Little Green Street

Survey of London: Volume 19, the Parish of St Pancras Part 2: Old St Pancras and Kentish Town. Originally published by London County Council, London, 1938.

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Citation:

, 'Little Green Street', in Survey of London: Volume 19, the Parish of St Pancras Part 2: Old St Pancras and Kentish Town, (London, 1938) pp. 70-71. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol19/pt2/pp70-71 [accessed 20 May 2024].

. "Little Green Street", in Survey of London: Volume 19, the Parish of St Pancras Part 2: Old St Pancras and Kentish Town, (London, 1938) 70-71. British History Online, accessed May 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol19/pt2/pp70-71.

. "Little Green Street", Survey of London: Volume 19, the Parish of St Pancras Part 2: Old St Pancras and Kentish Town, (London, 1938). 70-71. British History Online. Web. 20 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol19/pt2/pp70-71.

XXVII—LITTLE GREEN STREET

Figure 6:

LITTLE GREEN STREET, ELEVATION AND DETAILS OF BAYS BY A. E. GURNEY

This is quite the most interesting survival of the work of the late 18th-century after Grove Terrace and is noticeable for its varied bow-windows. It contains on its north side seven houses. No. I is covered with advertisements. No.2 has a charming little three-sided bay to its ground-floor room, projecting slightly, six panes wide, two panes to each face, and four panes deep. No. 3 has been refaced but the ground-floor window appears to be an old one. Nos. 4 and 5 are the best in the row, both have three faces like No. 2, only slightly projecting and similarly proportioned, but above them runs a full entablature with a delicately dentilled cornice which embraces both windows and both doorways and forms one delightful composition. The next two houses numbered 6 and 7 have similar bays but are not treated as one complete composition. The door and window to both houses are treated alike. There is, however, a modillioned cornice and a pair of very simple shaped brackets to both doors. No. 8 is not so distinguished, but is a larger structure. The back view from Highgate Road shows a charming variety of mansard roofs. The street is illustrated on Plates 24 and 25 as well as on the previous page (70).