BHO

St. Ives

Pages 212-220

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Huntingdonshire. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1926.

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In this section

68. ST. IVES (D.d.).

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XVIII S.E. (b)XXII N.E. (c). XXIII N.W.).

St. Ives is a small town on the left bank of the Ouse, 5 m. E. of Huntingdon. The Church, the Bridge and the Manor House are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish Church of All Saints, stands at the W. end of the town. The walls are of rubble with dressings of Barnack stone; the tower is faced with ashlar; the roofs are covered with lead. The survival of a 12th-century N.W. respond in the Nave indicates the existence of an aisled building at this period. A N. chapel was added to the Chancel in the 13th century, and the arch between the two still remains. The rest of the chancel with its buttresses is probably of the 14th century, heightened in the 15th century. There is also a large 14th-century window in the E. wall of the S. aisle. The whole of the rest of the structure, including the North Chapel, North and South Aisles, West Tower and North and South Porches, was re-built in the second half of the 15th century, probably c. 1470. The spire has been several times re-built and restored, the first time in 1748 and the last in 1918 after being damaged by an aeroplane. The church has been restored in modern times and the North Vestry added.

Architectural Description—The details are all of late 15th-century date, unless otherwise described. The Chancel (44½ ft. by 16½ ft.) has a much restored E. window of five cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with moulded reveals and label. In the N. wall is an arch, probably of the 13th century and with jambs and two-centred arch of one chamfered order; the moulded imposts have been cut back; further E. is a narrow archway with splayed jambs and four-centred head; the two windows are each of three cinque-foiled lights, with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a moulded label; between the windows is a doorway with hollow-chamfered jambs and four-centred head; it is now blocked but formerly opened into a vestry, now destroyed; the extent of the vestry is indicated by the middle buttresses on the N. wall and between them the outer face is recessed, the upper part of the wall being carried by a stone and tile arch of roughly four-centred form. In the S. wall are three windows all similar to those in the N. wall and all considerably restored; the S. doorway has moulded jambs, four-centred arch and label. The chancel-arch is mostly concealed by the organ, but is two-centred and of one moulded order, perhaps of the 14th century.

St Ives, the Parish Church of All Saints

The Nave (63 ft. by 16½ ft.) has N. and S. arcades of four bays with two-centred arches of two moulded orders, the outer continuous and the inner resting on attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the N.W. respond incorporates a 12th-century respond; the lower springers of the arch and part of the capital with a chamfered abacus are visible. E. of the N. arcade is a shallow recess in the wall with chamfered jambs and two-centred head. The clearstorey has on each side five windows, each of two cinque-foiled lights in a four-centred head with moulded reveals and label.

The North Chapel and Aisle (16½ ft. wide) are continuous. In the E. wall is a window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a moulded label and carved head-stops of bishops, either modern or re-set. In the N. wall are four windows generally similar to that last described but with slightly different tracery and all more or less restored; the re-set 14th-century N. doorway has chamfered jambs, two-centred arch and a moulded label with head-stops; against the easternmost buttress is a round projection with a conical top. In the S. wall, E. of the nave-arcade, is the blocked lower doorway to the rood-loft staircase; it is set in a projection and has moulded jambs, two-centred head and a modern label; further E. is an upper doorway with moulded jambs and ogee head, both probably of late 14th-century date; above the haunch of the E. arch of the nave-arcade is a segment of stonework, possibly part of a former round clearstorey-window. In the W. wall is a window similar to those in the N. wall.

The South Aisle (17½ ft. wide) has in the E. wall an early 14th-century window of five pointed lights with intersecting tracery and a single quatrefoil in a two-centred head with moulded jambs, mullions and label, with head-stops. In the S. wall are four windows, similar to those in the N. wall of the N. aisle; the S. doorway has moulded and shafted jambs and moulded two-centred arch and label, with modern head-stops. In the W. wall is a window similar to those in the S. wall.

The West Tower (13½ ft. square) is of three stages with a moulded plinth and a modern embattled parapet and modern spire. The E. tower-arch is two-centred and of two moulded orders, the outer continuous and the inner springing from attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases. The N. and S. arches are similar to the E. arch but spring from the same level as the nave-arcades, except the outer order on the inside, which is carried up to the same height as the E. arch. The partly restored W. window is of four cinque-foiled lights with tracery in a two-centred arch, with moulded reveals and cusped spandrels outside the arch; the W. doorway has moulded jambs and two-centred arch in a square head with traceried spandrels; in the middle of the frieze is a small modern niche; above the head is a frieze of quatre-foiled panels; flanking the doorway are large niches with moulded pedestals, shafted jambs and modern heads. The ground-stage of the tower has a stone vault (Plate 133) with moulded ridge, diagonal, intermediate and wall-ribs and a round bell-way in the middle; the bosses are carved with foliage, two shields with emblems of the Passion and a pelican 'in her piety.' The second stage has in the E., N. and S. walls a square-headed opening; in the W. wall is a pierced quatrefoil, set within a square. The bell-chamber has in each wall a pair of coupled windows each of two cinque-foiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head, the pair having a common square outer head with cusped spandrels and a moulded label.

The North Porch is of late 15th-century origin, but almost entirely restored. The outer archway is two-centred and of two moulded orders; the responds are modern except for the moulded capitals. The side walls have each a modern window.

The South Porch has a two-centred outer archway of two moulded orders with a moulded label and carved stops, one a head and one defaced; the moulded responds have attached shafts with moulded capitals and defaced bases. On each side of the archway is a niche with moulded pedestal, shafted jambs and bowed cinque-foiled head with crockets; the soffit of the head has a ribbed vault. The side walls of the porch have each a window of two cinque-foiled lights in a four-centred head with moulded reveals.

The Roof of the chancel is low-pitched and of eight bays with moulded and cambered tie-beams with curved braces; the main timbers are moulded and the wall-posts are carved with figures of saints and stand on stone head-corbels; the two eastern bays are boarded and panelled and have small carved angel-bosses and carved leaves at the angles of the panels; there is an added modern tie-beam between the second and third bays and between the fourth and fifth in a similar but ancient tie-beam, with carved figures on either side the central post, probably not in situ. The roofs of the N. and S. aisles are modern but retain some old corbels, four in the N. and one in the S. aisle, carved with heads and an angel and foliage. On the modern boarding of the bell-way in the tower is fixed a carved figure similar to those on the wall-posts of the chancel.

Fittings—Brackets: In nave—on W. faces of arcade-piers, ten moulded brackets (Plate 118), two pairs on the N. and three pairs on the S. side, carved with—(a) a lion's face; (b) a dog biting its own tail; (c) a ram; (d) a bull baited by a dog; (e) to (h) foliage; (i) an eagle; (j) an angel holding a scroll; below corbel (i) smaller bracket, carved and moulded, all late 15th-century. Brass Indent: In nave—of simple foliated cross, with indent of inscription-plate across stem, 15th-century. Chest (Plate 146): of plain oak boards with two large padlocks, incised date 1703 in front, front and ends bound with large scrolled straps. Doors: In chancel— in doorway to former vestry, of nail-studded battens. In S. doorway—of two folds and of battens, with hollow-chamfered frame and fillets, planted on, forming three panels to each fold, 15th-century, partly restored. In W. doorway, of battens on trellis-framing and of two folds, modern sheeting on face incorporating some pieces of tracery and the head of a rabbit, late 15th-century, very much restored. Font (Plate 9): octagonal bowl with continuous range of interlacing arcading resting on attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; central octagonal stem with four detached octagonal shafts all with moulded capitals and bases, 13th-century. Glass: In chancel —in tracery of N. windows, coloured fragments, etc. In N. aisle—in tracery of N.E. window, fragments of tabernacle-work, late 15th-century. Monuments: In churchyard—E. of N. aisle, (1) to Alice, wife of Thomas Marchal, 1706, head-stone. S. of chancel—(2) to (F)riswi . . . Williams, 1630, panelled table-tomb, with gabled top, date 1657 on gable. S. of S. aisle—(3) to . . . . ., 1696, rounded head-stone. Niches: In S. aisle—flanking E. window, two, one with chamfered jambs, trefoiled head, moulded label and mask-stops; the other similar but with an ogee head and label; early 14th-century, partly restored. See also Architectural Description under W. tower and S. porch. Piscinae: In S. aisle—in S. wall, of two bays (Plate 140) with moulded two-centred arches springing from detached shafts with moulded capitals and bases, the capital of the middle shaft carved also with foliage; common outer order with moulded jambs and round head carved with 'dog-tooth' ornament, two octofoiled drains, early 13th-century, partly restored. Plate: includes the silver head of an Italian processional cross, with ornament in relief, of the 15th- or early 16th-century with the symbols of the Evangelists at the ends of the arms, the Agnus Dei at the back and Satan overthrown at the foot. Pulpit (Plate 152): of oak, octagonal, sides panelled in two heights with moulded styles and rails, lower panels with enriched arches and side-pilasters, upper panels with strap-work ornament, continuous book-board supported by carved and scrolled brackets, late 16th- or early 17th-century; trumpet-stem with moulded ribs and moulded capital to post, probably earlier and partly restored. Recess: In S. aisle—in S. wall, with rebated jambs and round head, much restored. Scratching: In tower—on W. respond of S. arch, the date 1652.

Condition—Good.

Secular

c(2). St. Ives Priory, remains, on the W. side of Priory Road, 730 yards S.E. of the church, include the mediæval S.W. and N.W. walls of what was probably a barn. The walls are of coursed Barnack rubble standing about 8 ft. above the ground and measuring about 75 ft. and 25 ft. in length respectively. They have an external splayed plinth; there is one buttress against the shorter wall, three buttresses against the longer wall and a diagonal buttress at the angle. Both walls are pierced with small loops, splayed on the inside and with flat lintels, but all have now been blocked on the outside. In the northernmost wall is a blocked doorway and part of the long wall has been removed for a modern gateway. The longer wall has been extended towards the S.E. and returns along the roadway with re-used material.

In the rockery in the garden are a large number of worked stones, principally of 12th-century date and including moulded bases, 'cushion' caps, pieces of responds with half-round shafts, jamb-stones, a grotesque gargoyle, a corbel, etc.

Re-used as a coping-stone to the parapet-wall of the wharf on the N.E. side of the river is part of a tapering slab with remains of an effigy in high relief of 13th- or early 14th-century date; it probably came from the Priory.

Condition—Of wall good; of effigy, poor.

b(3). The Bridge (Frontispiece) crosses the Ouse from the southern end of Bridge Street on the S.W. side of the town and is in six spans of varying breadth, faced with Barnack ashlar and with a brick parapet and a stone coping. It is said to have been built probably late in the 14th or early in the 15th century, but the two southernmost arches were re-built in 1716 by Charles, 1st Duke of Manchester, whose son widened the wharf in 1724; the brick parapet is of 18th-century date and was probably re-built at the same time as the southern arches. The bridge rises appreciably towards the middle and the axis of the southern half is deflected considerably towards the E. The cut-waters to the piers are carried up to form triangular refuges by the side of the roadway, except over the second pier from the N., where the cut-waters are splayed back at four feet above the water-level on to a square face and the refuges above are of semi-hexagonal form. The middle pier on the E. side projects far into the river and above it was built the chapel of St. Leger, which has since been converted into a small dwelling and had two additional storeys added in 1736. The four original arches are each two-centred with chamfered edges, double-chamfered labels, and five chamfered ribs on the soffit; the fourth arch from the N. has been refaced on the W. side and has a plain key-stone. The two southernmost arches are each semi-circular and have plain voussoirs and soffits. There is a continuous moulded string above the arches, below the brick parapet.

St. Ives, Plan of the Bridge

The chapel (Plate 121) is now of four storeys with a double splayed plinth at the level of the basement-floor. The E. end is semi-hexagonal on plan and rises off the pointed cut-water which is carried back in splayed offsets to the wall-face. A moulded string-course runs round the building below the 18th-century brick additions and is sloped up towards the middle on the W. front in the form of a low pediment. The basement has in the N. and S. walls small rectangular lights and in the E. wall a segmental-headed doorway opening on to a modern balcony overhanging the river. The ground-floor had in each of the N., N.E., S. and S.E. walls a window with a four-centred head; the S. and N.E. windows are now blocked and the other two partly blocked and partly filled with 18th-century windows. In the W. wall, fronting the road, are a modern doorway and window with the space between filled in with later brickwork; adjoining the doorway is a small recess with an ogee-head; it is probably of re-used material and is now used for a foot-scraper; S. of the window is part of a former square-headed opening, now blocked. In the gable is a small blocked loop with a two-centred head.

Condition—Poor, some piers on W. side badly cracked and vertical cracks showing on N. and S. walls of the chapel.

b(4). Bridge House, on the W. side of the road, at the S. end of the bridge, is of two storeys, with cellars and attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 18th century and has a band-course between the storeys, a modillioned eaves-cornice and a hipped roof with pedimented dormer-windows. The E. front (Plate 120) is symmetrically arranged, the windows having segmental heads except that over the door-way, which has a round head. The doorway is flanked by fluted Doric pilasters supporting an entablature and segmental pediment; the door has six raised panels. The N. or river front has a round-headed window in the middle on each floor; the other windows have segmental heads. Inside the building the hall and two rooms on the first floor are lined with original panelling, with moulded dado-rails and cornices. The staircase has turned and fluted balusters and newels with Corinthian capitals, cut strings with carved brackets and moulded hand-rails. In the attics are some panelled doors and a balustrade of shaped slats.

Condition—Good.

b(5). House, now works and offices, on the E. side of the road, 30 yards S. of (4), is of two storeys; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 18th century and has a band-course between the storeys. The W. front has, on the first floor, two original windows each with eared architrave, solid frame, mullion and transom; both are now blocked. Inside the building are some original panelled doors.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(6). Manor House (Plate 120), on the W. side of the road, at the N. end of the bridge, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed and plastered and the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 16th century but has been much altered internally. The plan is half H-shaped, with the wings extending towards the W.; a large archway has been cut from the E. front to the space between the wings. The E. front has been much modernised but retains its four original projecting gables with enriched barge-boards; the moulded bressummer to the overhang has a band of arabesque-ornament. The S. or river-front has been refaced in brick, but the three gables retain their original barge-boards and bressummer similar to those on the E. front; the gables have original pendants at the top. The central chimney-stack of the S. wing is original and has three octagonal shafts with moulded bases. At the W. end of the N. wing is a large chimney-stack, perhaps of the 17th century. Inside the building the large room in the N. wing has an original moulded ceiling-beam, with enriched soffit and stops. The W. room of the S. wing has an original moulded ceiling-beam and a room on the first floor has an original stone fireplace, with chamfered jambs and three-centred head. Some plain ceiling-beams and joists are exposed and in the scullery is a cupboard, made up of early 17th-century panelling. Preserved in the house are four carved grotesque figures formerly used as brackets under the projecting gables.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (7–38).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. Some of the buildings have original chimney-stacks and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

St Ives, Plan Shewing the Position of Monuments

Bridge Street. N.W. side

b(7). House and shops, N.E. of (6), has a late 17th-century extension at the back and the front is of early 18th-century date. The front (Plate 120) has a modillioned eaves-cornice and a hipped roof; three windows on the first floor are of early 18th-century date and have moulded architraves; at each end of the front is a small panelled pilaster, with an Ionic capital. The back of the house has three small gables with a small moulded cornice carried across at the base of the gables. Inside the building three rooms have late 17th- or early 18th-century panelling with moulded cornices and dado-rails and panelled doors. A fourth room has a moulded surround to the fireplace, of the same date. In the attics is a balustrade with original flat wavy balusters and a newel with a ball terminal; there are also some doors with moulded battens.

b(8). House and shop, 65 yards N.E. of (7), was built early in the 18th century and the E. front has original sash-windows, a dentilled eaves-cornice and two dormers in the roof. Inside the building a room on the first floor has an original fireplace with moulded architrave, frieze and cornice, flanked by two cupboards with panelled doors. The stairs to the attics have a moulded handrail and in the attics is a battened door with mouldings planted on.

b(9). House (Plate 121), and shop, at the N. corner of Merryland and 15 yards N.E. of (8) was built probably in the 15th century and the upper storey projected on the E. and S. sides; at the E. end the overhang has been concealed by a modern shop-front, but at the angle is the original heavy diagonal bracket; there are other curved brackets on the S. side. The eaves have an early 18th-century cornice on the S. side, continued across the gable at the E. end. Inside the building some ashlar-work is exposed at the base of the chimney-stack.

S.E. side

b(10). House and shop, at the N. corner of Bull Lane, 30 yards N.E. of the bridge. It was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and the W. front (Plate 120) has rusticated angles, sash-windows, a modillioned eaves-cornice and three dormers in the roof. Inside the building the original staircase has turned balusters, moulded rails and strings and square newels with turned pendants. There are some early 18th-century panelled doors in the attics and a fireplace with an eared architrave and Dutch tiles.

b(11). House and shop, 10 yards S.W. of (10), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has a later addition at the back. The W. front has large sash-windows, a modillioned eaves-cornice and two dormers in the roof. Inside the building there are two original panelled doors in the attics.

Waterside

b(12). Range of five houses (Plate 120) fronting the wharf, 40 yards S.E. of Bridge Street, was built early in the 18th century and has later alterations and additions at the back. The walls are of brick, but the fronts of the easternmost and westernmost are covered with cement as are also the lower storeys of the second and third houses from the W. end. The exposed brick-work is chequered with red and yellow-coloured bricks. At the eaves is a moulded cornice and the third and fourth houses from the W. have a projecting band at the level of the first floor. At the W. end of the third house and E. end of the fourth house is a plain pilaster with an Ionic capital in cement at the eaves-level. The westernmost house has a cement-covered pilaster at either end of the front, but the lower part of the western one has been cut away and has a later window inserted below it. The windows have sash-frames. Inside the buildings are some two-panelled doors.

Wellington Street

b(13). Block of two cottages on N. side of the street, 60 yards S.E. of (12) was built probably early in the 18th century. The walls are of brick; at the level of the first floor is a plain projecting band and at either end and the middle of the front are plain brick pilasters. The windows have segmental heads and old frames.

Condition—Dilapidated and now unoccupied.

b(14). Cromwell Inn, on N. side of street at corner of Birt Lane, 20 yards S.E. of (13), was built early in the 18th century and has later additions at the back. The walls are of brick and the roofs are partly tiled and partly covered with modern asbestos slates. The street-fronts have a projecting brick band at the level of the first floor and a corbelled eaves-cornice on the front to Wellington Street. The back elevations have a projecting brick band with a moulded under-edge at the first-floor level and a moulded eaves-cornice; the windows have flat arched flush-frames and sashes with thick bars. On the front of the house is an elaborate wrought-iron frame for a hanging sign-board; it formerly belonged to the Ship Inn on the quay. Inside the building are several two-panelled doors. The staircase has a moulded and panelled string, a moulded handrail, turned balusters and circular fluted newels with moulded capitals and bases. The ceiling over the staircase has a cove against the walls.

b(15). Block of two cottages, on S. side of road opposite (13) is of early 18th-century date and has later tenements added at the back. The walls are of brick, covered with cement. There is a projecting band at the level of the first floor and the westernmost cottage has a cove below the eaves and an elliptical panel in the wall above the side passage.

b(16). Ouse Cottage, adjoining (15) on the S.E. is of two storeys. The walls are of brick and on the street-front are plain pilasters and a plain projecting band at the level of the first floor.

Market Place. N.E. side

b(17). Parrot Hotel, at the W. corner of White Hart Lane, has been much altered. The upper storey of the front block projects at the E. end.

b(18). Cross Keys Inn, 10 yards N.W. of (17), was built early in the 18th century and has sash-windows and a hipped dormer in the roof.

b(19). House (Plate 120) and shop, 15 yards N.W. of (18), has been faced with brick. At the back is a gabled projection enclosing an original newel-staircase with a rail and flat balusters at the top of the stairs.

b(20). House (Plate 120) and shop, N.W. of (19), is of three storeys with attics. The front block was re-built in brick c. 1720 and has a wooden eaves-cornice and a brick ornament on the front with a bell. At the back is a projecting gabled wing and across the head of the passage-way is a moulded beam. In the passage-way is a re-set early 16th-century beam (Plate 119) carved with a shield flanked by an ox and a sheep; the shield bears the arms of Ramsey Abbey—a bend charged with three rams' heads cut off at the neck, with the addition of a crown and a rose-sprig and the name of W. Wesbyche.

b(21). House (Plate 120) and shop, N.W. of (20), was built in the 18th century, but possibly incorporates parts of an earlier structure. Inside the building are portions of early 17th-century panelling and frieze.

S. side

b(22). House and shop, 10 yards N.W. of Free Church Passage, has a front block re-built early in the 18th century.

b(23). House and shop, on the N.W. side of Free Church Passage, 10 yards S. of the Market Place, was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of plastered brick, with a band between the storeys. The doorway has a flat moulded hood on shaped brackets. Inside the building are some original panelled doors and at the top of the staircase are some flat shaped balusters.

Crown Street. N. side

b(24). Crown Hotel and shop, opposite the N. end of Bridge Street, was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of plastered brick with a modillioned wood cornice at the eaves. A modern shop-window has been inserted on the ground-floor at the E. end of the front.

b(25). Royal Oak Inn, 10 yards N.W. of (24), has a late 17th-century N. wing at the back (Plate 121). It is of two storeys, but the lower storey has been refaced with brick on the front facing the yard. At the eaves is a wooden modillioned cornice. The upper storey is covered with pargeting and has a rectangular and elliptical panel each enclosed by a band of enriched bead-work set within enclosing panelling. The ground-floor doorway has a four-panelled door and on the first floor is a three-light mullioned and transomed window with leaded lights. Inside the building one of the first-floor rooms has a fireplace with a bolection-moulded surround and a moulded shelf.

b(26). House (Plate 121) and shop, adjoining (25) on the N.W., is of two storeys and of early 18th-century date. A modern shop-front has been inserted on the ground-floor and at the eaves is a wooden modillioned cornice.

b(27). House and shop, 40 yards N.W. of (26), was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of brick; the front wall is plastered and the back wall has the brickwork exposed. The front elevation has had modern shop-fronts inserted on the ground-floor. On the first floor is a range of sash-windows, two of which are blocked and one painted with imitation sashes; in the roof are three gabled dormers with moulded cornices and pediments. The back elevation has a projecting brick band at the level of the first floor. Inside the building, at the back of the shop, is a wide elliptical arch of wood with a moulded key-block; there are also some panelled doors.

Broadway. N. side

b(28). House, 80 yards N.W. of (27), was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of plastered brick with a modillioned eaves-cronice of wood. Two of the three dormer-windows retain moulded cornices and one has an old sash-window.

S. side

a(29). Building, now boat - builder's works, at westernmost end of street, adjoining river-bank, 200 yards S.E. of the church, is of two storeys. The lower parts of the N.E. and N.W. walls are of coursed Barnack ashlar for about half the length of each wall and have a splayed plinth along the N.W. side. One of the stones in the wall is ornamented with hatched diaper-work. The upper part of the building is of 18th-century brick. The stonework is re-used material, probably of early mediæval date.

b(30). House, 20 yards S.E. of (29), was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of brick and have a chamfered plinth, a projecting band with a rounded under-edge, at the level of the first floor, and a modillioned wood cornice at the eaves.

b(31). House and shop, 130 yards S.E. of (30), was refronted in brick in the 18th century. It has a carriage-way on the S.E. side. Inside the building one of the ground-floor rooms is lined with early 18th-century panelling with a moulded dado-rail and cornice. The fireplace has a moulded architrave, pulvinated frieze and moulded cornice. In the ceiling of the room adjoining is an original moulded beam. The room in the S. wing has a moulded dado-rail and a large bolection-moulded panel over the fireplace.

Merryland. S.W. side

b(32). House and shop, at W. corner of Wool-pack Lane has a cellar. It was much altered in the 18th century, when the present mansard roof was probably erected. On the S.E. side the upper storey projects and has an angle-bracket below; a southern extension is faced with brick.

b(33). House, 10 yards S.E. of (32), is of two storeys. It was built early in the 18th century. The back wall is of timber-framing and brick nogging.

b(34). House (Plate 120), now store, on S.E. side of Woolpack Lane, 25 yards S.W. of Merryland, is of two storeys. The front to the lane is gabled and has the upper storey projecting and carried on three projecting beams supported by struts.

a(35). Block of two cottages, on N.W. side of Prospect Place, 25 yards N.E. of the main road, was built early in the 18th century. The walls are of brick and have a projecting band at the level of the first floor. The windows on the first floor have wooden frames with mullions and transoms.

a(36). House, 40 yards N.W. of the church, was built early in the 18th century and has a later wing on the E. side. The E. front has a modillioned eaves-cornice.

a(37). Spare Rib Inn, 40 yards N. of the church, is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.E. and N.W. and built respectively in 1646 and 1656. The walls are of brick, mostly covered with cement. The S.E. gable of the N.W. wing has a panel with the date 1656. The N.E. wing has an original chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts and a panel in the base, with the date 1646. Inside the building, one room in the N.E. wing has a moulded ceiling-beam, perhaps of earlier date re-used. There are several early 18th-century panelled doors.

a(38). Green End Farm, house and barn, 700 yards N. of the church. The House (Plate 121) is of modified L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S. and W. and a small gabled wing on the W. side of the S. wing. Some of the timber-framing is exposed.

The Barn (Plate 121), called Oliver Cromwell's Barn, N. of the house, is of late 16th-century date, and has walls of red brick. It is about 100 ft. by 25 ft. and of five bays with brick buttresses opposite the trusses. The walls are pierced by narrow loops and in the middle bay are two doorways with three-centred heads; one of these has a door with original strap-hinges. S. of the barn is a range of outbuildings of similar materials and date.