Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1731

Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799.

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'Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1731', in Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799, (, ) pp. . British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/westminster/1731 [accessed 24 April 2024]

In this section

The churchwardens and surveyors of the highways of St George Hanover Square. WJ/SP/1731/04/008 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920010

To the right worshipfull his majestys justices
of the peace at their generall quarter sessions
assembled att Westminster

The humble petition of the church wardens
and surveyors of the highways of the parish of Saint George
Hanover Square

Sheweth
that the surveyors of the highways
of the said parish of Saint George Hanover Square for the
year last past have not made up and passed their
accounts relating to their said office as the law
directs in such cases.

Your petioners therefore humbly pray
your worships will be pleased to make
such order for the said surveyors to
pass their accounts as to your worships
shall seem meet

  • George Carpenter}
  • Cecill Wray} church wardens

  • Robert Owen
  • William Campbell} surveyors

The churchwardens and surveyors of the highways of St Anne Westminster. WJ/SP/1731/04 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920012

To the worshipfull his majesty's justices of the
peace for the city and liberty of Westminster at their general quarter sessions
of the peace for the said city and liberty at Westminster assembled

The humble petition of the churchwardens
and surveyors of the highways of the parish
of Saint Ann within the liberty of Westminster

Sheweth
that the highways and pavements to be amended and
[repaired?] by the said parish of Saint Ann are at present so
faulty and broken that they [cannot?] sufficiently be amended
[and repaired?] for [illegible] the feast of the birth
[of our Lord?] [illegible] than the expence
of [illegible] [pounds?]

[Wherefore?] [illegible] pray this
worshippful court to make such order therein
[for?] [illegible] [the?] inhabitants of the said
[parish?] [illegible] by the statute
[in that case provided?]

The churchwardens and surveyors of the highways of St George Hanover Square. WJ/SP/1731/04/010 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920013

To the right worshipfull his majestys justices
of the peace in their generall quarter sessions assembled att
Westminster.

The humble petition of the church wardens and surveyors of the highways
of the parish of Saint George Hanover Square in the liberty of Westminster and county
of Middlesex.

Sheweth
that the comon highways causeys and pavements to
[be?] repaired by the said parish are now so broken and out of repair that they
cannot be sufficiently amended and repaired for this present year
commencing from Christmas last att less charge than four hundred
pounds and upwards which may be raised by a rate of three pence
in the pound upon the inhabitants owners and occupiers of
lands houses tenements and hereditaments within the said parish

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray your
worships to grant your petitioners an order of this
court to enable your petitioners to make an assessment
of three pence in the pound upon all and every
the inhabitants of the said parish for repairing
the said highways causeys and pavements as by the
statute in that behalf made and provided

And your petitioners shall ever pray

John Sherwin. WJ/SP/1731/04/011 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920015

To the worshipfull,
the bench of justices; for the citty, and liberty, of Westminster

The humble petition, of John Sherwin.

Sheweth
that your petitioner, was (unknown to him) indicted in
Kent the last Rochester assizes, for reciting a false and scandelous
libel; reflecting on one William Silver (innkeeper of Gravesend)
and having a warrant served on him, from under the hand and seal of the
right honourable my Lord Cheif Justice Raymond; and carried before Jacob
Delamott Blagney esquire, one of his majesty's justices of the peace
for the citty and liberty of Westminster; was by his worship committed
to the Gate House and have continued ever since the seventeenth of
April last, not being able to give in bail; by the contrivances of
an attorney (which the said William Silver have imployed) who made
it his business, (after notice given) to goe to the friends of your petitioner
and acquant them; it was of dangerous consequence: and to others; preten-
ding they could not be found, which your petitioner can prove; either him=
self, or some other for him; have been and spoke with them, that would
have been sureties, for your petitioner, and them; that were substantial
house keepers, and free holders.

That the aforesaid William Silver, have taken no care to move
your petitioner, this last Maidstone assizes, to take his trial; he knowing
that your petitioner can prove the said book (which he calls a libel) to be your
petitioner true (but unhappy) case: it being dedicated to his majesty
and presented into his royal hand, to implore his most gracious pro-
tection, against the severest oppressions and wrongs, which ought not
to goe unpunished, by the laws of God and man.

That what the afore said William Silver have acted (by [prosecut?]
ing a bill of indictment in Kent, against your petitioner for that which was
printed, published, and sold in Middlesex,) is to [screen?] himself in his
vile actions which he have committed, and to ruin your petitioner (which
he have done already) with the assistance of his mony: and by keep=
ing your petitioner in goal, thinking by those unjust proceeding, to put
it quite out of your petitioners power ever to help himself, and for fear; he
should find some means or other, to bring him; the said William Silver
to justice.

That your petitioners wife; have been down at Maidstone
with a petition; from your petitioner to the right honourable my Lord Cheif
Justice Eyres, and the honourable Master [Barron?] Thompson, being [baked?]; by
a letter from the right honourable the Earl of Essex: and their lordships
was so pleased, to send orders to your petitioner to petition; the worshipful
justice's, for the citty, and liberty, of Westminster, whose care it was
to order your petitioner, to be set at liberty.

Your petitioner, most humbly prays; that your
worships be so pleased, out of the innate goodness, and
human compassion, to take your petitioners case, into your
wise consideration: and for the sake of God, and his poor
family, (which is your petitioner, his wife, and five children)
to discharge your petitioner out of goal, from his
long confinement, and not suffer him to perish, while
his family is starving at home: your petitioner
being quite reduced by the horrible contrivances; of
the aforesaid William Silver, who works all ways and
means, for your petitioners destruction; and now lies in a
very bad state of health, and with other misfortunes; of
his being sick, and lame, upwards of four years, and now,
is drove to the last extremity, and must inevitably
perish, without speedy redemtion, or any other releif; as
to your worships; thinks most meet.

And your petitioner; as in duty bound, shall ever pray etc.

Mathew Laney. WJ/SP/1731/04/012 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920016

To the honourable Sir John Gonson knight and the
worshipfull bench of justices now sitting
in Westminster Hall

the humble peticion of Mathew
Laney

Sheweth
that your petitioner was committed to the Gate
house on the 12th. day of February last being charged on the oath of John Hyatt
a tipstaffe for aiding and assisting in the rescue of one Mary Harvey [alias Mackay?]
where he has continued ever since in a very miserable manner being almost
famished for want of naturall subsistance

That your petitioner has a wife and four small children whose chiefe support
depended on your petitioners labour and industry, and by your petitioners confinement are
now reduced to the shocking view of [craving?] want and misery and must inevitably
perish unless your worships are pleased to enlarge your petitioner

That your petitioner was committed upon suspicion only and those who swore
the suspicion against him are now fully convinced that he was no way concerned in
the aforesaid rescue.

May it therefore please your worships to take
your petitioners case into your consideration, and to order
the said John Hyatt and Michael Gore (the in=
former) to attend on your worships in order to be sa=
tisfyed of the truth of this peticion or to grant the
petitioner such other reliefe as to your worship's great
wisdom shall seem meet

And your petitioner will ever pray etc

Mary Fedden. WJ/SP/1731/04/013 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920017

To the worshipfull,
the bench of justice's, for the city and liberty of Westminster
The humble petition, of Mary Fedden.

Sheweth;
that your petitioner, is indicted; and stands
charged with keeping a disorderly house, in Eagle Court
in the Strand; in the parish of Saint Martains in the Fields

That your petitioner, acknowledges that she, and her
husband keept the afore said house, but with no other intent
but to get an honest livelyhood, being poor people.

That your petitioner, and her husband could not hinder
persons to come into their house, to called for what they
pleased without giving offence, and likewise must acknolidge,
were not willing to turn money away, it being very hard
to come by.

That your petitioner, never keep't any late hours
except by chance, and that not exceeding eleven, or twelve
a clock, and that but very seldome, and are not the
people as is represented to your worships.

Your petitioner, most humbly
pray your worships, to take this into
your wise consideration, and begs upon her
knees; to take pitty on a young couple that
were realy ignorant, and will for the future
take care, how they offend the laws: and
implores your worships, out of your innate
goodness, and extensive charity, in human
compassion to forgive me; and ask God, the
King, and your worships pardon in what
is laid to my charge, and for time to come,
will always behave our selves, as becometh
true, faithfull, and quitet subjects etc.

And your petitioner as in duty bound, shall ever pray etc.

  • Mary Fedden

Mary Fedden. WJ/SP/1731/04/014 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920018

To Sir John Gonson knight

The humble petition of Mary Fedden

Sheweth
that your petitioner was yesterday found guilty
of an indictment for keeping a disorderly house in
Eagle Court in the Strand, that as your petitioners
conviction appeared to be intirely owing to the spiteful
evidence of some lodgers of your petitioners and
some neighbours your petitioner had the misfortune
to have differed with during the time she kept the said
house, that your petitioner had nothing charged upon her
but by hear say

Therefore humbly hopes that your honour will be
pleased, according to your wonted goodness, and as a
confermation of the good opinion the world has so
justly harboured of your justice and impartiality, to
recommend your petitioner to the honourable bench,
and prays that your endeavours may not be wanting
to mitigate her punishment in proportion to the
weakness of the evidence, your petitioner having
never been privy to any disorders, charged to have been
committed in her said house

And as in duty bound your petitioner shall ever pray etc

James Spencer. WJ/SP/1731/04/015 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653920019

To the worshipfull bench of justice's, for the citty, and liberty of Westminster
The humble petition of James Spencer.

Sheweth;
that your petitioner, was taken with a warrant, for
assulting one Laurence Campbel, and committed to the Gatehouse;
but got his inlargement, by giving bail, to answer his complaint
the last quarter sessions of the peace.

That your petitioner was indicted at the said sessions, by the
afore said Laurence Cambpel, and taken with a bench warrant,
and committed again to the Gatehouse, where your petitioner now
lies confined, for want of sureties.

That your petitioner acknowledges; that he did give the said
Laurence Cambpel, a strok over the fingers, with a smal twig
your petitioner had then in his hand, for being impudent, and for
swearing, with other unseemly words, and expressions; and
vile action, not becoming him to speak to men, he being
a shoo boy, about fiftheen or sixtheen years old, but
put on; by one Disney an Irish man who [pretends?]
he his an attorney, prompts and incouriages, and
supplyes the said said Laurance Cambpel, with mony,
and want's one guinea, of your petitioner to make it up;

That your petitioner have given notice, to the afore said
Laurence Cambpel, and his attorney (has he calls
himself) that this day your petitioner will plead guilty,
to the afore said indictment, or againt any other
complaints, made by them etc.

Your petitioner, most humbly pray
that your worship, would be so pleased
to take your petitioner case, into your
wise consideration, and order your petitioner
to be brought before your worships this
day, that he may plead guilty, to the
indictment prefered against him, which
your petitioner begs you would be pleasd to
enquire into, to see that your petitioner have justice,
according as to your wisdoms, think
most meet.

And your petitioner as in duty, bound; shall ever pray.

John Ainsworth. WJ/SP/1731/07/004 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653930004

To the worshipful his majesties justices of the peace for
the city and liberty of Westminster assembled at the
general quarter sessions of the peace

The humble petition of John Ainsworth

Sheweth
that your petitioner his wife and three sons obtained a legal settlement
in the parish of Saint Leonards Foster Lane your petitioner having been with
his said family an householder in the liberty of Saint Martins Le Grand
within the said parish for the space of two years and paid twelve pounds per annum
rent

That your petitioner with his said family for his convenience about two
years since removed into the parish of Christ Church in the county of Surry
the officers of which parish have required and insisted that your petitioner
should procure a certificate that he and his said family had a legal settlement elsewhere
or in default thereof threatned to remove them out of the said parish which if
effected would tend to his great prejudice

That your petitioner in March last applyed to George Scarlett a
constable in Saint Martins Le Grand who went to Edmund Brookes clerk to
Thomas Gouge esquire justice of the peace for the city and liberty of Westminster and county
of Middlesex who prepared such certificate and was paid for the same by your
petitioner as was also the said Scarlet for his trouble and they both saw Humphrey
Child and James Monk churchwardens and John Margary overseer of the poor of
the said parish of Saint Leonards Foster Lane sett their hands and seals thereto which
they did being well satisfyed that your petitioner and his said family had their last
legall settlement in the said parish

That your petitioners wife hath had a great deal of trouble besides charge and
expence to obtain such certificate

That although such certificate is true and as compleat as is required by law
as to the partyes signeing the same yet the said Brookes by the order of the said
Justice Gouge as your petitioner is ready to prove upon oath refuses to attest the
signeing and sealing the said certificate as by law is required without any just
reason that can be given by the said Justice Gouge for such his orders to his said
servant and the said Scarlett refuses to attest the said certificate or make oath
thereof till the said Brookes hath attested the same

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays your worships
that the said Brookes and Scarlet may be ordered to attend
your worships at this general quarter sessions of the
peace to answer your petitioners complaint and further
to do as this court shall direct

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

  • John Ainsworth

William Hancock, Elizabeth his wife and Henry Hancock their son. WJ/SP/1731/07/005 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653930006

To the honourable Sir John Gonson
and the rest of the honourable the
bench of justices.

The humble petition of
William Hancock Elizabeth his wife
and Henry Hancock their son.

Humbly sheweth.
that your petitioner Henry Hancock was
on the first day of May 1729 bound apprentice to Edward Bevan
bricklayer for seven years from thence next ensuing and that your
petitioner did faithfully serve his said master untill [said?] master left his
house and business in towne and retired somewhere to your petitioner
unknown and afterwards in expectation of his return with his wife
untill such time [as by said?] wife turned out of doors and bid to take care of
himself for that her husband Edward Bevan nor she neither could nor
would take any [further?] care of your petitioner as an apprentice.

And that your petitioner William Hancock who is a
poor sickley man gave said Bevan a bond that his said son should serve
out his time [and to?] [illegible] him in [nesessary?] apparell during said time, all
which they were [ready?] and willing on their parts (as they had hitherto) to
continue to convey with. But by said Bevans leaving and turning him
off as aforesaid is unable so to do with said Bevan and unless discharged
cannot get his bread with any other master.

Wherefore your petitioners most
humbly pray in consideration of their unhappy
circumstances that they may be respectively
relieved the father from his bond and the son
from [his?] indentures aforesaid, so that he may be
[discharged?] therefrom and at liberty to get another
master. And your petitioners shall
ever pray etc.

  • Henry Williams

Robert Cotes of St Mary Lestrand in this liberty, apothecary. WJ/SP/1731/10/004 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653940004

To the right worshipfull the chairman and other his majesties
justices of the peace for the city and liberty of Westminster in their
general quarter sessions of the peace assembled

The humble peticion of Robert Cotes of the parish
of Saint Mary Lestrand in this liberty apothecary

Most humbly sheweth
that your peticioner did by an indenture bearing date the 26th.
day of Febuary 1730 take one Anthony Carrafa to be an
apprentice to learn the art and mistry of an apothecary that
during the time the said Carrafa hath served your petitioner
as such apprentice he hath behaved himself as an idle and
disorderly aprentice and hath assaulted beat and bruised
year peticioner in a violent manner and hath done other great
wronges to your petitioner

Your petitioner haveing caused the said Carraffa to
be bound over to this present quarter sessions to answer
your petitioners said complaint

Therefore your petitioner humbly beggs this court to
order and appoint a day when the matters may be
heard before this court and that this court will
be pleased to punish the said apprentice and releive
your petitioner in the premisses as to this court shall
seem meet

And your petitioner shall for ever pray etc.

  • Robert Coles

Jervace Thornton of Theiving Lane Westminster, victualer. WJ/SP/1731/10/005 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653940006

To the worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace for
the city and liberty of Westminster in quarter
sessions (by adjournment) assembled.

The humble petition of Jervace Thornton of
Theiving Lane Westminster victualer.

Sheweth
that your petitioner was bound over on the fourteenth
day of October one thousand seven hundred and thirty
to appear at the next general quarter sessions of the
peace then next following to prosecute one Bethia
Kenworthy for feloniously stealing from him a
pewter plate of the value of six pence or thereabouts.

That your petitioners memory very often failing him
he forgott to appear at the said sessions, for which
neglect he hath had notice given him that the said
recognizance will be estreated.

That your petitioners said neglect was not any
ways willfull (of which he is now ready and willing
to make oath)

He therefore most humbly prays
your worships to consider him as an
infirm man which is truly the case
and to grant him releif in the
premisses as your worships shall
think fitt.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

  • Jarvis Thornton

John Fisher of St Margarets Westminster, plumber. WJ/SP/1731/10/006 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653940007

Westminster

To the honourable chairman and the rest of the worshipfull
justices of the peace for the city and liberty of Westminster in their
general quarter sessions assembled

The humble petition of John Fisher of Saint Margerets
Westminster plumber

Most humbly sheweth
That your petitioner being very well acquainted
with one Robert Burges of the parish of Saint Margaretts Westminster
bricklayer did at his request before John Trevannion esquire one
of his majestys justices of the peace to the liberty aforesaid for did
become bail for the personall appearance of him the said Burgess to
appear in April sessions last to answer the complaint of John
Marsh for an assault and that at the said sessions a bill of
indictment was found against him for the said assault and
he the said Robert Burgess did thereupon put in bail to
appear and plead to the said indictment in July sessions following
which your petitioner ignorantly thought was a sufficient
discharge to him but being since informed to the contrary
most humbly prays that this honourable court woud be pleased
to respite the recognizance in which he stands bound
untill the next sessions or as your honours shall think proper
the said Burgess being now in custody of one Francis Chase
an officer to the sherriff of Middlesex by virtue of a an action
issued out of his majesty's court of Kings Bench at the suit
of Rebecca Marsh for trover and conversion of severall
bank notes to the value of nine hundred and twenty
pounds

And your petitioner for such favour shall
ever pray

  • John Fisher

Patrick Russell, minister, Jonas Clifton and 19 other inhabitants of Westminster. WJ/SP/1731/10/008 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653940009

To the worshipfull the chairman and other his majesties justices of
the peace for the city and liberty of Westminster in their generall quarter
sessions of the peace assembled

The humble petition of the shop keepers tradesmen and
inhabitants in and about Russell Street Drury Lane
and other parts adjoyning in the said liberty of Westminster
whose names are hereunder subscribed

Most humbly sheweth
that at the generall quarter sessions of the peace held
for the said city and liberty in June last your petitioners did by their petition
to this court sett forth that severall lewd and disolute persons took
up their residence in the neighbourhood adjoyning to your petitioners in and
about Russell Street and Drury Lane where great disorders and outcrys
in the night fighting robberies and all sorts of debauchery were committed
there to the great disturbance of your petitioners and the rest of the
neighbours and that your petitioners should be obliged to their great
damage to quit their habitations for the sake of their quiet and to
prevent their children and servants being currupted by those wicked
wretches if some speedy means were not used to suppress the same
and it was therefore prayed by your petitioners that this court would
be pleased to take the premisses into consideration and to provide such
speedy and effectuall means for the suppressing such notorious disorders
as this court should think fitt upon which humble petition this court
was pleased to make an order of refferance to several of his majestie justices
of the peace for the said city and liberty who mett as a committee
pursuant to such order at sundry vestrys from time to time and
examined your petitioners and others and have issued out their warrants
against a great number of disorderly house keepers in the said neighbourhood
and against wicked idle and disorderly person's frequenting such houses

That through the blessing of almighty God and the care and
pains of the worthy gentlemen of the said committee by their constant
and frequent meetings there have been a great number of such wicked
persons taken and apprehended and brought to justice for such
their evill practices

That your petitioners have indicted several disorderly house=
keepers in the said neighbourhood who are now under prosecution
some of whome have fled from justice and have removed their
habitations to the great satisfaction of your petitioners. That some
other's still remain and cary on their wicked practices as aforesaid

That your petitioners being thorowly scensible of the great
services the said committee have done by order of this court in suppressing
a great number of disorderly and wicked persons so rageing amongst
us.

Therefore your petitioners takes this oppertunity of
returning our most humble and hearty thanks to this court for
the great good the said committee have already done and that the
said committee will please to continue and examine further into the
disorders which still remain in the said neighbourhood and other places
adjoyning in order totally to suppress the same

And your petitioners as in duty bound shall ever pray etc

  • Patrick Russell minister

  • Jonas Clifton
  • [Gave?] Lloyd
  • Timothy Clony
  • Daniel Sandford
  • William Bodle
  • William Welsh
  • John Addams

  • George [Sadlen?]
  • E. Walter
  • Joseph Bissell
  • John Wheeler
  • Thomas Prest
  • Christopher Hardiss
  • John Hoand
  • James Mailhet
  • Henry [Minekye?]
  • Joseph Pagett
  • William Richins
  • William Richard
  • William Lane

Francis Steadman. WJ/SP/1731/10/003 (1731). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS653940014

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the
peace for the city and liberty of Westminster in
quarter sessions assembled

The humble peticion of Francis Steadman

Sheweth
that on the eighteenth day of May last
your peticioner bound his son Robert an apprentice
to Master Francis Laxley of the parish of Saint James [in?]
the liberty of Westminster barber surgeon for the term
of seven years, that since your petitioners said son hath been
bound, his said master hath beat and abused him in a
barbarous manner, with unlawfull weapons without
any just provocation given by your petitioners said son

Your petitioner therefore [illegible]
this worshipfull court [w...?] [illegible]
for his said sons master [att...?] [illegible]
shew cause why he [ha...?] [illegible]
son, and why he should not [illegible]
from his indenture of apprenticeship [illegible]

and your petitioner shall pray etc.


  • Francis Steadman

The master being in [illegible] after the [violent?]
[illegible], who having [illegible] may be [illegible] prejudicate to

  • Witnesses Francis Steadman et uxor

  • Mary Steadman

  • Robert Steadman son