Shepperton

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1937.

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Citation:

'Shepperton', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937), pp. 110-111. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp110-111 [accessed 18 June 2024].

. "Shepperton", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937) 110-111. British History Online, accessed June 18, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp110-111.

. "Shepperton", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937). 110-111. British History Online. Web. 18 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp110-111.

In this section

44 SHEPPERTON (B.e.)

(O.S. 6 in. XXIV, S.E.)

Shepperton is a parish on the N. bank of the Thames 4 m. S.E. of Staines. The church is the principal monument.

Ecclesiastical

(1) Parish Church of St. Nicholas stands near the river. The walls generally are of flint-rubble, partly checkered with ashlar blocks; the dressings are of Reigate and other freestone; the W. tower is of brick and the roofs are tiled. There are some remains of re-used 12th or 13th-century work in the Church which as a whole was re-built with much old material in 1614; the earlier building is said to have been damaged or destroyed by floods. The West Tower was re-built in 1710 mainly at the expense of the Rev. Lewis Atterbury. The church was restored in 1934 when the Vestries were added.

Architectural Description—The features are all of the 17th century unless otherwise described.

The Chancel (25½ ft. by 16 ft.) has a partly restored E. window of three cinque-foiled lights in a segmental-pointed head with a moulded label. In the N. wall is a modern window and in the S. wall a modern doorway. The two-centred chancel-arch is of two chamfered orders, the outer continuous and the inner springing from attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases.

The Nave (40½ ft. by 18¼ ft.) has, in the N. wall, a four-centred arch of two chamfered orders, the outer continuous and the inner springing from shafts with moulded capitals and bases; further W. are two windows, the eastern of two four-centred lights in a square head and the western modern. In the S. wall is an arch, similar to that in the N. wall, and two windows, the eastern partly restored and similar to the end-windows of the transepts; the western window is modern; the S. doorway, now blocked, has jambs and two-centred arch of two orders with defaced imposts. At the W. end of the nave is an early 19th-century gallery.

The North Transept (18½ ft. by 15¼ ft.) has, in the N. wall, a window of three pointed lights with uncusped tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label. In the W. wall is a blocked doorway with moulded jambs and four-centred head; above it is an 18th-century doorway to the gallery of that period.

The South Transept (16 ft. by 14¼ ft.) has, in the S. wall, a restored window similar to that in the N. transept; above it is a square panel. In the W. wall is a partly restored window of two pointed lights with uncusped tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label.

The West Tower (7 ft. by 11¾ ft.) was built in 1710, except the tower-arch, and is of stock bricks with an embattled parapet (Plate 2). The early 17th-century tower-arch is two-centred and of two chamfered orders, the outer continuous and the inner springing from semi-octagonal shafts with moulded capitals and bases. The N. and S. walls have each a square-headed window. The re-set early 17th-century W. doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head with a moulded label; the spandrels are carved with Tudor roses and foliage. The second storey has, in the S. wall, an early 19th-century doorway to the gallery; in the W. wall is a re-set early 17th-century window of one light with a segmental-pointed head. The bell chamber has, in the E., N. and S. walls, a brick window with a three-centred head; in the W. wall are two similar windows.

Shepperton, the Parish Church of St. Nicholas

The Roofs of the nave and transepts are of trussed-rafter type, ceiled on the soffit and having tie-beams; the tie-beam in the S. transept is a 15th-century moulded timber re-used.

Fittings—Brass Indent: In chancel—with group of figures, inscription-plate and roundels, partly covered. Floor-slabs: In chancel—(1) to Daniel Proctor, 1675, with shield-of-arms. In S. transept, (2) to Matthew Nicholls, 1714, and Ann Nicholls, 1715. Miscellanea: Incorporated in church walls—various pieces of worked stone including numerous sections of columns.

Condition—Good.

Secular

(2) Rectory (Plate 32), N. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are partly timber-framed and partly of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 15th or early in the 16th century; part of the existing main block formed the hall and no doubt had cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. This block was remodelled early in the 18th century and the whole S. front faced with tile-bricks on the timber-framing. There are modern additions at the back. The front is symmetrically designed and entirely of early 18th-century date; it has a coved eaves-cornice, hipped roofs to the wings and dormer-windows to the main block. The doorway has a flat hood on carved brackets. Inside the building, the hall has original moulded ceiling-beams and there are exposed ceiling-beams elsewhere in the house. The early 18th-century staircase has turned balusters, square newels and close strings.

Condition—Good.

(3) Ivy Cottage, three tenements, 80 yards N. of the church, is of two storeys. The walls are partly timber-framed and partly of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 16th century, but has been altered and partly refaced. The upper storey projects on part of the E. front.

Condition—Fairly good.

(4) Barn (Plate 33), at Manor Farm, 380 yards W. of the church, is of one storey, timber-framed and weather-boarded. It was built late in the 17th century and is of eleven bays with queen-post trusses and three porches on the S. side.

Condition—Good.

(5) White Cottage, on the E. side of the road about 1 m. N.N.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and with tiled roofs. It was built probably late in the 16th century but has been refronted in brick. The ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Fairly good.