [27 January 1412], in order to show their records and the authority by which they do such things, in order to explain what is alleged in the said petition. And let the same council have power, by authority of parliament, to do whatever seems best to them in this matter.
Soit envoiez pur certeins gentz des dites villes, d'estre devant le counseil du roy a la quinzisme de Seint Hiller < proschein > , pur monstrer lour evidences, et leur auctoritee, par quoy ils fount tieles choses, en declaracion de ce q'est contenuz deins la dite peticion. Et ait mesme le counseil poair, par auctoritee du parlement, de faire ce qe leur semblera meulx en ce cas. Let certain men from the said towns be summoned to be before the king's council on the quinzaine of St Hilary next [27 January 1412], in order to show their records and the authority by which they do such things, in order to explain what is alleged in the said petition. And let the same council have power, by authority of parliament, to do whatever seems best to them in this matter.
[memb. 3]
XVII. < Communes des countees de Gloucestre etc. > XVII. [Complaint of the commons of the county of Gloucester, etc. against malefactors from Wales].
42. Item, priount les communes de les countees de Gloucestre, Wyrcestre, Hereford, Bristuit, Somerset, et d'autres plusours countees, villes, et burghs, auxibien deins la marche de Gales come de les countees suisditz, et lour compleynont de les graundes mieschiefs et damages q'ils ount euez et sustenuz devant ces heures, et unqore ount de jour en autre, par les rebelx et larouns de diverses seignuries de Gales, qi tout temps gisont en agaite en hautes chymyns, et preignent plusours des ditz suppliantz, et d'autres lieges nostre seignur le roy, auxi bien deins les countees suisditz, come en les ditz seignuries de Gales, eux amesnantz en diverses seignuries de Gales, en boys et disertes, et la les lient as arbres, et eux gardent par deux moys ou trois come en prisone et peyns jesqes q'ils soient raunsonez a le pluis outre de lour biens et pluis, a graund damage et destruccion des ditz suppliantz et de lour amys. Les queux rebelx apres le dit treson, qe appartient a la corone, sount resceux, vitaillez, et soeffrez en les avantditz seignuries, et ount diverses trewes et sauf conduyt, et fount lour fyns et gree ovesqe les ministres des ditz seignuries a lour volunte; et ensy sount supportez, vitaillez, et soeffrez par les ministres des ditz seignuries et autres lour amys, qe nulle remedie, correccion, ne deliverance des prisoners suisditz, saunz graund raunceon devant mayn paie, en nulle manere poet estre fait, mays a demurrer en graund peyne jesqe a mort, a graund destruccion et anientisment des plusours lieges nostre seignur le roy. 42. XVII. Commons of the counties of Gloucester etc. Also, the request of the commons of the counties of Gloucester, Worcester, Hereford, Bristol, Somerset and various other counties, towns, and boroughs, both in the March of Wales and in the aforesaid counties: they complain of the great wrongs and damage which they have had and borne before this time, and still have daily, at the hands of rebels and robbers from various lordships in Wales who continually lie in wait on highways and seize many of the said supplicants and other lieges of our lord the king, both within the aforesaid counties and in the said lordships in Wales, and take them into various lordships in Wales, to woods and uninhabited places, and tie them to trees there, and keep them for two or three months in prison and torture them until they are ransomed with all of their goods and more, to the great damage and destruction of the said supplicants and their kinsmen. Which rebels, following such treason (which pertains to the crown), are harboured, fed, and supported in the aforesaid lordships, and enjoy various truces and safe-conducts, and make their fines and agreements with the officers of the said lordships at their pleasure; and so they are harboured, fed, and supported by the officers of the said lordships and their other kinsmen, and there is no redress, correction, or freedom for the aforesaid prisoners under any circumstances unless a large ransom is paid beforehand, but they remain in mortal danger, to the great harm and ruin of many of our lord the king's lieges.
Qe please a nostre dit seignur le roy de considerer les premisses, et les articles et remedies dessouths escriptz, par l'advys des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en cest present parlement d'ordiner pur tiels mieschiefs remedies sufficeantz: May it please our said lord the king to take the foregoing into consideration, and the articles and remedies described below, and with the advice of the lords spiritual and temporal in this present parliament to ordain adequate remedies for such wrongs:
Primerement, d'ordeigner, qe si ascune liege nostre seignur le roy de cy enavant soit pris ou raunsonez par ascunes rebelx ou larouns dedeins ascune counte de roialme, ou seignuries de Gales, qe les avantditz rebelx et larouns surce soient enditez devant le viscount, seneschall, ou soun lieutenant en mesme le counte, seignuries, ville, ou burgh, dount le prisoner est q'est ensy pris; et l'enditement envoie a le viscount, seneschall, ou soun lieutenant de la seignurie l'ou des ditz rebelx soient neez, demurantz, ou conversantz; ovec un maundement pur arester les ditz rebelles et faire deliverance de les avantditz prisoners. Et en cas qe les avauntditz officers ou ministers des ditz seignuries soient negligentz sur celle ordinance, issint qe les ditz prisoners ne soient par eux deliverez, q'adonqes les amys des ditz prisoners eient poair, en toutz lieux deins le roialme, come en les seignuries suisditzde Gales, d'arester les tenantz de mesme le seignurie, ou lour biens, et les gardre sanz deliverance par ascune manere de disclayme, jesqes les ditz prisoners ensy [p. iii-664][col. a] prises soient deliverez ovesqe lour biens et despenses. Firstly, to ordain that if any liege of our lord the king is henceforth taken or ransomed by any rebels or robbers in any county of the realm or lordship in Wales, that the aforesaid rebels and robbers should be indictedfor this before the sheriff, the steward, or his lieutenant in the same county, lordship, town, or borough from which the prisoner who is thus taken comes; and the indictment should be sent to the sheriff, steward, or his lieutenant of the lordship where the said rebels are born, dwelling, or residing, with an order to arrest the said rebels and free the aforesaid prisoners. And in the event that the aforesaid officers or officials of the said lordships are negligent in enforcing this ordinance, so that the said prisoners are not freed by them, then the kinsmen of the said prisoners should have authority, in all places within the realm as well as in the aforesaid lordships in Wales, to arrest the tenants of the same lordship or their goods, and to keep them without any release by any kind of disclaimer until the said prisoners thus seized [p. iii-664][col. a] are released with their goods and costs.
Item, d'ordeigner, qe de cy enavaunt nulls viscount, seneschall, lieutenant, ne ascune autre officer ne ministre d'ascune countee ou seignurie de Gales, eie power de doner ne grantier nulle sauf conduyt ne trewes, ne fyn faire, ne par disclayme deliverer tiels rebelles ou larons qe en ascune manere parnount ou raunsenont ascunes des lieges nostre seignur le roy, saunz ce qe devant soient pardonez par especial cherte nostre seignur le roy pur le treson suisdit qe partient a la corone, et si ascune officer ou ministre d'acune seignurie de Gales face la contrarie de cest ordinance, qe adonqes soit ajugge come maintenour des ditz rebelles, et mys a fyne et raunceon a nostre seignur le roy. Also, to ordain that henceforth no sheriff, steward, lieutenant, nor any other officer or official from any county or lordship in Wales should have the authority to give or grant any safe-conduct or truce, or make fine, or liberate by disclaimer any such rebels or robbers who seize or ransom any of our lord the king's lieges in any way, unless they have already been pardoned by the special grace of our lord the king for the aforesaid treason (which pertains to the crown); and if any officer or official of any lordship in Wales acts contrary to this ordinance, he should then be adjudged as a supporter of the said rebels and obliged to make fine and ransom with our lord the king.
Item, d'ordeigner, qe si ascune liege nostre seignur le roy soit pris ou raunsonez decy enavaunt par tielx rebelles et larouns suisditz, deins le roiaume, ou seignuries de Gales, qe les avauntditz prisoners ensy prises, et lour amys en lour noun, aient poair de arester les ditz rebelles et larouns en toutz lieux l'ou ils purrount estre trovez deins le roialme, come en les seignuries avauntditz de Gales, et faire lour accion, et recoverer lour damage sur les ditz rebelles, auxibien < qe > come les ditz treson ou felonie furent faitz ou perpetrez en mesme le countee ou seignurie l'ou les ditz rebelles soient trovez. Also, to ordain that if any liege of our lord the king is seized or ransomed henceforth by any such aforesaid rebels and robbers within the realm or the lordships in Wales, that the aforesaid prisoners thus seized, or their kinsmen in their name, should have the authority to arrest the said rebels and robbers anywhere they are found within the realm, as well as in the aforesaid lordships in Wales, and make their action and recover their damages against the said rebels, just as if the said treason or felony was committed or perpetrated in the same county or lordship where the said rebels were found.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'advisera. The king will consider this further.
XVIII. < Mesurage de draps. > XVIII. [Measurement of cloth].
43. Monstrent les communes: qe come oretarde sibien par vous, tressoveraigne seignur liege, come par Roy Richard darrein, par lettres patentes reales, al instance des diverses gentz pur lour singuler avantage, grantee estoit sibien l'office del mesurage des draps laignees, come de canevas, ove fees et commoditees a ycell office appurtenantz, a avoir et excercier deins vostre citee de Loundres et les suburbes d'icelle, l'ou nulle tiel office unqes fuist, ou ascune fee a ycelle regardant; la mesmes ceux as queux les ditz grauntz estoient faitz, de lour propre volunte, par colour des ditz lettres patentz, ount clayme et demaunde un novelle tallage de chescun vendour et achatour de draps laignees, et canevas. C'estassavoir, de chescun vendour d'un draps laignee d'entier longure d'assise obole et de l'achatour obole, et de pluis long draps pluis, et de pluis court meins, solonc l'afferant: et de chescun c alnes del canevas del vendour i d. et de l'achatour i d. et de pluis long pluis, et meindre meins, solonc la nombre des alnes. Et outre, de lour tort demesne, par manace de vie et de membre, d'emprisonement et destresse des biens, ont ils levez des ditz vendours et achatours, denizeins et foreins, aliens et estraunges nemy enfraunchiseez, deins vostre dit citee de Loundres, diverses sommes torcenousement, encountre les estatuitz en temps de voz nobles progenitours au countrarie faitz; par queux est ordeigne, qe nulle taillage ne eide serroit grauntee ne levee saunz assent et consent des seignurs et communes de roialme; come par les ditz estatutz pleinement est declare; et auxi encountre une ordeignance fait l'an de regne le Roy Edward vostre aiel, qe Dieu assoile, vynt et septisme, en quele ordinance, al request des prelatz, ducs, counts, barouns, chivalers, et communes, a soun graund counseil le dit an a Westm' assemblez, relessa les forfaitures des draps laigneez, pur quele relees les ditz seignurs et communes graunterount a vostre dit aiel un subside, a prendre de chescun entier drap laigne vendable, en quel grayn n'est, iiij d. et de demy tiel drap ij d. de chescun entier drap, en quel grayn fuist, v d. et de chescun entier drap de scarlet vi d. Et qe l'alneour du dit vostre aiel eust pur soun [col. b] travail, d'un drap entier obole, et d'un dimy drap quart, del vendour tantsoulement. Issint toutesfoitz, qe apres ce qe l'alneour eust pris subside et alnage pur ascune drap solonc la graunte avauntdite, pluis pur icelle ne soit demaunde, pris, ne receux. (fn. iii-647-247-1) 43. XVIII. Measurement of cloth. The commons declare: whereas recently both by you, most sovereign lord, and by the late King Richard [II], by royal letters patent, at the request of various people for their own profit, it was agreed that both the office which measures woollen cloth and canvas, and the fees and profits pertaining to that office, were to be situated and exercised within your city of London and its suburbs, where no such office has ever been situated, nor any fee concerning this; and the people to whom the said grants were made, at their own will, by authority of the said letters patent, have claimed and demanded a novel tax from each seller and buyer of woollen cloth and canvas: namely, a halfpenny from each seller of a woollen cloth, and a halfpenny from the buyer, for the entire duration of the assize, and more for longer, and less for shorter cloth, proportionately: and for each 100 ells of canvas 1 d. from the seller, and 1 d. from the buyer, and more for a longer and less for a shorter length, according to the number of ells. And moreover, through such unlawful action, by threat of life and limb, of imprisonment and distraint of goods, they have unlawfully levied numeroussums from the said sellers and buyers, denizens and foreigners, unenfranchised aliens and strangers, within your said city of London, contrary to the statutes made in the time of your noble progenitors, by which it is ordained that no tallage or aid should be granted or levied without the agreement and consent of the lords and commons of the realm; as is clearly stated by the said statutes; and also contrary to an ordinance made in the twenty-seventh year of the reign of King Edward [1353], your grandfather, whom God absolve, in which ordinance, at the request of the prelates, dukes, earls, barons, knights and commons at his great council assembled in the said year at Westminster, forfeitures of woollen cloth were relaxed, for which relaxation the said lords and commons granted a subsidy to your said grandfather, to be collected from each whole woollen cloth sold which contains no grain, 4 d., and from half of any such cloth 2 d., and from each whole cloth which contains grain, 5 d., and from each whole cloth of scarlet, 6 d. And it was stated that the alnager of your said grandfather should have for his [col. b] trouble a halfpenny from a whole cloth and a farthing from a half cloth, from the seller only; with the intention that in future the alnager would take the subsidy and alnage on each cloth according to the aforesaid grant, and no more should be demanded, taken, or received. (fn. iii-647-247-1)
Que please a vostre roial mageste, ove l'assente des seignurs de cest present parlement assemblez, ordeigner, qe nulle tiel novelle tallage ou charge soit mys sur les dits draps et canevas, ne sur les vendours n'achatours d'icelle. Et qe tieles lettres patentes ent faitz soient voidez, et tenuz pur nulls. Et qe nulls tieles lettres ent soient faitz en temps avenir. May it please your royal majesty, by the assent of the lords assembled in this present parliament, to ordain that no such novel tax or charge should be imposed on the said cloth and canvas, nor on the sellers or buyers of it. And that any letters patent authorising it should be invalidated and considered null and void. And that no such letters should be made concerning it in future.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit l'estatuit ent fait tenuz et gardez. Let the statute made on this be upheld and maintained.
XIX. < Drapers, etc. > XIX. [Petition of the drapers concerning the measurement of cloth].
44. Supplient humblement les drapers, et les fesours des draps de le roialme d'Engleterre en les parties de west: que please a nostre dit seignur le roy, qe a soun parlement tenuz a Westm' l'an de vostre regne septisme, ordinez estoit et estable, qe les draps du ray tendroient la longure et laeure come en le dit estatuit est contenuz pluis au plein; et qe si les faisours des draps deslors fesoient lour ditz draps de meindre longure ou laieure, qe mesmes les faisours duissent forfaire lour draps queux serroient trovez par l'Alneour de meindre longure ou laeure. Et puis nostre dit seignur le roy, a soun parlement tenuz a Gloucestre, l'an de soun regne ix m , ordeigna et establist, qe les faisours des ditz draps de ray, et les vendours d'icelles, serroient auxi fraunkes en les fesour et vent d'icelles, come ils furent devant le dit parlement le dit an vij me , et qe le dit estatuit fait en mesme le parlement le dit an vij me touchant cest matier serroit de tout cassez et adnullez, ne de nulle force ne value a toutz jours. Et outre ce, nostre dit seignur le roy pardonast en mesme le parlement a les ditz faisours des draps du ray, et les vendours d'icelles, la forfaiture et tout ce qe a luy appartenoiet, ou en ascune manere purront apparteigner, par ycelle encheson. Et puis, par nostre dit seignur le roy a soun parlement tenuz a Westm', l'an de soun regne xi me , ordeigne fuist et establie, qe un novel seal, eiant signe et marche difference de l'auncien seal de l'office de l'alneour, serroit fait et delivere a les alneours; et qe apres qe mesme le seal, ensy de novel fait, serroit delivere as ditz alneours, proclamacion serroit fait overtement en les parties de west, et aillours parmy le roialme, qe nulle persone faisantz draps du ray, et dozeins de ray, ou de colour, de mesmes les parties de west, n'aillours deins le roialme d'Engleterre, serroit si hardy de takker et pliter ensemble teux maneres de draps, devant qe l'alneour ust fait soun serche et soun vewe < duement > d'iceux draps, q'ils tiendroient lour longure et laeure ordeignez par le dit estatuit, le dit an vij me , sur peyne de forfaiture d'icells, et surcertein peyne limite sur l'alneour faisant au contrarie, come en le dit estatut est contenuz pluis au plein. (fn. iii-647-253-1) 44. XIX. Drapers, etc. The request of the drapers and manufacturers of cloth in the western parts of the realm of England: may it please our said lord the king that at his parliament held at Westminster in the seventh year of your reign [1406], it was ordained and established that striped cloth should comply with the length and width which is clearly specified in the said statute; and that if in future the manufacturers of cloth make their said cloth shorter or narrower, that the same manufacturers should forfeit any cloth which has been found by the alnager to be shorter or narrower. Then our said lord the king, at his parliament held at Gloucester, in the ninth year of his reign [1407], ordained and established that manufacturers of the said striped cloth, and sellers of it, should be as free to manufacture and sell it as they were before the said parliament in the said seventh year, and that the said statute touching this matter made in the same parliament in the said seventh year should be totally quashed and annulled, having no force or value forever. Moreover, our said lord the king pardoned in the same parliament the said manufacturers of striped cloth, and the sellers of it, the forfeiture and whatever pertained or might pertain to him in any way on that account. And then it was ordained and established by our said lord the king at his parliament held at Westminster in the eleventh year of his reign [1410], that a new seal, with a different stamp and mark to the old seal of the office of alnager, should be made and delivered to the alnagers; and that after the samenewly-made seal had been delivered to the said alnagers, proclamation should be made publicly in the western counties and elsewhere throughout the realm that no manufacturer of striped cloth, or dozens of striped or coloured cloth, in the same western counties, or elsewhere within the realm of England, should be so bold as to sew and fold together such kinds of cloth, before the alnager had made his due search and view of that cloth, and that they should keep to the length and width ordained by the said statute in the said seventh year; under penalty of forfeiture of it, and on pain of a fixed penalty to be imposed on any alnager acting to the contrary, as is clearly specified in the said statute. (fn. iii-647-253-1)
Que please a nostre dit seignur le roy, considerant les obscurez paroles et ambiguites faitz en les ditz estatutz; et auxi considerant le graund nombre des estatuitz faitz en temps de Edward nadgairs roi d'Engleterre, aiel nostre seignur le roy q'orest, et en temps Richard nadgairs roy second puis le conquest, et en temps nostre seignur le roy q'orest, qe a poy les ditz estatutz sount sy contrariantz, queux purront estre amendez sanz pluis pleyn declaracion d'icelle, par assent des seignurs espirituelx et temporelx en cest present parlement, et par auctorite de mesme le parlement, de pardoner a les ditz suppliantz, et a chescun liege de soun roialme d'Engleterre, tout la forfaiture et peyne, et tout ce qe a nostre dit seignur le roy appartient, ou en chescun manere purra apparteigner par cause ou force des ditz estatutz ou ordinance, ou ascune de eux, touchant les draps de ray. Et enoutre de grauntier et ordeigner en mesme le parlement, par assent suisdite, qe [p. iii-665][col. a] nulle draps de ray soit forfait en temps avenir pur defaute d'assise en laeure, parissint q'il teigne l'assise du laeure de .v. quarters; ne qe les alneours du roialme, ne ascune de eux, rien forfacent, ou forface, ne en ascune peyne encourgent, ou encourge, par cause de ensealer des tielx draps de ray, conteignantz nient pluis en laeure qe l'assise de .v. quarters. Parissint qe les ditz draps de ray conteignent la longure de .xxviij. verges, et de laeure de .v. quarters, come desuis, sur peyne de forfaiture d'icelles. May it please our said lord the king - considering the obscure words and ambiguities in the said statutes; and also considering the large number of statutes made in the time of Edward late king of England, our present lord the king's grandfather, and in the time of the late King Richard the second since the conquest, and in the time of our present lord the king, almost all of which statutes are so contradictory that they ought to be amended without further deliberation - by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal in this present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, to pardon the said supplicants and every liege of his realm of England any forfeiture and penalty, and whatever pertains or might pertain to our said lord the king in any way by reason or force of any of the said statutes or ordinances concerning striped cloth. Moreover, to grant and ordain in the same parliament, by the aforesaid assent, that [p. iii-665][col. a] no striped cloth should be forfeit in future for default of the assize in width, provided that they keep to the assize width of five quarters; nor that any of the alnagers of the realm should forfeit or lose anything, or incur any penalty, as a result of sealing any such striped cloth which measures less than the assize width of five quarters. Provided that the said striped cloth measures twenty-eight rods in length and five quarters in width, as above, under penalty of forfeiture of it.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy voet, qe les estatutz faitz en ce cas l'an septisme, et l'an unzisme de soun regne, soient fermement tenuz et gardez, et mys en due execucion. (fn. iii-647-257-1) Et quant a la pardone affaire par nostre dit seignur le roy, come il est contenuz en la dite peticion, le roy voet ent estre advisez. The king wills that the statutes made on this matter in the seventh and eleventh year of his reign should be firmly kept and maintained and duly enforced. As to the pardon to be made by our said lord the king, as specified in the said petition, the king will consider this further. (fn. iii-647-257-1)
[memb. 2]
XX. < Custumers, etc. > XX. [Appointment of customs officers, etc].
45. Please a nostre tressoveraigne seignur le roy d'ordeigner en cest present parlement, qe toutz maneres des custumeres, countrollours, gaugeours des vynes, et sercheours, queux serrount desore enavaunt faitz en les villes et portes deins le roialme d'Engleterre, soient desore faitz de les pluis sufficeantz gentz, continuelment demurantz et receantz deins mesmes les villes et portes, et nient aillours dehors; et de ce sibien enavauntage de nostre dit seignur le roy, come al ease de merchauntz amesnantz lour biens et merchaundises as ditz villes et portes, queux sount graundement tariez de custumer lour ditz biens et merchaundises, a cause qe les ditz officers sount en diverses longtismes paiis a sercher et querer, ascune foitz n'ount pleyn conusance des biens et merchaundises accustumers al profit du roy. 45. XX. Customs officers, etc. May it please our most sovereign lord the king to ordain in this present parliament that all kinds of customs officers, controllers, gaugers of wine and searchers who henceforth may be appointed in the towns and ports within the realm of England should in future be appointed from the most competent men permanently dwelling and residing in the same towns and ports, and not from anywhere else; and this both for the benefit of our said lord the king, and to help the merchants who bring their goods and merchandise to the said towns and ports, who are greatly delayed in the payment of customs duties on their said goods and merchandise because the said officers are often in distant parts searching and examining, and frequently do not have full knowledge of the goods and merchandise which are to be customed for the profit of the king.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soient tielx officers faitz en manere come il ad estee useez devaunt ces heures; et soient mesmes les officers continuelment recehantz et demurantz sur lour offices, et en especial a temps de les charge et discharge de les niefs et vesselx entrantz les portes d'Engleterre et passantz hors d'icelles; issint qe nulle tiel officer, apres le temps dessuisnomme, soy absent de soun dit office par trois semaignes a pluis, sur peyne deperdre soun dit office, s'il ne soit commaunde et charge en especial de record d'estre en les courtes du roy, ou autrement en service nostre dit seignur le roy de record, come dessuis est dit. (fn. iii-647-264-1) Let such officers be appointed in the same way as it has been done in the past; and let the same officers reside and dwell permanently in their offices, especially at the time of the loading and unloading of boats and vessels entering and leaving the ports of England; so that no such officer, after the aforementioned time, should be absent from his office for more than three weeks, on pain of losing his said office, unless he has been ordered and charged specifically on record to appear in the king's courts or is otherwise in the service of our lord the king as a matter of record, as is said above. (fn. iii-647-264-1)
XXI. < Enquest, etc. > XXI. [Inquest concerning tenements in London].
46. Item, suppliount humblement les communes: qe come un enquest d'office fuist pris devaunt Richard Merlowe, adonqes mair et eschetour de Loundres; par quel enquest fuist trove qe Anneys qe fuist la femme a William atte Mille, jueler, murast seisi de deux mees et deux shoppes ove lour appurtenauncez en la paroche de Seint Michel atte corne, en soun demesne come de fee, sanz heir; par vertue de quel les tenementz furent seisez en les mayns de voz, tresgracious seignur, et par vous grauntez par voz lettres patentz a Philip Briccheford et William Courson a avoir pur terme de lour vies. Par force de quel grant, Johan Swalowe, Thomas Aleyn et Johan Lane, citezeins de Loundres, furent oustez; sur quel ouster les ditz suppliantz viendroient en vostre chauncerie, et monstreront cause sufficeant d'aver restitucion de mesmes les tenementz, come piert pleynement de record en mesme la chauncerie, et avoient brief de scire facias vers les ditz Philip et William direct a les viscountz de Loundres. Les queux Philip et William viendront en la dit chauncerie par garnisement en le dit brief de scire facias, et alleggeront lour estate estre de vostre graunt par voz lettres patentz a terme de lour vies, et prieront aide de vous, le quele fuist graunte. Et commaunde fuist outre as ditz suppliantz, de suer pur avoir brief de procedre avaunt en le dit plee. Sur quele les ditz suppliantz [col. b] pursuerent al gardein de prive seal, pur avoir le dit brief de procedendo, direct a vostre chaunceller d'Engleterre, de outre procedre en le dit plee, come droit et ley demaundount: les queles suppliantz le dit brief ne purront avoir, ne cause resonable a eux monstre pur quoy ils ne duissent le dit brief avoir, a graund retardacion de lour suyt, et disheritesoun des ditz suppliantz. 46. XXI. Inquest, etc. Also, the commons pray that, whereas an ex officio inquest was held before Richard Merlowe, then mayor and escheator of London, by which inquest it was found that Anne, widow of William atte Mill, jeweller, died seised of two houses and two shops with their appurtenances in the parish of St Michael atte Corn, in her demesne as of fee, without heir; by virtue of which the tenements were taken into your hands, most gracious lord, and granted by you by your letters patent to Philip Brichford and William Courson to hold for the term of their lives. By virtue of which grant, John Swallow, Thomas Aleyn and John Lane, citizens of London, were removed; following which removal the said supplicants came into your chancery and showed sufficient reason why they should have restitution of the same tenements, as appears clearly on the record in the same chancery; and they obtained a writ of scire facias against the said Philip and William addressed to the sheriffs of London. Which Philip and William came into the said chancery by summons of the said writ of scire facias, and alleged their estate to be held by your grant by your letters patent for the term of their lives, and requested your help, which was granted. Moreover, the said supplicants were ordered to sue for a writ to proceed further in the said plea. Whereupon the said supplicants [col. b] requested a writ de procedendo from the keeper of the privy seal, addressed to your chancellor of England, and moreover to proceed in the said plea, as right and law require: however, the supplicants were unable to obtain the said writ, nor was lawful reason given to them why they ought not to have the said writ, to the great delay of their suit and the disinheritance of the said supplicants.
Que please a nostre seignur le roy en cest present parlement de commaundre a soun dit gardeyn de prive seal de faire brief de procedendo en la manere suisdit, et en toutz cases semblables, sanz targer d'aucuny; come droit et loie demaundent. May it please our lord the king in this present parliament to order his said keeper of the privy seal to issue a writ de procedendo in the aforesaid manner, and in all similar cases, without any delay; as right and law require.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'advisera. The king will consider this further.
XXII. XXII. [Tolls on the River Severn.]
47. Item, monstrent voz communes, pur les burgeys de les villes de Bristuyt et de Gloucestr', et autres lieges nostre seignur le roy demurantz sur la river de Severne, en le counte de Glouc': qe come le dit river devaunt ces heures ad estee franc a toutz les ditz lieges, de carier et recarier a lour volunte toutz lour merchaundises, biens et chateux par le dit ryver de paiis en autre, et de ville en ville, adjoignauntz al dit ryver, en quele manere qe lour plerra; savant les custumes et autres duetes duez de mesme la ryver a vous, tresgracious seignur; tanqe oretarde, qe certeins persones de les parties de Beaudeley, et de counte de Salop', et Gales, aiantz grosses bateux appellez trowes, eux confederantz, et ensurantz ensemble pur lour singuler profit qe nulle homme n'aueroit ascune passage par les ditz parties ove lour biens et chateux en le dit ryver, sinon q'il voudroit lower les ditz bateux a lour volunte, pur la cariage des ditz biens et chateux par le ryver avantdit; l'ou les ditz lieges, ascunes pur poverte, ascunes pur eschuer outrageous charges, et auxi pur leger cariage, devant ces heures ount fait en les ditz parties du dit ryver certeins dragges autrement appelles flotes, pur carier maeresme, et fuaile, autrement appellez staffeshides et kides,et lour autres biens, a les burgeys et lieges avauntditz, entant qe les < ditz > confederatours, ove autres malefesours disconuz, en la veile de Seint Michel darrein passe, gisantz en agaite pres Beaudeley pur certeins persones du dit ville de Gloucestre, et autres lieges avantditz aiantz tieles dragges et flotes de maresme et fuaile, autrement appelle staffeshides et kides, et d'autres biens illoeqes, pur eux avoir carie au dite ville de Gloucestre, ove graund force et armes pristeront les governours del dit dragge appelle flote, et eux firent de trenchier en peces le dit flote en le dit ryver, ou autrement lour testes serroient illoeqes decoupes. Issint qe tout le maresme et fuaile, autrement appelle staffeshides et kides, et autres biens avauntditz, furent par le dit ryver amesnez et perduz, a graund empoverissement et destruccion de les ditz burgeys et lieges en le dit countee, entant q'ils [n'ont] graund pleinte pres eux de maresme, fuail, autrement appelle staffeshides et kides, et autres biens, d'ent estre carie, come desuis est dit, s'ils encountre tiel riote, confederacie, et male governance n'eient le pluis hastief remedie, eide et socour en cest cas. 47. Also, your commons declare, on behalf of the burgesses of Bristol and Gloucester and the other lieges of our lord the king dwelling on the river Severn in the county of Gloucester: whereas the said river has previously been free to all the said lieges to bring back and forth at will all their merchandise, goods and chattels along the said river from one area to another, and from town to town adjoining the said river, in any way they wished; savingthe customs and other duties due from the same river to you, most gracious lord; recently, however, certain persons from the area of Bewdley, the county of Shropshire, and Wales, who have large boats called trowes, conspired and banded together for their own profit that no man should be allowed passage through the said area with their goods and chattels on the said river, unless they were willing to pay for the said boats to carry their said goods and chattels along the aforesaid river; whereupon the said lieges, some on account of poverty, some in order to avoid these outrageous charges or to secure lighter transports, recently made certain drags, otherwise called floats, in these parts of the said river, in order to carry timber and firewood, otherwise called staffeshides or faggots, and their other goods, to the aforesaid burgesses and lieges; but the said conspirators, with other unknown malefactors, on the eve of Michaelmas last [28 September], lay in wait near Bewdley for various people from the said town of Gloucester and other aforesaid lieges who had such drags and floats of timber and firewood, otherwise called staffeshides or faggots, and other goods there, in order to take them to the said town of Gloucester, and with great force and arms seized the steersmen of the said drag, called a float, and made them cut the said float into pieces in the said river, failing which their heads would be cut off there. So that all the timber and firewood, otherwise called staffeshides or faggots, and the other aforesaid goods fell into the said river and were lost, to the great impoverishment and destruction of the said burgesses and lieges in the said county; for there will be a severe shortage of timber or firewood, otherwise called staffeshides or faggots, and other goods, to be carried there in the aforesaid fashion, unless they have a speedy remedy, help and protection in this matter against such rioting, conspiracy, and wrongdoing.
Please a vostre tresgracious seignurie de considerer l'orrible et heynous mieschief avantdit, qe serroit suffert pur singuler profit de duzse ou vynt persones, qe Dieu defend. Et auxi de considerer, qe en temps de este nulles tiels bateux pur la menouste de eawe ne purront passer par le dit river ove cariage, de socorer ou aider les ditz burgeys et lieges en le dit counte, et d'ent ordiner, qe les ditz burgeys et lieges desorenavant purront aver sauf condite et passage ove lour maeresme et fuaile, et autres lour biens, sanz interrupcion, distourbance, ou impediment d'ascuny, a les villes et countees avauntditz, par dragges et flotes, ou par autre cariage a lour volunte, par tout le ryver avauntdit. Et ceo sur peyne de chescuny persone fesant [p. iii-666][col. a] come desuis est dit, de paier a vous tressoveraigne seignur cli. en cas q'il soit ent duement convict; et sur peyne de chescuny autere persone, de quel estat ou condicion q'il soit, destourbant desorenavaunt aucuny des ditz burgeys et lieges en le dit ryver, issint q'il ne poet aver salve passage et conducte ove bateux, dragges, et flotes, ou ove un de eux, a lour volunte, parmy tout le dit ryver, ove lour merchandises et chateux a les counte et villes avauntditz, depardre a vous, tresgracious seignur, xl li. et auxi a partie ent greve ses damages a treble, queux il suffert pur la cause avauntdit, solonc vostre discrecion; en plein punissement de tieux malveys riotes et ensamples par toutz les autres ryvers fraunkes deins le roialme d'Engleterre et Gales. May it please your most gracious lordship to consider the aforesaid dreadful and heinous wrong, which has been committed for the individual profit of twelve or twenty persons, which God forbid. And also to consider that in summer-time, for lack of water, such boats with loads are unable to pass along the river; and therefore to help and aid the said burgesses and lieges in the said county by ordaining that henceforth the said burgesses and lieges should be able to have safe-conduct and passage with their timber and firewood, and their other goods, without any interference, hindrance or impediment, to the aforesaid towns and counties, using drags and floats or other kinds of carriage as they wish, along all the aforesaid river. And this on pain from each person acting in the abovesaid manner of [p. iii-666][col. a] paying £100 to you, most sovereign lord, in cases where they are duly convicted; and on pain from each other person, of whatever estate or condition he may be, who hinders any of the said burgesses and lieges on the river henceforth with the result that they are unable to have safe-passage and conduct with any boats, drags and floats, at their will, along all the said river, with their merchandise and chattels to the aforesaid counties and towns, to lose £40 to you, most gracious lord, and also to pay the injured party three times the damages which he suffers for the aforesaid reason, according to your discretion; and severe punishment also for such evil lawlessness and behaviour along all the other free rivers within the realm of England and Wales.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit fait come ad este usez devant ces heures. Let it be done as it has been accustomed to be done in the past.
XXIII. < Viscounts, etc. > XXIII. [Arrest of Welsh rebels and their kin].
48. Item, priont les communes: qe please a nostre seignur le roy d'ordeigner, et sur graund peyne charger, les viscountes, seneschal, et lieutenantz de chescun seignurie de Gales, de prender et arester les proscheins parentz et cosyns de sank de toutz les rebelles qe enavaunt preignont, robbent, ou raunsonent ascunes de ses lieges, et eux garder sanz deliverance faire jesqes les ditz prisoners et lieges ensy prises, robbes, ou raunsonez, soient deliverez, ove lour biens, costages, et expens; a cause qe les grandes maintenance et supportacion qe les ditz rebelles avount par lour ditz parentz, cosyns, et alliance, fount eux a demurer en lour rebellion, saunz pees ou grace clamer ou desirer. 48. XXIII. Sheriffs, etc. Also, the commons pray that it may please our lord the king to order and charge under severe penalty the sheriffs, steward, and lieutenants from each lordship in Wales to take and arrest the near relations and kinsmen of any rebels who formerly seized, robbed or ransomed any of his lieges, and to keep them without release until the said prisoners and lieges thus seized, robbed or ransomed are set free with their goods, costs and expenses; because, through the great maintenance and support that the said rebels receive from their family, kinsmen, and relatives, they allow them to maintain their rebellion, without peace or mercy being proclaimed or sought.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy s'advisera. The king will consider this further.
XXIIII. < Attournes, etc. > XXIIII. [Numbers of attorneys].
49. Item, supplient humblement les clerkes, et attournes de l'un bank et de l'autre, qe come a le parlement nostre seignur le roy a Westm' darrein tenuz, ses communes monstrerent, qe graund et grevous compleint fuist a eux fait par diverses gentz des plusours countees d'Engleterre, a cause de graund multitud des attournes deins les courts nostre dit seignur le roy esteantz, diverses errours, deceites, et injuries furent faitz de jour en autre en les ditz courtees, et extorceons, dispenses, et graundes perdes as diverses lieges nostre dit seignur le roy deins soun roialme, a graund damage et esclaundre des ditz courts, et empoverissement des ditz lieges si sufficeant remedie ne soit ent ordeine en le dit parlement. 49. XXIIII. attorneys, etc. Also, the request of the clerks and attorneys of the one bench and the other: whereas at the parliament of our lord the king last held at Westminster [1410], his commons declared that great and grievous complaint had been made to them by several people from various counties of England that: - Because of the great number of attorneys in the courts of our said lord the king, various errors, deceits and injuries were made daily in the said courts, and extortions, expenses and large losses incurred by various lieges of our lord the king within his realm, to the great damage and ill-repute of the said courts and the impoverishment of the said lieges, unless an adequate remedy was ordained on this in the said parliament.
Plerroit a sa roial mageste de commaundre a ses justices sibien de l'un bank come de l'autre, d'appeller devant eux toutz attournes q'avoient riens affaire devaunt eux en les courtes suisditz, et par due et loial examinacioun eux examiner. Et si ascuns de eux puissent estre trovez devant les ditz justices coupables en [col. b] ascune des pointes avauntditz, qe les ditz justices eux toutoutrement ousterent des ditz courtes pur toutz jours; et d'eslier de novelle de les pluis sufficeantz et loialx attournes, d'ascune counte .vi., d'ascune counte .viij., d'ascune counte .x., et d'ascune counte .xij. solonqe la quantite du counte, et nient plusours. Et qe ceux issint esluez de novelle, soient jurez devaunt les ditz justices d'an en an, et de terme en terme, d'estre foialx et loialx au nostre dit seignur le roy, et de fere droit et loialte a sez ditz lieges, en toutz cases q'ils averont affaire en ses ditz courtes. Et si ascune des ditz attournes issint [memb. 1] esluz fuisse trove coupable en ascune des pointes avauntditz en temps avenir; ou si ascune autre forsqe les ditz attournes par les ditz justices issint eslutz, soy entremelle, ou preigne sur luy ascune suyt deins les ditz courtes, adonqes serroit pris, et averoit emprisonement d'un an et ferroit raunceon a la volunte du roy. Et outre ce ordeiner par estatut, qe nulle filacer de l'un banc ne de l'autre, ne prenotorie, serroit attourne. A quel peticion nostre seignur le roy respondust, qe touchant la nombre, et la charge de serement des attournes, ovesqe la peyne compris deins la dit peticion, il la voilloit. Savez toutesfoitz qe les filacers et prenotaries purroient estre, et serroient, attournes, come ils ount estee devaunt ces heures. Et si les ditz filacers, ou prenotories, serroient trovez en defaute en temps avenir encountre la forme de la dit peticion, q'ils averoient la double peyne d'emprisonement de les ditz attournes, compris en mesme cest peticion; et outre ce ferroient fyne et raunceon a la volunte le roy. Les queux peticion et responce s'ils soient enactez par la manere avauntdite pur estatut, et mys en execucion, sount si grevousez, emportablez, et impossiblez, q'ils ne puissent estre eschuez. (fn. iii-647-288-1) May it please his royal majesty to order his justices both of one bench and the other to call before them all attorneys who have no business before them in the aforesaid courts, and examine them by due and faithful examination. And if any of them should be found to be guilty before the said justices on [col. b] any of the aforesaid points, then the said justices should entirely remove them from the said courts forever, and choose anew from the most competent and loyal attorneys, eight from one county, ten from another county, and twelve from another county, according to the size of the county, and no more. And that those thus newly chosen should be sworn before the said justices each year and each term to be faithful and loyal to our said lord the king, and to act justly and loyally to his said lieges in all cases which they will have to deal with in the said courts. And if any of the said attorneys thus [memb. 1] selected is found guilty on any of the aforesaid points in future, or if any person other than the said attorneys thus chosen by the said justices, meddles in or takes upon himself any suit in the said courts, then he should be arrested, and suffer imprisonment for a year, and make ransom at the king's will. Moreover, to ordain by statute, that no filazer from one bench or the other, nor protonotary, should be an attorney. - To which petition our lord the king replied that concering the number, and the requirement for an oath from the attorneys, with the penalty specified in the said petition, he wills it. Saving forever that filazers or protonotaries should be able to be, and can be, attorneys, as they have been in the past. And if the said filazers or protonotaries are found to be at fault by the terms of the said petition in future, they should incur double the penalty of imprisonment specified for the said attorneys in this same petition; and moreover they should make fine and ransom at the king's will. (fn. iii-647-288-1) Which petition and reply if they are enacted by statute in the aforesaid manner, and duly enforced, will be so harmful, unbearable, and impossible, that they will be unable to be adhered to.
Que please a vostre gracious seignurie de considerer les importables et impossibles pointz de la dite peticion, les queux ne gisent pas en poair de nulluy homme de garder saunz offence; et surce grauntier as ditz suppliantz, qe la dite peticion, a lour request en ycest present parlement soit modifie par vous, nostre tresgracious seignur le roy, par advys de voz justices. Purveu toutesfoitz, qe pur fauxceyn et deceytz faitz de purpos, la dite peticion estoise en saforce; pur Dieu, et en oevere du charitee. May it please your most gracious lordship to consider the intolerable and unenforceable points in the said petition, which do not lie within the power of any man to keep without contravention; and thereupon to grant to the said supplicants that the said petition, at their request in this present parliament, should be modified by you, our most gracious lord the king, with the advice of your justices. Provided always that in cases of deliberate fraud and deceit the said petition should remain in force; for God, and by way of charity.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit la peyne comprise en cest peticion touchant les prenotaries et les filacers myse en suspense tanqe a proschein parlement. Et en le mesne temps, soient les justices de l'un banc et de l'autre chargez d'entrecomer de la matire comprise en mesme la peticion, et des diverses autres mieschiefs esteantz en les officers et ministres sibien en l'un bank come en l'autre, par entry cy et le proschein parlement; et en mesme celle parlement faire report de lour advys en celle partie. Let the penalty specified in this petition concerning the protonotaries and filazers be put in abeyance until the next parliament. And in the meantime let the justices of the one bench and the other be charged to discuss the matter specified in the same petition and the various other problems which exist with the officers and ministers both of the one bench and the other, between now and the next parliament; and let them report in that parliament concerning their advice on this matter.

Appendix 1411

3 November 1411

Westminster

1

General Pardon

Proclamation by the king, 'of his reverence for God, and at the special request of the lords spiritual and temporal and of the commons in the last parliament', of a general pardon to all his subjects for all crimes including treason committed before 19 December, with certain named exceptions; provided that they sue for charters of pardon before Midsummer 1412. By the king of his grace in parliament. Dated 22 December 1411 at Westminster.

Source : CCR 1409-13 , 311.

2

Statute of Riots

Cap. vii of the Statute Roll for this parliament is the 1411 Statute of Riots, which, unusually, does not appear to have been based on a petition presented by the commons. It is possible, however, that it was issued as a response to the petition submitted by Lord Roos of Helmsley against the king's justice Robert Tirwhit, which was discussed in this parliament and determined by a commission of arbitration set up in parliament (items 12-14 on the roll).

The statute placed the responsibility for dealing with any 'riot, assembly, or rout of people' on the justices of the peace and the sheriff or deputy sheriff of the shire. They were given the power to convict offenders in the same manner as specified in the statute on forcible entries of 1391 ( SR , II.78, c. ii), and the statute of riots of 1394 ( SR , II.89, c. viii). If they failed to apprehend the offenders, their record on the case, when submitted to the king and council, would be regarded as the equivalent of that of a jury of presentment. Offenders who refused to surrender themselves would automatically be regarded as convicted, and punishment would be at the discretion of the king and council. Sheriffs and justices of the peace who failed to enforce the statute would be liable for a fine of £100 to the king.

Source : SR , II.169 (c. vii).

3

Cap. vi of the statute roll for this parliament is a re-affirmation of the 1410 statute banning galley-halfpennies ( SR , II.163, c. v) and all other previous statutes relating to Scottish and other foreign money. Once again, this does not appear to be based on a petition presented by the commons.

Source : SR , II.168 (c. vi).

4

Pardon to Henry Savage, 'at the supplication of the commons of the last parliament', of £92 which he collected in taxes for the king in Oxfordshire but of which he was robbed. By privy seal. Dated 24 December 1411 at Westminster.

Source : CPR 1408-13 , 360.

Footnotes

  • f1411int-1. See Appendix, items 1-3.
  • f1411int-2. The wardrobe's expenses declined to an annual average of £17,110 in 1410-11, having never been below £20,000 before 1409: Given-Wilson, Royal Household , 271-2; Steel, Receipt of the Exchequer , 99-101.
  • f1411int-3. Great Chronicle of London , 90.
  • f1411int-4. McFarlane, Lancastrian kings , 108; Kirby, Henry IV , 235-8; Wylie, Henry IV , IV.58.
  • f1411int-5. The decision to hold a parliament had been taken as early as 28 August: Wylie, Henry IV , IV.41.
  • f1411int-6. HOC , I.225-9.
  • f1411int-7. CPR 1408-13 , 346. The letters patent are recited on the roll.
  • f1411int-8. 'non poterat circa honorem et utilitatem regni ulterius laborare': Incerti Scriptoris Chronicon Angliae , ed. J. A. Giles (London, 1848), 63.
  • f1411int-9. Eulogium Historiarum , iii.420-1. It is worth remembering that this author's chronology is often very confused, as his facts can also be: the 'leprosy' is almost certainly incorrect, and the journey around England certainly is.
  • f1411int-10. Parliament of 1426, item 12..
  • f1411int-11. The Eulogium Historiarum , III.421, noted nothing more than the details of the land tax; The St Albans Chronicle , 61, simply mentioned that a parliament was held, but gives no details.
  • f1411int-12. Kirby, Henry IV , 236. Prince Henry later compensated Courtenay with the first bishopric to fall vacant after he became king, that of Norwich in June 1413.
  • f1411int-13. Kirby, Henry IV , 240-1. As with the 1404 income tax, it was also stipulated that no member of parliament should be appointed as a collector, receiver or assessor of the tax.
  • f1411int-14. Wylie, Henry IV , IV.44-9.
  • f1411int-15. Great Chronicle of London , 90
  • f1411int-16. Wylie, Henry IV , IV.51. This was Arundel's fifth and final term as chancellor.
  • f1411int-17. Kirby, 'Councils and councillors of Henry IV', 35-65.
  • f1411int-18. Peter McNiven, 'Prince Henry and the English political crisis of 1412', History , 65 (1980), 1-16.
  • f1411int-19. The only noteworthy changes in the list of summonses to the lords were (1) the exclusion of the abbot of Shrewsbury from the lords spiritual; (2) the addition to the lords temporal of Thomas Dacre of Gilsland, born in 1387, whose father Thomas had died in 1399, and William Botreaux, born in 1389, whose father, also William, had died in 1395.
  • f1411int-20. They later complained that because the parliament was never opened, they had been obliged to remain in London at their own expense, and asked Henry V to reimburse them (Parliament of 1413, item 26).
  • iii-647-7-1. CPR 1408-13 , 346
  • iii-647-41-1. CPR 1408-13 , 378-81
  • iii-647-73-1. CPR 1408-13 , 358
  • iii-647-79-1. CPR 1408-13 , 351
  • iii-647-85-1. CPR 1408-13 , 353
  • iii-647-91-1. CPR 1408-13 , 371
  • iii-647-102-1. CPR 1408-13 , 362
  • iii-647-106-1. SR , II.136-7 (c. xii)
  • iii-647-131-1. SR , II.166 (c. i)
  • iii-647-134-1. SR , I.255 (c. iv); II.114-5 (c. xi)
  • iii-647-186-1. SR , II.36 (c. ii)
  • iii-647-189-1. SR , II.166-7 (c. ii)
  • iii-647-209-1. SR , II.3 (c. vii); ii.113-4 (c. vii)
  • iii-647-212-1. SR , II.167 (c. iii)
  • iii-647-247-1. SR , I.330-1 (c. iv)
  • iii-647-253-1. SR , II.154 (c. x); II.160 (c. vi); II.163-5 (c. vi)
  • iii-647-257-1. SR , II.168 (c. v)
  • iii-647-264-1. SR , II.168 (c. v)
  • iii-647-288-1. Parliament of 1410, item 63